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1234 Main St.
Waterloo ON N2K3T6
12/16/2018 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
96
Items Inspected
8
Needs service
15
Safety concern

1 - General Inspection Information

Age of Building
35 - 40 Year(s)
Status of Property
Furnished, Vacant
Type of Building
Raised Ranch, Detached
Temperature (°C)
6
Weather Conditions
Clear
People Present
Buyer, Buyer Agent
Home Maintenance

All homes require regular and preventive maintenance to maximize the economic life spans of elements and to minimize unanticipated repair or replacement needs. Annual maintenance costs may run 1 to 3% (or more) of the sales price of a house depending on age, design, and/or the degree of prior maintenance. Every homeowner should develop a preventive maintenance program and budget for normal maintenance and unexpected repair expenses. Remedial work should be performed by a specialist in the appropriate field following local requirements and best practices.

Aesthetic Considerations

A standard building inspection does not include a determination of all potential concerns or conditions that may be present or occur in the future including aesthetic/cosmetic considerations or issues (appearances, surface flaws, finishes, furnishings, odors, etc.).

Element Descriptions

Any descriptions or representations of element material, type, design, size, dimensions, etc., are based primarily on visual observation of inspected or representative components. Owner comment, element labeling, listing data, and rudimentary measurements may also be considered in an effort to describe an element. However, there is no guarantee of the accuracy of any material or product descriptions listed in this Report; other or additional materials may be present. Independent evaluations and/or testing should be arranged if verification of any element's makeup, design, or dimension is needed. Any questions arising from the use of any particular terminology or nomenclature in this Report should be addressed prior to closing.

Elements Not Inspected

Any element or component not evaluated as part of this inspection should be inspected prior to closing. Either make arrangements with the appropriate tradesman or contact the Inspection Company to arrange an inspection when all elements are ready for inspection.

Inaccessible Elements

If any area of the home is inaccessible and/or elements were concealed or otherwise obstructed from the view, then an inspection of that area/element could not be performed. The seller should be questioned about any concerns that may exist related to inaccessible or hidden areas prior to closing. If possible, access should be provided or limiting factors should be removed to allow an inspection prior to closing by the home inspector or appropriate specialist.

House Orientation

Location descriptions/references are provided for general guidance only and represent orientations based on a view facing the front of the house from the outside. Any references using compass bearings are only approximations. If there are any questions, obtain clarification prior to closing.

Extra Photos

If other pictures of the property were taken by the inspector and not included in the Report, they were either destroyed or not included because they were poor quality, redundant, or superfluous images, or were provided to the client for their general information only as a separate attachment.

Age Estimations & Design Life Ranges

Any age estimations represent the inspector's opinion as to the approximate age of components. Estimations may be based on numerous factors including, but not limited to, appearance and owner comment. Design life ranges represent the typical economic service life for elements of similar design, quality and type, as measured from the time of original construction or installation. Design life ranges do not take into consideration abnormal, unknown, or discretionary factors, and are not a prediction of future service life. Stated age or design life ranges are given in "years," unless otherwise noted, and are provided for general guidance purposes only. Obtain independent verification if knowledge of the specific age or future life of any element is desired or required.

Construction Regulations

Building codes and construction standards vary regionally. A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of a property for compliance with building or health codes, zoning regulations or other local codes or ordinances. No assessments are made regarding acceptability or approval of any element or component by any agency, or compliance with any specific code or standard. Codes are revised on a periodic basis; consequently, existing structures generally do not meet current code standards, nor is such compliance usually required. Any questions regarding code compliance should be addressed to the appropriate local officials.

Design & Adequacy Issues

A standard home inspection does not include any element design or adequacy evaluations including seismic or high-wind concerns, soil bearing, energy efficiency, or energy conservation measures. It also does not address in any way the function or suitability of floor plans or other design features. Furthermore, no determinations are made regarding product defects notices, safety recalls, or other similar manufacturer or public/private agency warnings related to any material or element that may be present in any house or on any property.

Cost of Repairs

The Inspection Company will not provide cost of repair information on defects noted to our Clients. If cost of repair may affect your purchase decision, several contractor quotations should be obtained prior to making such decisions. Costs can vary depending on the time of the year, reputation and skill of tradesmen/contractors.

Mechanical System Upgrades

No evaluations are made as part of a standard home inspection regarding heating, ventilation, or air conditioning (HVAC) system design, system efficiency, adequacy, compliance with current energy standards or costs, and other factors that may be associated with the need to or desire to repair, replace, or upgrade any equipment. If new HVAC equipment is required or desired, now or in the future, in addition to costs associated with the purchase and installation of the equipment itself, there may be additional expenses related to structural alteration or air handler and distribution system replacement or alterations. For additional information on energy efficiency requirements, contact your local City/Town or Municipal District HVAC Inspection Department.

Building Permits / Code Inspections

A home inspection is not a code compliance inspection. To obtain information/documentation regarding the issuing of permits and/or code compliance inspections related to the original construction or subsequent renovations or repairs, the local/municipal building inspection department should be contacted.

Environmental & Mold Issues / Exclusions

The potential health effects from exposure to many elements found in building materials or in the air, soil, water in and/or around any house are varied. A home inspection does not include the detection, identification or analysis of any such element or related concerns such as, but not limited to, mold, allergens, radon, formaldehyde, asbestos, lead, electromagnetic fields, carbon monoxide, insecticides, refrigerants, and fuel oils. Furthermore, no evaluations are performed to determine the effectiveness of any system designed to prevent or remove any elements (e.g., water filters or radon mitigation). An environmental health specialist should be contacted for evaluation of any potential health or environmental concerns. Review additional information on MOLD/MICROBIAL ELEMENTS below.

Mold & Microbial Elements / Exclusions

The purpose and scope of a standard home inspection does not include the detection, identification or assessment of fungi and other biological contaminants, such as molds, mildew, wood-destroying fungi (decay), bacteria, viruses, pollens, animal dander, pet or vermin excretions, dust mites and other insects. These elements contain/carry microbial particles that can be allergenic, infectious or toxic to humans, especially individuals with asthma and other respiratory conditions or sensitivity to chemical or biological contaminants. Wood destroying fungi, some molds, and other contaminants can also cause property damage. One particular biological contamination concern is mold. Molds are present everywhere. Any type of water leakage, moisture condition or moisture-related damage that exists over a period of time can lead to the growth of potentially harmful mold(s). The longer the condition(s) exists, the greater the probability of mold growth. There are many different types of molds; most molds do not create a health hazard, but others are toxic.

Indoor mold represents the greatest concern as it can affect air quality and the health of individuals exposed to it. Mold can be found in almost all homes. Factors such as the type of construction materials and methods, occupant lifestyles, and the amount of attention given to house maintenance also contribute to the potential for molds. Indoor mold contamination begins when spores produced by mold spread by air movement or other means to an area conducive to mold growth. Mold spores can be found in the air, carpeting, insulation, walls and ceilings of all buildings. But mold spores only develop into an active mold growth when exposed to moisture. The sources of moisture in a house are numerous and include water leakage or seepage from plumbing fixtures, appliances, roof openings, construction defects (e.g., EIFS wall coverings or missing flashing) and natural catastrophes like floods or hurricanes. Excessive humidity, or condensation, caused by faulty fuel-burning equipment, improper venting systems, and/or inadequate ventilation provisions is other sources of indoor moisture. By controlling leakage, humidity and indoor air quality, the potential for mold contamination can be reduced. To prevent the spread of mold, immediate remediation of any water leakage or moisture problems is critical. For information on mold testing or assessments, contact a qualified mold specialist.

Neither the evaluation of the presence or potential for mold growth, nor the identification of specific molds and their effects, falls within the scope of a standard home inspection. Accordingly, the Inspection Company assumes no responsibility or liability related to the discovery or presence of any molds, their removal, or the consequences whether property or health-related.

Remedial Work

Quotes should be obtained prior to closing from qualified (knowledgeable and licensed as required) specialists/contractors to determine actual repair/replacement costs for any element or condition requiring attention. Any cost estimates provided with a home inspection, whether oral or written, only represent an approximation of possible costs. Cost estimates do not reflect all possible remedial needs or costs for the property; latent concerns or consequential damage may exist. If the need for remedial work develops or is uncovered after the inspection, prior to performing any repairs contact the Inspection Company to arrange a re-inspection to assess conditions Aside from basic maintenance suitable for the average homeowner, all repairs or other remedial work should be performed by a specialist in the appropriate field following local requirements and best practices.

Wood-Destroying Insects / Organisms

In areas subject to wood-destroying insect activity, it is advisable to obtain a current wood-destroying insect and organism Report on the property from a qualified specialist, whether or not it is required by a lender. A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of the nature or status of any insect infestation, treatment, or hidden damage, nor does it cover issues related to other house pests or nuisances or subsequent damage.

The purpose of this Report is to render the inspector's professional opinion of the condition of the inspected elements of the referenced property (dwelling or house) on the date of inspection. Such opinions are rendered based on the findings of a standard limited time/scope home inspection performed according to the Terms and Conditions of the Inspection Agreement and in a manner consistent with applicable home inspection industry standards. The inspection was limited to the specified, readily visible and accessible installed major structural, mechanical and electrical elements (systems and components) of the house. The inspection does not represent a technically exhaustive evaluation and does not include any engineering, geological, design, environmental, biological, health-related or code compliance evaluations of the house or property. Furthermore, no representations are made with respect to any concealed, latent or future conditions.

2 - Grounds

IN NI NP R
2.1 Site Profile X X
2.2 Vegetation X
2.3 Fencing and Gate(s) X
2.4 Driveways X
2.5 Walkway(s) and Patio(s) X X
2.6 Retaining Wall(s) X X
2.7 Deck(s) and Porch(es) X X
2.8 Exterior Step(s) X
2.9 Handrail(s) and Guard(s) X X
General Grounds Inspection Limitations

A standard inspection does not include evaluation of elements such as site lighting, irrigation systems, barbecues, sheds, outbuildings, fencing, privacy walls, docks, seawalls, pools, spas and other recreational or site elements. Evaluation of these elements prior to closing would be advisable.

Retaining Wall(s) Limited Evaluation

Analyzing retaining walls is a tricky business. With most retaining walls, the important components are not visible. Also, determining the rate of movement of a retaining wall is impossible from a one-time visit. Monitoring is normally required. In some cases, the angle of the wall gives a clue to the performance. Most walls are built with a slight lean to the higher side. If the wall is leaning away from the high side, it has probably moved. Once retaining walls begin to move, they rarely stop, although the movement may be slow and seasonal.

Site Elements

While informational comments may be made related to the condition of certain site elements, the primary intent of inspection of any site element is limited to evaluation relative to its effect on the building.

Deck(s) & Porch(es) Substructure Not Evaluated

Areas of the deck(s) and/or porch(es) substructure(s) were observed to be inaccessible due to limited space below, permanently installed skirting or vegetation blocking. These areas couldn't be evaluated and are excluded from the inspection

Exterior Step(s) Stair Drain(s) Limited Evaluation

The condition of the drain(s) observed at the base(s) of exterior stairs is unknown. It's beyond the scope of a home inspection to determine if these drains flow adequately during prolonged periods of heavy rain. Recommend consulting with the property owners about this if possible, and monitoring drains in the future. If water is found to accumulate, then it is recommended that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, by cleaning, repairing or installing drains.

Lawn Irrigation System(s) Not Inspected

Lawn Irrigation systems are not inspected within the scope of a standard home inspection. Advise evaluation prior to closing by a qualified contractor. Buried lines are subject to hidden damage or leakage. Seasonal maintenance will be required. Chronic spray from lawn sprinklers onto the house may cause structural damage, insect infestation or other problems. Entire system should be checked and corrected for orientation and spray pattern.

Geological Factors

This Report does not include evaluation of any soils or geological conditions/concerns. Construction on certain soils, particularly expansive clays, fill soils, hillside and waterfront areas, necessitate special design consideration. Evaluation of these factors, or the need for them, is beyond the scope of this inspection. Pertinent information should be obtained from local officials and/or a qualified specialist prior to closing, particularly if any concerns are detected or if home is in a detrimental soils area.

Site / Underground Drains

Site drains, including any underground piping and downspout drains, often must be regularly maintained/cleared in order to provide adequate water run-off and discharge. Adequacy of any such system cannot be readily determined.

Inspection of the grounds elements is primarily intended to address the condition of listed, readily visible and accessible elements immediately adjacent to or surrounding the house for conditions and issues that may have an impact on the house. Elements and areas concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected. Neither the inspection nor Report includes any geological surveys, soil compaction surveys, ground testing, or evaluation of the effects of, or potential for, earth movement such as earthquakes, landslides, or sinking, rising or shifting for any reason. Information on local soil conditions and issues should be obtained from local officials and/or a qualified specialist prior to closing. In addition to the stated limitations on the inspection of site elements, a standard home inspection does not include evaluation of elements such as underground drainage systems, site lighting, irrigation systems, barbecues, sheds, detached structures, fencing, privacy walls, docks, seawalls, pools, spas and other recreational items. Additional information related to site element conditions may be found under other headings in this Report, including the STRUCTURE section.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Site Profile

Substandard Clearance(s) from Window(s)
SW Side(s) of Building

Substandard clearance(s) was observed at one or more ground-level windows. Grading near ground-level windows should be maintained regularly to ensure a significant clearance between the bottom of the window sill(s) and the grading to prevent the chance for water to enter the structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms and mold growth. Recommend re-grading where necessary to ensure a minimum clearance of at least 6 inches between the bottom of the window sill and the top of the grading surface(s) and/or installing covers to prevent snow build-up or moisture intrusion issues.

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - Walkway(s) and Patio(s)

Trip Hazards
NE Side(s) of Property

Cracks, holes, settlement, heaving or deterioration resulting in trip hazards were observed in walkway(s) or patio(s). For safety reasons, recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.6.1 - Retaining Wall(s)

Rot
NW and NE Side(s) of Property

Some wood materials in one or more retaining walls were observed to have visible rot. The retaining walls appeared to be serviceable, but recommend monitoring them in the future. Further rot and/or deterioration may occur and retaining walls may need significant repairs or replacement at some point. Note that such repairs are often expensive.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
2.7.1 - Deck(s) and Porch(es)

Substandard Construction
SE Side(s) of Property

One or more deck(s) were observed to have substandard construction. This may result in a potential safety hazard such as the structure(s) separating from the building. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair or replace per standard building practices.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.7.2 - Deck(s) and Porch(es)

Wooden Surfaces Overdue for Maintenance
SE Side(s) of Property

Wooden surfaces, railings, step(s) or built-in seating were observed to be overdue for normal maintenance. Recommend that a qualified person clean and preserve as necessary. Where decks have been coated with a finish such as opaque stains or paint, it may be too difficult to strip the finish and apply anything but paint or opaque stain. Where transparent stain or penetrating oil has been applied in the past, recommend that penetrating oil be used.

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
2.9.1 - Handrail(s) and Guard(s)

Handrail(s) not Graspable
SE Deck Step(s)

Handrails at one or more locations were observed to be not graspable and pose a fall hazard. Handrails should be 1 1/4 to 2 inches in diameter if round, or 2 5/8 inches or less in width if flat. Recommend that a qualified person install graspable handrails or modify existing handrails per standard building practices.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.9.2 - Handrail(s) and Guard(s)

Post(s) Missing / Substandard
SE Deck(s)

Posts for handrail(s) or guard(s) were observed to be missing or substandard. This poses a safety hazard. At a minimum, 4” x 4” posts for handrail(s) and guard(s) should be located at each end or termination of a handrail or guard. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace post(s) per standard building practices.

Wash Appliance Repair

3 - Exterior

IN NI NP R
3.1 Exterior Wall Surfaces X
3.2 Exterior Foundation Walls X
3.3 Exterior Flashing and Trim X
Exterior Wall Surfaces: Style(s) and Material(s)
Brick veneer, Fiber cement
Exterior Foundation Walls: Styles and Materials
Poured concrete
General Exterior Inspection Limitations

Storms, screens, safety glazing, locks and other attachments are not inspected unless otherwise noted. Comments on storms generally are limited to surface conditions; function and operation are not evaluated. Perform an inventory of storms/screens to confirm presence/location.  Typically exterior elements that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground are also excluded.

Limited Evaluation of Exterior Foundation Walls

Many conditions inhibit the observation of the exterior foundation walls, including, but not limited to, vegetation, soil, snow cover and storage around the exterior. The inspector does not move furnishings and storage around the structure exterior. The foundation walls were observed to the greatest extent possible at the exterior sides of the structure and for raised foundations, from the crawl space opening and/or from inside the crawl space (if accessible).

Shutters / Ornamental Trim

The condition of ornamental features such as shutters is not included in a standard home inspection; however, due to exposure to the elements, there is a potential for decay or damage. Regular maintenance will be required. All components and adjacent areas should be checked for damage.

Check Permits for Additions / Modifications

Based on new, substandard or non-standard construction observed, additions/modifications to this property may have been made without the owner having attained permits or inspections from the municipality. Work may have been performed by someone other than a qualified contractor or person. Consult with the property owner about this, and if necessary research permits. At worst case, if substantial work was performed without permits, this knowledge must be disclosed when the building is sold in the future. This can adversely affect future sales. Also, the local municipality could require costly alterations to bring the building into legal compliance or even require that the additions or modifications be removed.

Possible Lead-Based Paints

Exterior surfaces may be covered with lead-based paint, particularly in pre-1978 homes. The likelihood of exposure to lead hazards is minimal if the paint is intact or covered with another product. Neither testing nor assessment is part of a standard home inspection. Testing by a qualified specialist should be arranged if paint damage or other potential hazards exist or to address individual concerns.

Inspection of exterior elements is limited to readily visible and accessible surfaces of the house envelope and connected appurtenances as listed herein; elements concealed from view by any means cannot be inspected. All exterior elements are subject to the effects of long-term exposure and sudden damage from ongoing and ever-changing weather conditions. Style and material descriptions are based on predominant/representative components and are provided for general information purposes only; specific types and/or material make-up material is not verified. Neither the efficiency nor integrity of insulated window units can be determined. Furthermore, the presence/condition of accessories such as storms, screens, shutters, locks and other attachments or decorative items is not included, unless specifically noted. Additional information on exterior elements, particularly windows/doors and the foundation may be provided under other headings in this Report, including the INTERIOR and STRUCTURE section(s).

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations

4 - Roofing

IN NI NP R
4.1 Roofing X
4.2 Exposed Flashings X
4.3 Ventilation Covers X
4.4 Gutters and Downspouts X X
4.5 Soffit and Fascia X
4.6 Plumbing Stack(s) X
4.7 Chimney(s) / Vent(s) X
Roofing: Style(s)
Hip & Valley
Roofing: Material(s)
Asphalt Shingles
Roofing: Age of Roof Covering (est.)
2 - 5 Year(s)
General Roofing Inspection Limitations

The evaluation of a roof is primarily a visual assessment based on general roofing appearances. The verification of actual roofing materials, installation methods or roof age is generally not possible. Conditions such as hail damage or the lack of underlayment may not be readily detectible and may result in latent concerns. If the inspection was restricted to viewing from the ground and/or was affected by weather conditions or other limitations, a roofer's assessment would be advisable, particularly if the roofing is old or age is unknown

Couldn't Traverse Roof

Normally the inspector attempts to traverse roof surfaces during the inspection; however, due to the type of roof covering (slippery or fragile), roof configuration (steep or very high) or weather conditions observed at the time of the inspection, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof surface. At the time of the property inspection, the roof was observed from ground locations using ladders, binoculars, and zoom cameras. The inspector is not required to walk on roofs that, in the opinion of the inspector, may cause inherent danger to them or may possibly cause damage to the roof, particularly tile roofs and metal roofs. The absolute best way to get an inspection of 100% of the roof is to hire a qualified roofing contractor.

Limited Evaluation of Water-Tightness

The water-tightness of a roofing system is dependent on the proper installation of the roofing material and underlayment, its physical condition, and the proper function of all flashings (metal or other membrane installed at protrusions through the roof, such as vent pipes, skylights and valleys). While general roofing conditions were reported, this Report is not a guarantee the roof is or will be watertight or leak free.

Limited Evaluation of Chimney(s) / Vent(s)

The type of limited visual inspection of chimneys, vents, fireplaces and stoves performed as part of a home inspection does not include the in-depth evaluations that professional chimney and fireplace inspectors and technicians generally must conduct to comply with current code requirements and/or identify concealed conditions and deficiencies. These inspection requirements may include three types of inspections - Level I through Level III - with a Level III inspection being the most technically exhaustive. If such inspections are desired or locally required, they must be performed by a qualified chimney inspector or technician. The internal elements of chimney (flues, liners, etc.) are not readily accessible for a visual inspection and fall outside the scope of a standard home inspection. Hidden internal defects and/or fire hazards may be present in any chimney but are more common with older chimneys. Chimney inspection services, including the use of special video equipment for internal investigations, are available from qualified chimney specialists and should be considered prior to closing, particularly with older chimneys or when external concerns have been identified.

The inspection of roofs and rooftop elements is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein; elements and areas concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected. This inspection does not include chimney flues and flue liners, or ancillary components or systems such as lightning protection, solar panels, and similar elements, unless specifically stated. Element descriptions are provided for general information purposes only; the verification of roofing materials, roof age, and/or compliance with manufacturer installation requirements is not within the scope of a standard home inspection. Issues related to roof or roofing conditions may also be covered under other headings in this Report, including the STRUCTURE section.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Gutters and Downspouts

Debris
Throughtout

Debris build-up was observed to have accumulated in one or more gutters or downspouts. Gutters can overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior, or water can accumulate around the foundation. Gutters and downspouts often clog with debris. Screens or deflectors are sometimes installed to prevent leaves and twigs from getting into the troughs. These rarely work well. They become loose and often fall out. They also make cleaning more difficult. Special screens are available for the top of downspouts to prevent the entry of debris. These work better, but still must be cleaned regularly. Recommend cleaning gutters and downspouts now and as necessary in the future.

Roof Roofing Professional

5 - Structure

IN NI NP R
5.1 Interior Foundation Walls X
5.2 Basement Insulation Material(s) X
5.3 Basement Floor X
5.4 Floor Substructure X X
5.5 Roof Structure and Sheathing X
5.6 Attic Insulation Material(s) and Depth X X
5.7 Attic Vapour Barrier X
5.8 Attic and Roof Ventilation X
Interior Foundation Walls: Material(s)
Poured Concrete
Basement Insulation Material(s): Material(s)
Not visible
Attic Insulation Material(s) and Depth: Material(s)
Fibreglass Batt
Attic Insulation Material(s) and Depth: Depth
5-7 Inches (R15-R21)
General Structure Inspection Limitations

Inspection of structural components and other house elements may be restricted by the presence of finished surfaces and materials. No assessments are made of the suitability of renovations or finish work. Local building officials should be contracted to verify compliance with permit and inspection requirements, including fire safety, egress, and clearance issues. Any obstructed area or areas where evaluation was otherwise prevented should be inspected when limiting conditions are removed.

Limited Evaluation of Concrete Slab

In most cases, the visible portion of a concrete house slab is extremely limited due to floor covering, furnishings, exterior landscaping and grade levels. Such components may prevent identification of the specific type/style slab and may cover cracks, settled areas or other indications of potential concerns. Furthermore, few if any framing members (walls and floors) are visible for inspection and any in-/under-slab duct or piping cannot be assessed.

Limited Evaluation of Finished Area(s)

Inspection of structural components and other house elements may be restricted by the presence of finished surfaces and materials. No assessments are made of the suitability of renovations or finish work. Local building officials should be contracted to verify compliance with permit and inspection requirements, including fire safety, egress, and clearance issues.

Limited Evaluation of Insulation

An energy assessment or audit is outside the scope of the standard home inspection. Any comments on amounts and/or materials are for general informational purposes only and were not verified. Some insulation may contain or release potentially hazardous materials; avoid disturbing. Wall insulation is not readily visible. Pre-1970s homes are more likely to have been constructed with insulation levels significantly below present day standards.

Mold Identification

The identification of mold, mildew, fungus and other microbial organisms is beyond the scope of a home inspection. Any area showing evidence of or having the potential for water leakage, moisture intrusion and/or inadequate ventilation can cause or contribute to a structure or health hazard. If such conditions exist or occur, arrange for further investigation by a certified industrial hygienist or other appropriate specialist to determine whether mold hazards exist, if there is an ongoing climate for contamination and the recommended remedial action.

The inspection of attic areas, the structure and foundation is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein. Due to typical design and accessibility constraints such as insulation, storage, finished attic surfaces, roofing products, etc., many elements and areas, including major structural components, are often at least partially concealed from view and cannot be inspected. In most homes, only a representative portion of the insulation can be inspected. Any element description provided is for general information purposes only; the specific material type and/or make-up cannot be verified. Any element description provided is for general information purposes only; the specific material type and/or make-up cannot be verified. A standard home inspection does not include an evaluation of the adequacy of the roof structure to support any load, the thermal value or energy efficiency of insulation, the integrity of vapour retarders, or the operation of thermostatically controlled fans. Older homes generally do not meet insulation and energy conservation standards required for new homes. Neither the inspection nor the Report includes geological surveys, soil compaction studies, ground testing, evaluation of the effects of or potential for earth movement such as earthquakes, landslides, or sinking, rising or shifting for any reason, or verification of prior water penetration or predictions of future conditions. Furthermore, a standard home inspection is not a wood-destroying insect inspection, an engineering evaluation, a design analysis, or a structural adequacy study, including that related to high-wind or seismic restraint requirements. Additional information related to the house structure may be found under many other headings in this Report. Additional information related to attic elements and conditions may be found under other headings in this Report, including the INTERIOR and INSULATION AND VENTILATION section(s).

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Floor Substructure

Missing / Substandard Post-Beam Ties
NE Side(s) of Building

One or more support posts were not positively secured to the beam above. While this is common in older homes, current standards require positive connections between support posts and beams above for lateral movement reinforcement. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing metal plates, plywood gussets or dimensional lumber connecting posts and beams.

Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Attic Insulation Material(s) and Depth

Insulation Substandard (<R38)
Throughout

The ceiling insulation installed in the attic was observed to be substandard, it appeared to have an R rating that's significantly less than current standards (R38). Heating and cooling costs will likely be higher due to poor energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified contractor install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices.

House construction Insulation Contractor

6 - Electrical

IN NI NP R
6.1 Main Service Line(s) X
6.2 Main Disconnect Size and Protection Type X
6.3 Main Panel Size and Protection Type(s) X
6.4 Sub-Panel Size(s) and Protection Type(s) X
6.5 Grounding and Bonding X
6.6 Branch Circuit Wiring X
6.7 Receptacles X X
6.8 Switches X
6.9 Lighting X
6.10 Smoke Detectors X X
6.11 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detectors X X
Main Disconnect Size and Protection Type: Protection Type
Circuit Breakers
Main Panel Size and Protection Type(s): Protection Type(s)
Circuit Breakers
Sub-Panel Size(s) and Protection Type(s): Protection Type(s)
Circuit Breakers
Branch Circuit Wiring: Material(s)
Vinyl-Wrapped NM Copper, Cloth-Wrapped NM Copper
Main Disconnect Size and Protection Type: Size
Basement SE Wall(s)
100 AMP
Main Panel Size and Protection Type(s): Size
Basement SE Wall(s)
100 AMP
Sub-Panel Size(s) and Protection Type(s): Size(s)
Basement SE Wall(s)
60 AMP
General Electrical Inspection Limitations

Evaluations and material descriptions are based on a limited/random check of components. Accordingly, it is not possible to identify every possible condition or concern in a standard inspection. All electric defects/potential concerns should be evaluated or corrected by a licensed electrician.

Limited Evaluation of Auxiliary / Low-Voltage Systems

Evaluation of ancillary, low voltage electric or electronic equipment (e.g., TV, doorbell, computer, cable, lightning protection, surge protection, low voltage lighting, intercoms, site lighting, alarms etc.,) is not performed as part of a standard home inspection.

Limited Evaluation of Electrical System Bonding

The proper electric bonding and grounding of equipment and other house components is required for occupant safety. There are many variables that affect bonding, such as, but not limited to local codes and practices and equipment manufacturer requirements. The integrity of the bonding and grounding systems is also subject to the installation methods and material quality. While bonding or grounding issues may be commented on in this inspection Report, a home inspector cannot and does not verify the integrity or continuity of the bonding or grounding systems for any house element or system. If you would like assurances regarding the integrity of the electric bonding or grounding system in a house or for any particular equipment, we recommend that you contact a qualified electrician or other qualified technician to provide this service.

Limited Evaluation of Smoke Detectors

The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Smoke alarms should be installed in each bedroom, in hallways leading to bedrooms, on each level and in attached garages. They have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. Batteries in smoke alarms should be changed when taking occupancy and annually in the future. Carbon monoxide alarms should be installed near sleeping areas and on each level in homes with a fuel-burning appliance or attached garage.

Main Service Line(s): Size
SE Side(s) of Building
200 amp

The inspection of the electric system is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein. Wiring and other components concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected. The identification of inherent material defects or latent conditions is not possible. The description of wiring and other components and the operational testing of electric devices and fixtures are based on a limited/random check of representative components. Accordingly, it is not possible to identify every possible wiring material/type or all conditions and concerns that may be present. Inspection of  Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs) is limited to the built-in test functions. No assessment can be made of electric loads, system requirements or adequacy, circuit distribution, or accuracy of circuit labeling. Auxiliary items and electric elements (or the need for same) such as surge protectors, lighting protection systems, generators, security/safety systems, home entertainment and communication systems, structured wiring systems, low-voltage wiring, and site lighting are not included in a standard home inspection. Additional information related to electric elements may be found under many other headings in this Report.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations
Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - Receptacles

Missing GFCI Protection
Basement Utility Room Sink(s) | Basement Bathroom(s) | Main Level Bathroom(s)

One or more electric receptacles (outlets) at the kitchen, bathroom(s), wet bar, laundry sink, utility sink, garage, exterior, basement, crawl space, pool, spa or jetted tub were observed to have no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
6.10.1 - Smoke Detectors

Old / Recommend Replacement
Basement | Main Level

Based on the age of this structure and the observed appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may have been installed more than 10 years ago. According to the National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA.

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
6.11.1 - Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detectors

Missing
Basement

Carbon monoxide alarms were observed to be missing from one or more locations at the time of the inspection. This is a potential safety hazard. Every home that has a combustion appliance should have carbon monoxide detectors. The local building code may require it. Typically, the requirement is to have one detector located near the furnace or combustion appliance, one near the entry door(s) to an attached garage and one detector in each bedroom area.

Wrench DIY

7 - Heating

IN NI NP R
7.1 Main Heating System(s) X
7.2 Ducts and Registers X
7.3 Thermostat(s) X
7.4 Humidifier(s) X X
7.5 Auxiliary Heat and Fireplace(s) X X
Main Heating System(s): Energy Source(s)
Natural Gas
Main Heating System(s): Manufacturer(s)
Ruud
Main Heating System(s): Date(s) of Mfg. (est.)
2008
Auxiliary Heat and Fireplace(s): Type(s)
Basement Rec Room(s) | Main Level Living Room(s)
Gas fireplace(s), Wood fireplace(s)
Main Heating System(s): System Type(s)
Basement
Forced Air
Thermostat(s): Style(s)
Main Level Hallway(s)
Programmable
General Heating Inspection Limitations

Evaluation is limited to an operational check of conventional residential systems. No design or heating adequacy evaluation, thermostat calibration assessment, heat loss analyses or active/passive solar systems evaluations are performed as part of a standard inspection. Furthermore, no specific evaluations were performed related to the presence of any fuel storage tanks or asbestos-containing materials. Independent evaluation is required to address any possible asbestos or tank concerns.

Limited Evaluation of Heat Exchanger

The "heart" of a furnace is a metal chamber referred to as a heat exchanger. All or most areas of this exchanger are not readily accessible or visible to a home inspector. Therefore, assessment of a furnace is limited to external and operational conditions. The older the unit, the greater the probability of failure. A thorough inspection by a qualified HVAC contractor is advised for full evaluation of heat exchanger conditions, particularly if the unit is beyond 5+ years old or any wear is exhibited.

Heating System Upgrade Needs

No evaluations are made as part of a standard home inspection regarding heating, ventilation, air conditioning or heat pump system design, system, adequacy, compliance with current energy standards or costs, and other factors that may be associated with the need to or desire to repair, replace, or upgrade any equipment. If new heat pump equipment is required or desired, now or in the future, in addition to costs associated with the purchase and installation of the equipment itself, there may be additional expenses related to structural alteration or air handler and distribution system replacement or alterations.

Limited Evaluation of Auxiliary Equipment

Add-on components or systems (electronic air cleaners, humidifiers, water treatment systems, etc.) are not evaluated unless specifically indicated.

Limited Evaluation of Gas / Wood-Burning Fireplace(s)
Basement Rec Room(s) | Main Level Living Room(s)

Due to typical design restrictions, any inspection of the fireplace, stove and inserts is limited; internal components, flue, flue connectors, etc., are generally not visible. Furthermore, any inspection is of the physical condition only, and does not include code/fire safety compliance assessment or an operational check of flue/vent drafting. Unit and venting deficiency may represent fire/safety concerns. Flue inspections should be performed by a qualified chimney sweep or competent specialist.

The inspection of heating systems is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein. Elements concealed from view or not functional at the time of inspection for any reason cannot be inspected. A standard home inspection does not include a heat-loss analysis, heating design or adequacy evaluation, energy efficiency assessment, installation compliance check, chimney flue inspection or draft test, solar system inspection, or buried fuel tank inspection. Furthermore, portable units and system accessories or add-on components such electronic air cleaners, humidifiers, and water treatment systems are not inspected, unless specifically indicated. The functional check of heating systems is limited to the operation of a basic cycle or mode and excludes the evaluation of thermostatic controls, timing devices, analysis of distribution system flow or temperatures, or operation of full system features (i.e., all cycles, modes, and controls). Additional information related to the heating system may be found under other headings in this Report, including the COOLING section.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations
Credit
Comment
7.4.1 - Humidifier(s)

Needs Service / Inoperable
Basement Furnace(s)

The humidifier system attached to the furnace(s) appeared to be inoperable or in need of servicing. This system may operate while the heating system is operated, but the inspector does not determine its efficiency or if it is working correctly. Recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor evaluate and make repairs or perform maintenance (e.g. clean or replace filters) as necessary.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Auxiliary Heat and Fireplace(s)

Recommend Specialist Evaluate / Clean / Repair
Basement Rec Room(s) | Main Level Living Room(s)

One or more fuel or wood-burning fireplaces were observed at the property. When such devices are used, they should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually to determine if repairs are needed. A chimney inspection should be performed with every sale or transfer of property with a wood or fuel-burning device. Recommend consulting with the property owner about recent and past servicing and repairs. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate all wood and fuel-burning devices and chimneys, and clean and repair as necessary.

Fire Fireplace Contractor

8 - Cooling

IN NI NP R
8.1 Cooing System(s) X
8.2 Main Disconnect(s) X
8.3 Refrigerant Line(s) X
8.4 Condensate Line(s) X
Cooing System(s): Manufacturer(s)
Goodman
Cooing System(s): Date(s) of Mfg. (est.)
2008
Cooing System(s): Style(s)
SE Side(s) of Building
Central air conditioner
General Cooling Inspection Limitations

Evaluations are usually restricted to the basic operation of electric central air conditioning and heat pump systems. No heat gain, sizing, or design evaluations were performed. Thermostat calibration, accuracy and adequacy of conditioned air distribution were not determined. The evaporator coil (indoor coil) is not visible for inspection. Cool/cold weather operation/evaluation is not part of a standard inspection. No assessment was made related to the use of or potential hazards of any system refrigerant.

Not Tested (Outside Temp <18°C)

The outdoor air temperature was below 18°C during the inspection. Air conditioning systems can be damaged if operated during such low temperatures. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.

The inspection of cooling systems (air conditioning and heat pumps) is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein. Elements concealed from view or not functional for any reason cannot be inspected. A standard home inspection does not include a heat gain analysis, cooling design or adequacy evaluation, energy efficiency assessment, installation compliance check, or refrigerant issues. Furthermore, portable units or add-on components such as electronic air cleaners are not inspected, unless specifically indicated. The functional check of cooling systems is limited to the operation of a basic cycle or mode and excludes the evaluation of thermostatic controls, timing devices, analysis of distribution system flow or temperatures, or operation of full system features (i.e., all cycles, modes, and controls). Air conditioning systems are not checked in cold weather. Additional information related to the cooling system may be found under other headings in this Report, including the HEATING section.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations

9 - Plumbing

IN NI NP R
9.1 Water Supply Source(s) X
9.2 Water Supply Piping and Shut-Off(s) X
9.3 Water Supply Lines X
9.4 Water Heater Tank(s) X X
9.5 Gas Meter(s) X
9.6 Fuel Supply Piping and Shut-Off(s) X
9.7 Drain and Waste Lines X
9.8 Laundry Sink(s) X
9.9 Washer Supply Line(s) X
9.10 Dryer Vent(s) X X
9.11 Hose Bib(s) X X
Water Supply Source(s): Source(s)
Public
Water Supply Lines: Material(s)
Copper
Water Heater Tank(s): Energy Source(s)
Electric
Water Heater Tank(s): Capacity(s)
184l
Water Heater Tank(s): Date(s) of Mfg. (est.)
2008
Drain and Waste Lines: Material(s)
ABS
Water Supply Piping and Shut-Off(s): Style(s) and Material(s)
Basement Crawlspace
Copper, 1/2"
Fuel Supply Piping and Shut-Off(s): Location(s)
Basement | NE Side(s) of Building
Furnace(s), Gas fireplace(s), BBQ
General Plumbing Inspection Limitations

Evaluation of the plumbing system was limited to permanently connected fixtures and readily visible pipe conditions. The function and effectiveness of laundry standpipes, vent pipes, floor drains, fixture overflows, anti-siphon devices and similar items generally cannot be evaluated. Conditions are subject to unpredictable change, e.g., leaks may develop, water flow may drop, drains may become blocked, etc. The detection of sewer gases and the condition/function of sub-slab or in ground piping are excluded from a standard inspection. In ground piping is subject to blockage/collapse.

Exterior Faucets

Exterior faucets that do not operate may be turned off, not connected, or, in cold weather, may be frozen. Consider all factors when concerns are indicated. The use of backflow preventers is advised, and in many areas now required, to prevent possible contamination of the water supply condition.

Gas Leak Detection

A home inspection does not include a pressure test or any other means to verify the integrity and freedom of leakage of a natural gas or propane gas system. While gas detection equipment may be used as an optional means to help identify possible leakage at representative/random locations, such use does not represent a full leakage test of the gas system. Furthermore, any reference to the gas system's condition is based solely on physical condition of the piping. Leakage can occur at any time for numerous reasons, even when the physical condition of the pipe appears satisfactory. Any suspected gas leakage should be investigated immediately. In the event of significant leakage, the house should be immediately evacuated, without using any devices or equipment that could serve to ignite the gas.

Limited Evaluation of Auxiliary Systems

A standard home inspection does not include assessment of any water filter or treatment system, irrigation system, outdoor plumbing, backflow preventers (anti-siphon devices), fire sprinklers or similar systems.

Limited Evaluation of Laundry Equipment

Neither the laundry equipment nor the utility hook-ups (water, electric and gas), nor venting and waste lines for any particular appliance are evaluated as part of a standard inspection. Personal concerns related to any laundry equipment or hook-up needs of new equipment should be assessed by a qualified tradesman.

Limited Evaluation of Water Supply / Waste Disposal

Neither the source; type; or quality of water supply; nor the method of waste disposal is determined as part of a standard home inspection. Advise obtaining documentation/verification of type systems. If a private water and/or waste system exist, independent evaluation by a specialist is recommended.

Limited Evaluation of Water Valves

Main and in-line water shut-off valves may not be tested during a standard home inspection. Water valves, such as the main shut-off, is generally operated infrequently. Consequently, it is not unusual for them to become difficult to turn over time or even “frozen” in place. They may leak or fail when operation is attempted after a period of inactivity. Advise periodically checking and operating all valves to determine if repairs are needed and to ensure operation if needed in an emergency.

Private Septic Tank(s) Excluded from Inspection

Based on visible components or information provided to the inspector, this property appeared to have a private sewage disposal (septic) system. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Generally, septic tanks should be pumped and inspected every 3 years. Depending on the type of system and municipal regulations, inspection and maintenance may be required more frequently, often annually. Recommend the following: Consult with the property owner about this system's maintenance and repair history; Review any documentation available for this system; Review inspection and maintenance requirements for this system; That a qualified specialist evaluate, perform maintenance and make repairs if necessary.

Underground Piping

It is not possible to determine the condition, function, or flow of water or waste in buried or concealed piping or other components of the water supply system, sanitary or storm sewers, or septic systems within the scope of a standard home inspection. Information may be available from the homeowner, local building department, and/or water or sewage departments/utilities regarding the history of the water and sewer systems in the area and/or associated with the subject property. Pipe evaluation services which utilize special video equipment or other means are generally available to determine the condition of buried or concealed sewer lines and whether they are clear of obstructions. Arranging for such an inspection is recommended for homes in older communities, especially in areas where soil conditions or tree roots have been reported to contribute to sewer line failures or blockage, when a house has been vacant for an extended period, or in drought conditions.

Water Heater Tank(s): Manufacturer(s)
Basement
GSW

The inspection of the plumbing system is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein. Piping and other components concealed from view for any reason cannot be inspected. Material descriptions are based on a limited/random check of representative components. Accordingly, it is not possible to identify every piping or plumbing system material, or all conditions or concerns that may be present. A standard home inspection does not include verification of the type water supply or waste disposal, analysis of water supply quantity or quality, inspection of private onsite water supply or sewage (waste disposal) systems, assessment/analysis of lead piping/solder or lead-in-water concerns, or a leakage test of gas/fuel piping or storage systems. Furthermore, the function and effectiveness of any shut-off/control valves, water filtration or treatment equipment, irrigation/fire sprinkler systems, outdoor/underground piping, backflow preventers (anti-siphon devices), laundry standpipes, vent pipes, floor drains, fixture overflows, and similar features generally are not evaluated. Additional information related to plumbing elements may be found under other headings in this Report, including the BATHROOM and KITCHEN section(s).

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Water Heater Tank(s)

TPR Drain Line(s) Missing / Substandard
Basement Water Heater

The temperature-pressure relief valve drain line for one or more water heaters was observed to be too short or missing. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair per standard building practices. For example,  by extending the drain line to within 6 inches of the floor, or routing it to drain outside.
 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.10.1 - Dryer Vent(s)

Mylar Accordion Ducting
Basement Laundry Room(s)

The clothes dryer was observed to be equipped with a vinyl or mylar, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. Plastic and mylar foil tubing are not approved for clothes dryer venting as these materials can melt, tend to get kinked or crushed, and allow lint to accumulate. Dryer lint is very flammable. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), improper dryer ventilation leads to approx. 14,000 fires per year. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace dryer venting with only UL listed rigid metal or semi-rigid 4" metal duct (meeting UL 2158A). Dryer vents should terminate to the home's exterior where they won't be blocked by dirt, snow, vegetation, etc. The vent should be less than 35' long, be as straight as possible, and should have no screen installed. Dryer vents should be cleaned at least twice annually for energy efficiency and fire safety reasons. The duct's interior is not visible to the inspector and dryer vents within walls/ceilings or behind insulation are not visible.

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
9.11.1 - Hose Bib(s)

Not Frost-Free
SW Side(s) of Building

One or more hose bibs (outside faucets) were not the "frost-free" design, and are more likely to freeze during cold weather than frost-free hose bibs. Recommend that a qualified plumber upgrade these with frost-free hose bibs to prevent freezing, pipes bursting, flooding and possible water damage.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

10 - Kitchen

IN NI NP R
10.1 Countertop(s) and Cabinets X
10.2 Kitchen Sink(s) X
10.3 Range(s) and Cooktop(s) X
10.4 Dishwasher(s) X
10.5 Ventilation / Range Hood(s) X
Range(s) and Cooktop(s): Energy Source(s)
Natural Gas
Range(s) and Cooktop(s): Manufacturer(s)
Main Level Kitchen(s)
Jenn-Air
Dishwasher(s): Manufacturer(s)
Main Level Kitchen(s)
GE
Limited Evaluation of Cabinetry & Countertop(s)

Assessment is limited to a check of visible counter areas and a representative number of cabinet components. All cabinetry should be checked when clear of storage or obstruction prior to closing on house.

General Appliance Inspection Limitations

Appliance evaluations are outside the scope of a standard home inspection in many areas and are only inspected if so indicated. When performed, evaluations are limited to a basic operations check of only listed units and generally exclude thermostatic or timer controls, energy efficiency considerations, cooking or cleaning adequacies, appliance accessories, washer/dryers, refrigerators, ice makers and any portable appliances. Appliances typically have a 5-10 year service life. Operation of all appliances should be confirmed during a pre-closing inspection; have owner demonstrate operation if possible. Obtain all operating instructions from the owner or manufacturer.

Limited Evaluation of Appliance Utilities

Appliance inspections do not include evaluation of the adequacy or capacity of any utility or utility connections or compliance with code or manufacturer requirements. Upgrades to water, waste, gas or electric lines may be required to meet specifications of any particular appliance; especially when a new or larger capacity appliance is added.

Limited Evaluation of Cooking Appliances

Cooking adequacies, anti-tip features, self-cleaning cycles and other accessories are not evaluated as part of a home inspection. While the proper tip over protection cannot be verified during a home inspection, all units should be checked to confirm manufacturer recommended tip-protection has been installed as a precautionary measure.

Limited Evaluation of Dishwasher(s)

Any assessment of an installed dishwasher is limited to a single cycle operation of the motor and visual check of other readily accessible components. Dishwashing/cleaning adequacy and soap dispenser function were not evaluated. This is a high maintenance item. Seal leaks may develop after vacancy or other inactive periods.

Limited Evaluation of Auxiliary Systems

A standard home inspection does not include assessment of any water filter or treatment system, or similar systems.

Inspection of the kitchen is limited to visible and readily accessible elements as listed herein. Elements concealed from view or not functional at the time of inspection cannot be inspected. The inspection of cabinetry is limited to functional unit conditions based on a representative sampling; finishes and hardware issues are not included. The inspection of appliances, if performed, is limited to a check of the operation of a basic representative cycle or mode and excludes evaluation of thermostatic controls, timing devices, energy efficiency considerations, cooking or cleaning adequacies, self-cleaning functions, the adequacy of any utility connections, compliance with manufacturer installation instructions, appliance accessories, and full appliance features (i.e., all cycles, modes, and controls). Portable appliances or accessories such as washer, dryers, refrigerators, microwaves, and ice makers are generally excluded. Additional information related to kitchen elements and appliances may be found under other headings in this Report.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations

11 - Bathroom

IN NI NP R
11.1 Vanity(s) / Countertop(s) X
11.2 Sink(s) X
11.3 Bathtub(s) X
11.4 Ventilation X X
11.5 Toilet(s) X
General Bathroom Inspection Limitations

Bathrooms are high use areas with many components subject to periodic malfunction, particularly those related to the plumbing system. Normal usage could not be simulated during the inspection; therefore, anticipate the possibility of leakage or other concerns developing with normal usage/aging or as latent conditions are discovered with removal of carpeting, tile, shower pans, etc. The function and water-tightness of fixture overflows or other internal fixture components generally cannot be assessed. The water-tightness of all tile, enclosures, and other surfaces must be maintained on a regular basis.

Limited Evaluation of Vanity(s) / Countertop(s)

Assessment is limited to a check of visible counter areas and a representative number of cabinet components. All cabinetry should be checked when clear of storage or obstruction prior to closing on house.

Limited Evaluation of Ancillary System(s)

A standard inspection does not include evaluation of ancillary items such as saunas, steam baths, etc. unless specifically included.

Safety Glazing not Determined

Any glass enclosure or glass surfaces adjacent to fixtures (e.g., shower/tub doors) should be safety or tempered glass. Unless otherwise noted, no verification of the presence of safety glazing is made a part of a standard inspection.

The inspection of bathrooms is limited to readily accessible and visible elements as listed herein. Bathrooms are high-use areas containing many elements subject to ongoing wear and periodic malfunction, particularly fixtures and other components associated with the plumbing system. Normal usage cannot be simulated during a standard home inspection. Water flow and drainage evaluations are limited to a visual assessment of functional flow. The function and watertightness of fixture overflows or other internal fixture components generally cannot be inspected. A standard home inspection does not include evaluation of ancillary items such as saunas or steam baths. Additional issues related to bathroom components may be found under other headings, including the plumbing system.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations
Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Ventilation

Vent Fan Duct(s) Disconnected / Substandard in Attic
NE Side(s) of Attic

The ducting in the attic for one or more bathroom vent fans was observed to be broken, disconnected, loose or substandard. Bathroom ventilation fans produce large amounts of moisture which should not enter structure interiors including the attic space. Moisture can accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

12 - Interior

IN NI NP R
12.1 Exterior Doors X
12.2 Interior Doors X
12.3 Windows X
12.4 Flooring Finishes X
12.5 Wall Finishes X X
12.6 Ceiling Finishes X X
12.7 Stairway(s) X
General Interior Inspection Limitations

Evaluation of wall, ceiling or floor components is generally limited to readily visible structural conditions. Aesthetic or cosmetic factors, (e.g., paint, wallpaper) or the condition of finish materials or coverings are not considered unless specifically noted. Furthermore, it is not possible to determine the wall insulation, type or condition of surfaces or hidden structural concerns that may exist under floor cover, carpeting, paneling, drop ceilings, etc. If the type flooring is a concern, it should be confirmed before closing.

Furnished Residence Disclaimer

Structures that are occupied and fully or partially furnished at the time of the property inspection many times prevent the inspector from seeing everything, testing everything, or having access to everything. Along with defects that may not be observed due to such conditions, since the structure is still being lived in and used, additional deferred maintenance items may be present by the time the sale is finalized. Although some minor interior defects might be noted in your Home Inspection Report, such minor defects should not be considered an exhaustive, complete, or definitive list of minor defects, particularly when the residence is still occupied. In bathrooms and kitchen, as well as other areas, fresh paint can conceal visual clues concerning moisture damage. Renovations or remodeling can prevent the inspector from determining how the structure has interacted with its environment through wind, rain, soil movement, etc. Wallpaper, mirrors, wall hangings, and furnishings may conceal defects or damage to walls; concealed defects are not within the scope of the property inspection. Carefully note the condition of the property during your final walk-through and feel free to call me if you have any questions.

Indoor Air Quality & Mold

All houses are potentially subject to indoor air quality concerns due to numerous factors such as improper venting systems, outgassing from construction materials, etc. Air quality can also be adversely affected by the growth of molds, fungi and other micro-organisms—most are results of excess moisture conditions. A home inspection does not include assessment of potential health of environmental contaminants or allergens. If leakage occurs of detrimental moisture conditions exist or develop the possibility of potentially harmful contaminants exist and therefore should be immediately addressed. For air quality evaluations, a qualified testing firm should be contacted.

Limited Evaluation of Possible Moisture Infiltration / Leakage

The particular cause of a leak, or the status of any prior leakage conditions, cannot be readily verified in most cases. If any possible causes for leakage anywhere in the house are noted, it should be understood that additional unanticipated factors may also be contributing to or causing the condition. Hidden damage may exist. All areas of potential concern should be attended to and/or monitored for leakage. Any renovation or finish work should only start after verification and correction of the cause of leakage.

Limited Evaluation of Windows & Doors

Windows and door evaluations are based on a random sampling of a representative number of units. All units should be checked by the buyer for possible operational concerns or other deficiencies. Unless noted, presence of safety glazing at windows/doors is not evaluated.

Inspection of the house interior is limited to readily accessible and visible elements as listed herein. Elements and areas that are inaccessible or concealed from view by any means cannot be inspected. Aesthetic and cosmetic factors (e.g., paint and wallpaper) and the condition of finish materials and coverings are not addressed. Window and door evaluations are based on a random sampling of representative units. It is not possible to confirm safety glazing or the efficiency and integrity of insulated window/door units. Auxiliary items such as security/safety systems (or the need for same), home entertainment or communication systems, structured wiring systems, doorbells, telephone lines, central vacuums, and similar components are not included in a standard home inspection. Due to typical design restrictions, inspection of any fireplace, stove, or insert is limited to external conditions. Furthermore, such inspection addresses physical condition only; no code/fire safety compliance assessment or operational check of vent conditions is performed. Additional information on interior elements may be provided under other headings in this Report, including the STRUCTURE section and the major house systems.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations
Credit
Comment
12.5.1 - Wall Finishes

Possible Asbestos in Mid-1980s and Older Wall(s)

Wall plaster and other finish surfaces, particularly textured surfaces on pre-1980s homes, may possibly contain asbestos. If the surface is undamaged and painted or coated, potential concerns related to airborne asbestos are reduced; however, if it becomes damaged, the client may wish to have this material tested by a qualified lab to determine if it does contain asbestos. In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not disturbing it may reduce or effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodelling, they should have it tested by a qualified lab and/or consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or asbestos abatement specialist.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.6.1 - Ceiling Finishes

Possible Asbestos in Mid-1980s and Older Ceiling Finishes

Ceiling plaster, acoustical tile and other finish surfaces, particularly textured ceiling surfaces on pre-1980s homes, may possibly contain asbestos. If the surface is undamaged and painted or coated, potential concerns related to airborne asbestos are reduced; however, if it becomes damaged, the client may wish to have this material tested by a qualified lab to determine if it does contain asbestos. In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not disturbing it may reduce or effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodelling, they should have it tested by a qualified lab and/or consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or asbestos abatement specialist.

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Garage

IN NI NP R
13.1 Entry Door(s) into Dwelling X X
13.2 Garage Floor Slab X
13.3 Garage Wall Finishes X
13.4 Garage Ceiling Finishes X
13.5 Garage Exterior Door(s) X
13.6 Garage Window(s) X
13.7 Garage Vehicle Door(s) X
13.8 Garage Vehicle Door Operator(s) X
General Garage Inspection Limitations

More so than many other areas of a house, garages tend to have storage and other items that restrict visibility. Any specific noted limitation may be in addition to normal restrictions. Advise a check of obstructed areas when clear.

Garage / House Separation Inspection Limitations

Fire-rated wall/ceiling assemblies are generally required between the house and garage. This report does not fully address any specific requirement; rather it is generally limited to a determination of whether frame walls are covered or not. The integrity of any fire separation assembly must be maintained for proper protection. Wall insulations and vapour retarders are generally not observable and may only be commented on if an observed defect exists.

Inspection of the garage is limited to readily visible and accessible elements as listed herein. Elements and areas concealed from view cannot be inspected. More so than most other areas of a house, garages tend to be filled with storage and other items that restrict visibility and hide potential concerns, such as water damage or insect infestation. A standard home inspection does not include an evaluation of the adequacy of the fire separation assemblies between the house and garage, or whether such assemblies comply with any specific requirements. Inspection of garage doors with connected automatic door operator is limited to a check of operation utilizing hard-wired controls only. Additional information related to garage elements and conditions may be found under other headings in this Report, including the ROOFING and EXTERIOR section(s).

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations & Observations
Credit
Comment
13.1.1 - Entry Door(s) into Dwelling

Not Fire-Resistant
North Entry Door(s)

The door between the garage and the house did not appear to be fire resistant, or the inspector was unable to verify that it was via a label. This is a potential safety hazard. House to garage doors, to prevent fire and fumes from spreading from the garage into interior living space, should be constructed of fire-resistant materials. Doors, generally considered to be suitable for the purpose, are solid core wood, steel, honeycomb steel or a door that has been factory labeled as fire rated. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace or repair the door and, at that time, make any other corrections that might be required to provide suitable fire resistance between the garage and the dwelling per standard building practices.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
13.1.2 - Entry Door(s) into Dwelling

Missing Self-Closing Device(s)
North Entry Door(s)

One or more door between the garage and the house were observed to be missing a self-closing device. These devices are installed to keep the door closed to prevent possible fire and fumes from the garage from spreading to the house. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor