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1234 Main St.
Vancouver, WA 98684
05/23/2019 9:00AM

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agent

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Comment Key and Definitions

The following definitions of comment descriptions represent this inspection report. All comments by the inspector should be considered before purchasing this home. Any recommendations by the inspector to repair or replace suggests a second opinion or further inspection by a qualified contractor. All costs associated with further inspection fees and repair or replacement of item, component or unit should be considered before you purchase the property.


Inspected (IN) = I visually observed the item, component or unit and if no other comments were made then it appeared to be functioning as intended allowing for normal wear and tear.


Not Inspected (NI) = I did not inspect this item, component or unit and made no representations of whether or not it was functioning as intended.  If applicable, I will state a reason for not inspecting this item.


Not Present (NP) = This item, component or system was not found in this home or building. It is possible it could be hidden from view and was not found during the inspection, or is not present.


Repair or Replace (RR) = The item, component or unit is not functioning as intended, needs repair or further inspection by a licensed, qualified contractor. Items, components or units that can be repaired to a satisfactory condition may not need replacement.


Additional Information Regarding This Report

Any recommendation for repair or further review made by the inspector should be accomplished by a licensed, qualified, specialist or contractor, which may make recommendations for repair in addition to what the home inspector has identified.  As a courtesy, the inspector may make comments regarding the number of occurrences and locations of defects, however, this is not a technically exhaustive inspection and all locations may not be noticed or mentioned in the report.  Photos are used as a courtesy to help illustrate issues, but typically do not indicate all locations of an issue.  It is recommended for a licensed contractor to further review an issue to find all defects or locations.  The inspector recommends that you obtain information regarding repairs during your contingency period, as these recommendations may affect your valuation of the property.


Please be advised that the home inspection report is meant to identify 'Material' defects in a home.  A material defect is a specific issue with a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk to people.  The fact that a system or component is near, at or beyond the end of its normal useful life is not, in itself, a material defect. The home inspection and report is not meant to point out cosmetic and readily apparent deficiencies in a home and these items will not typically be included in the home inspection report.


Commonly Used Terms

Deferred cost: Systems of components costing significant amounts of money that are estimated or appear to be within a few years of needing replacement.


Monitor: Items that are recommended to be periodically inspected for any changes that may require further action or repair.


Repair / Replace / Review: More urgent or important repairs that are recommended to be accomplished sooner rather than later or reviewed by a contractor to determine extent of repair necessary as they may have significant cost or affect the structure negatively.


Safety: Items in the opinion of the inspector are safety related and pose a current or potential risk to the home's occupants.


Home Inspector Requirements / Standards of Practice

Home inspectors are not required to report on the following: Life expectancy of any component or system; The causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; Any component or system that was not observed; The presence or absence of pests such as wood damaging organisms, rodents, or insects; or Cosmetic items, underground items, or items not permanently installed. Home inspectors are not required to: Offer warranties or guarantees of any kind; Calculate the strength, adequacy, or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility; Determine the presence or absence of any suspected adverse environmental condition or hazardous substance, including but not limited to mold, toxins, carcinogens, noise, contaminants in the building or in soil, water, and air; Determine the effectiveness of any system installed to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; Predict future condition, including but not limited to failure of components; Since this report is provided for the specific benefit of the customer(s), secondary readers of this information should hire a licensed inspector to perform an inspection to meet their specific needs and to obtain current information concerning this property.

1 - Inspection Details

In attendance
Customer, Customer's agent
Building type
Single family 2 story with basement
Status of home
Vacant
Style of home
Contemporary
Approximate age of home
2006
Predominant house facing direction
West
Weather
Clear
Temperature
32-40 F
Rain in last 3 days
Yes
Ground condition
Damp

2 - Roofing

Ins NI NP RR
2.1 Roof Coverings X X
2.2 Roof Flashing X X
2.3 Skylights, Chimneys and Roof Penetrations X X
2.4 Roof Drainage Systems X X
Roof covering material
Architectural, Asphalt/Fiberglass
Roof covering layers
1
Chimney (exterior)
NA
Viewed roof from
Walked roof
Roof Drainage Systems: Drainage general info

Maintenance Tip:  Maintain the home's drainage systems and landscaping for proper water management.  Gutters and downspouts should be kept free of debris that can impede water drainage and to prevent over flowing which can deposit large amounts of water next to the home's foundation.  Underground drains should be operational and any drainage issues noticed should be repaired right away.  Any downspouts not having underground drains should have extensions that deposit water 5 to 6 feet away from the home's foundation.  All landscaping, patios, walkways, or surfaces that shed water should slope away from the home.  Proper gradient is a 5% slope away from the home which equates to 6 inches of drop in 10 feet.

Roof Drainage Systems: Underground drains not visible

Underground drainage for the roof runoff is present on this property.  I cannot see the underground drains or interiors and am unable to determine if they are functional.  

The home inspector shall observe: Roof covering; roof drainage systems; flashings; skylights, chimneys, roof penetrations; and signs of' leaks or abnormal condensation on building components. The home inspector shall: Describe the type of roof covering materials; and report the methods used to observe the roofing. The home inspector is not required to: Walk on the roofing; or observe attached accessories including but not limited to solar systems, antennae, and lightning arrestors.


Underground drainage systems are not visible and not inspected or tested.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Roof Coverings

Mod - hvy moss

There is moderate to heavy moss on the roof covering.  Moss can damage the roof covering and potentially promote leaking.  I recommend having the moss cleaned off of the roof covering as soon as possible.   Never pressure wash shingles as this can damage them and shorten roof cover life.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Roof Coverings

Damaged shingles
Northwest

There are damaged shingles on the roof which need replacing as necessary by a roofer to prevent potential moisture intrusion and damage to the home's structure. Have a roofer further inspect the roof covering for all necessary repairs.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Roof Flashing

No kickout flashing
Southwest

Kickout flashing directs water away from the wall cladding and into the gutter at roof eave / sidewall intersections to prevent water running down and potentially behind the wall cladding causing damage to the structure.    While not required on older homes when built, it is a VERY good item to have installed for preventative maintenance if not currently installed and can help prevent leaks and costly repairs. I recommend having a roofer add kickout flashing to areas not having one.

Roof Roofing Professional
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Comment
2.3.1 - Skylights, Chimneys and Roof Penetrations

Exposed fasteners
Examples

Where fasteners have been driven through the roof covering leaving the fastener head exposed, it is recommended to seal the penetration with roofing cement / sealant to prevent possible leakage around that point. I recommend sealing exposed penetrations / fastener heads. Note that a representative number of areas are inspected and photos do not typically include all locations recommended for repair.
Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
2.4.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Minor gutter debris

There is a minor amount of debris in the gutters.  There is not enough debris to prevent water flow currently, however, it is important to keep gutters clean to properly manage water around the home.  Overflowing gutters can deposit larger amounts of water next to the home and cause damage to the structure.  Check gutters at least twice yearly Spring and Fall and clean as necessary. 

Credit
Comment
2.4.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Gutter pitching up shingles
South, West

In some areas, the gutter is too high and the shingles are pitched up at the roofline creating a spot where water does not drain properly. I recommend adjusting the gutter to avoid pooling water on the shingles as this can lead to moisture damage to the roof structure below.

Gutter Gutter Contractor

3 - Exterior

Ins NI NP RR
3.1 Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim X X
3.2 Doors (Exterior) X X
3.3 Windows X
3.4 Decks, Balconies, Stoops, Steps, Areaways, Porches, Covers and Railings X X
3.5 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage, Driveways, Patios, Walkways and Retaining Walls X X
3.6 Eaves, Soffits and Fascias X
Siding Style
Lap, Rock and mortar
Siding Material
Adhered Concrete Masonry Veneer, Fiber cement
Exterior Entry Doors
Steel, Sliding glass insulated
Appurtenance
Deck, Patio
Driveway
Concrete, Gravel
Patios
Concrete
Deck
Wood
Walkways
Concrete
Doors (Exterior): Change locks
I recommend changing / re-keying all locks and garage door codes upon moving into the home. 
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage, Driveways, Patios, Walkways and Retaining Walls: Typical cracking
There are typical cracks in the driveway / walkways. The driveway and walkways are still serviceable.
Limitations
Vegetation

The home inspector shall observe: Wall cladding, flashings, and trim; entryway doors and a representative number of windows; garage door operators; decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches and applicable railings; eaves, soffits, and fascias; and vegetation, grading, drainage, driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls with respect to their effect on the condition of the building. The home inspector shall: Describe wall cladding materials; operate all entryway doors and a representative number of windows; operate garage doors manually or by using permanently installed controls for any garage door operator; report whether or not any garage door operator will automatically reverse or stop when meeting reasonable resistance during closing; and probe exterior wood components where deterioration is suspected. The home inspector is not required to observe: Storm windows, storm doors, screening, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories; fences; presence of safety glazing in doors and windows; garage door operator remote control transmitters; geological conditions; soil conditions; recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); detached buildings or structures; or presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks. The home inspector is not required to: Move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice or debris that obstructs access or visibility.


Underground drainage systems are not visible, inspected, or commented upon.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim

Caulk gapping / cracking

The caulking is cracking or gapping in some areas.  Caulking needs to be well maintained at siding / trim, siding / window, and butt joints if the joint is not flashed. This is a maintenance item and should be periodically inspected and repaired as necessary. I recommend re-caulking in these areas to prevent water intrusion and damage to the structure.  

Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim

Seal siding penetrations
North, South

There are penetrations in the siding where the hole or gap should be caulked or sealed to prevent water and pest intrusion.  Even small holes can allow significant amounts of water into a wall cavity over time and cause damage.  Repair as soon as possible.

Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim

Siding maintenance needed
Seal splits and cracks repaint as necessary

The siding needs general maintenance.  Repairing any over driven nail holes by caulking / sealing, and repairing any paint by removing loose paint and re-painting is recommended.  Repair seal any gaps, splits, in the siding or joints.  Drive or replace any nails which are coming loose.  Pro-active inspection and siding maintenance will keep it in better shape longer. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.1.4 - Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim

Manufactured Stone Veneer incorrect installation

No sealant bead at transitions, Insufficient clearance from stone to grade, No weep screed, No flashing at top of stone assembly

The AMSV (Adhered Manufactured Stone Veneer) or cultured stone as many people call it is not properly installed according to published industry guidelines.  The MVMA (Masonry Veneer Manufacturers Association) publishes guidelines for proper installation of manufactured stone veneer.  These guidelines help to prevent moisture related issues with the veneer.  Not all best practices may be required by a jurisdiction.  While I do not see any current moisture issues as a result of the installation, however, it has a higher risk of moisture related issues due to the lack of following best practices. Have it further inspected by a manufactured stone veneer inspector if you would like more information on whether repairs are recommended for this particular installation.  Please keep in mind, if this is an older installation, it may have been installed prior to some of the current requirements, however, the best practices still apply to older installations, and they may benefit from being repaired to minimize risk of moisture related issues.

For reference, here is the current installation guidelines for manufactured stone from the MVMA: View Publication

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.1.5 - Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim

Wood rot
North, East, South, West under deck, at deck off living room

There is some trim / siding around the home that has some wood decay.  Decayed wood can potentially attract pests such as insects.  I recommend replacement of any decayed wood.  Have a siding contractor further review the siding to find and repair all areas.  

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.6 - Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim

Gap over flashing caulked

The gap over flashings is caulked. This is improper installation. There should be an approximate 1/4 inch gap over head flashings which is not caulked for proper water drainage from behind the siding.  This could potentially increase the likelihood of water damage to the structure. If the siding is replaced in the future, ensure the installer does not caulk the gap over flashings.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.1.7 - Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim

Loose butt joints
North

Some siding course butt joints have edges curling up away from the home and needs to be pinned back to prevent moisture intrusion behind the siding.  Be sure and follow manufacturer directives for placement and fastener specifics.  It is usually indicated to use stainless or galvanized finish nails only.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.8 - Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim

House due for paint

The house is due for paint.  Some areas appear thin and there are many areas of peeling is missing paint.  I recommend having the entire house painted to help protect the structure.  

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.9 - Wall Cladding, Flashing, and Trim

Incorrect nailing of siding

Fiber cement siding has some areas of incorrect installation. Is not nailed correctly and has nails in some butt joints.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Doors (Exterior)

Deck sliding door not properly flashed

Exterior doors should be wrapped at the bottom sill and properly flashed to prevent water intrusion.  This door does not appear to be properly flashed to prevent water intrusion.  There is a lot of sealant at the bottom of the door in the attempt to seal this area.  There are gaps in the sealant. I recommend having a contractor with knowledge of proper door flashing review this door to make appropriate repairs and prevent potential water damage.  

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Windows

No screens

There are screens missing on some windows. Screens are important to keep out pests and insects.  I recommend adding screens to any windows not having one.  

Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Decks, Balconies, Stoops, Steps, Areaways, Porches, Covers and Railings

Multiple deck issues

Wood decay in structure, No metal hold downs from rim joist to floor joists, Cantilevered more than 1/4 supported span

Over the years, deck construction standards have changed significantly.  A deck built to standards at the time of construction may not meet current standards today.  Decks, like other systems, have a lifespan, typically 10-15 years on average.  The current deck building standards are outlined in the DCA 6 - Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide.  I note multiple issues with the deck and recommend a deck contractor familiar with current standards review and correct the deck as necessary including any additional deficiencies discovered.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.4.2 - Decks, Balconies, Stoops, Steps, Areaways, Porches, Covers and Railings

No railing / guard
North

There is no railing installed in an area in which current safety standards require a railing or guard.  I recommend installation of a railing / guard in this area for safety.  Stairways with 4 or more risers should have an approved graspable profile railing and balusters spaced no more than 4 inches apart if the side of the stairs is exposed to falls. Walking surfaces greater than 30 inches above the ground within 3 feet of the walking surface should have a railing installed for safety. Areas noted: 
House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage, Driveways, Patios, Walkways and Retaining Walls

Trim vegetation

In some areas, there is vegetation in contact with or close to the siding. Vegetation against the siding can trap moisture against the home and facilitate pest intrusion.  I recommend trimming all vegetation away from the home by at least 1-2 feet and 5 feet away from the roof to prevent damage and pest intrusion.

Credit
Comment
3.5.2 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage, Driveways, Patios, Walkways and Retaining Walls

Negative gradient
Southeast, South

There is a negative slope or drainage towards the home in one or more areas. This area does not drain water away from home and needs landscaping and / or drainage corrected. Recommend any areas that slope toward the home be corrected to maintain positive drainage of water away from the home.  Proper slope away from the home is 5% or 6 inches for the first ten feet of ground cover, and 1/4 inch per foot on other surfaces such as patios.  If proper drainage cannot be met by landscaping, additional drainage may be necessary, and a drainage contractor should review the premises for further advice.  

4 - Garage / Carport

Ins NI NP RR
4.1 Garage Ceilings X
4.2 Garage Walls (including Firewall Separation) X
4.3 Garage Floor X
4.4 Garage Windows X
4.5 Overhead Door(s) X
4.6 Service door X
4.7 Occupant Door (garage to inside of home) X
4.8 Garage Door Operators X X
Garage Door Type
Two automatic
Garage Door Material
Light inserts
Auto-opener Manufacturer
LIFT-MASTER
Garage Type
Two car attached
Roof covering
Same as house
Siding material
Same as house
Siding style
Same as house
Photo sensors reverse door
Reverse door as expected
Pressure reverse operable
Reversed as expected
Garage Floor: Typical floor cracks

There are typical concrete shrinkage cracks in the garage floor.  All concrete cracks and these look typical of garage slab shrinkage cracking.  No action is necessary.

Garage Floor: Storage items
Floor rugs
Storage items were present in the garage and not all areas of the floor were visible.  These areas were not inspected and no representation can be made as to their condition.

The inspector shall: Inspect the condition and function of the overhead garage doors and associated hardware; test the function of the garage door openers, their auto-reverse systems and secondary entrapment devices (photoelectric and edge sensors) when present; inspect the condition and installation of any pedestrian doors; inspect fire separation between the house and garage when applicable; report as a fire hazard the presence of any ignition source (gas and electric water heaters, electrical receptacles, electronic air cleaners, motors of installed appliances, etc.) that is within eighteen inches of the garage floor; describe any deficiencies of these systems or components. The inspector is not required to: Determine whether or not a solid core pedestrian door that is not labeled is fire rated; verify the functionality of garage door opener remote controls; move vehicles or personal property; operate any equipment unless otherwise addressed in the SOP.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace
Credit
Comment
4.7.1 - Occupant Door (garage to inside of home)

Self close hinges

I recommend adding self-closing hinges to the garage occupant door for fire safety.  Current safety standards require them.  It may not have been a requirement when this home was built, however, it is a recommended fire safety upgrade.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.8.1 - Garage Door Operators

Controller too low

The garage door opener control is installed less than 5 feet tall above the walking surface. Manufacturers recommend installation at least 5 feet above the walking surface to avoid small children from operating the door.  Have the controller raised to be at least 5 feet above walking surface.

Garage Garage Door Contractor

5 - Interiors

Ins NI NP RR
5.1 Ceilings X
5.2 Walls X
5.3 Floors X
5.4 Windows (representative number) X X
5.5 Doors (representative number) X
5.6 Steps, Stairways, Balconies and Railings X X
5.7 Counters / Cabinets / Closets (representative number) X
Ceiling Materials
Gypsum Board
Wall Material
Gypsum Board
Floor Covering(s)
Tile, Carpet, Hardwood T&G
Interior Doors
Wood, Hollow core
Window Types
Thermal/Insulated, Casement, Single-hung, Vinyl Clad
Window Manufacturer
UNKNOWN
Cabinetry
Wood
Countertops
Tile, Granite
Ceilings: Repairs noted
Southeast Bedroom

Repairs are noted to the ceiling in one or more places in the home.  This is for your information.  

The home inspector shall observe: Walls, ceiling, and floors; steps, stairways, balconies, and railings; counters and a representative number of installed cabinets; and a representative number of doors and windows. The home inspector shall: Operate a representative number of windows and interior doors; and report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components. The home inspector is not required to observe: Paint, wallpaper, and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors; carpeting or draperies, blinds, or other window treatments.


The interior of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. The inspection did not involve moving furniture, personal belongings, inspecting areas not visible or obstructed from view.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Ceilings

Sheetrock cracks normal

There are some cracks in the sheetrock in the ceiling around the home.  This appears to be cosmetic in nature.  Recommend monitor and repair as necessary.
Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
5.4.1 - Windows (representative number)

Fogged window
Master Bedroom

Some windows around the home have a broken seal and there is some haziness between the panes. These windows still function fine as insulated windows, however, aesthetically they are not appealing and do not provide a clear view.   Have them repaired or replaced by a glass contractor. 

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.4.2 - Windows (representative number)

Blind cords contain loop

Some window blind cords contain loops. This is a potential strangle hazard for small children.  I recommend cords that do not contain loops.

Credit
Comment
5.4.3 - Windows (representative number)

Window guards - child safety

For your information, there are no window guards on some windows in the home on the upper floors which restrict how far the window can be opened. I recommend consider adding window guards on the windows to restrict how far they can be opened for additional child safety if small children will be present in the home.
Credit
Comment
5.4.4 - Windows (representative number)

Gapping caulk / sealant

One or more windows around the home where the sill has some gapping or missing sealant.  Air movement can be prevented around windows with proper sealing  I recommend repair / caulking. 
Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
5.4.5 - Windows (representative number)

Counterbalance inop
Kitchen

One or more window counterbalance is inoperable. The window does not stay up when raised. Recommend repair. 

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Steps, Stairways, Balconies and Railings

Railing loose
2nd Floor

The railing is loose in one or more areas.  I recommend repair as necessary.  

6 - Structural Components

Ins NI NP RR
6.1 Foundations, Basement and Crawlspace X
6.2 Columns, Piers and Beams X
6.3 Walls (Structural) X
6.4 Floors (Structural) X
6.5 Ceilings (Structural) X
6.6 Roof Structure and Attic X
Foundation
Poured concrete
Method used to observe Crawlspace
No crawlspace
Floor Structure
Slab, Not visible
Wall Structure
Not visible
Columns or Piers
Not visible
Ceiling Structure
Truss cord bottoms, Not visible
Roof Structure
Engineered wood trusses, OSB sheathing
Roof-Type
Hip
Method used to observe attic
Crawled, Limited access
Attic info
Scuttle hole
Attic access location
Bedroom ceiling
Limitations
Restricted access, 40%
Walls (Structural): Wall not visible

The wall structure is mainly not visible or able to be inspected due to wall coverings such as drywall.

Ceilings (Structural): Ceiling not visible - insulation
The ceiling structure is mostly not visible for inspection due to installed insulation in the attic. 
Roof Structure and Attic: Some attic areas inaccessible
Not all areas of attic visible or accessible. All readily accessible areas were traversed, inspected and observations in the report include these areas. The inaccessible areas were not inspected and no observations have been reported for these areas.

The Home Inspector shall observe structural components including foundations, floors, walls, columns or piers, ceilings and roof. The home inspector shall describe the type of Foundation, floor structure, wall structure, columns or piers, ceiling structure, roof structure. The home inspector shall: Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected; Enter under floor crawl spaces, basements, and attic spaces except when access is obstructed, when entry could damage the property, or when dangerous or adverse situations are suspected; Report the methods used to observe under floor crawl spaces and attics; and Report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components. The home inspector is not required to: Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely effect the health of the home inspector or other persons.


Photos may be used to illustrate an issue, but may not indicate every location or occurrence. The visible structure of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. In crawlspaces and attics, there are dark recesses, blocked visibility by ductwork, structural members, insulation, etc and some areas are not visible for inspection.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace

7 - Electrical System

Ins NI NP RR
7.1 Service Entrance Conductors X
7.2 Service and Grounding Equipment, Main Overcurrent Device, Main and Distribution Panels X X
7.3 Branch Circuit Conductors, Overcurrent Devices and Compatability of their Amperage and Voltage X
7.4 Connected Devices and Fixtures (Observed from a representative number on the building interior and exterior) X X
7.5 Polarity and Grounding of Receptacles X
7.6 GFCI / AFCI Outlets and Breakers X X
7.7 Smoke Alarms X
7.8 Carbon Monoxide Detectors X X
Electrical Service Conductors
Below ground, Aluminum, 240 volts
Panel Type
Circuit breakers
Electric Panel Manufacturer
SIEMENS
Panel capacity
200 AMP
Wiring Methods
NMB (Non-metallic)
Branch wiring
Copper, Aluminum
Service grounding conductor
Appears to be properly grounded
Service entrance location
Exterior of home, South
Service and Grounding Equipment, Main Overcurrent Device, Main and Distribution Panels: Main disconnect location
North
Outside, At main panel, Both
Main panel location
garage

Maintain proper clearance around electrical panels which is 30 inches wide measured either from the centerline (15 inches each way) or from one edge of the panel, 3 feet to the front of the panel, and all the way from 6 feet 6 inches high to the floor.  It is important to keep this area clear for working access and for quick access in the event of an emergency.  

Service and Grounding Equipment, Main Overcurrent Device, Main and Distribution Panels: Inspected
The main electrical panel was inspected.
GFCI / AFCI Outlets and Breakers: Test AFCI / GFCI
I recommend testing any existing AFCI / GFCI breakers or receptacles monthly to ensure proper operation.
Smoke Alarms: Smoke detector default

I recommend replacing all smoke alarms upon move in unless you know the absolute age. If the detectors are 10 years or older, replace them as recommended by the NFPA.  Test all smoke alarms upon move in to ensure proper operation, and test monthly or as recommended by the manufacturer. Replace all smoke alarm batteries yearly. Note that smoke alarms are required in each sleeping room, in a common area outside of sleeping rooms, on each floor, in basements, and habitable attics.

Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Test CO detectors regularly
I recommend testing Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors upon move-in, weekly or per manufacturer directions and changing batteries upon move-in and yearly. Please note that Carbon Monoxide detectors are required in a common area on each level of the home including basements and habitable attics. Replace CO detectors per manufacturer instructions, typically about every 5 years.  I recommend replacement of CO detectors upon move in unless you know the exact age.

The home inspector shall observe: Service entrance conductors; Service equipment, grounding equipment, main over current device, and main and distribution panels; amperage and voltage ratings of the service; branch circuit conductors, their over current devices, and the compatibility of their ampacities and voltages; the operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling's exterior walls; the polarity and grounding of all receptacles within six feet of interior plumbing fixtures, and all receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected structures; the operation of ground fault circuit interrupters; and smoke alarms. The home inspector shall describe: Service amperage and voltage; service entry conductor materials; service type as being overhead or underground; and location of main and distribution panels. The home inspector shall report any observed solid core aluminum branch circuit wiring. The home inspector shall report on presence or absence of smoke alarms. The home inspector is not required to: Insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels; test or operate any over current device except ground fault circuit interrupters; dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels; or Observe: Low voltage systems; security system devices, heat detectors; telephone, security, cable TV, intercoms, or other ancillary wiring that is not a part of the primary electrical distribution system; or built-in vacuum equipment.


Photos may be used to illustrate an issue, but may not indicate every location or occurrence. The electrical system of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Outlets were not removed and the inspection was only visual. Any outlet not accessible (behind the refrigerator or furniture for example) was not inspected or accessible.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace
Credit
Comment
7.2.1 - Service and Grounding Equipment, Main Overcurrent Device, Main and Distribution Panels

Inadequate panel clearance

Electrical panel clearance is required to be 30 inches minimum width, 3 feet to the front and extending from 6 feet 6 inches tall all the way to the floor to allow adequate working space around the electrical panel.  There is inadequate clearance around the electrical panel per requirements.  I recommend repair to provide proper working clearance.
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Comment
7.4.1 - Connected Devices and Fixtures (Observed from a representative number on the building interior and exterior)

Burned out / missing bulb
Bathroom

There are one or more burned out or missing bulbs at light fixtures around the home.  Try changing the bulb, and that does not work, have an electrician repair the wiring. 

Credit
Comment
7.4.2 - Connected Devices and Fixtures (Observed from a representative number on the building interior and exterior)

Loose outlet / switch
2nd Floor hallway

There are one or more loose electrical outlets or light switches.  Fixture wiring should be secured tightly in the gangbox to prevent coming loose. I recommend repair. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
7.4.3 - Connected Devices and Fixtures (Observed from a representative number on the building interior and exterior)

No outlet deck / balcony

As of 2008, balconies, decks and porches that are accessible from inside the dwelling unit having greater than 20 square feet of area should have at least one receptacle outlet installed within the perimeter of the balcony, deck or porch. The receptacle shall not be located more than 6½ feet (2m) above the balcony, deck or porch surface.  This is to prevent potential misuse of extension cords.  I recommend an electrician add an exterior outlet in this area.  Areas noted:
Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
7.6.1 - GFCI / AFCI Outlets and Breakers

No GFCI required area
Exterior (all), Garage (all)

There is no GFI (Ground Fault Interrupt) protection at electrical outlets in some areas currently required to prevent shock hazards. Current standards require GFCI protected outlets at kitchen countertops and islands, garages, exterior outlets, bathroom outlets, outlets within 6 feet of a water source or that are in potentially damp areas such as crawlspaces as a safety feature. I recommend adding GFI protection to these areas not having it as a safety upgrade.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.8.1 - Carbon Monoxide Detectors

No CO detector in required area
1st Floor, 2nd Floor

There were no carbon monoxide detectors observed in one or more required locations.  Carbon monoxide detectors are required in a common area on each level of the home, in the immediate vicinity of sleeping rooms, in basements and habitable attics.  Recommend installing carbon monoxide detectors per manufacturer instructions in these areas. 

8 - Plumbing System

Ins NI NP RR
8.1 Plumbing Drain, Waste and Vent Systems X
8.2 Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures X X
8.3 Hot Water Systems, Controls, Chimneys, Flues and Vents X
8.4 Main Water Shut-off Device (Describe location) X
8.5 Fuel Storage and Distribution Systems (Interior fuel storage, piping, venting, supports, leaks) X
8.6 Main Fuel Shut-off (Describe Location) X
8.7 Sump Pump / Ejector Pump X
8.8 Central Vacuum System X
Water Source
Well
Water Filters
None
Plumbing Water Supply (into home)
Not visible
Plumbing Water Distribution (inside home)
Not visible, Copper stub outs
Plumbing Waste
ABS, Not visible
Waste System
Septic system
Water Heater Power Source
Electric
Water Heater Capacity
50 Gallon (2-3 people)
Manufacturer
GE
Water Heater Location
Garage
Temperature Pressure Relief Valve and Piping
Present
Water meter location
None
Sump / Ejector pump(s)
None apparent
Main Fuel Shut-off (Describe Location): Shut off at propane tank
The main fuel shut off is at propane tank outside.
Plumbing Drain, Waste and Vent Systems: Septic alarm
North

There is a septic alarm for the septic system.  If the system is in alarm status, you should call a septic contractor.  

Hot Water Systems, Controls, Chimneys, Flues and Vents: Electric water heater
7 years old

There is an electric water heater installed. The typical life expectancy of water heaters is 10-12 years.  You can potentially extend the life with yearly maintenance including servicing by a plumber, changing the anode rod(s), and draining the tank to help eliminate sediment.

Hot Water Systems, Controls, Chimneys, Flues and Vents: Normal hot water temp
You have normal hot water temperature in the expected range of 100 - 120 Fahrenheit (F). Please note that water temperature in excess of 120 degrees F is a scalding hazard and should be avoided.
Main Water Shut-off Device (Describe location): Water shutoff location
garage

Note your main water shutoff location in case you need to quickly turn off the water in case of emergency.

Limitations
Ceiling / wall / floor covering, Slab
Plumbing Drain, Waste and Vent Systems: Septic system not inspected
To note, this home appears to have a septic system. The septic system was not inspected and is outside the scope of the home inspection. I recommend you have the septic system inspected by a qualified septic contractor and serviced as recommended.  I also recommend you know where the septic lid / covers are located and ensure that they always remain securely fastened or buried to avoid the possibility of children or animals falling into the septic tank.  Septic tanks are particularly dangerous to children.
Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures: Irrigation system not inspected
The home is equipped with an irrigation system.  This system is mostly underground and not visible, is beyond the scope of the home inspection, and was not inspected.  I recommend an irrigation company test your irrigation system to verify it is working properly and does not have any leaks.  You may also need yearly testing of the backflow prevention device by a certified tester.  The Clark County irrigation safety document is a good document for your reference.
Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures: Water well further inspection

This house is on a well water system. The well was not inspected, and is outside of the scope of the home inspection. I recommend you have the water quality tested and flow tested, and the well inspected by a qualified contractor and serviced as recommended.  I recommend asking current owner or qualified contractor to instruct you in the operation and maintenance of the well water system.


Pressure tank located in the garage.

The home inspector shall observe: Interior water supply and distribution system, including: piping materials, supports, and insulation; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections; interior drain, waste, and vent system, including: traps; drain, waste, and vent piping; piping supports and pipe insulation; leaks; and functional drainage; hot water systems including: water heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; and chimneys, flues, and vents; fuel storage and distribution systems including: interior fuel storage equipment, supply piping, venting, and supports; leaks; and sump pumps. The home inspector shall describe: Water supply and distribution piping materials; drain, waste, and vent piping materials; water heating equipment; and location of main water supply shutoff device. The home inspector shall operate all plumbing fixtures, including their faucets and all exterior faucets attached to the house, except where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance. The home inspector is not required to: State the effectiveness of anti-siphon devices; determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; operate automatic safety controls; operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets; Observe: Water conditioning systems; fire and lawn sprinkler systems; on-site water supply quantity and quality; on-site waste disposal systems; foundation irrigation systems; spas, except as to functional flow and functional drainage; swimming pools; solar water heating equipment; or observe the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.


Information regarding shutoff valves: No shutoff valves are operated in or around the home during the home inspection.  Operating shutoff valves which may not have been operated for long periods of time may result in failure or leaking of the valve.  The only valves that are operated are at fixtures such as sinks, showers, and toilets.  Plumbing piping and shutoff valves, while not leaking at the time of inspection, have the potential to leak later in time and is beyond the inspector's control to predict.


Information regarding irrigation systems: Irrigation systems are beyond the scope of a normal visual home inspection.  Most components of an irrigation system are underground, and not visible to the inspector.  It is beyond the control of the inspector to make predictions regarding the irrigation system and its proper operation.  For this reason, if the home is equipped with an irrigation system, it is recommended to have it checked by a lawn care company independently of the home inspection.


The plumbing in the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Washing machine drain lines for example cannot be checked for leaks or the ability to handle the volume during drain cycle and the interior of old piping systems such as cast iron or galvanized cannot be seen on the interior to examine the condition.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace
Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Plumbing Drain, Waste and Vent Systems

Septic covers not fastened

One or more septic tank covers are loose and / or not fastened down.  This could allow an animal or child to fall in. Recommend fastening down covers and keeping them fastened at all times. This is a potential safety hazard. Areas noted:
Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
8.2.1 - Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures

Caulk / grout maintenance
Kitchen, Bathrooms 2nd Floor

There is some gapping / cracking of the caulk or grout around one or more plumbing fixtures.  Recommend keeping these areas well maintained to prevent potential moisture intrusion and damage to the structure.  Recommend caulking/grout maintenance as necessary. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
8.2.2 - Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures

Leak at fixture
Master Bathroom under jacuzzi, exterior hose bib when in use

There is a leak at one or more plumbing fixtures. I recommend repair by a plumber.  

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.2.3 - Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures

Toilet loose
1st Floor

The toilet is loose at the base. This could allow leaking around the base / wax ring and damage to the flooring below. I recommend replacement of the wax ring, and tightening securely to the floor. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.2.4 - Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures

High water pressure
90 PSI p

The water pressure to the home exceeds 80 psi. Recommended maximum pressure is 80 psi to prevent potential damage to internal plumbing and appliances. Recommend a qualified plumber add a pressure regulator for you to maintain water pressure at or below 80 psi.  Current pressure approximately:
Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
8.2.5 - Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures

Jacuzzi tub needs lines cleaned

The Jacuzzi tub, when operated has algae in the lines. It just needs to be operated and treated to blow the lines out.

Credit
Comment
8.2.6 - Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures

Unknown plumbing piping
North

There is some water piping on the side of the house on the north side that appears to be for landscaping. It is not protected from freezing and I do not know if there is a shut-off for it.  Ask seller for details and have a plumber review because this piping does not look professionally installed.  

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
8.3.1 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Chimneys, Flues and Vents

WH not tightly secured

Water heaters should be tightly secured to prevent rocking and breaking straps loose during v seismic  activity.  The heater is not tightly secured.  I recommend adding blocking behind the heater to secure it to the wall and prevent rocking.  

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - Fuel Storage and Distribution Systems (Interior fuel storage, piping, venting, supports, leaks)

Strap propane tank

I recommend strapping of the propane tank outside the home to prevent potential tipping during seismic activity which could result in potential leaking.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.5.2 - Fuel Storage and Distribution Systems (Interior fuel storage, piping, venting, supports, leaks)

More than 120 gallons of Propane next to home

It is only allowed to store up to 120 gallons of propane next to the home. Do not exceed this amount 4 recommended safety guidelines.

9 - Heating / Central Air Conditioning

Ins NI NP RR
9.1 Heating Equipment X
9.2 Normal Operating Controls X
9.3 Automatic Safety Controls X
9.4 Distribution Systems (including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units and convectors) X X
9.5 Chimneys, Flues and Vents (for fireplaces, gas water heaters or heat systems) X
9.6 Presence of Installed Heat Source in Each Habitable Room X
9.7 Solid Fuel Heating Devices (Fireplaces, Woodstove) X
9.8 Gas/LP Firelogs and Fireplaces X
9.9 Cooling and Air Handler Equipment X
Heat Type
Heat pump forced air, Backup electric furnace
Furnace location
garage
Energy Source
Electric
Number of Heat Systems (excluding wood)
Two
Heat System Brand
RHEEM
Ductwork
Insulated, Not visible, and
Filter Type
Washable
Filter Size
20x25, 1 inch, (Two filters)
Filter Location
ceiling, upstairs
Types of Fireplaces
Propane gas logs vented
Operable Fireplaces
One
Number of Woodstoves
None
Cooling Equipment Type
Heat Pump Forced Air
Cooling Equipment Energy Source
Electricity
Central Air Manufacturer
RHEEM
Heating Equipment: Heat pump

This house has a heat pump for the main source of heating.  Life expectancy of heat pumps is statistically about 15 years. The temperatures were checked at the house registers in heat pump heating mode and found to be within normal operating range. I recommend servicing by an HVAC technician yearly. According to the serial number, your unit is approximately: 13 years

Heating Equipment: Electric furnace

This furnace unit is an electric forced air furnace. Typical life span furnaces is 15 - 20 years. You can identify potential problems and extend the life of your furnace with regular servicing from an HVAC technician. The age of your furnace according to the manufacturer data plate or serial number is: 


The furnace operated using thermostat controls


The output temperature at the register was within normal expected temperature rise for an electric furnace.

Heating Equipment: Heat pump normal temp

The heat pump was operated using thermostat controls and the output temperature at the register was within normally expected temperature ranges for a heat pump.

Heating Equipment: Backup emergency heat normal temp

The heat pump system was operated in backup emergency electric furnace heat mode, responded normally to thermostat input and temperatures at the register were in the normal expected range.

Heating Equipment: Deferred heat pump

Statistically, the typical life expectancy of a heat pump is approximately 15 years.  Due to the age of the heat pump, I recommend budgeting for a new unit. According to the serial number or date listed on the heat pump, the approximate age is: 

Gas/LP Firelogs and Fireplaces: Gas fireplace operated

I inspected and operated the gas fireplace.  I recommend servicing of the fireplace yearly.   For your information, if you are a Northwest Natural gas customer, you can schedule a free inspection and testing of your gas appliances.  Here is a link for more information. https://www.nwnatural.com/CustomerService/EquipmentServices/InspectionInformation

Cooling and Air Handler Equipment: Cooling appliance general

The home has an air conditioner installed.  Typical life expectancy of a compressor is 12-15 years.  This appliance, according to manufacturer serial numbers or data plate information is approximately:  13 years

I recommend yearly servicing by an HVAC technician.

Cooling and Air Handler Equipment: Deferred cooling appliance

Typical life expectancy of air conditioner/heat pump compressor units is 12 to 15 years. Due to the age of your unit, I recommend budgeting for a new unit. According to the serial numbers or data plate your unit age is approximately:  13 years

Limitations
Below 60 degrees F
Cooling and Air Handler Equipment: Too cold to operate AC / heat pump

I did not operate the air conditioner / heat pump because it was below 60 degrees F.  Manufacturers indicate to not run air contioners below 60 degrees because damage to the compressor could occur.  Have it serviced at the beginning of the next cooling season.

The home inspector shall observe permanently installed heating and cooling systems including: Heating equipment; cooling equipment that is central to home; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible; solid fuel heating devices; heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and the presence of an installed heat source in each room. The home inspector shall describe: energy source, and heating equipment and distribution type. The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls. The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector is not required to: Operate heating systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage, operate automatic safety controls, ignite or extinguish fires, or Observe: the interior of flues, heat exchangers, fireplace insert flue connections, humidifiers, electronic air filters, or the uniformity or adequacy of heat supply to the various rooms.


The heating and cooling system of this home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. The inspection is not meant to be technically exhaustive. The inspection does not involve removal and inspection behind service door or dismantling that would otherwise reveal something only a licensed heat contractor would discover.  Heat exchangers of gas furnaces are not visible and cannot be inspected during a home inspection.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Heating Equipment

Recommend servicing

I was unable to determine the last time the furnace and heat pump was serviced. Heating / cooling appliances should be serviced yearly. I recommend servicing followed by yearly servicing by an HVAC technician. 

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Distribution Systems (including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units and convectors)

Missing damaged foam
South at heat pump

The foam sleeve on suction line is missing or damaged in one or more area(s) at outside compressor unit or other areas. Missing foam on suction line can cause energy loss and condensation. I recommend repair as needed by qualified person. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Insulation and Ventilation

Ins NI NP RR
10.1 Insulation in Attic X
10.2 Insulation Under Floor System X
10.3 Vapor Retarders (in Crawlspace or basement) X
10.4 Ventilation of Attic and Foundation Areas X
10.5 Venting Systems (Kitchens, Baths and Laundry) X X
10.6 Ventilation Fans and Thermostatic Controls in Attic X
Attic Insulation
Batt, Fiberglass, Approximate, R38
Ventilation
Soffit Vents, Passive
Exhaust Fans
Fan only
Dryer Power Source
240 Electric
Dryer Vent
Metal
Floor System Insulation
NONE, Not visible
Insulation in Attic: Fiberglass batt insulation has gaps

The fiberglass batt insulation in the attic has some gaps and areas where the fiberglass does not cover the ceiling well.  It would be a bump in efficiency to have some blown fiberglass insulation installed to help eliminate the gaps and voids which is very difficult to avoid with fiberglass batts

Venting Systems (Kitchens, Baths and Laundry): Periodic cleaning dryer vent

I recommend knowing the location of the dryer exhaust vent and having the vent piping cleaned periodically / yearly as needed to prevent the buildup of lint which can be a fire hazard. 

Limitations
Restricted access, Limited visibility

The home inspector shall observe: Insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces; ventilation of attics and foundation areas; kitchen, bathroom, and laundry venting systems; and the operation of any readily accessible attic ventilation fan, and, when temperature permits, the operation of any readily accessible thermostatic control. The home inspector shall describe: Insulation in unfinished spaces; and absence of insulation in unfinished space at conditioned surfaces. The home inspector shall: Move insulation where readily visible evidence indicates the need to do so; and move insulation where chimneys penetrate roofs, where plumbing drain/waste pipes penetrate floors, adjacent to earth filled stoops or porches, and at exterior doors. The home inspector is not required to report on: Concealed insulation and vapor retarders; or venting equipment that is integral with household appliances.


Photos may be used to illustrate an issue, but may not indicate every location or occurrence. The insulation and ventilation of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Venting of exhaust fans or clothes dryer cannot be fully inspected and bends or obstructions can occur without being accessible or visible (behind wall and ceiling coverings). Only insulation that is visible was inspected.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace
Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - Insulation in Attic

Attic hatch no insulation

There is no insulation installed on the attic hatch.  This can result in some loss of energy efficiency.  Recommend insulation be installed on the top of the attic hatch.
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Comment
10.5.1 - Venting Systems (Kitchens, Baths and Laundry)

Dryer vent lint

There is lint buildup in the dryer exhaust duct work.  I recommend having the dryer duct cleaned.  Too much lint buildup is a fire hazard. 
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.5.2 - Venting Systems (Kitchens, Baths and Laundry)

Noisy exhaust fan
Master Bathroom

One or more exhaust fans are very noisy and sound like the bearings are failing, recommend repair / replace as necessary. Areas noted: 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
10.5.3 - Venting Systems (Kitchens, Baths and Laundry)

Exhaust damper louvers stuck shut
Southeast

The exhaust vent louvers are painted or stuck shut I need to be freed to operate normally and allow adequate air flow from the exhaust fans.

11 - Built-In Kitchen Appliances

Ins NI NP RR
11.1 Dishwasher X
11.2 Ranges/Ovens/Cooktops X
11.3 Range Hood (s) X
11.4 Trash Compactor X
11.5 Food Waste Disposer X
11.6 Microwave Cooking Equipment X
Kitchen exhaust
Vented
Ranges/Ovens/Cooktops: Aged range
The range/stove is an aged appliance, and due to it's age, and I recommend budgeting for a new unit.

The home inspector shall observe and operate the basic functions of the following kitchen appliances: Permanently installed dishwasher, through its normal cycle; range, cook top, and permanently installed oven; trash compactor; food waste disposal; ventilation equipment or range hood; and permanently installed microwave oven. The home inspector is not required to observe: Clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven function, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation; non built-in appliances; or refrigeration units. The home inspector is not required to operate: Appliances in use; or any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.


The built-in appliances of the home were inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed.

  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace

12 - Miscellaneous

Ins NI NP RR
12.1 Pest Activity X
  • Ins = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • RR = Repair or Replace
Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Pest Activity

Rodent activity
Garage

There appears to be rodent activity in one or more areas of the home.  I am not a licensed pest inspector, and am unable to diagnose or provide information regarding pests in the home.   I recommend review by a licensed pest control operator / inspector for further recommendation. 

Pest control Pest Control Pro