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1234 Main St.
BOYNTON BEACH, FL 33435
12/15/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
2
Maintenance item
40
Recommendation
6
Safety hazard

1 - Inspection Details

General: Date
06/08/2019
General: Start Time
10 A.M.
General: Finish Time
1 P.M.
General: In Attendance
Client
General: Occupancy
Occupied, Utilities on
General: Temperature (approximate)
85 Fahrenheit (F)
General: Weather Conditions
Clear, Recent Rain, Hot
General: Type of Building
Single Family
General: Style
One-Story, Single Family
General: Utilities
All Utilities On
General: Water Source

Public 

General: Sewage Disposal
Public
General: Soil Condition
Damp
Structure Details: Age of the Structure
62
Structure Details: Structure Orientation
S
Structure Details: Structures Inspected
House, Attached Garage
The Following Items Have Been Excluded From the Inspection:
Irrigation System, Shed, Water System
Your Report:

Albanese Property Inspections LLC is pleased to submit the enclosed report. This report is a professional opinion based on a visual inspection of the readily accessible areas and components of the building. This report is neither an engineering inspection nor an exhaustive technical evaluation. An engineering inspection or a technical evaluation of this nature would cost many times more and take days, if not weeks, to complete.


Please understand that there are limitations to this type of visual inspection. Many components of the property are not visual during the inspection and very little historical information (if any) is provided in advance of, or even during, the inspection, While we believe we can reduce your risk of purchasing a property, we can not eliminate it, nor can or do we assume it. Even the most comprehensive inspection cannot be expected to reveal every condition you may consider significant to ownership. In addition to those improvements recommended in our report, we recommended that you budget for unexpected repairs. On the average, we have found it necessary for you to set aside a percentage of the value of the home on an annual basis that will be sufficient to cover unexpected repairs. This maybe 1 % for a modest home and a higher amount, say maybe 3 % or so, for a more complex and /or an older home with aging systems and some deferred maintenance.


Your attention is directed to your copy of the Pre-Inspection Agreement. It more specifically explains the scope of the inspection and the limit of our ability in performing this inspection. The Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics of the International Association of Certification Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) prohibit us from making any repairs or referring any contractors. We are not associated with any other party to the transaction of this property, except as may be disclosed by you. 


The information provided in this report is solely for your use. Albanese Property Inspections LLC will not release a copy or this report, nor will we discuss its contents with any third party, without your written consent.


We know you had many options in your choice of an inspection company. Thank you for selecting us. We appreciate the opportunity to be your choice in the building inspection industry. Should you have any questions about the general conditions of the house in the future, we would be happy to answer these.

What Really Matters In a Home Inspection

Congratulations on buying your new home. 

The process can be stressful. A home inspection is supposed to give you peace of mind, but often has the opposite effect. You will be asked to absorb a lot of information in a short amount of time. This often includes a written report, checklist, photographs, environmental reports, and what the inspector himself says during the inspection. All this combined with the seller's disclosure and what you notice yourself makes the experience even more overwhelming. What should you do?

 Relax. Most of your inspection will be maintenance recommendations, life expectancy and minor imperfections. These are nice to know about. However, the issues that really matter will fall into four categories: 

1. Major defects. An example of this would be a significant structural failure. 

2. Things that may lead to major defects. A small water leak coming from a piece of roof flashing, for example. 

3. Things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home. Structural damaged caused by termite infestation, for example. 

4. Safety hazards. Such as a lack of GFCI-protection. 

Anything in these categories should be corrected. Often a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4). 

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. Realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in the report. No home is perfect. Keep things in perspective. Don't kill your deal over things that don't matter. It is inappropriate to demand that a seller address deferred maintenance, conditions already listed on the seller's disclosure, or nit-picky items.

Introduction, Scope, Definitions, Category Description, & Compliance Statement

INTRODUCTION, SCOPE, DEFINITIONS, & COMPLIANCE STATEMENT 

INTRODUCTION: The following is your home inspection report. The report includes pictures, information, and recommendations. This inspection was performed in accordance with the current Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics of the American Society of Home Inspectors. The Standards contain certain and very important limitations, exceptions, and exclusions to the inspection. A copy is available prior to, during, and after the inspection, and it is part of the report. The cost estimates and video are not part of the bargained-for report. 

SCOPE:  A home inspection is intended to assist in evaluating the overall condition of the dwelling. The inspection is based on observation of the visible, readily accessible and apparent condition of the structure and its components on this day. The results of this inspection are not intended to make any representation regarding the presence or absence of latent or concealed defects that are not reasonably ascertainable or readily accessible in a competently performed inspection. 

No warranty, guarantee, or insurance by Albanese Property Inspections LLC is expressed or implied. This report does not include inspection for wood destroying insects, mold, lead or asbestos. A representative sampling of the building components is viewed in areas that are accessible at the time of the inspection. No destructive testing or dismantling of components is performed. Not all defects will be identified during this inspection. Unexpected repairs should be anticipated. 

The person conducting your inspection is not a licensed structural engineer or other professional whose license authorizes the rendering of an opinion as to the structural integrity of a building or its other component parts. 

You are advised to seek two professional opinions and acquire estimates of repair as to any defects, comments, improvements or recommendations mentioned in this report. We recommend that the professional making any repairs inspect the property further, in order to discover and repair related problems that were not identified in the report. We recommend that all repairs, corrections, and cost estimates be completed and documented prior to closing or purchasing the property. Feel free to hire other professionals to inspect the property prior to closing, including HVAC professionals, electricians, engineers, or roofers. 

TO BE CONCISE, the following phrases have been used in the report to identify systems or components that need your attention prior to closing or purchasing the property: MONITORING RECOMMENDED: Denotes a system or component needing further evaluation and/or close observation in order to determine if correction is needed. IMPROVEMENT AND REPAIR RECOMMENDED: Denotes a system or component that should receive normal maintenance, repair, or adjustment in order to function properly. CORRECTION AND FURTHER EVALUATION RECOMMENDED: Denotes a system or component that is significantly deficient or at the end of its service life, and needs corrective action by a professional. We recommend the professional making any corrective action to inspect the property further (further evaluation), in order to discover and repair related problems that were not identified in the report. All corrections and evaluations must be made prior to closing or purchasing the property. 

FLORIDA STATE HOME INSPECTOR COMPLIANCE STATEMENT: 

I represent that I am a full member in good standing of the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI), www.nachi.org. 

I will conduct a home inspection of the previously mentioned property in accordance with the ASHI Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice and the Home Inspection Agreement. 

I am in compliance with the Florida Home Inspection Law. 

I carry all the state-required insurance. 

Stephen Albanese, President of Albanese Property Inspections LLC


Category Descriptions: 

Listed below is a description of the Categories used throughout the report to help understand the severity of an item.  Any items list in the below categories may be based on the inspectors opinion.  These categories are not designed to be considered as an enforceable repair or responsibility of the current homeowner, but designed to inform the current client of the current condition of the property and structure.  They may be used in negotiations between real estate professionals. 

Maintenance/Monitor =  The item, component, or system while perhaps is functioning as intended may be in need of minor repair, service, or maintenance; is showing wear or deterioration that could result in an adverse condition at some point in the future; or consideration should be made in upgrading the item, component, or system to enhance the function, efficiency, and/or safety.  Items that fall into this category frequently be addressed by a homeowner or Licensed Handyman and are considered to be routine homeowner maintenance (DIY) or recommended upgrades.   


Deficiencies =  The item, component, or system while perhaps functioning as intended is in need of moderate repair, service, is showing signs of wear or deterioration that could result is an adverse condition at some point in the future; consideration should be made in upgrading the item, component, or system to enhance the function, efficiency and/or safety. Items falling into this category can frequently be addressed by a licensed handyman or qualified contractor of trade and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY items.  


Safety & Immediate Attention =  The item, component, or system poses a safety concern to occupants in or around the home.  Some listed concerns may have been considered acceptable for the time of the structures construction, but pose a current risk.  

The item, component or system is not functioning as intended, or needs further inspection by a qualified license contractor of trade; possible damage to the structure, item, or component may occur. Repairs may be possible to satisfactory condition with out repair. 


OUTSIDE THE SCOPE OF THE HOME INSPECTION

The following areas and descriptions are not included in the scope of this inspection: 

   Structural integrity, 

   Geological stability or ground condition of site, 

   System design problems or functional adequacy, operational capacity, quality or suitability for particular use of items inspected, 

   Fireplace and flue draft, 

   Capacity for the garbage disposal to grind food or the dishwasher to clean properly, 

   Cosmetic items including, but not limited to minor scratches, scrapes, dents, cracks, stains, soiled or faded surfaces,  

   Wells or well pumps, 

   Septic systems, 

   Cisterns 

   Sewer lines beyond the foundation wall and not visible, 

   Fountains, 

   Electronic air cleaners or filters, 

   Water quality or volume, 

   Water conditioning systems, 

   Environmental hazards, 

   Active or passive solar systems, 

   Security systems, 

   Detached buildings or equipment unless specifically included and paid for in the agreement, 

   Central vacuum systems, 

   Wall or window mounted air conditioning systems, 

   Home warranty and component warranties.  

 

Mold

This home inspection is not an inspection for mold. Mold can be present in any home. Mold cannot grow unless there is excess moisture. The key to mold control is moisture control. While this inspection attempts to detect high moisture conditions that can lead to mold growth, be advised that mold can grow in hidden areas which are beyond the scope of this inspection. If mold is a concern to you, you should obtain a further evaluation by a mold specialist prior to the end of the inspection contingency.


Recommended reading -  A Brief Guide to Mold Moisture and Your Home

General: Overview

A home inspection is not a pass or fail type of inspection. It is a visual only evaluation of the conditions of the systems and accessible components of the home designed to identify areas of concern within specific systems or components defined by the Florida State Standards of Practice, that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector at the exact date and time of inspection. Conditions can and will change after the inspection over time. Future conditions or component failure can not be foreseen or reported on. Components that are not readily accessible can not be inspected.Issues that are considered as cosmetic are not addressed in this report. (Holes, stains, scratches, unevenness, missing trim, paint and finish flaws or odors). It is not the intent of this report to make the house new again.Any and all recommendations for repair, replacement, evaluation, and maintenance issues found, should be evaluated by the appropriate trades contractors within the clients inspection contingency window or prior to closing, which is contract applicable, in order to obtain proper dollar amount estimates on the cost of said repairs and also because these evaluations could uncover more potential issues than able to be noted from a purely visual inspection of the property. This inspection will not reveal every concern or issue that exists, but only those material defects that were observable on the day of the inspection. This inspection is intended to assist in evaluation of the overall condition of the dwelling only. This inspection is not a prediction of future conditions and conditions with the property are subject to change the moment we leave the premises.

1. Definitions and Scope


1.1.  A home inspection is a non-invasive, visual examination of the accessible areas of a residential property (as delineated below), performed for a fee, which is designed to identify defects within specific systems and components defined by these Standards that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector.  The scope of work may be modified by the Client and Inspector prior to the inspection process.

  1. The home inspection is based on the observations made on the date of the inspection, and not a prediction of future conditions.

  2. The home inspection will not reveal every issue that exists or ever could exist, but only those material defects observed on the date of the inspection.

1.2.  A material defect is a specific issue with a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk to people.  The fact that a system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal, useful life is not, in itself, a material defect.

1.3.  A home inspection report shall identify, in written format, defects within specific systems and components defined by these Standards that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector.  Inspection reports may include additional comments and recommendations.


2. Limitations, Exceptions & Exclusions


2.1. Limitations:

  1. An inspection is not technically exhaustive.
  2. An inspection will not identify concealed or latent defects. 
  3. An inspection will not deal with aesthetic concerns, or what could be deemed matters of taste, cosmetic defects, etc. 
  4. An inspection will not determine the suitability of the property for any use. 
  5. An inspection does not determine the market value of the property or its marketability.
  6. An inspection does not determine the insurability of the property. 
  7. An inspection does not determine the advisability or inadvisability of the purchase of the inspected property. 
  8. An inspection does not determine the life expectancy of the property or any components or systems therein. 
  9. An inspection does not include items not permanently installed. 
  10. This Standards of Practice applies to properties with four or fewer residential units and their attached garages and carports.

2.2. Exclusions:

I. The inspector is not required to determine:

  1. property boundary lines or encroachments.
  2. the condition of any component or system that is not readily accessible. 
  3. the service life expectancy of any component or system. 
  4. the size, capacity, BTU, performance or efficiency of any component or system. 
  5. the cause or reason of any condition. 
  6. the cause for the need of correction, repair or replacement of any system or component. 
  7. future conditions. 
  8. compliance with codes or regulations. 
  9. the presence of evidence of rodents, birds, bats, animals, insects, or other pests. 
  10. the presence of mold, mildew or fungus.
  11. the presence of airborne hazards, including radon. 
  12. the air quality. 
  13. the existence of environmental hazards, including lead paint, asbestos or toxic drywall.
  14. the existence of electromagnetic fields. 
  15. any hazardous waste conditions. 
  16. any manufacturers' recalls or conformance with manufacturer installation, or any information included for consumer protection purposes.
  17. acoustical properties.
  18. correction, replacement or repair cost estimates. 
  19. estimates of the cost to operate any given system.

II. The inspector is not required to operate:

  1. any system that is shut down.
  2. any system that does not function properly. 
  3. or evaluate low-voltage electrical systems, such as, but not limited to:

          1. phone lines;
          2. cable lines;
          3. satellite dishes;
          4. antennae;  
          5. lights; or
          6. remote controls.

  4. any system that does not turn on with the use of normal operating controls. 
  5. any shut-off valves or manual stop valves. 
  6. any electrical disconnect or over-current protection devices. 
  7. any alarm systems. 
  8. moisture meters, gas detectors or similar equipment.

III. The inspector is not required to:

  1. move any personal items or other obstructions, such as, but not limited to:  throw rugs, carpeting, wall coverings, furniture, ceiling tiles, window coverings, equipment, plants, ice, debris, snow, water, dirt, pets, or anything else that might restrict the visual inspection.
  2. dismantle, open or uncover any system or component.
  3. enter or access any area that may, in the inspector's opinion, be unsafe. 
  4. enter crawlspaces or other areas that may be unsafe or not readily accessible. 
  5. inspect underground items, such as, but not limited to: lawn-irrigation systems, or underground storage tanks (or indications of their presence), whether abandoned or actively used. 
  6. do anything that may, in the inspector's opinion, be unsafe or dangerous to him/herself or others, or damage property, such as, but not limited to:  walking on roof surfaces, climbing ladders, entering attic spaces, or negotiating with pets. 
  7. inspect decorative items. 
  8. inspect common elements or areas in multi-unit housing. 
  9. inspect intercoms, speaker systems or security systems.
  10. offer guarantees or warranties. 
  11. offer or perform any engineering services. 
  12. offer or perform any trade or professional service other than a home inspection. 
  13. research the history of the property, or report on its potential for alteration, modification, extendibility or suitability for a specific or proposed use for occupancy. 
  14. determine the age of construction or installation of any system, structure or component of a building, or differentiate between original construction and subsequent additions, improvements, renovations or replacements. 
  15. determine the insurability of a property.
  16. perform or offer Phase 1 or environmental audits.
  17. inspect any system or component that is not included in these Standards.


3. Standards of Practice

  3.1. Roof 

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves:

  1. the roof-covering materials;
  2. the gutters;
  3. the downspouts;
  4. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and 
  5. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of roof-covering materials.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  1. observed indications of active roof leaks.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. walk on any roof surface.
  2. predict the service life expectancy. 
  3. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. 
  4. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces.
  5. move insulation. 
  6. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments.
  7. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspector's opinion, to be unsafe.
  8. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. 
  9. perform a water test.
  10. warrant or certify the roof.
  11. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

  3.2. Exterior 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the exterior wall-covering materials; 
  2. the eaves, soffits and fascia;
  3. a representative number of windows;
  4. all exterior doors;
  5. flashing and trim;
  6. adjacent walkways and driveways;
  7. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
  8. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
  9. railings, guards and handrails; and 
  10. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  1. the type of exterior wall-covering materials.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  1. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting.
  2. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. 
  3. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. 
  4. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. 
  5. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. 
  6. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. 
  7. inspect for safety-type glass. 
  8. inspect underground utilities. 
  9. inspect underground items. 
  10. inspect wells or springs. 
  11. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. 
  12. inspect swimming pools or spas. 
  13. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. 
  14. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. 
  15. inspect drainfields or dry wells. 
  16. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

  3.3. Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the foundation;
  2. the basement;
  3. the crawlspace; and
  4. structural components.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of foundation; and
  2. the location of the access to the under-floor space.

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil;
  2. observed indications of active water penetration; 
  3. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and
  4. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself.
  2. move stored items or debris. 
  3. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. 
  4. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. 
  5. provide any engineering or architectural service. 
  6. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

  3.4. Heating 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the heating system, using normal operating controls.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the heating system;
  2. the energy source; and
  3. the heating method.

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any heating system that did not operate; and
  2. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect, measure, or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, makeup air, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems.
  2. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. 
  3. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. 
  4. light or ignite pilot flames. 
  5. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. 
  6. override electronic thermostats. 
  7. evaluate fuel quality.
  8. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.
  9. measure or calculate the air for combustion, ventilation, or dilution of flue gases for appliances.

  3.5. Cooling 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the cooling system, using normal operating controls.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and
  2. the cooling method.

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any cooling system that did not operate; and
  2. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system.
  2. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. 
  3. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. 
  4. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. 
  5. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

  3.6. Plumbing 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the main water supply shut-off valve;
  2. the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  3. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  4. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  5. all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  6. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  7. the drain, waste and vent system; and
  8. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  2. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  3. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  4. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
  5. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  2. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  3. active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; and  
  4. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. light or ignite pilot flames.
  2. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. 
  3. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. 
  4. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. 
  5. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. 
  6. open sealed plumbing access panels. 
  7. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. 
  8. operate any valve.
  9. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. 
  10. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. 
  11. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, back-flow prevention or drain-stop devices. 
  12. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. 
  13. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems.
  14. inspect wastewater treatment systems.
  15. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. 
  16. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. 
  17. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. 
  18. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. 
  19. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves.
  20. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation.
  21. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene, polyethylene, or similar plastic piping.

  22. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

  3.7. Electrical 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the service drop;
  2. the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  3. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  4. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  5. the electric meter and base;
  6. service-entrance conductors;
  7. the main service disconnect;
  8. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  9. service grounding and bonding;
  10. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  11. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  12. for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  1. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  2. the type of wiring observed.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  1. deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  2. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  3. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  4. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and
  5. the absence of smoke and/or carbon monoxide detectors.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures.
  2. operate electrical systems that are shut down. 
  3. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts.
  4. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. 
  5. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms.
  6. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarm systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems.
  7. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled.
  8. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. 
  9. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. 
  10. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any time-controlled devices. 
  11. verify the service ground. 
  12. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. 
  13. inspect spark or lightning arrestors.
  14. inspect or test de-icing equipment. 
  15. conduct voltage-drop calculations. 
  16. determine the accuracy of labeling.
  17. inspect exterior lighting. 

 3.8. Fireplace   

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;
  2. lintels above the fireplace openings;
  3. damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and
  4. cleanout doors and frames.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  1. the type of fireplace.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  1. evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;
  2. manually operated dampers that did not open and close;
  3. the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;
  4. the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and
  5. cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect the flue or vent system.
  2. inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels. 
  3. determine the need for a chimney sweep. 
  4. operate gas fireplace inserts. 
  5. light pilot flames. 
  6. determine the appropriateness of any installation. 
  7. inspect automatic fuel-fed devices. 
  8. inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices. 
  9. inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted. 
  10. ignite or extinguish fires. 
  11. determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics. 
  12. move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents. 
  13. perform a smoke test.
  14. dismantle or remove any component.
  15. perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection.
  16. perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

  3.9. Attic, Insulation & Ventilation 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas;
  2. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and
  3. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.
II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of insulation observed; and
  2. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  1. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard.
  2. move, touch or disturb insulation. 
  3. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. 
  4. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. 
  5. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. 
  6. activate thermostatically operated fans. 
  7. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring.
  8. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

  3.10. Doors, Windows & Interior 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them;
  2. floors, walls and ceilings;
  3. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps;
  4. railings, guards and handrails; and
  5. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  1. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  1. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings;
  2. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and
  3. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments.
  2. inspect floor coverings or carpeting.
  3. inspect central vacuum systems. 
  4. inspect for safety glazing. 
  5. inspect security systems or components. 
  6. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. 
  7. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. 
  8. move suspended-ceiling tiles. 
  9. inspect or move any household appliances. 
  10. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. 
  11. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. 
  12. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. 
  13. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. 
  14. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. 
  15. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. 
  16. operate or examine any sauna, steam-generating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. 
  17. inspect elevators. 
  18. inspect remote controls. 
  19. inspect appliances. 
  20. inspect items not permanently installed.
  21. discover firewall compromises. 
  22. inspect pools, spas or fountains.
  23. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. 
  24. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.


 

 

4. Glossary of Terms


  • accessible:  In the opinion of the inspector, can be approached or entered safely, without difficulty, fear or danger.
  • activate:  To turn on, supply power, or enable systems, equipment or devices to become active by normal operating controls. Examples include turning on the gas or water supply valves to the fixtures and appliances, and activating electrical breakers or fuses.
  • adversely affect:  To constitute, or potentially constitute, a negative or destructive impact.
  • alarm system:  Warning devices, installed or freestanding, including, but not limited to: carbon-monoxide detectors, flue gas and other spillage detectors, security equipment, ejector pumps, and smoke alarms.
  • appliance:  A household device operated by the use of electricity or gas. Not included in this definition are components covered under central heating, central cooling or plumbing.
  • architectural service:  Any practice involving the art and science of building design for construction of any structure or grouping of structures, and the use of space within and surrounding the structures or the design, design development, preparation of construction contract documents, and administration of the construction contract.
  • component:  A permanently installed or attached fixture, element or part of a system.
  • condition:  The visible and conspicuous state of being of an object.
  • correction:  Something that is substituted or proposed for what is incorrect, deficient, unsafe, or a defect.
  • cosmetic defect:  An irregularity or imperfection in something, which could be corrected, but is not required.
  • crawlspace:  The area within the confines of the foundation and between the ground and the underside of the lowest floor's structural component.
  • decorative:  Ornamental; not required for the operation of essential systems or components of a home.
  • describe:  To report in writing a system or component by its type or other observed characteristics in order to distinguish it from other components used for the same purpose.
  • determine:  To arrive at an opinion or conclusion pursuant to examination.
  • dismantle:  To open, take apart or remove any component, device or piece that would not typically be opened, taken apart or removed by an ordinary occupant.
  • engineering service:  Any professional service or creative work requiring engineering education, training and experience, and the application of special knowledge of the mathematical, physical and engineering sciences to such professional service or creative work as consultation, investigation, evaluation, planning, design and supervision of construction for the purpose of assuring compliance with the specifications and design, in conjunction with structures, buildings, machines, equipment, works and/or processes.
  • enter:  To go into an area to observe visible components.
  • evaluate:  To assess the systems, structures and/or components of a property.
  • evidence:  That which tends to prove or disprove something; something that makes plain or clear; grounds for belief; proof.
  • examine:  To visually look (see inspect).
  • foundation:  The base upon which the structure or wall rests, usually masonry, concrete or stone, and generally partially underground.
  • function:  The action for which an item, component or system is specially fitted or used, or for which an item, component or system exists; to be in action or perform a task.
  • functional:  Performing, or able to perform, a function.
  • functional defect:  A lack of or an abnormality in something that is necessary for normal and proper functioning and operation, and, therefore, requires further evaluation and correction.
  • general home inspection:  See "home inspection."
  • home inspection:  The process by which an inspector visually examines the readily accessible systems and components of a home and operates those systems and components utilizing this Standards of Practice as a guideline.
  • household appliances:  Kitchen and laundry appliances, room air conditioners, and similar appliances.
  • identify:  To notice and report.
  • indication:  That which serves to point out, show, or make known the present existence of something under certain conditions.
  • inspect:  To examine readily accessible systems and components safely, using normal operating controls, and accessing readily accessible areas, in accordance with this Standards of Practice.
  • inspected property:  The readily accessible areas of the buildings, site, items, components and systems included in the inspection.
  • inspection report:  A written communication (possibly including images) of any material defects observed during the inspection.
  • inspector:  One who performs a real estate inspection.
  • installed:  Attached or connected such that the installed item requires a tool for removal.
  • material defect:  A specific issue with a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk to people.  The fact that a system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal, useful life is not, in itself, a material defect.
  • normal operating controls:  Describes the method by which certain devices (such as thermostats) can be operated by ordinary occupants, as they require no specialized skill or knowledge.
  • observe:  To visually notice.
  • operate:  To cause systems to function or turn on with normal operating controls.
  • readily accessible:  A system or component that, in the judgment of the inspector, is capable of being safely observed without the removal of obstacles, detachment or disengagement of connecting or securing devices, or other unsafe or difficult procedures to gain access.
  • recreational facilities:  Spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment and athletic facilities.
  • report (verb form): To express, communicate or provide information in writing; give a written account of.  (See also inspection report.)
  • representative number:  A number sufficient to serve as a typical or characteristic example of the item(s) inspected.
  • residential property:  Four or fewer residential units.
  • residential unit:  A home; a single unit providing complete and independent living facilities for one or more persons, including permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking and sanitation.
  • safety glazing:  Tempered glass, laminated glass, or rigid plastic.
  • shut down:  Turned off, unplugged, inactive, not in service, not operational, etc.
  • structural component:  A component that supports non-variable forces or weights (dead loads) and variable forces or weights (live loads).
  • system:  An assembly of various components which function as a whole.
  • technically exhaustive:  A comprehensive and detailed examination beyond the scope of a real estate home inspection that would involve or include, but would not be limited to:  dismantling, specialized knowledge or training, special equipment, measurements, calculations, testing, research, analysis, or other means.
  • unsafe:  In the inspector's opinion, a condition of an area, system, component or procedure that is judged to be a significant risk of injury during normal, day-to-day use. The risk may be due to damage, deterioration, improper installation, or a change in accepted residential construction standards.
  • verify:  To confirm or substantiate.

 

These terms are found within the Standards of Practice.  Visit InterNACHI's full Glossary. 

 

 


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Comment
1.1.1 - General

Change Locks

Albanese Property Inspections LLC recommends that ALL locks and Security codes be changed before moving into the house.

2 - Roof

IN NI NP D
2.1 Coverings X X
2.2 Shingles X X
2.3 Flat X
2.4 Roof Drainage Systems X X
2.5 Flashings X X
2.6 Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations X X
2.7 Valleys X
Coverings: Material
Asphalt
Coverings: Roof Life Expectancy
Architectural Single 30 yrs
Shingles : Type of Shingle
Laminated or Architectural
Flashings: Material
Metal
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Roof Penetrations Observed
Plumbing Vent PVC, Vents
Inspection Method
Roof, Walked On Roof

The roof was accessed by ladder.  At the time of inspection the coverings and flashings appeared to be in good condition. Defects can occur at anytime.

Roof Type/Style
Gable, Flat, Combination
Overall condition

Roofing is in acceptable condition. The visual assessment of the roof revealed no apparent deficiencies at the time of the inspection. 

Coverings: Estimated Roof Age
15

Please refer to the seller's disclosure in reference to the roof system, age, condition, prior problems, etc. Only the property owner would have intimate, accurate knowledge of the roof system. For example, I can only guess the age. 

This inspection is not a guarantee that a roof leak in the future will not happen. Roofs leak. Even a roof that appears to be in good, functional condition may leak under certain circumstances. We will not take responsibility for a roof leak that happens in the future. This is not a warrantee or guarantee of the roof system.

Shingles : Visible Layers
One
Shingles : Representative Shingle Condition
Good

Shingle appear to be in good condition at the time of the inspection. Moderate granule accumulation in the gutter but nothing out of the ordinary for this age of roof. Very minimal cracking or weathering observed. 

Flat: Condition

Rolled composition - appears serviceable/ within useful life. 

Roof Drainage Systems: Roof Drainage System
Partial Gutter System
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Aluminum

Recommend to have gutters installed around entire house to direct water flow/runoff away from the foundation of the home. 

Recommend to clean out any/all gutters upon occupying the home. This will prevent water overflow into the ground causing soil erosion near the foundation.

Valleys : Condition

Satisfactory - The valleys appear to be in satisfactory condition.  

Albanese Property Inspections LLC Notes:

We are not professional roofers. Feel free to hire one prior to closing. 

We do our best to inspect the roof system within the time allotted. We inspect the roof covering, drainage systems, the flashings, the skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations. We are not required to inspect antennae, interiors of flues or chimneys which are not readily accessible, and other installed accessories. This is not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes. 

It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection. We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roof, and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy. 


The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain) would be needed to do so. Occupants should monitor the condition of roofing materials in the future. For older roofs, recommend that a professional inspect the roof surface, flashings, appurtenances, etc. annually and maintain/repair as might be required. If needed, the roofer should enter attic space(s). Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions perform adequately or are leak-free.


The report is not intended to be conclusive regarding the life span of the roofing system or how long it will remain watertight in the future. The inspection and report are based on visual and apparent conditions at the time of the inspection. Unless prolonged and extensive rain has fallen just prior to the inspection, it may not be possible to determine if active leakage is occurring. Even Then, numerous features may conceal active leakage. Usually not all attics are readily accessible for inspection. The client is advised to inquire about the presence of any roof leaks with the present owner.

IF Required, Only Qualified, License personnel Should Carry Out Any Repairs Needed.

All roofs require periodic maintenance to achieve typical lifespans, and should be inspected annually. Expect to make periodical repairs to any roof on a routine basis with replacement at the end of the roof's material Useful Service Life, which may not be equal to its Design Life.

CONCLUSIONS MADE BY THE INSPECTOR DO NOT CONSTITUTE A WARRANTY, GUARANTY, OR POLICY OF INSURANCE.


Standards of Practice: 

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
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Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Coverings

Exposed Nails

Nails are exposed on the roofs surface in one or more areas. These are areas that can be susceptible to water intrusion under the shingles and reaching the surface of the roof deck. Recommend monitoring as annual home maintenance and apply sealing around the nail heads with roofing cement/sealant to prevent this from possibly happening or further deteriorating in the future.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Coverings

Debris on roof - minor

Minor debris accumulation observed. Would recommend removing and cleaning debris from roof at least once a year to minimize moisture penetration issues. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Shingles

Granule Loss

There is granule loss on the shingles. Based on the age of this roof the granule loss is considered normal. It is recommended to have the roof evaluated by a certified roofing contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Debris

Debris has accumulated in the gutters. Recommend cleaning to facilitate water flow.

Here is a DIY resource for cleaning your gutters. 

$
Credit
Comment
2.4.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Downspouts Drain Near House

One or more downspouts drain too close to the home's foundation. This can result in excessive moisture in the soil at the foundation, which can lead to foundation/structural movement. Recommend a qualified contractor adjust downspout extensions to drain at least 6 feet from the foundation. 

Here is a helpful DIY link and video on draining water flow away from your house. 

$
Credit
Comment
2.4.3 - Roof Drainage Systems

Partial Gutter System

Less than 50% of the house had gutters installed. It is recommend that all areas of a home are protected by a gutter system. Gutters help direct water away from the homes foundation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - Flashings

No rubber boot flashing at roof penetrations

Improper caulking observed at roof penetrations. The lack of proper rubber boots could lead to water penetration and moisture issues at these locations. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.6.1 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Sealant Used Instead of Flashing

Sealant was used at one or more roof penetrations (e.g. pipes, vents, chimneys) rather than flashing. Sealant is not required for most roof penetrations when installations of such items are done professionally and per standard building practices. The presence of sealant suggests that work was performed by someone who was not a qualified contractor. The sealant will be a maintenance issue in the future since it must be renewed periodically. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair where necessary and per standard building practices. For example, by removing sealant and installing flashing.

Contractor Qualified Professional

3 - Exterior

IN NI NP D
3.1 Siding, Flashing & Trim X
3.2 Exterior Doors & Windows X X
3.3 Walkways, Patios & Driveways X X
3.4 Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps X
3.5 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X
3.6 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls X X
3.7 Fences/ Gate X
3.8 Landscaping X X
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Style
Stucco
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Wall Cover Condition
Appeared Serviceable
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Wall trim
Metal Materials
Exterior Doors & Windows : Exterior Entry Door
Wood
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Patio cover

Tin. 

Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Covered Porch, Patio
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Concrete

Concrete slab satisfactory. 

Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Site Grading

Gentle slope, Grade at foundation appears serviceable. 

Fences/ Gate: Type
Chain Link
Landscaping : Condition
Above Average
Inspection Method
Viewed from Ground
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway Material
Asphalt, Concrete
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Brick, Stucco
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Patio Material
Concrete
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Walkway Material
Brick, Concrete
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Patio structure
Metal with screens
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Soffit & Fascia Photos

Soffit and fascia in good condition at the time of the inspection. No deterioration at overhangs observed. 

Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Back patio covered

Indoor/ outdoor carpet covering the screened in patio section which is limiting the inspection of the concrete. 

We are not exterior experts. Feel free to hire an exterior contractor prior to closing. 

Water can be destructive and foster conditions that can be harmful to health. For this reason, the ideal property will have the ground around the foundation perimeter that slopes away from the residence about 6 inches for the first 10 feet from the foundation. And the interior floors will be several inches higher than the exterior grade. Also, the residence will have roof gutters and downspouts that discharge into drains or trays that carry or divert water away from the foundation. The sellers or occupants will have a more intimate knowledge of the site than we will have during our limited visit. Recommend asking the seller about water problems including but not limited to water puddles in the yard, gutter or downspout problems, water penetration into the lowest level of the structure, and drainage systems. Recommend closely monitoring and inspecting the exterior during a heavy rainstorm to observe the way the surface water is managed. Standing puddles near the house foundation are to be avoided.

Standards of Practice:

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Exterior Doors & Windows

Needs new/ updated weather stripping

Mutiple air gaps observed. Would recommend new weatherstripping to maximum the homes energy efficiency. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Driveway Cracking - Major

Major cracks observed. Recommend asphalt contractor evaluate and replace.

$
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Vegetation in contact with siding

Vegetation, shrubs, and/ or trees in close contact with the side of the property. Would recommend cutting and removing any such type of vegetation at least 10 feet from the house. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.8.1 - Landscaping

Overgrown Landscaping

The landscaping is overgrown. Some of the plants and shrubs could pose a safety hazard to young children or dogs. Please take care when traversing the backyard.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

IN NI NP D
4.1 Foundation X
4.2 Floor Structure X
4.3 Wall Structure X
4.4 Ceiling Structure X X
4.5 Beams/ Underlayment X
4.6 Crawlspace vapor retarder X
4.7 Moisture X
4.8 Recent movement X
4.9 Ventilation X
Inspection Method
Crawlspace Access, Visual
Foundation: Foundation Bolts
This inspection noted the presence of foundation bolts correctly used to secure the framing to the foundation.
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Dirt
Floor Structure: Material
Concrete, Wood Beams
Floor Structure: Sub-floor
Plywood
Wall Structure: Wall Structure

Wall material are concrete blocks. 

Beams/ Underlayment : Condition
Satisfactory

The beams installed appears to be in satisfactory condition. 

Moisture : Moisture observed
No
Recent movement : Condition

There is no evidence of any recent movement. 

Foundation: Material
Slab on Grade, Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU)

Concrete masonry units (CMU) laid in horizontal, interlocking rows. CMUs are generally 8”x16” and 8” wide

Ventilation : Condition

Satisfactory - The cross-ventilation in the crawlspace appears to be adequate. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Ceiling Structure

Evidence of Water Intrusion

Ceiling structure showed signs of water intrusion, which could lead to more serious structural damage. Recommend a qualified contractor identify source or moisture and remedy.

$
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Comment
4.4.2 - Ceiling Structure

Kitchen Area - Damaged Observed

Ceiling damage and past water damage observed. Would recommend further evaluation and repair by a qualified professional. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
4.4.3 - Ceiling Structure

Past Repairs

Underfloor/ Bathroom area - repair done in the past - cast iron/ PVC. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - HVAC

IN NI NP D
5.1 General X
5.2 Condensing Unit X X
5.3 Normal Operating Controls X
5.4 Air Handler X X
5.5 Ductwork/ Distribution X
5.6 Service Record X X
General: A/C Type
Split System, Central
General: Cooling source
Electric
General: Distribution
Flex Duct
General: Location
Exterior West, Garage
General: Heat Source
Electric
General: Heat Type
Forced Air
General: Last Service Date
Unknown
Condensing Unit: Condenser Serial #
0909748990
Condensing Unit: Estimated Age Condensing Unit
10 Year(s)
Condensing Unit: Good condition

The condensing unit was in good condition.

Condensing Unit: Unit size

3 ton

13 seer

Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location

Family room 

Air Handler: Air Handler Model #
ARUF363616BA
Air Handler: Air Handler Serial #
0907191206
Air Handler: Estimate Age Air Handler
10 Year(s)
Air Handler: Manufacturer
Goodman
Air Handler: Unit in Good Condition

The air handler appeared in good condition. The unit ran as expected. 

Air Handler: Coil/ Fin

Serviceable and in good condition. 

Ductwork/ Distribution : Ductwork

Flexible round 

Condensing Unit: Condenser Model #
GSC130361FA
Air Handler: Condensate line

Condensate line installed. 

General: Cooling SEER Rating
13 SEER

Modern standards call for at least 13 SEER rating for new install. 

Read more on energy efficient air conditioning at Energy.gov.

General: Filter Advice
Recommend that home buyers replace or clean HVAC filters upon taking occupancy depending on the type of filters installed. Regardless of the type, recommend checking filters monthly in the future and replacing or cleaning them as necessary. How frequently they need replacing or cleaning depends on the type and quality of the filter, how the system is configured (e.g. always on vs. "Auto"), and on environmental factors (e.g. pets, smoking, frequency of house cleaning, number of occupants, the season.
Condensing Unit: Manufacturer
Goodman
Normal Operating Controls: Condition

Good - electric thermostat controls for central heating and air conditioning are installed. Automatic controls were not tested or overridden. 

Air Handler: Filter Location
Wall

Filter shows signs of delayed maintenance. We recommend these filters to be changed or cleaned every 30 to 45 days for the best performance. 

Air Handler: Condensation

Condensation has built up at the top of the unit where the ductwork meets the air handler. This can be caused by a small air leak where the cool air is meeting the warmer room temperature, low pressure in the HVAC system, etc. Recommend and HVAC contractor to evaluate the systems pressure and the overall condition of the coils and pipes to ensure there is no refrigerant leaks.

Service Record : General:

The cooling system should be serviced every year by a HVAC professional technician. Make sure they record the service on a tag near the cooling system.

Standards Cooling System:

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage. 

Standards Heating System:

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

Not inspected: 

The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Condensing Unit

Loose anchor tie down

The anchor tie down points have become loose. The unit tilts and wobbles under slight pressure. Recommend further evaluation and repair. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Air Handler

Wet stains

Below the air handler there are stains that are wet when checked with a moisture meter. The unit was ran and no signs of moisture leaking was evident. This may be from a recent leak. The air handler should be evaluated and monitored in the future to help prevent damage from moisture leaking.


Condensation drain may have recently backed up and leaked.

$
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Service Record

No Visible Service Tag

There is no visible recent-service tag on the air conditioning system. Possibly indicating delayed maintenance. Recommend having the system cleaned, inspected, and serviced by an HVAC professional.

Contractor Qualified Professional

6 - Plumbing

IN NI NP D
6.1 Main Water Shut-off Device X
6.2 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
6.3 Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures X
6.4 Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents X X
6.5 Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems X
6.6 Water Pressure X
Filters
None
Water Source
Public
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Drain Size
Unknown
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material
Cast iron
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Distribution Material
Copper
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Supply Material
Galvanized
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Capacity
30
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Energy Source
Electric
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Estimated Age
10 Years
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Garage
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
Bradford White
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Overall condition

Appears serviceable, no leaks observed. TPR valve noted but not tested. 

Main Water Shut-off Device: Meter location
South

Shut off located front elevation of the property 

Main Water Shut-off Device: Main shutoff valve
West

Located at the west side elevation of the property. 

Main Water Shut-off Device: Fire Hydrant Proximity

75ft from property 

Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water supply condition

No leakage observed, but monitor in the future. Water leaks can occur at any time. 

Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Timer
The water heater energy usage (read electric bill), could be significantly reduced by the installation of a water heater timer device.
1. Studies by the Florida Solar Energy Center and major electric companies, confirm that an electric heater accounts for some 1/3 of a typical homes electric power bill(i.e.-of a typical $ 150 monthly bill-some 1/3 or about $ 50, is attributable to the electric water heater}. Farther, these studies confirm that the installation of a water heater timer can reduce the unit's energy consumption by some 50% (i.e.-in this example by some $ 25 a month- every month---FOREVER !
2. A hot water timer is similar (but different) from a pool or a sprinkler system timer that controls the time the hot water heater is allowed to be "ON" and therefore it also controls the amount of electricity the unit consumes.
3) It is our opinion that you have a routine life style, therefore is very little economic sense to require the water heater to be "ON" and consuming electrical energy during the later night and early morning hours, when it could be atomically be turned "OFF" by a water heater timer. Similarly, you may desire the unit to be "OFF" during the mid day hours. The installation and adjustment of an electric water heaters thermostat is possible to accomplish by a handy and safety conscious homeowner. However the installation requires the opening of the unit's electrical service. This will expose hazardous live electrical connections- which can TAKE YOUR LIFE via electrocution. For safety's sake work on ALL electrical appliances with the power disconnected. If you have questions what so ever, please consult with a qualified electrical appliance specialist.
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Type
Tank
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Water Shut-Off Valve & Connectors

The water shut-off valve to the water heater tank is installed. Not leaking. 

This valve turns off the cold water supply to the tank. Good.

Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: TPR valve

The temperate pressure relief valve at the upper portion of the water heater is a required safety valve which should be connected to a drain line of proper size terminating just above the floor elevation. If no drain is located in the floor a catch pan should be installed with a drain extending to a safe location. The steam caused by a blow-off can cause scalding. Improper installations should be corrected. 

Water Pressure : Condition

Water pressure from 40 to 80 pounds per square inch is considered within normal/ acceptable range. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

No Expansion Tank 2012

No expansion tank was present.  Expansion tanks allow for the thermal expansion of water in the pipes. These have been required in certain areas for new installs or replacement since 2012. Recommend a qualified plumber evaluate and install.

$
Credit
Comment
6.4.2 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

No TPR catch pain or drain

TPR should discharge into a catch pan or drain. Neither was observed. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

7 - Electrical

IN NI NP D
7.1 Service Entrance Conductors X X
7.2 Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device X X
7.3 Grounding X
7.4 Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses X
7.5 Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles X X
7.6 GFCI & AFCI X X
7.7 Smoke Detectors X X
7.8 Carbon Monoxide Detectors X
7.9 Ceiling fans X X
7.10 Electrical outlets X X
Meter
One Meter, West Side
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Overhead
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Garage
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Capacity
Unknown
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Manufacturer
Federal Pacific
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker, Fuses
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Location
Garage
Grounding : Grounding Location

Grounded via connection to metallic water pipe. 

Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Not Visible
Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: General
Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Kitchen Interior

All light fixtures serviceable at the time of the inspection. 

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Bathroom Interior

Bathroom lights and switches serviceable at the time of the inspection. 

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Master Bath

Functional 

Ceiling fans : Condition

All ceiling fans are operational. 

Electrical outlets: Exterior walls

Grounded type outlets appear to be properly grounded. 

Electrical outlets: Garage

Outlets appear functional 

Electrical outlets: General Condition
Outdated
Meter Condition

The meter box exterior appears functional. No major rust or damage. Not loose. Good. 

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Disconnect Location

Located at the exterior of the west side of the property. System is outdated and needs to be updated. 

Electrical outlets: Interior outlets

Grounded type outlets appear to be properly grounded.

We are not electricians. Feel free to hire an electrician prior to closing. 

If we feel that it is safe enough to open the electrical panel, we will check the interior components of service panels and sub panels, the conductors, and the over-current protection devices. Inside the house, we will check a representative number of installed lighting fixtures, switches, and receptacles. This is not an exhaustive inspection of every component and installation detail. There will be receptacles and switches and lights that we will not have time to inspect. Ask property owner about all of the wall switches. Therefore, it is essential that any recommendations that we may make for correction should be completed before the close of escrow, because an electrician could reveal other problems or recommend repairs. 


The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician. 

Standards:

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Service Entrance Conductors

Mast Improperly Installed

Mast is not properly installed. Weather head should be at least 3ft above the roof. 

$
Credit
Comment
7.2.1 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Outdated system

Electrical system appears outdated by today’s standards. Upgrade to be considered. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.2.2 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Double taps

Double taps observed in the electrical panel. Highly recommend fixing by a qualified electrician. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.2.3 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Loose Screws

One or more screws are loose attaching the dead front cover to the panel. All four screws need to be fully secured in order to minimize any safety risks. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Switches Installed Improperly

One or more switches are installed improperly. Master bedroom closet has a light switch with no known fixture source. Recommend licensed electrician repair or replace.

$
Credit
Comment
7.5.2 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Unsafe light switch location

Non GFCI protected electrical switch in close proximately to shower area. Recommend further evaluation and correction by a licensed electrician. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.6.1 - GFCI & AFCI

No GFCI Protection Installed

No GFCI protection present in all locations. Recommend licensed electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles in all locations.

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. 

$
Credit
Comment
7.7.1 - Smoke Detectors

Inappropriate Location

Smoke detector effectiveness may be compromised due to location. Recommend relocating according to manufacturers instructions.
$
Credit
Comment
7.7.2 - Smoke Detectors

Additional smoke detectors

We suggest additional smoke detectors to be installed in appropriate locations. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.9.1 - Ceiling fans

Outdated hardware

Outdated ceiling fan switch installed. Would recommend updating this system. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.10.1 - Electrical outlets

Exterior outlet missing weather cover.

Recommend further evaluation and replacement by a qualified professional. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
7.10.2 - Electrical outlets

Non functional outlet

Outlet non functional in living room. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.10.3 - Electrical outlets

Loose outlet connection

Loose connection to wall could pose a safety hazard. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified professional. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

8 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

IN NI NP D
8.1 Attic X X
8.2 Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement) X
8.3 Ventilation X
8.4 Exhaust Systems X
Dryer Power Source
Electric
Dryer Vent
Metal (Flex)
Flooring Insulation
None
Attic: R-value
38
Attic: Size
Full Size
Attic: Roof to wall attachment
Toe nail
Attic: Insulation Depth

15 inches 

Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Soffit Vents
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans
Fan with Light
Attic: Inspection Method

Attic Access

The method used to inspect the structure of the home.

Attic: Insulation Type
Cellulose
Attic: Structure

A rafter system is installed in the attic cavity to support the roof decking. The rafter spacing is 16 inch on center. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Attic

Exposed electrical connection

Exposed electrical connection observed outside of a junction box. This could pose a fire hazard. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

9 - Doors, Windows & Interior

IN NI NP D
9.1 Doors X X
9.2 Windows X X
9.3 Floors X X
9.4 Walls X
9.5 Ceilings X
9.6 Steps, Stairways & Railings X X
9.7 Countertops & Cabinets X
9.8 Closets X
Doors: Condition

Overall door condition is serviceable. 

Windows: Window Manufacturer
Unknown
Windows: Window Type
Double-hung, Awning
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Laminate
Doors: Doors Inspected

I inspected a representative number of doors according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate door locks and door stops, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 



Windows: Overall condition

A representative sampling was taken. Windows as a grouping are generally operational. 

Floors: Floor Coverings
Hardwood, Tile
Walls: Wall Material
Drywall
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Plaster
Steps, Stairways & Railings: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 


All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a minimum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 



I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

Not Inspected:

The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Carpeting and flooring, when installed over concrete slabs, may conceal moisture. If dampness wicks through a slab and is hidden by floor coverings that moisture can result in unhygienic conditions, odors or problems that will only be discovered when/if the flooring is removed. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Doors

Doorbell not functioning

Doorbell does not function properly. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.1.2 - Doors

Locking hardware- Master bath

Master bathroom locking hardware needs adjustment or replacement. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Windows

Damaged

One or more windows appears to have general damage, but are operational. Recommend a window professional clean, lubricate & adjust as necessary.
$
Credit
Comment
9.2.2 - Windows

Combination of New & Old

Old and new windows installed next to one another in one or more locations. Would recommend evaluation and further investigation into its reasoning. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Floors

Uneven areas noted

Uneven areas noted

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.3.2 - Floors

Hardwood tripping hazard

Hardwood shows moderate to heavy wear and poses a moderate tripping hazard in areas. Overall the condition of the floors was observed to be serviceable. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Hardwood interior steps tripping hazard

Uneven steps leading from family room to bedroom hallway could pose a safety issue due to the difference in riser height. 

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10 - Bathrooms

IN NI NP D
10.1 Bathtub X
10.2 Cabinets X
10.3 Electrical X X
10.4 Exhaust Fan X X
10.5 Flooring X
10.6 Shower X X
10.7 Sink/countertop X
10.8 Toilets X X
10.9 Wall X
Cabinets: Condition
Serviceable
Exhaust Fan: Ventilation

Only a window is provided for ventilation. 

Flooring: Material
Tile
Flooring: Condition

Tile is in good condition. 

Sink/countertop: Countertop Condition

Serviceable 

Wall: Condition

Shower walls/ tub appear serviceable 

Bathtub : Running water

Running water

Shower: Running water
Sink/countertop: Running water and under sink area

Plumbing is in good condition. Hot and cold  water both observed. No noticeable drop in pressure when running water from two or more fixtures. 

Toilets: Toilets Inspected

I flushed all of the toilets. All toilets drained in a timely manner. Water shut off valves observed on all toilets. 

We are not plumbers. Feel free to hire a plumber prior to closing. 

All bathroom fixtures, including toilets, tubs, showers, and sinks are inspected. Approximately 15 minutes of water is run at each fixture. Readily visible water-supply and drain pipes are inspected. Plumbing access panels are opened, if readily accessible and available to open. Normal foot pressure is applied around the base of each toilet, tub, and shower to check for deteriorated flooring. Normal hand pressure is applied carefully to the walls of each shower to check for deterioration. Re-grouting and sealant around the tub shower, and fixtures should be considered routine maintenance. We do not perform water leak tests on drain lines or shower pans. We simply look for active leaks, which is quite limited by our short time in the property

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Electrical

GFCI Missing

One or more electric receptacles at the bathroom(s) had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:

Outdoors (since 1973)
Bathrooms (since 1975)
Garages (since 1978)
Kitchens (since 1987)
Crawl spaces and unfinished basements (since 1990)
Wet bar sinks (since 1993)
Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005)
$
Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Exhaust Fan

Exhaust fans not installed

Exhaust fans were not installed in one or more bathrooms. Recommend having exhaust fans installed to remove excess moisture from the bathrooms when in use by a licensed electrical contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
10.6.1 - Shower

Shower head loose

The master bathroom shower head and connected plumbing is loose and wobbles under pressure. One or more bolts most likely have come loose. This could lead to unseen water damage. Recommend further evaluation and repair. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
10.8.1 - Toilets

Toilet tank loose connection

Master bathrooms toilet tank is loose and wobbles under a small load. If the tank breaks off while in use it could lead to body harm and/ or water damage in this area. Recommend further evaluation and correction by a licensed plumber. 

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11 - Kitchen

IN NI NP D
11.1 Cabinets X
11.2 Countertops-Backsplash X
11.3 Electrical X
11.4 Flooring X
11.5 Appliances X
11.6 Fixtures & Drain X
Cabinets: Condition
Serviceable
Appliances : Dishwasher

Operational 

Appliances : Microwave

Serviceable 

Fixtures & Drain: Condition
Serviceable
Fixtures & Drain: Garbage disposal
No
Countertops-Backsplash: Countertop Material
Formica (plastic laminate)
Flooring: Flooring

Tile flooring throughout kitchen. No defects observed. 

Appliances : Refrigerator

No water line installed, older model. 

Fixtures & Drain: Water test

Hot and cold both serviceable. 

Cabinets: Material
Wood
Electrical: GFCI protection

It is recommended that all electrical outlets be protected by GFCI in all wet areas of the kitchen to include countertops, bars, behind refrigerator, and under sink. GFCI was not present under sink.

Appliances : Range/ Cooktop/ Oven

Electric - older model. 

Appliances : Ventilation

Microwave exhaust observed in working condition. 

Fixtures & Drain: Kitchen Sink

Stainless steel - under sink P-trap appears serviceable. No leaks detected at this time. Leaks can occur and develop at anytime please monitor in the future. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies

12 - Laundry

IN NI NP D
12.1 General X
General: Laundry receptacle
General: Dryer Manufacturer
Whirlpool
General: Washer Manufacturer
Whirlpool
General: Dryer Observation
The dryer unit was operated through a cycle. It heated it's drum and then stopped at the end of the cycle.
General: Dryer Operation
We normally operate Clothes Dryers without a wash load (i.e. we run the unit through its full cycle empty). This gives us an idea of the unit's functionality, but we caution you, it does NOT replicate operating the unit fully loaded with a heavy wash load.
General: Washer Observation
Both hot and cold water was available to the washer. The unit was operated through a full cycle. It filled, cycled through a wash, initial spin and drain, rinse and final spin cycle. No leakage was detected and there were no unusual conditions noted.

MAINTENANCE TIP:
For equipment more than a few years old, we recommend that all clothes washer machine hoses and their gaskets be replaced upon your taking possession of the unit.
General: Washer Operation
We normally operate Clothes Washers without a wash load (i.e we run the unit through its full cycle empty). This gives us an idea of the unit's functionality, but we caution you, it does not replicate the unit fully loaded with a heavy wash load.
General: Dryer Vent
Provided - vents to the outside

LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT:
Cautionary Statement; We normally operate on-site laundry equipment. Washers and dryers have special safety concerns to owners. During our inspection, we attempt to check the utility connections, supply of hot and cold water, grounded electrical receptacles and some safety devices. During our inspection we endeavor to verify that the equipments operates properly, however we do NOT verify the proper operation of ALL safety devices and other built in safe guards. This is a job for an appliance specialist.

Please be aware that with any appliance being used everyday, owners often forget, or over look the potential hazards that are present in these day-to-day helpmates. All laundry equipment operates both with electricity and high speed motors and rotating drums. Because of the combination of water and electricity along with high-speed rotation, all laundry equipment should be respected. PLEASE SECURE ALL OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MANUALS FROM PRESENT OWNERS OR THE MANUFACTURERS. Virtually all manufacturers have this consumers information available to you-contact the respective manufacturer.

Please instruct all children that these appliances are potentially hazardous and they should not be played with, nor should anyone under any circumstances, place a hand inside any operating laundry equipment.

LIMITATIONS OF APPLIANCES INSPECTION:

As we discussed and is described in your inspection contract, this is a visual limited in scope by (but not restricted to) the following conditions.

Thermostats, timers and other specialized features and controls are not tested.

The temperature calibration, functionality of timers, effectiveness, efficiency and overall performance of appliances is outside the scope of this inspection.

Please refer to the pre-inspection contract for a detailed explanation of the scope of this inspection.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies

13 - Garage or Carport

IN NI NP D
13.1 Ceiling X
13.2 Floor X
13.3 Walls & Firewalls X
13.4 Garage Door X
13.5 Garage Door Opener X
13.6 Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home) X X
13.7 Roof X
Ceiling: Condition
Serviceable
Garage Door: Material
Metal
Garage Door: Type
Sliding
Garage Door: # of Doors
1
Roof: Condition
Serviceable - same as house
Type
Attached, Garage, One car
Floor: Condition
Concrete - serviceable
Walls & Firewalls: Condition
Serviceable
Notes

We do not evaluate or measure the fire-ratings of the drywall/plaster in the garage or the rating of the door between the garage and the house. Different cities require different ratings. Ideally, there should be a 5/8-inch Type X drywall or equivalent on the walls and ceiling that separate the garage from habitable rooms. And a 20-minute fire-rated door separating the house and garage. We check for breaches of the firewall. We do not pressure test the garage door openers. 


VEHICLE DOOR: safety tips:

1. The garage door is the largest moving object in the home. It can weigh hundreds of pounds. Often it is supported with spring tension Both the weight of the door itself and the condition of these powerful springs can be dangerous on their own. Combined these two items can become a potentially lethal item. During our inspection, we attempt to inspect vehicle doors for proper operation. 

2. Operation of the safety mechanisms should be verified monthly. Switches for door openers should be located as high as practical to prevent children from playing with the door. Children should be warned of the potential risk of injury.

3. Regular lubrication of the garage door tracks, rollers, springs and mounting hardware is recommended. Consult the owners manual or contact the door/opener manufacture. www.overheaddoor.com/Pages/safety-information.aspx

Ceiling: Under roof storage

A larger storage area located above the garage was observed. 

Garage Door: Condition
Manual, Appeared Serviceable
Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Fire rated door

There is a fire rated door separating the garage from the living areas of the house. 

Walls & Firewalls: Personal items in garage

The large amount of personal items in the garage prevented the inspector from conducting a full inspection of this area. 

Garage Door Opener: No garage door motor present
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
13.6.1 - Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home)

Not Self-closing

Door from garage to home should have self-closing hinges to help prevent spread of a fire to living space. Recommend a qualified contractor install self-closing hinges. 

DIY Resource Link.

14 - WDO

IN NI NP D
14.1 Termite Evidence X X
Notice:

We are not pest control experts. All statements made regarding the presence of pests should be verified by a qualified pest control company. We try our best to locate and point out any evidence of WDO (wood destroying organisms). 



  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
14.1.1 - Termite Evidence

Evidence of termites

Termite wings observed on multiple window sills and counter tops. Recommend further evaluation and correction by a pest control expert. 

Read for more information regarding termites: https://www.nachi.org/Termites.htm



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