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1234 Main St.
Boone, NC 28607
04/08/2020 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
75
Items Inspected
12
Minor concerns/update items
33
Moderate concerns/maintenance items
13
Major defects/safety hazards

HOW TO READ THIS REPORT

Defects are organized into 3 categories within the report:

Minor Concerns/Update Items: These items are very minor issues or improvements that can usually be addressed by the homeowner or a handyman. These items may also include outdated systems that function properly but are beyond service life. (items will not appear in summary page).

Moderate Concerns/Maintenance Items: These items are more serious and may effect the functionally of the component or system. These also include items that are in need of normal maintenance and service.  Repairs should be performed by a qualified professional.

Major Defects/Safety Hazards: These items consist of major defects or damage to systems and components.  These items may also be safety hazards that can cause personal injury.  Any repairs should be conducted by a licensed professional and may be more expensive.


It is strongly advised that all updates or repairs be performed by a licensed professional of the component or system.    


ITEMS NOT INSPECTED/LIMITATIONS

There are items that are not inspected in a home inspection including, but not limited to; fences and gates, pools and spas, outbuildings or any other detached structure, storm doors and storm windows, screens, window AC units, central vacuum systems, water softeners, alarm and intercom systems, and any item that is not a permanently attached component of the home. Also drop ceiling tiles are not removed unless water damage is visible, as they are easily damaged, and this is a non-invasive inspection. Subterranean systems are also excluded, such as but not limited to: sewer lines, septic tanks, water delivery systems, and underground fuel storage tanks. 

Water and gas shut off valves are not operated under any circumstances. As well, any component or appliance that is unplugged or "shut off" is not turned on or connected for the sake of evaluation. I don't have knowledge of why a component may be shut down, and can't be liable for damages that may result from activating said components / appliances. 

Also not reported on are the causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; Any component or system that was not observed; Calculate the strength, adequacy, design or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility. 

Lastly a home inspection does not address environmental concerns including, but not limited to: Asbestos, lead, lead based paint, radon (unless requested), mold, wood destroying organisms (termites, etc), cockroaches, rodents, pesticides, fungus, treated lumber, Chinese drywall, mercury, or carbon monoxide.

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client
Occupancy
Furnished
Style
Mountain
Type of Building
Single Family
Weather Conditions
Clear, Recent Snow/Ice
Temperature (approximate)
32 Fahrenheit (F)
Main Entrance Faces
West

.1102 STANDARDS OF PRACTICE
This Section sets forth the minimum standards of practice required of licensed home inspectors. In
this Section, the term “home inspectors” means licensed home inspectors.

.1103 PURPOSE AND SCOPE
(a)   Home  inspections  performed  according  to  this  Section  shall  provide  the  client  with
 an  understanding  of  the  property conditions, as inspected at the time of the home inspection.
(b)  Home inspectors shall:
(1) provide a written contract, signed by the client, before the home inspection is performed that
shall:
(A) State that the home inspection is in accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North
Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board as set forth in this Section;
(B) State what services shall be provided and the cost; and
(C) When an inspection is for only one or a limited number of systems or components, state that the
inspection is limited to only those systems or components;
(2) inspect readily visible and readily accessible installed systems and components described in
Rules .1106 through
.1115 of this Section;
(3) submit a written report, pursuant to G.S. 143-151.58(a), to the client that shall:
(A)  Describe  those  systems  and  components  required  to  be  described  in  Rules  .1106  
through  .1115  of  this Section;
(B) State which systems and components present at the home and designated for inspection in this
Section were not inspected, and the reason for not inspecting;
(C)  State any systems or components inspected that do not function as intended, allowing for
normal wear and tear, or appear not to function as intended, based upon documented tangible
evidence;
(D)  Describe  each  system  or  component,  pursuant  to  Part  (b)(3)(C)  of  this  Rule;  state  
how  the  condition  is defective; explain the implications of defective conditions reported; and
direct the client to a course of action for repair, monitoring, or further investigation by a
specialist;
(E)  State the name, license number, and signature of the person conducting the inspection.
(4) submit a summary page(s) pursuant to G.S. 143-151.58(a1).
(c)  Home inspectors may:
(1)          report observations and conditions, including safety or habitability concerns, or
render opinions of items in addition to those required in Paragraph (b) of this Rule; or
(2)          exclude systems and components from the inspection if requested by the client, and so
stated in the written contract.

.1104 GENERAL LIMITATIONS
(a) Home inspections done in accordance with this Section are not technically exhaustive.
(b) This Section applies to buildings with four or fewer dwelling units, and individually owned
residential units within
multi-family buildings, and their attached garages or carports.

.1105 GENERAL EXCLUSIONS:
(a) Home inspectors are not required to report on:
(1)      Life expectancy of any component or system;
(2)      The causes of the need for a repair;
(3)      The methods, materials, and costs of corrections;
(4)      The suitability of the property for any specialized use;
(5)      Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements, or
restrictions;
(6)      The market value of the property or its marketability;
(7)      The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property;
(8)      Any component or system that was not inspected;
(9)      The presence or absence of pests such as wood damaging organisms, rodents, or insects; or
(10)    Cosmetic damage, underground items, or items not installed; or
(11)    The presence or absence of systems installed to control or remove suspected hazardous
substances listed in Subparagraph (b)(7) of this Rule.
(b) Home inspectors are not required to:
(1)      Offer warranties or guarantees of any kind;
(2)      Calculate the strength, adequacy, or efficiency of any system or component;
(3)      Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or
be dangerous to or adversely affect the health or safety of the home inspector or other persons;
(4)      Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable;
(5)      Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls;
(6)      Move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris
that obstructs access or visibility;
(7)      Determine  the  presence  or  absence  of  any  suspected  adverse  environmental  
condition  or  hazardous substance, including  mold, toxins, carcinogens, noise, contaminants in
the building or in soil, water, and air;
(8)      Determine the effectiveness of any system installed to control or remove suspected
hazardous substances;
(9)      Determine House Energy Ratings (HER), insulation R values, system or component
efficiencies;
(10)    Inspect heat recovery and similar whole house ventilation systems;
(11)    Predict future condition, including failure of components;
(12)    Project operating costs of components;
(13)    Evaluate acoustical characteristics of any system or component;
(14)    Inspect equipment or accessories that are not listed as components to be inspected in this
Section; or
(15)    Disturb insulation, except as required in Rule .1114 of this Section.
(c) Home inspectors shall not:
(1)      Offer or perform any act or service contrary to law; or
(2)      Offer  or  perform  engineering,  architectural,  plumbing,  electrical,  or  any  other  
job  function  requiring  an occupational  license  in  the  jurisdiction  where  the  inspection  
is  taking  place,  unless  the  home  inspector holds a valid  occupational license.  In that  
case the  home inspector shall inform the client that the  home inspector  is  so  licensed,  and  
therefore  qualified  to  go  beyond  this  Section  and  perform  additional
inspections beyond those within the scope of the Standards of Practice.

.1116 CODE OF ETHICS
(a)   Licensees shall discharge their duties with fidelity to the public and to their clients, with
fairness and impartiality to all.
(b)   Opinions expressed by licensees shall be based only on their education, experience, and
honest convictions.
(c)   A licensee shall not disclose any information about the results of an inspection without the
approval of the client for whom the inspection was performed, or the client’s representative.
(d)   No licensee shall accept compensation or any other consideration from more than one
interested party for the same service without the written consent of all interested parties.
(e)   No licensee shall compensate, either financially or through other services or benefits,
realty agents or other parties with a financial interest in closing or settlement of real estate
transactions for the following:
(1)   Referral of inspections; or
(2)   Inclusion on a list of recommended inspectors or preferred providers.
(f)   No licensee shall express, within the context of an inspection, an appraisal or opinion of
the market value of the inspected property.
(g)   Before the execution of a contract to perform a home inspection, a licensee shall disclose to
the client any interest he or she has in a business that may create a conflict of interest for the
home inspector. No licensee shall allow his or her interest in any business to affect the quality
or results of the inspection work that the licensee may be called upon to perform.
(h)   A licensee shall not solicit for repairs of systems or components found defective in the
course of a home inspection performed by the licensee or that licensee’s company.
(i)   Licensees shall not engage in false or misleading advertising or otherwise misrepresent any
matters to the public.
(j)   Licensees shall not inspect properties under contingent arrangements whereby any compensation
or future referrals are dependent on reported findings or on the sale of a property.
(k)   A licensee shall not impugn the professional reputation or practice of another home
inspector, nor criticize another inspector’s reports.


2 - Grounds

Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Stoop/Steps, Multi Level deck
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Wood
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway/Parking Area Material
Gravel
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Walkway/Patio Material
Pavers
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Retaining Wall
Concrete Block
Snow/ice covered
Parking area, stairs, roof

Exterior Surfaces are covered with snow/ice.  These areas could not be seen to be fully inspected.

Multi-level Deck

This home has an attached multi-level deck.  This structure is beyond the scope of a home inspection as it requires extensive engineering for construction.  While it is inspected for common defects, you may wish to have a structural engineer evaluate the structure before closing.

$
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Negative Grading
West Wall

Grading is sloping towards the home in some areas. This could lead to water intrusion and foundation issues. Recommend qualified landscaper or foundation contractor evaluate to ensure that water flows away from home or is otherwise controlled.


Here is a helpful article discussing negative grading. 


Note: Home inspectors have no way of knowing if adequate drain systems are installed below grade. You may wish to verify with the seller if a drain system is installed and whether or not they have had water intrusion issues.

Triangle Grading Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.2 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Tree Overhang

Trees observed overhanging the roof. This can cause damage to the roof and prevent proper drainage. Recommend a qualified tree service trim any overhanging branches. 

Yard scissors Tree Service
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.3 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Leaning Retaining Wall
SW Retaining wall

Retaining wall appears to be leaning and showing signs of deterioration. This is an indication of inadequate construction, deteriorating from age or overwhelming pressure on the wall. Over time, the wall may continue to lean and potentially fail. A landscaping professional is recommended to evaluate further.

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.4 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Failed Retaining Wall
Lower Parking area retaining wall

The retaining wall has failed and no longer functions as originally intended. A general contractor is recommended to repair/replace as needed to ensure adequate drainage and prevent potential safety hazards.

Hardhat General Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.5 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Improper drainage/wash out
North Wall

There appears to be one or more areas of inadequate drainage indicated by wash out next to exterior walls and/or around deck footings. A grading professional is recommended to evaluate further to repair/replace wash out areas and improve drainage around the home.

Triangle Grading Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck

The multi-level deck has several areas of concern including but not limited to:

No lateral support or bracing,

Wall anchors improperly installed through siding,

Upper level deck and roof structure supported by cantilever,

Support posts installed on retaining wall, 

Structure leaning heavily away from home,

4x4 support posts used to support upper deck and roof structure,

rims and bands nailed to 4x4 posts instead of bearing directly on top of posts,

Improperly installed roof support structure.

These Items are serious structural concerns and safety hazards that may lead to structure failure.  A structural engineer is recommended to evaluate further and provide a course of action for repair/replacement/modification as needed.

House construction Structural Engineer
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.2 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Stairs

The exterior stair structures have serious areas of concern, including but not limited to:

Missing handrail and balusters,

no center stringer,

Missing footers,

Heavy leaning to one side,

inadequate attachment and support structure,

exposed footers from wash out,

Stairs detaching from landing with no bottom stringer support,

missing, damaged and overall inadequate footings,

These items are serious structural and safety concerns which could lead to trip hazards and structural failure.  A structural engineer is recommended to evaluate further and provide a course of action for repair/replacement/modification as needed.


Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.3 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Front stoop

The front stoop has detached from the house and has overall inadequate/improper construction.  This is a serious safety and structural concern.  Replacement by a qualified contractor is recommended.

Hardhat General Contractor

3 - Exterior

Inspection Method
Visual
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Wood
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Style
Panels
Wall Structure: Wall Construction
Framed

.1107 EXTERIOR
(a) The home inspector shall inspect:
(1)      Wall cladding, flashings, and trim;
(2)      Entryway doors and a representative number of windows;
(3)      Garage door operators;
(4)      Decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches, and appurtenant railings;
(5)      Eaves, soffits, and fascias;
(6)      Driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls; and
(7)      Vegetation, grading, and drainage with respect only to their effect on the condition of
the building.
(b) The home inspector shall:
(1)      Describe wall cladding materials;
(2)      Operate all entryway doors;
(3)      Operate garage doors manually or by using installed controls for any garage door operator;
(4)      Report whether or not any garage door operator will automatically reverse or stop when
meeting reasonable resistance during closing; and
(5)      Probe exterior wood components where deterioration is suspected.
(c) The home inspector is not required to inspect:
(1)      Storm windows, storm doors, screening, shutters, and awnings;
(2)      Fences;
(3)      For the presence of safety glazing in doors and windows;
(4)      Garage door operator remote control transmitters;
(5)      Geological conditions;
(6)      Soil conditions;
(7)      Recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis
courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities), except as
otherwise required in 11 NCAC 8.1109(d)(5)(F);
(8)      Detached buildings or structures; or
(9)      For the presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks.                                      

$
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding

The exterior wood siding, trim and flashing has several areas of deterioration evident.  Over time, these areas will continue to deteriorate and allow further damage, organic growth, and/or water entry.  A siding professional is recommended to evaluate and repair/replace as needed.  Hidden damage may be present.

Siding Siding Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Fascia - Damaged
West and North Walls

Several sections of the fascia are damaged do to excessive water exposure and lack of maintenance. Recommend qualified professional evaluate, determine cause and repair/replace as needed to prevent further deterioration.  Hidden damage will be present under gutter.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Displaced Soffit
West and north walls

The soffit is displaced areas at the eaves of the home. This can promote pest and water intrusion and damage in these areas. Securely replacing the displaced areas is recommended.  Hidden damage may be present.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Roof

Inspection Method
Binoculars, Ground
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Layers
1 layer
Estimated Age
20+ years
Coverings: Material
Metal (lapped seam)
Roof Drainage Systems, Gutters: Gutter Material
Seamless Aluminum
Flashings: Material
Aluminum
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Chimny Roof Penetration
None
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Penetrations
Plumbing Vents, Power mast
Snow/ice covered

The roof is partially covered with snow/ice.  It could not be seen to be fully inspected.  Roofing professional is recommended to fully evaluate the roof before closing.

.1108 ROOFING
(a) The home inspector shall inspect:
(1)      Roof coverings;
(2)      Roof drainage systems;
(3)      Flashings;
(4)      Skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and
(5)      Signs of' leaks or abnormal condensation on building components.
(b) The home inspector shall:
(1)      Describe the type of roof covering materials; and
(2)      Report the methods used to inspect the roofing.
(c) The home inspector is not required to:
(1)      Walk on the roofing; or
(2)      Inspect attached accessories including solar systems, antennae, and lightning arrestors.

$
Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Coverings

Roof-Older

The installed roofing material appears to be older. Metal roofs have a typical service life of 50+ years with proper maintenance.  Because of the age of the roof and the state of the rest of the home, a roofing contractor is recommended to evaluate further and determine its remaining useful life as well as perform any needed maintenance.

Roof Roofing Professional
$
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Roof Drainage Systems, Gutters

Downspouts Drain Near House
NE Corner

One or more downspouts drain too close to the home's foundation and/or deck support footings. This can result in excessive moisture in the soil at the foundation, which can lead to foundation/structural movement and water entry. Recommend a qualified professional adjust downspout extensions to drain at least 6 feet from the foundation. 

Here is a helpful DIY link and video on draining water flow away from your house. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Roof Drainage Systems, Gutters

Gutter Damaged

Gutters were damaged/dented/sagging. This can result in overflow and excessive moisture in the soil at the foundation, which can lead to water intrusion foundation/structural movement.  It can also damage wood components below and promote water entry.  Recommend a gutter contractor evaluate and repair. 

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
4.2.3 - Roof Drainage Systems, Gutters

Gutters Missing

There are no gutters present in one or more areas on the structure.  Gutters are recommended because they collect rain water from the roof and direct it away form the building. With no gutters in place, rainwater can fall at the soil directly below deck support footers and foundation walls. This can soften the soil and cause potential structural concerns or water entry. A gutter professional is recommended to install gutters.

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
4.2.4 - Roof Drainage Systems, Gutters

Gutter missing end cap
NW Corner

The gutter has a missing end cap.  A gutter professional is recommended to properly install the end cap to ensure adequate water control.

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor

5 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Exterior Doors: Exterior Entry Door
Fiberglass, Glass, Hollow Core, Wood
Exterior Doors: Sliding Doors
None
Windows: Window Manufacturer
Unknown
Windows: Window Type
Double-hung, Thermal
Walls: Wall Material
Paneling
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Popcorn, Sheetrock
Floors: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Hardwood, Tile, Vinyl
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Laminate
Furnished

This home is fully or partially furnished.  Furniture and other items may conceal potential defects that could not be seen or reported.  

.1113 INTERIORS
(a) The home inspector shall inspect:
(1) Walls, ceiling, and floors;
(2) Steps, stairways, balconies, and railings;
(3) Counters and a representative number of built-in cabinets; and
(4) A representative number of doors and windows.
(b) The home inspector shall:
(1) Operate a representative number of windows and interior doors; and
(2) Report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful
condensation on building components.
(c) The home inspector is not required to inspect:
(1) Paint, wallpaper, and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors;
(2) Carpeting; or
(3) Draperies, blinds, or other window treatments; or
(4) Coatings on and hermetic seals between panes of glass in windows and doors.

$
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Exterior Doors

Door Does Not Close or Latch
Sauna Area

Door does not close or latch properly. Recommend qualified handyman adjust strike plate and/or lock to ensure ease of use and security.  

Here is a DIY troubleshooting article on fixing door issues. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.1.2 - Exterior Doors

Water entry evident
Lowest level entry

Heavy water entry is evident at the base of the lowest level exterior door.  This is likely the result of the failed gutter and deteriorating exterior.  A general contractor is recommended to evaluate further, determine cause and extent of the damage and repair/replace as needed.

Hardhat General Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Interior Doors

Door Doesn't Latch
Lower SE Bedroom. Lower level bathroom

Door doesn't latch properly. Recommend handyman repair latch and/or strike plate to ensure proper operation.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.2 - Interior Doors

Door Sticks
Lower, SW Bedroom, Lowest level bathroom

Door sticks and is tough to open/close. Recommend adjusting the door in the frame and/or sanding down offending sides.

Here is a helpful DIY article on how to fix a sticking door. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.3 - Interior Doors

Bifold Doors - Missing
Master Bedroom

The master bedroom has a missing bifold door.  Replacement is recommended to ensure full functionality.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Windows

Failed Seal
Lower level dining and living room

Observed condensation between the window panes, which indicates a failed seal. Recommend qualified window contractor evaluate & replace to ensure window clarity, thermal integrity and prevent potential water entry and damage.


Note: Windows may just need to be cleaned.  Cleaning is recommended before any other action is taken.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - Windows

Windows will not stay open
Lower Level living room

One or more windows will not stay open when lifted. This is an indication of failed hardware.  A window repair specialist is recommended to evaluate further to ensure proper operation.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Walls

Bowing wall panels
Lower, SW Bedroom

The lower level bedroom walls have bowing wall panels.  This is an indication of heavy ambient air moisture or water entry from the below grade wall.  A general contractor is recommended to evaluate further and determine the cause of the bowing wall panels, remedy and moisture/water issues and repair replace damaged panels.  Hidden damage and organic growth may be present behind the walls.

$
Credit
Comment
5.5.1 - Ceilings

Stain(s) on Ceiling
Lower level living room

Moisture staining was observed on the ceiling.  The stain was inactive when tested with a moisture meter.  Verify with the seller that the issue has been resolved.  Monitor the area for further evidence of water intrusion.  If additional leaking is evident, a qualified professional is recommended to evaluate further.  

Conversation 512 Inquire With Seller
$
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Floors

Moderate Wear

Floors in the home exhibited moderate surface wear along major paths of travel. Recommend a qualified flooring contractor evaluate for possible re-finish. 

$
Credit
Comment
5.6.2 - Floors

Moisture Damage
In front of hot tub and lowest level toilet

Floors had areas of visible moisture damage and soft areas. Recommend a qualified flooring contractor evaluate & repair areas of moisture. 

Flooring Flooring Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.6.3 - Floors

Sloping Floor

There several areas in the home where the floors are sloping or not level. While there is no structural issue evident, you may wish to have the floor system evaluated by a general contractor and leveled out to your satisfaction.

Hardhat General Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.7.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Missing railing

There is no railing installed on the interior stairway.  This is a potential safety/fall hazard.  A qualified professional is recommended to install adequate railing.

Contractor Qualified Professional

6 - Built-in Appliances

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Electric
Dryer: Dryer Power Source
220 Electric
Dryer: Dryer Vent
Metal (Flex)
Dishwasher: Brand
Whirlpool
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
GE
Garbage Disposal: Garbage Disposal
Tested, Functional
Washing Machine: Brand
GE
Dryer: Brand
GE
Refrigerator Not On

Refrigerator not inspected.

Built-in Microwave not present.

.1115 BUILT-IN KITCHEN APPLIANCES
(a) The home inspector shall inspect and operate the basic functions of the following kitchen
appliances:
(1) Installed dishwasher(s), through a complete cycle;
(2) Range(s), cook top(s), and permanently installed oven(s);
(3) Trash compactor(s);
(4) Garbage disposal(s);
(5) Ventilation equipment or range hood(s); and
(6) Installed microwave oven(s).
(b) The home inspector is not required to inspect:
(1) Clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven functions, or thermostats for calibration or automatic
operation;
(2) Non built-in appliances; or
(3) Refrigeration units.
(c) The home inspector is not required to operate:
(1) Appliances in use; or
(2) Any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.

$
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Dishwasher

Improperly Installed Drain line

The dishwasher drain line has no high loop installed. This allows water from the sink to drain back into the dishwasher and can allow organic growth build up in the drain line. Installing a high loop is recommended. 


Click here for a DIY resource.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
6.1.2 - Dishwasher

Improperly installed wiring

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - Dryer

Dryer vent duct too long

The dryer vent duct is excessively long. This can cause lint buildup inside the duct and prevent adequate ventilation for the dryer causing potential malfunction. Shortening the duct to ensure the most direct path to the exterior is recommended.

Wrench DIY

7 - Lower Level Built-in Appliances

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
None
Dryer: Dryer Power Source
220 Electric
Dryer: Dryer Vent
Vinyl (Flex)
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Cooktop Brand/Energy Source
Electric, GE
Washing Machine: Brand
GE
Dryer: Brand
GE
Refrigerator Not On

Dishwasher not present.

Refrigerator not inspected.

Garbage Disposal not present.

Built-in Microwave not present.

.1115 BUILT-IN KITCHEN APPLIANCES
(a) The home inspector shall inspect and operate the basic functions of the following kitchen
appliances:
(1) Installed dishwasher(s), through a complete cycle;
(2) Range(s), cook top(s), and permanently installed oven(s);
(3) Trash compactor(s);
(4) Garbage disposal(s);
(5) Ventilation equipment or range hood(s); and
(6) Installed microwave oven(s).
(b) The home inspector is not required to inspect:
(1) Clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven functions, or thermostats for calibration or automatic
operation;
(2) Non built-in appliances; or
(3) Refrigeration units.
(c) The home inspector is not required to operate:
(1) Appliances in use; or
(2) Any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.

$
Credit
Comment
7.7.1 - Dryer

Dryer vent disconnected

Dryer vent is disconnected or does not vent to the exterior. This can allow a lint build up causing a potential fire hazard and may also cause moisture build-up damaging wood components. Routing the vent directly to the exterior is recommended.

Tools Handyman/DIY

8 - Fireplace

Type
Gas, Prefabricated, Ventless
Gas Supply Shut Off

Gas supply or pilot light was turned off, so operation of gas fireplaces could not be verified. Recommend having gas supply or pilot light turned on and operation of fireplaces confirmed.

Lintels not present.

Cleanout Doors & Frames not present.

.1111 HEATING (a) The home inspector shall inspect permanently installed heating systems including: (1) Heating equipment; (2) Normal operating controls; (3) Automatic safety controls; (4) Chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible; (5) Solid fuel heating devices; (6) Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and (7) The presence or absence of an installed heat source for each habitable space. (b) The home inspector shall describe the: (1) Energy source; and (2) Heating equipment and distribution type. (c) The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls appropriate to weather conditions at the time of the inspection. (d) The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector shall report the method of inspection used to inspect the heating system and whether or not access panels were removed. (e) The home inspector is not required to: (1) Operate heating systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage or when inappropriate to weather conditions at the time of inspection; (2) Operate automatic safety controls; (3) Ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or (4) Ignite a pilot light; or (5) Inspect: (A) The interior of flues; (B) Fireplace insert flue connections; (C) Heat exchanges; (D) Humidifiers; (E) Electronic air filters; (F) The uniformity or adequacy of heat supply to the various rooms; or (G) Solar space heating equipment.

$
Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Firebox/Mantel

Cracks in Firebrick/panels

The firebrick/panels inside the firebox is cracked or has open mortar joints.  This is a potential fire hazard as the brick/panel is a barrier between the fire and structure.  A professional chimney sweep is recommended to evaluate further.  

Fireplace Chimney Sweep
$
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Vents, Flues & Chimneys

No exhaust

The fireplace flue has been removed but has not been properly sealed.  This allows the gases, moisture and heat from the logs to vent directly into the attic space.  This is a fire hazard.  A general contractor is recommended to evaluate further.  

Hardhat General Contractor

9 - HVAC

Inspection Method
Standard Operation Controls
Heat Systems: Energy Source
Electric, Propane
Heat Systems: Heat Type
Electric Baseboard, Monitor Heat, Ceiling Heater
Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location(s)
In each room
System Shut Down
Monitor Heat

One or more heating systems in the home were shut down or otherwise did not respond with normal controls.  You may wish to have a system technician evaluate before closing.

Window AC Unit

This home is equipped with a window AC unit.  This system is beyond the scope of a home inspection and was not inspected.

.1111 HEATING
(a) The home inspector shall inspect permanently installed heating systems including:
(1)      Heating equipment;
(2)      Normal operating controls;
(3)      Automatic safety controls;
(4)      Chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible;
(5)      Solid fuel heating devices;
(6)      Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports,
insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and
(7)      The presence or absence of an installed heat source for each habitable space.
(b) The home inspector shall describe the:
(1)      Energy source; and
(2)      Heating equipment and distribution type.
(c) The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls appropriate to
weather conditions at the time of the inspection.
(d) The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or
installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector shall report the method of
inspection used to inspect the heating system and whether or not access panels were removed.
(e) The home inspector is not required to:
(1)      Operate heating systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment
damage or when inappropriate to weather conditions at the time of inspection;
(2)      Operate automatic safety controls;
(3)      Ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or
(4)      Ignite a pilot light; or
(5)      Inspect:
(A)  The interior of flues;
(B)  Fireplace insert flue connections;
(C)  Heat exchanges;
(D)  Humidifiers;
(E)  Electronic air filters;
(F)  The uniformity or adequacy of heat supply to the various rooms; or
(G)  Solar space heating equipment.

.1112 AIR CONDITIONING
(a) The home inspector shall inspect:
(1)      Central air conditioning and through-the-wall ductless installed cooling systems
including:
(A)  Cooling and air handling equipment; and
(B)  Normal operating controls.
(2)      Cooling distribution systems including:
(A)  Fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with associated supports, dampers, insulation, air filters,
registers, fan- coil units; and
(B)  The presence or absence of an installed cooling source for each habitable space.
(b) The home inspector shall describe the:
(1)      Energy sources; and
(2)      Cooling equipment type.
(c) The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls appropriate to
weather conditions at the time of the inspection.
(d) The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or
installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector shall report the method used to
inspect the air conditioning system and whether or not access panels were removed.
(e) The home inspector is not required to:
(1)      Operate cooling systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment
damage;
(2)      Inspect window air conditioners; or
(3)      Inspect the uniformity or adequacy of cool-air supply to the various rooms.

$
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Heat Systems

Inoperable
Lower and lowest level bathroom ceiling heaters

Heating unit was inoperable at time of inspection. Recommend qualified HVAC professional evaluate & ensure functionality.

Fire HVAC Professional

10 - Plumbing

Filters
None
Water Source
Public
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material
ABS
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Distribution Material
Copper, Pex, Insulated
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Supply Material
Poly
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Fixtures (sinks, tubs, showers, toilets)
Traps P-Type
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Power Source/Type
Electric
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Capacity
50 gallons
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Model
NE3F50RD 110
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Serial
1814109862457
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufactured year
2018
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Main Gas Shut-off Location
Exterior North, Above Ground Tank
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Distribution material
CSST
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
Crawlspace, At street/meter
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Lower level, Closet
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
US Craftmaster

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding.   Replacing the anode rod every 5 years or according to manufacturer recommendations is also recommended.

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help. 

Hot tub/Sauna

This home is equipped with am indoor hot tub and sauna.  These systems along with support structures, plumbing, and electrical connections are outside the scope of a home inspection.  A system professional is strongly advised to fully evaluate before closing.

.1109 PLUMBING
(a) The home inspector shall inspect:
(1)      Interior water supply and distribution system, including:  piping materials, supports, and
insulation; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections;
(2)      Interior drain, waste, and vent system, including:  traps; drain, waste, and vent piping;
piping supports and pipe insulation; leaks; and functional drainage;
(3)      Hot water systems including:  water heating equipment; normal operating controls;
automatic safety controls; and chimneys, flues, and vents;
(4)      Fuel storage and distribution systems including:  interior fuel storage equipment, supply
piping, venting, and supports; leaks; and
(5)      Sump pumps.
(b) The home inspector shall describe:
(1)      Water supply and distribution piping materials;
(2)      Drain, waste, and vent piping materials;
(3)      Water heating equipment, including fuel or power source, storage capacity or tankless
point of use demand systems, and location; and
(4)      The location of any main water supply shutoff device.
(c) The home inspector shall operate all plumbing fixtures, including their faucets and all
exterior faucets attached to the house, except where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an
appliance.
(d) The home inspector is not required to:
(1)      State the requirement for or effectiveness of anti-siphon devices;
(2)      Determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private or the
presence or absence of backflow devices;
(3)      Operate automatic safety controls;
(4)      Operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets;
(5)      Inspect:
(A)     Water conditioning systems;
(B)     Fire and lawn sprinkler systems;
(C)     On-site water supply quantity and quality;
(D)     On-site waste disposal systems;
(E)      Foundation irrigation systems;
(F)      Bathroom spas, whirlpools, or air jet tubs except as to functional flow and functional
drainage;
(G)     Swimming pools;
(H)     Solar water heating equipment; or
(I)       Fixture overflow devices or shower pan liners;
(6)      Inspect the system for proper sizing, design, or use of materials.
(7)      Report on the absence or presence of thermal expansion tanks; or,
(8)      Report on the adequacy of the reported water heater capacity.

$
Credit
Comment
10.2.1 - Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems

Leaking Pipe
Lowest level shower drain line

A DWV pipe showed signs of a leak. Recommend a qualified plumber evaluate and repair to prevent additional leaking and potential water damage.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Toilet Leaking
Lowest Level Toilet

Toilet is leaking from the tank.  A plumbing contractor is recommended to repair/replace as needed to prevent additional leaking and water damage.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
10.3.2 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Leaking Faucet
Main level kitchen sink

There Is evidence of leaking from the water supply faucet. repair/replacement is recommended to prevent potential water damage to the wall or cabinet below and ensure proper operation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
10.3.3 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Missing control valve
East Wall under deck

One or more exterior hose bibs have missing/damaged water control valves. Replacing the missing/damaged valves is recommended to ensure proper operation.

Wrench DIY
$
Credit
Comment
10.3.4 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Malfunctioning diverter
Lower level shower

The shower diverter did not function properly when tested.  Repair/replacement is recommended to ensure proper operation and ease-of-use

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
10.5.1 - Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems

CSST not bonded

The gas piping system of this home includes corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST). This flexible gas line system has specific installation requirements related to electrical bonding, designed to reduce the potential for lightning related electrical arcing that can perforate the tubing and result in gas leaks or fires. During the home inspection, the CSST could not be verified to be integrally bonded or to have a bonding attachment. An electrical contractor should be consulted for a complete evaluation of the CSST installation to ensure the presence of an electrical bonding path.

Electric Electrical Contractor

11 - Electrical

Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Overhead, Aluminum, 240 Volts
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Manufacturer
Cutler Hammer
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Conduit, Romex
Smoke/CO Detectors: Inspection Method
Not tested
Main Disconnect Breaker Location
Interior, Main Panel
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Lower Level, Closet
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Location
Crawl space
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Front Cover Removed for Inspection?
Yes

.1110 ELECTRICAL
(a) The home inspector shall inspect:
(1)      Electrical service entrance conductors;
(2)      Electrical service equipment, grounding equipment, main overcurrent device, and interiors
of panelboard enclosures unless unsafe conditions are reported;
(3)      Amperage and voltage ratings of the electrical service;
(4)      Branch circuit conductors, their overcurrent devices, and the compatibility of their
ampacities at the interiors of panelboard enclosures unless unsafe conditions are reported;
(5)      The operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures,
switches, and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling’s exterior walls;
(6)      The polarity and grounding of all receptacles within six feet of interior plumbing
fixtures, and all receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected
structures;
(7)      The operation of ground fault circuit interrupters; and
(8)      Smoke detectors and installed carbon monoxide alarms.
(b) The home inspector shall describe:
(1)      Electrical service amperage and voltage;
(2)      Electrical service entry conductor materials;
(3)      The electrical service type as being overhead or underground; and
(4)      The location of main and distribution panels.
(c) The home inspector shall report in writing the presence of any readily accessible single strand
aluminum branch circuit wiring.
(d) The home inspector shall report in writing on the presence or absence of smoke detectors, and
installed carbon monoxide alarms in any homes with fireplaces, fuel fired appliances, or attached
garages, and operate their test function, if readily accessible, except when detectors are part of
a central system.
(e) The home inspector is not required to:
(1)      Insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels;
(2)      Test or operate any overcurrent device except ground fault circuit interrupters;
(3)      Dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of panelboard
enclosures; or
(4)      Inspect:
(A)  Low voltage systems;
(B)  Security systems and heat detectors;
(C)  Telephone, security, cable TV, intercoms, or other ancillary wiring that is not a part of the
primary electrical distribution system;
(D)  Built-in vacuum equipment;
(E)  Back up electrical generating equipment;
(F)  Other alternative electrical generating or renewable energy systems such as solar, wind, or
hydro power;
(G)  Battery or electrical automotive charging systems; or

(H)  Electrical systems to swimming pools or spas, including bonding and grounding.

$
Credit
Comment
11.3.1 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Improper Wiring
Crawl space sub panel

The sub panel is improperly wired. The grounds and neutrals are not separated/isolated. This is a potential safety hazard if there is ever an over current event such as a lightning strike. A licensed electrician is recommended to evaluate further.

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
11.3.2 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Double Tap

The electric system has one or more breakers that are double tapped. This means that two conductors are installed into one breaker that is only designed to hold one conductor. This is a potential safety hazard as it can cause arcing or overheating. A licensed electrician is recommended to evaluate and repair/replace as needed.

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Cover Plates Missing
Closets, dining room, crawl space

One or more receptacles are missing a cover plate. This causes short and shock risk. Recommend installation of plates.
Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
11.4.2 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Drooping ceiling fan
Lower level living room

The ceiling fan in the lower level has drooping fan blades.  This is an indication of heavy moisture in this level and can cause the fan to malfunction.  A qualified professional is recommended to repair/replace as needed.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
11.5.1 - GFCI & AFCI

Missing GFCI Protection
Kitchens, Bathrooms, Exterior

GFCI protected receptacles were missing in one ore more recommended areas in the home.  GFCI receptacles help protect against potential shock hazards in areas near water.  A licensed electrician is recommended to update all receptacle in the recommended areas.

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
11.5.2 - GFCI & AFCI

GFCI Receptacle - did not trip/reset
Lowest Level Bathroom

One or more GFCI receptacles did not trip/reset when tested. A licensed electrician is recommended to evaluate further and repair/replace as needed to alleviate potential safety concerns and ensure proper operation.

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
11.6.1 - Smoke/CO Detectors

Older Smoke Alarms

The installed smoke alarms appear to be older than 10 years. Replacing smoke alarms every 10 years is recommended as they loose sensitivity over time.

Wrench DIY
$
Credit
Comment
11.6.2 - Smoke/CO Detectors

No CO Detectors Installed

There are no permanently installed CO detectors in the home.  This is a potential safety concern as fuel burning appliances are in use.  Installing CO detectors according to manufactures instructions is recommended.

Tools Handyman/DIY

12 - Attic and Roof Structure

Attic Access
Scuttlehole/Hatch
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type/Depth
Batt, Fiberglass, 10-15 Inches
Attic Insulation: Insulation Installed In
Between Ceiling Joists
Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Gable Vents, Passive
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans
Fan/Heat/Light
Roof Structure: Material
Plywood, Trusses
Roof Structure: Type
Gable
Ceiling Structure: Type Of Ceiling Structure
Conventional
Location of Attic Access
Bedroom Closet
Inspected From
From Access Panel

.1114 INSULATION AND VENTILATION
(a) The home inspector shall inspect:
(1) Insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces;
(2) Ventilation of attics and foundation areas;
(3) Kitchen, bathroom, and laundry venting systems; and
(4) The operation of any readily accessible attic ventilation fan, and, when temperature permits,
the operation of any readily accessible thermostatic control.
(b) The home inspector shall describe:
(1) Insulation in unfinished spaces; and
(2) The absence of insulation in unfinished space at conditioned surfaces.
(c) The home inspector is not required to report on:
(1) Concealed insulation and vapor retarders; or
(2)  Venting equipment for household appliances that are not required to be inspected pursuant to
the North Carolina Home Inspector Standards of Practice.
(d) The home inspector shall:
(1)   Move insulation where readily visible evidence indicates a problem; and
(2)   Move floor insulation where plumbing drain/waste pipes penetrate floors, adjacent to
earth-filled stoops or porches, and at exterior doors.

$
Credit
Comment
12.3.1 - Exhaust Systems

Bathroom Vents Into Attic

Bathroom fan vents into the attic, which can cause moisture and organic growth. Recommend a qualified professional property install exhaust fan to terminate to the exterior.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
12.3.2 - Exhaust Systems

Bathroom Vent Inoperable
Main Level vent fan

The bathroom vent fan did not function properly when tested.  A licensed electrician is recommended to evaluate further and repair/replace as needed to ensure proper operation and alleviate potential safety concerns.

Electric Electrical Contractor

13 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

Conditioned
Not conditioned
Foundation: Foundation Type
Crawl Space
Foundation: Foundation Wall
CMU
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Dirt
Floor Structure: Floor Structure Material
Wood Beams, 2x10 Joists, Steel Columns
Floor Structure: Sub-floor
Inaccessible, Plywood
Insulation: Flooring Insulation
Batt, Fiberglass
Ventilation: Type
Wall Vents
Inspection Method
Visual, Inspected From Inside


.1106 STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS
(a) The home inspector shall inspect structural components including:
(1)      Foundation;
(2)      Floors;
(3)      Walls;
(4)      Columns or piers;
(5)      Ceilings; and
(6)      Roofs.
(b) The home inspector shall describe the type of:
(1)      Foundation;
(2)      Floor structure;
(3)      Wall structure;
(4)      Columns or piers;
(5)      Ceiling structure; and
(6)      Roof structure.
(c) The home inspector shall:
(1)      Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected;
(2)      Enter under floor crawl spaces, basements, and attic spaces except when access is
obstructed, when entry could damage the property, or when dangerous or adverse situations are
suspected;
(3)      Report the methods used to inspect under floor crawl spaces and attics; and
(4)      Report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of
abnormal or harmful building components.

$
Credit
Comment
13.1.1 - Foundation

Foundation Cracks - Major
North Wall, NW Corner, West Wall

Severe cracking noted at the foundation. This is typically consistent with soil movement and could lead to serious damage to structural components, foundation and/or slabs. Recommend a structural engineer evaluate and provide a report on course of action and remedy.

Here is an informational article on foundation cracks.

$
Credit
Comment
13.1.2 - Foundation

Foundation Wall Water Intrusion
NW and SW Corners

Water intrusion is evident through the foundation wall with darker stains and efflorescence. This is an indication of inadequate exterior drainage. Moisture in a crawlspace/basement can cause potential organic growth and damage to wood components. A grading or basement professional is recommended to evaluate further.

Triangle Grading Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
13.2.1 - Floor Structure

Modified construction
West Crawl space area, Hot tub support structure.

The floor structure has areas of modified or added supports.  This is an indication of previous structural issues in the home.  Verify with the seller what structural issues are present.  A general contractor or structural engineer is recommended to evaluate further.

House construction Structural Engineer
$
Credit
Comment
13.2.2 - Floor Structure

Subfloor - water stains/damage
Under Hot tub and lowest level entry door

There is water staining/damage on the subfloor visible from the crawl space. This is an indication of potential leaking from the exterior and plumbing leaks. A general contractor is recommended to evaluate further to determine the extent of the damage and repair/replace as needed.  Hidden damage may be present under the insulation

Hardhat General Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
13.3.1 - Insulation

Falling/damaged insulation

There are areas of falling,damaged or missing insulation under the home. This can make the home less energy efficient and is an indication of inadequate ventilation and/or moisture control. An insulation professional is recommended to evaluate further.

House construction Insulation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
13.5.1 - Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement)

Displaced

The vapor barrier in the crawl space is displaced and missing in several areas.  This can allow harmful moisture to enter the crawl space and cause damage, organic growth, and unhealthy living conditions.  replacing or adding additional vapor barrier to cover the entire floor space is recommended.

House construction Insulation Contractor