Loading
Document Name
Sort Generated Document By
Total Credit Requested
$ 0.00
Preview
Create
Header Text
Total Credit Requested
$ 0.00
Preview
Create
Viewing:

1234 Main St.
Greenville, South Carolina 29615
04/08/2020 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
11
Minor item / maintenance
38
Observation / recommendation
2
Safety concern / major impact

Thank you for trusting Apple Tree Inspections with your home inspection.

The Report Summary (which can be selected above) is a tool to enable you to navigate through the report quickly, viewing the more significant concerns, recommendations, and those items identified as deficient in the opinion of the inspector. The full report includes informational details, limitations of the inspection, and other suggestions. You should read and understand the entire home inspection report. This inspection is not a guarantee or warranty of any kind, nor is it a list of mandatory repairs. It is merely a list of observations, recommendations, and suggested upgrades or maintenance. We encourage our clients to seek a second opinion or further evaluation from a specialist regarding any issues of concern or when he or she needs or desires a more exhaustive investigation, which is beyond the scope of a general home inspection. This report contains technical information. If you have any questions about any of the information it contains, please call the office. We can arrange for a verbal consultation with your inspector.

Call (864) 501-7593     Visit Our Website    info@AppleTreeInspections.com


1 - Inspection Details

IN NI NP O
1.1 General Information X
1.2 Inspection / Site Details X
1.3 Concerns / Natural Hazards X
Inspection / Site Details: Type of Building
Single Family
Inspection / Site Details: Occupancy
Vacant
Inspection / Site Details: In Attendance
Client 1, Client's Agent

None

General Information: Introduction Notes

Congratulations on buying your new home, and thank you for choosing Apple Tree Inspections to perform your complete home inspection. The goal of this inspection and report is to put you in a better position to make an informed real estate decision. This report is a general guide and provides you with some objective information to help you make your evaluation of the overall condition of the home. A home inspection is not intended to reflect the value of the property. We do not make any representation as to the advisability of purchase or property value. We will not be able to identify all improvements, defects, or hazards during the short time of this inspectionThis inspection is not a guarantee or warranty of any kind. Apple Tree Inspections endeavors to operate in compliance with InterNACHI's Standards of Practice. Please refer to the pre-inspection agreement for a full explanation of the scope of the inspection. This Home Inspection Report contains information about items that are not functioning correctly, deficient, unsafe, or are near the end of their useful service lives in the professional judgment of the inspector. Home inspectors cannot predict future behavior, and as such, we cannot be responsible for things that occur after the inspection. We do not intend any 3rd party use, and we will not be accountable to any parties for the contents of the report, other than the party named herein. The home inspection report itself is copyrighted, and may not be used in whole or in part without Apple Tree Inspections written permission. We are available to you throughout the real estate transaction process. Sincerely, Travis Clarke Certified Master Inspector 

Apple Tree Inspections L.L.C. 

 (864) 501-7593 

Travis@AppleTreeInspections.com   

www.AppleTreeInspections.com

General Information: Definitions

Any findings or comments listed under "Safety Concern / Major Impact" means that the reported item has or could have a significant impact on the value or safety of the home. The client is strongly encouraged to have all defects labeled red, further evaluated or repaired, by a qualified professional, or contractor. Any findings or comments listed under "Observation / Recommendation" are improvements that the inspector recommends, or the reported item is improper or not working as intended. The client is encouraged to make a repair or correction or to consider consulting a specialist for additional information. "Minor Item / Maintenance" means that the inspector suggested a minor repair, improvement, or routine maintenance. Inspected (IN) = The item, component, or system was visually inspected, and if no other comments are listed, then it appeared to be functioning as intended. Not Inspected (NI) = The item was not checked, and no representations made of whether or not it was performing as expected. We will state a reason for not inspecting an item when applicable. Not Present (NP) = The item, component, or system is not in this home or building. Observations (O) = During the inspection, the inspector found a deficiency, concern, or had a comment.

General Information: The Report Summary

The Report Summary section is intended to be a tool to assist our clients and their representative(s) in preparing a repair request, if and when applicable. THIS REPORT IS NOT A LIST OF MANDATORY REPAIRS BUT A LIST OF SUGGESTED REPAIRS OR UPGRADES. The Report Summary is intended to follow the flow of the main body of the Property Inspection Report. The order of repair priority is left up to the sole discretion of the client. This summary contains only those items identified as deficient. You should read and understand the entire Home Inspection Report before completing any repair request. This report provides technical information. If you are unclear about any of the information, it contains, please give us a call. 

General Information: Perspective

All directional references in this report, in essence (left, right, front, back, etc.), are from the perspective of facing the front of the house, as depicted in the cover image above.

General Information: Use of Photos and Video

Your report includes many photographs, and may also include video. Some pictures are intended as a courtesy and added for your information. Other images are to help clarify where the inspector has been and inspected. Some photos may be of items that are not working or recommendations from the inspector. These are to help you better understand this report and may allow you to see areas or details that you usually would not see. Not all conditions, problems, or concerns listed in the report will have photos attached. Click on any image for a larger view

Concerns / Natural Hazards: Radon Explanation

Radon explanation

The home is in an area known to have elevated radon levels. Radon is a colorless, naturally occurring radioactive gas formed deep underground from the decay of uranium. Lighter than air, radon rises through cracks and fissures in the ground and may enter a home's living space through a crawlspace, basement, or slab-on-grade. The only foundation type which will not allow radon to accumulate is a raised foundation through which natural air movement occurs freely. Because radon levels are related to the structure of the soil beneath the home, they are home site-specific and may vary widely among households that are closely situated. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), radon causes 21,000 lung cancer deaths per year in the United States (U.S.). Radon is the second most frequent cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. Radon-induced lung cancer is thought to be the 6th leading cause of cancer death overall. Mitigation techniques are available, which typically reduce indoor levels to within the acceptable range. I suggest that you negotiate with the seller for the cost of any needed mitigation. The average outdoor level of radon is 0.4 pCi/L, and the average indoor level in the united states is about 1.3 pCi/L. The EPA recommends remediation if the average level over a 48 hour test period is over 4.0 pCi/L. For additional information about radon levels, please visit Radon Information

General Information: What Is & What Is Not Inspected

A general home inspection is a noninvasive visual inspection, which typically includes the following parts of a home.

  • The Grading and Vegetation
  • The Roof and Gutters
  • The Exterior Wall Coverings Porches and Decks
  • The Foundation and Structure
  • The Heating Cooling and Ventilation Systems
  • The Electrical System
  • The Plumbing System
  • The Appliances Cabinets and Countertops
  • The Interior Including the Ceilings, Walls, and Floors
  • The Doors and Windows
  • The Attic and Insulation
  • The Crawlspace or Basement
  • And the Garage

Of course, an inspector has limitations, we cannot see through walls or floors, and we can't predict the future. Sometimes an Item may work when we check it, but this does not guarantee that it will work in the future. We can only report on what we observe at the time of the inspection. Some of the items not customarily inspected are;

  • Systems Or Areas Of The Home That Are Not Accessible
  • Cable, T.V. and Low Voltage Wiring
  • Wells
  • Septic Systems
  • Window Air Conditioners
  • Fences
  • Water Softeners, and Water Filters
  • Sewer Lines
  • Phone Lines
  • Clothes Washer and Dryer
  • Humidifiers or Dehumidifiers
  • Solar Heating or Solar Power Systems
  • Security Alarm Systems
  • Pools or Spas
  • And Sprinkler Systems

If you would like any of these items inspected, please make additional arrangements. You should also not rely on the inspection to report defects in cosmetic items, such as floor coverings, or interior paint. A home inspection is primarily for the structural, mechanical, and safety items in a home. We are not building code inspectors and do not inspect for current building code compliance. Also, cosmetic issues such as painting defects, carpet stains or defects, craftsmanship, superficial or cosmetic cracks in walls and ceilings, etc., are inherently subjective and are not included in the home inspection report. We leave the acceptability of these readily observable items to the sole discretion of the client. 

General Information: Limited Inspection (Personal Property)

Furnished rooms in the house, or areas containing personal property limit the inspector's ability to observe or inspect in those areas visually. There may be concealed defects in a home not readily observable at the time of the inspection.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations

2 - Home-Site / Grading & Vegetation

IN NI NP O
2.1 General Information X
2.2 Building Lot Grading X X
2.3 Driveways and Walkways X X
2.4 Trees and Vegetation X
2.5 Retaining Wall / Fence X
General Information: Introduction Notes

The inspection of the home site typically includes adequate surface drainage, driveway and walkways, window wells, potential tree problems, and retaining wall conditions that may affect the home structure. Note: The General Home Inspection does not include inspection of landscape irrigation systems, fencing, or swimming pools/spas unless pre-arranged as ancillary inspections.

Building Lot Grading: House Built Lower Than Road

The house is below the public street grade. Extra caution should be taken to prevent possible water intrusion to the structure. Do not build flowerbeds that will cause a damming effect and hold water next to the foundation. Positive drainage should always be maintained.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Building Lot Grading

Improve Exterior Grading

The yard did not slope away from the house 6 inches for the first 10 feet as recommended by modern building standards. (mainly shown in the attached images). I suggest improving the grading or possibly adding a drainage system to help prevent settling or water from entering the crawlspace area.


Triangle Grading Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.1 - Driveways and Walkways

Cracked - Minor

I observed minor cracks or deficiencies in the driveway or walkway. Cracks that are less than 1/4" and not showing differential movement, in essence, heaving or settling, are generally considered cosmetic. (see the attached images) Cracks in concrete or paved surfaces are not uncommon and typically occur as a result of expansion and contraction as concrete ages. I suggest sealing the cracks to help prevent further deterioration. Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link

Tools Handyman/DIY

3 - Home Exterior

IN NI NP O
3.1 General Information X
3.2 Trim, Soffits & Fascia X X
3.3 Exterior Siding X
3.4 Brick, Stone or Masonry X X
3.5 Exterior Wall Flashings X X
3.6 Porch(s) X
3.7 Patio X
3.8 Deck(s) X X
3.9 Exterior Stairs X X
General Information: Exterior Wall Covering Material
Brick Veneer
Trim, Soffits & Fascia: Trim Material
Steel/Metal/Aluminum
Trim, Soffits & Fascia: Soffit / Fascia Material
Wood, Steel/Metal/Aluminum
General Information: Introduction Notes

Inspection of the home exterior typically includes the exterior wall covering materials, windows and doors, driveway and walkways, exterior plumbing and electrical and components, potential tree problems, and retaining wall conditions that may affect the home structure. 

Brick, Stone or Masonry: Brick Veneer / Cladding

Although the exterior wall construction was not visible and concealed behind the interior and exterior wall coverings, the outer walls of the home appeared to be conventional wood framing covered on the exterior by brick veneer. Modern construction methods include an air gap left between the wood framing and the brick and a technique for diverting any moisture that may enter the air gap to the weather-face of the exterior. The masonry is typically connected to the framing using metal fasteners.

General Information: New Paint

Freshly painted or repaired exterior materials, including wall coverings, windows, doors, trim, and decks, may conceal defects that I might otherwise see.

Exterior Siding not present.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Trim, Soffits & Fascia

Damaged Trim

There is some damage to the exterior trim. (mainly shown in the attached images). Consider repair or replacement as needed to help prevent moisture intrusion, insect entry, or damage to underlying materials.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Trim, Soffits & Fascia

Gap In Trim, Fascia or Soffit (Caulk)

There are cracks, gaps, or holes in the trim, or soffit area, which should be repaired or filled with the appropriate sealant. (see photos) This condition can allow water or pest entry and possibly result in the deterioration of the surrounding materials or other problems.
                      Right Garage Door

$
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Brick, Stone or Masonry

Missing / Loose Bricks Or Stones

Bricks were loose or missing in one or more areas (mainly shown in attached images). This condition may indicate deterioration of the bond between the mortar and brick/stone or other defects. I recommend that a qualified professional evaluate the masonry, replace or reattach any loose/missing materials, and make any other repairs needed at that time.

Brick Masonry, Concrete, Brick & Stone
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Exterior Wall Flashings

Exterior Wall Flashing (Missing / Improper)

Areas, where exterior wall materials changed, were not protected by flashing as recommended by good building practice. This condition may result in moisture intrusion in these areas. The Inspector did not observe any indications of moisture-related damage at this time. Here is a link to a helpful online article Exterior Flashing

$
Credit
Comment
3.8.1 - Deck(s)

Ledger Board (Add Bolts)

There were indications that the deck's ledger board may not be adequately attached to the home. (see photos) This condition could cause the wood deck to pull away from the building. I recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate the ledger board to ensure adequate attachment and add appropriate fasteners as needed. Modern standards recommend installing deck ledger bolts are about every 16" and alternate between the top and bottom of the ledger board. (see photos) Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link

House front 1 Deck Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.9.1 - Exterior Stairs

Loose Railing At Steps

The handrail for the steps was observed to be loose and was a possible fall hazard. Stair railings should be strong enough to support a 200-pound-force. I recommend repair for improved safety. Here is a link to a helpful article online Exterior Railing

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Roof & Roof Drainage System

IN NI NP O
4.1 General Information X
4.2 Roof Drainage Systems X X
4.3 Underlayment X
4.4 Asphalt Shingles X X
4.5 Roof & Plumbing Vents / Penetrations X X
4.6 Roof Flashings X
4.7 Chimney & Skylights At Roof X
General Information: Roof Covering Material
Asphalt
General Information: Inspection Method
Walked the Roof
Asphalt Shingles: Layers
1+ Layer
General Information: Introduction Notes

The roof inspection portion of the General Home Inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified roofing contractor. Because of variations in installation requirements of the considerable number of different roof-covering materials installed over the years, the General Home Inspection does not include confirmation of proper installation. Home Inspectors are trained to identify common deficiencies and to recognize conditions that require evaluation by a specialist in the time allotted. Inspection of the roof typically includes a visual assessment of the roof structure, roof-covering materials, flashing, and roof penetrations like chimneys, mounting hardware for roof-mounted equipment, attic ventilation devices, ducts for evaporative coolers, and combustion and plumbing vents. The roof inspection does not include leak-testing and will not certify or warranty the roof against future leakage. An inspector usually is not able to find or identify leaks unless they are occurring at the time of the inspection. The roof covering materials should be inspected annually as part of a routine maintenance plan.

Underlayment: # 15 Felt Paper

The roof appeared to have #15 felt paper installed as a water-resistant underlayment beneath roof-covering materials. The underlayment was visible only at the eaves. Most of the membrane was hidden beneath roof-covering materials and, therefore, not inspected.

Asphalt Shingles: Dimensional - Architectural

The roof finish materials were architectural asphalt shingles. Laminated shingles are composed of multiple layers bonded together. Composition shingles are composed of a fiberglass mat embedded in asphalt and covered with ceramic-coated mineral granules. Shingles with multiple layers bonded together are usually more durable than shingles consisting of a single layer.

General Information: Unseen Roof Leaks

The inspection of the roof does not preclude the possibility of leakage or water damage. Leakage or water damage can occur at any time and may depend on rain intensity, wind velocity, direction, and other environmental factors. The entire underside of the roof sheathing is not visible or accessible, and therefore, I was unable to inspect for indications of leaks in every area and under every condition.

General Information: Life Expectancy

This home inspection report does not cover the life expectancy of the roofing covering materials. If any concerns exist about the roof covering life expectancy or potential for future problems, I recommend consulting with a roofing specialist. This inspection does not determine the insurability of the roof. I inspected the roof covering materials according to current InterNACHI Standards of Practice.

Underlayment: Underlayment Disclaimer, Edges Only

The inspector is typically only able to view the underlayment at the roof edges in representative locations around the perimeter of the roof. Most of the membrane was hidden beneath roof-covering materials and, therefore, not inspected.

Roof Flashings: Not Visible

Most of or all of the roof flashing was not visible due to roofing materials installed.

Chimney & Skylights At Roof not present.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Downspout(s) Extension / Redirect

I recommend that all rain gutter downspouts be extended and directed away from the home to help safely discharge the roofs runoff water away from the foundation. Downspouts should discharge about 3 feet away from the house. Extensions are especially important when the ground does not slope away from the home's exterior. Here is a link to a helpful article online Downspouts

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Asphalt Shingles

Older Roof (Moderate)

The roof is older, and there is some evidence of deterioration, such as uniform granule loss or past repairs. (see photos) There were indications that the roof may be starting to approach the end of its useful life. I did not see any signs of active water leaks at the time of the inspection, and I do not feel that the roof needs replacement at this time. If the client is concerned, he or she may wish to consult with a roofing specialist for a second opinion. Asphalt shingles typically have a lifespan of 15 - 20 years. 

$
Credit
Comment
4.4.2 - Asphalt Shingles

Hail / Impact Damage (Localized)

There were indications of hail or other impact damage in localized areas of the roof covering materials. The impact damage may allow further deterioration of the roof covering, damage to the roof structure, or water penetration. Because the impact damage was so random and given the proximity to the golf cause, the damage was likely the result of golf balls. You are strongly encouraged to have your insurance company and a licensed roofing contractor inspect the roof and evaluate the insurability and condition of the roofing material fully.

Roof Roofing Professional
$
Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Roof & Plumbing Vents / Penetrations

Paint Plumbing Vents

PVC plumbing vents are susceptible to premature degradation from sunlight and exposure to UV radiation. Consider painting the roof plumbing vents or wrapping them with an appropriate protective material to extend the life of the vents. (Preventative Maintenance Suggestion). Here is a link to a helpful article online Paint Vents

5 - Doors & Windows

IN NI NP O
5.1 General Information X
5.2 Exterior Doors X X
5.3 Storm / Sliding Glass Doors X
5.4 Windows From (Exterior) X X
5.5 Windows From (Interior) X X
5.6 Interior Doors X X
5.7 Door Hardware X X
Windows From (Interior): Window Type (Material)
Vinyl Double Pane
Windows From (Interior): Window Type (Operation)
Double-hung
General Information: Introduction Notes

I inspected the doors and windows according to today's InterNACHI Standards of Practice. Our inspection typically includes the door and window operation, condition, and hardware in addition to the molding or trim work. 


Exterior Doors: Exterior Door Stops

All exterior doors should have doorstops installed to help prevent damage to adjacent interior wall coverings.

Interior Doors: Interior Door Stops

All interior doors should have doorstops installed to help prevent damage to adjacent interior wall coverings.

General Information: New Paint

Freshly painted or repaired exterior or interior materials, including doors windows and trim, may conceal defects that I might otherwise see.

Windows From (Interior): Lost Seals

Signs of lost seals in the thermal pane windows may appear and disappear as temperature and humidity change. Some windows with failed seals may not be evident at the time of this inspection. We visually check the windows in a non-exhaustive manner looking for obvious fogging. When we note lost thermal pane seals, we recommend a window specialist for further evaluation and thoroughly rechecking all of the windows.


  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Exterior Doors

Door Jamb / Trim - Decay or Rot

I observed wood decay or rot at the brick molding, door jambs, or threshold of one or more exterior doors (mainly shown in the attached images). I recommend repair or replacement of all deteriorated wood. Wood decay is a common condition in our climate, especially where the wood trim or door jamb is near the ground. Small areas of wood decay can usually be filled and repaired with wood epoxy. Larger areas may require replacement.
                      

$
Credit
Comment
5.2.2 - Exterior Doors

Worn Paint / Finish, Exterior Door

The exterior door(s) and door jambs had deteriorated worn or peeling paint or varnish. (see the attached images)  Maintenance and painting will help prevent deterioration of the door and trim materials. Wood doors may eventually operate poorly if the wood is left unprotected. 

Paint roller Painting Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Windows From (Exterior)

Damaged or Missing Window Screens
Throughout

I observed damaged or missing screens from the exterior of the windows. (representative examples shown in the attached images)  Window screens help prevent insects from entering the home and protect the glass from minor damage.

$
Credit
Comment
5.4.2 - Windows From (Exterior)

Caulking At Windows (Maintenance)
Throughout

The sealant or caulking around some widows was old, cracked, or missing and needed re-application to help avoid moisture intrusion in these areas. (see photos) Sealant-dependent regions should be examined on an annual basis and re-applied as necessary.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.4.3 - Windows From (Exterior)

Rusted Steel Lintels
Most Of The Exterior Windows

I observed one or more rusted steel lintels above the windows at the time of the inspection. (shown in the attached images) This condition may damage or crack the masonry because steal expands as it rusts. Rusting can also eventually structurally weaken the steel. I recommend sanding and painting any affected lintels to help prevent future damage. 

Paint roller Painting Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.5.1 - Windows From (Interior)

Inoperable Window(s)

The window(s) (shown in the attached images) was inoperable or extremely difficult to open, close, or lock at the time of the inspection. I recommend service or adjustment by a qualified professional.


Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.5.2 - Windows From (Interior)

Moisture Intrusion

I observed signs of water intrusion at or around the windows or window sills. (shown in the attached images) Water intrusion at windows creates conducive conditions for water damage and wood-destroying insects. The cause of moisture intrusion should be determined and corrected as needed. I was unable to determine the condition of concealed underlying materials. Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
5.5.3 - Windows From (Interior)

No Tempered Glass

One or more windows (mainly shown in the attached images) did not appear to have tempered glass installed. This safety glass in specific locations became a requirement for new construction in the 1970s. For safety reasons, consider having tempered glass installed to comply with modern safety standards. Several companies manufacture protective films for installation on existing windows. With certain products placed on the non-tempered window, if it is hit or broken, the glass should stick to the film, helping to prevent injury. Homes are not required to be updated to comply with newly enacted safety standards. 



$
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Interior Doors

Door Hits / Sticks

The Interior door(s) (shown in the attached images) rub, hit, or stick in the frame and required repair or adjustment at the time of the inspection. Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.6.2 - Interior Doors

Door(s) Do Not Latch

The interior door(s) (shown in the attached images) did not latch as intended and should be adjusted or corrected as needed.

$
Credit
Comment
5.7.1 - Door Hardware

Loose Door Knob / Handle

The front door (shown in the attached image) had a loose doorknob or handle. I suggest repair for proper door operation.

Tools Handyman/DIY

6 - Home Interior

IN NI NP O
6.1 General Information X
6.2 Walls X
6.3 Ceilings X X
6.4 Floors X
6.5 Interior Trim X
6.6 Cabinets X
6.7 Counter-Tops X
6.8 Stairway & Railing(s) X
6.9 Thermal Imaging X
Cabinets: Cabinetry Material
Wood
Counter-Tops : Countertop Material
Granite
General Information: Introduction Notes

I inspected the interior of the home, according to today's InterNACHI Standards of Practice. Note: Although the inspector may choose to make a note of one or more cosmetic items, as a courtesy to the client, COSMETIC CONDITIONS are NOT a part of a standard home inspection. A home inspector is primarily concerned with (FUNCTION, STRUCTURE, AND SAFETY). Cosmetic issues such as painting defects, carpet stains/defects, craftsmanship, superficial or cosmetic cracks in walls and ceilings, etc., are inherently subjective and are often not included in the home inspection report. We leave the acceptability of these readily observable items to the sole discretion of the client. The general home inspection of the home interior typically includes:

  • Interior Walls (primarily a structural inspection)
  • Interior Floors (primarily a structural inspection)
  • Interior Ceilings (primarily a structural inspection)
  • Interior Trim
  • Cabinets
  • Counter-tops
  • Stairways & Railings (condition and safety)

NOTE: Mold / Indoor Air Quality testing is an ADDITIONAL service/inspection offered by Apple Tree Inspections, and NOT included in a standard home inspection.

Ceilings: Stain(s) on Ceiling

There are stains on the ceiling (mainly at the location shown in the attached images). I suggest repainting these areas.

Thermal Imaging: General Information

Infrared (thermal imaging) is an advanced, non-invasive technology that allows the inspector to show homeowners things about their homes that cant be revealed using conventional inspection methods. A thermal imaging camera has a special lens that focuses the infrared light emitted by the objects in view. Thermal cameras essentially record the temperature of various objects in the frame and then assign each temperature a shade of a color. The detector then creates a detailed temperature pattern of the image called a thermogram, which lets you see how much heat an object is radiating compared to the objects around it.  A trained inspector can use a thermal imaging camera to help detect

  • Heat loss and air infiltration in walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors;
  • Damaged and/or malfunctioning radiant heating systems;
  • Air-conditioner compressor leaks;
  • Under-fastening and/or missing framing members, and other structural defects that can lead to energy loss; 
  • Broken seals in double-paned windows.

In terms of detecting moisture intrusion, an IR camera can help locate:

  • Plumbing leaks;
  • Hidden roof leaks before they cause serious damage;
  • Missing, damaged and/or wet insulation; 
  • Water and moisture intrusion around penetrations and at the foundation and building envelope that could lead to structural damage and mold.

IR cameras are equally effective at locating hot spots in the home, including:

  • Circuit breakers in need of immediate replacement;
  • Overloaded and undersized circuits;
  • Overheated electrical equipment and components;  
  • Electrical faults before they cause a fire.

Additionally, based on the color gradients that thermal images provide, an inspector can locate:

  • Possible pest infestation, as revealed by energy loss through shelter tubes left by boring wood-destroying insects;
  • The presence of intruders, such as rats, mice and other larger pests hiding within the structure and detected because of their heat signature that the IR camera captures; and
  • Dangerous flue leaks, which can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning of the homes residents.
General Information: New Paint

Freshly painted or repaired interior materials, including walls, ceilings, and trim, may conceal defects that I might otherwise have seen. 

General Information: Occupied / Staged - Limited Inspection

A home that is occupied or furnished, and contains personal property limits the inspector's ability to observe or inspect in those areas visually. There may be concealed defects in a home not readily observable at the time of the inspection.

Cabinets: Cabinets Limited View

Cabinets filled with stored items limit the inspector's ability to perform a visual inspection. Personal property may conceal defects which might otherwise be observable. 

Thermal Imaging: Thermal Imaging Disclaimer

Thermal images included in this inspection report are provided as a courtesy, are limited to certain portions of the home and should not be considered as part of a full-home thermal imaging inspection. The inspector chooses the portions of the home to be scanned or photographed and photographs may be included in the report at the Inspector's sole discretion.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Ceilings

Water Stain Moisture Meter (Past)

I checked the water stain(s) (at the location(s) shown in the attached images) with a moisture meter or thermal imager. It registered normal moisture levels indicating that there was not an active leak at the time of the inspection, or the moisture problem may be intermittent. Consider asking the seller about the cause of the water staining or damage. 

Mag glass Monitor

7 - Appliances & Ventilation

IN NI NP O
7.1 General Information X
7.2 Range / Oven Combination X
7.3 Built-in Microwave X
7.4 Kitchen Ventilation X
7.5 Food Waste Disposal X
7.6 Dishwasher X X
7.7 Refrigerator X
7.8 Bath Fans & Dryer Vent / Other X
7.9 Miscellaneous Appliances X
Range / Oven Combination: Range / Oven Energy Source
Gas
Kitchen Ventilation : Exhaust Hood Type
Vented
General Information: Introduction Notes

The general home inspection does not include any appliance warranty or guarantee. The examination of the appliances may show them to be operating as expected when checked; however, this does not guarantee future life or failure. Pictures of the manufacture labels were taken for each appliance if found, and these pictures are in the corresponding section, which follows. The images are to enable the homeowner to check for any recall notices from the appliance manufacturer. The bathroom ventilation inspection is limited to operation with standard controls. Bath fans, dryer vents, or range hood ductwork is concealed often by insulation or other obstructions and may terminate to an inconspicuous location such as the soffit or roof. Verifying each vent's proper termination to the exterior is beyond the scope of a general home inspection.

Range / Oven Combination: Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the range/oven are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.  

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Kitchen Ventilation : Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the range hood are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.    

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Food Waste Disposal: Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the food waste disposal are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.  

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Dishwasher: Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the dishwasher are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.  

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Dishwasher: Dishwasher Drain Line
Drain Looped

A loop or anti-siphon device at the dishwasher helps prevent water from the kitchen sink from siphoning and flooding through the dishwasher.

Refrigerator: Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the refrigerator are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.  

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Miscellaneous Appliances: Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures Showing information for records and to check for possible recalls. 

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

General Information: Appliances Not Inspected

Outdoor cooking equipment, refrigerators, washers and dryers, ice makers, trash compactors, wine coolers, and whole-house vacuums are outside the scope of this home inspection. If present, these appliances were not inspected.

Range / Oven Combination: Limited Inspection

The General Home Inspection scope of testing does not include testing all of the range or ovens features but is limited to confirmation of regular baking and burner operation. You might consider asking the seller about the functionality of any other features.

Built-in Microwave not present.

Bath Fans & Dryer Vent / Other not inspected.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
7.6.1 - Dishwasher

Secure Dishwasher

I recommend securing the dishwasher to the cabinets or countertop before use. Improperly secured dishwashers create conducive conditions for water leaks or other defects.

Tools Handyman/DIY

8 - Garage / Carport

IN NI NP O
8.1 General Information X
8.2 Walls & Ceiling / Fire Separation X
8.3 Garage Floor X
8.4 Garage Overhead Door X
8.5 Garage Door Opener X X
General Information: Type
Attached, 2-Car
Walls & Ceiling / Fire Separation: Fire Rated Door To Garage
Yes
Garage Floor: Source Of Ignition
Yes
Garage Overhead Door: Material
Steel/Metal/Aluminum, Insulated
General Information: Introduction Notes

Inspection of the garage typically includes: 

  • The fire/smoke separation wall between the garage and home
  • The doors including the fire rated door from garage to home 
  • The windows (operation condition and hardware)
  • Proper electrical conditions including Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) protection;
  • Interior walls (primarily structural)
  • Interior floors (primarily structural)
  • Interior ceilings (primarily structural)
  • Garage overhead door (limited testing and visual evaluation of condition)
  • Garage door opener (testing for regular operation and safety)


General Information: Freezer / Fridge In Garage
Yes, Power On
Garage Door Opener: Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the garage door opener are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.    

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Garage Door Opener: General Notes / Disclaimer

We do not test the garage door or opener using specialized equipment, and this inspection will not confirm compliance with the manufacturer's specifications. We perform a basic check of the garage doors and openers according to the Inspector's judgment from experience. You should adjust your expectations accordingly. If you wish to ensure that the garage door complies with the manufacturer's specifications, including the automatic-reverse feature, you should have it inspected by a qualified garage door specialist.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - Garage Door Opener

Photo Eyes Mounted Too High

The garage door photo-sensors were installed over 6 inches above the floor. Photoelectric sensors are a safety device intended to help prevent injury by raising the vehicle door if the sensor detects an object under the door. Generally-accepted safety standards have required the installation of photosensors in new homes since 1993. I recommend correction by a qualified professional.

Garage Garage Door Contractor

9 - Insulation & Attic

IN NI NP O
9.1 General Information / Access X
9.2 Attic General X
9.3 Attic Insulation X X
9.4 Attic Ventilation X
9.5 Wall Insulation X
9.6 Crawlspace Insulation X X
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Blown, Fiberglass
Crawlspace Insulation: Floor / Ceiling Insulation Type
Fiberglass Batt
Wall Insulation: Insulation Type
Not Visible
General Information / Access: Introduction Notes

The inspection of the attic and insulation typically includes a visual examination of the following:

  • Roof structure (framing and sheathing)
  • Attic space ventilation
  • Thermal insulation
  • Electrical components (wiring, outlets, switches, and lighting)
  • Plumbing components (supply and vent pipes, bathroom vent terminations) 
  • HVAC components (drip pans, ducts, condensate, and TPR discharge pipes)

There are nearly always parts of the attic that are not visible or accessible due to a lack of adequate headroom or concealment by insulation. The attic inspection is limited to what is readily apparent and safely accessible to the inspector. 

General Information / Access: Pull-Down Ladder

A ceiling-installed pull-down ladder provided access to the attic (see photos). Consider insulating the ladder to reduce unwanted heat loss/gain. I have shown one possible idea in the attached image.

General Information / Access: Wall Hatch / Door

A wall hatch or door provided access to the attic. (see photos). The access door should have weather stripping and insulation to a level equivalent of the surrounding wall to assist in maintaining a consistent R-value.

Attic Insulation: Depth of Insulation
10 - 12 Inches

Blown-in insulation has an approximate R-value of 2 1/2 - 3 1/2 per inch of insulation. 

Attic Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Ridge Vents

Proper roof ventilation reduces heat in the summer and helps prevent condensation in the winter. Reducing the temperatures in the attic with adequate ventilation also usually helps extend the life of the roofing materials. It is often best to evenly distribute half of the vents near the peak, and the other half near the bottom at the soffit which creates a convective airflow from bottom to top. 

Wall Insulation: 2x4 Walls

There were indications that the exterior walls were 2x4 studs providing cavities for thermal insulation approximately 3 1/2 inches thick. Typically, this would allow for an R-value of R-11- R 13

Attic General: Limited Inspection

The attic space lacked adequate headroom, or access obstructions prevented the inspection of one or more areas of the attic. As a result, the attic inspection was limited. The portion(s) of the attic which was not accessible may contain damage or defects that have the potential to cause unexpected repairs in the home. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for the portions of the attic which were not observable, or readily accessible at the time of the inspection.

Wall Insulation: Not Visible

The exterior wall insulation is typically not visible at the time of the home inspection because the exterior and interior wall finishes conceal it. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Attic Insulation

Attic Ladder Insulation - Damages / Missing

The attic access ladder's insulation was damaged or missing at the time of the inspection. Access openings should have comparable levels of insulation as the rest of the attic. Consider installation to help reduce unwanted heat loss/gain. I have shown one possible solution in the attached image.

$
Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - Crawlspace Insulation

Loose, Missing Insulation

Thermal insulation was loose, missing, or had fallen out from between the floor joists in several areas of the crawlspace. (see photos) Insulation should be adequately secured in position or replaced as needed to help reduce heating and cooling costs and create a more comfortable living environment. Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link

10 - Crawlspace / Basement

IN NI NP O
10.1 General Information X
10.2 Crawlspace General X
10.3 Crawlspace Moisture (Interior) X X
10.4 Basement General X
10.5 Basement Moisture (Interior) X
10.6 Sump Pump X X
Crawlspace General: Inspection Method (Access Location)
From Inside Crawlspace
Crawlspace Moisture (Interior): Crawlspace Floor
Dirt With Vapor Barrier
Sump Pump: Location
Crawlspace

A sump pump was installed to help remove groundwater. 

General Information: Introduction Notes

We endeavor to inspect the crawlspace/basement, according to today's InterNACHI Standards of Practice. This inspection typically includes:

  • Structure (Foundation and Framing)
  • Moisture related problems 
  • Vapor barrier
  • Ventilation
  • Thermal insulation
  • Electrical components: (wiring, outlets, switches, and lighting)
  • Plumbing components: (supply and waste pipes, water heater and TPR discharge pipes if present) and
  • HVAC components present (furnace, condensate, and ductwork)
Crawlspace General: Crawlspace Access Foundation Hatch

I accessed the crawlspace area through a foundation hatch in the exterior wall. 

Crawlspace Moisture (Interior): Crawlspace Moisture Content
12% - 16% Widespread

The moisture content of the wood framing materials was spot-checked with a moisture meter at several locations in the crawl space and found to be within the range stated above. (see the attached images) The moisture content should ideally be below 20% to help prevent wood rot, termite activity, and mold.

Sump Pump: Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the sump pump are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.  

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

General Information: Limited Moisture Inspection

The inspector will spot check the wood framing materials in the crawlspace or basement area with a moisture meter looking for elevated moisture levels. It is not feasible to check all of the wood materials in the limited time allotted for a home inspection. Often the wood framing is concealed by insulation, ductwork, or other obstructions, which limit the inspector's ability to observe. For these reasons, there may be locations with elevated moisture or damage not seen at the time of the inspection. 

Crawlspace General: Not Visible

There are nearly always parts of the crawlspace that are not visible or accessible due to a lack of adequate headroom or concealment by insulation or other obstructions. The crawlspace inspection is limited to what is readily apparent to the inspector. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for the portions of the crawl space, which were not readily accessible or viewable at the time of the inspection.

Basement General not present.

Basement Moisture (Interior) not present.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Crawlspace Moisture (Interior)

Scattered Surface Fungi

Localized areas of the crawlspace had scattered surface fungi on the wood framing materials indicating that the crawlspace has elevated levels of moisture at times. (see photos). This condition is not uncommon in our climate. The EPA states that small areas affected by mold or mildew may be cleaned by homeowners using soap and water. Consider taking steps such as installing a vapor barrier, improving ventilation, or installing a dehumidifier to lower the moisture levels in the crawlspace area. The client may wish to consider having a qualified mold specialist further evaluate the affected areas or test the indoor air quality if he or she is concerned about any possible health-related mold. Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
10.6.1 - Sump Pump

Sump Pump Extension

I recommend extending the sump discharge further away from the foundation to help ensure that the safe release of water away from the house.

11 - Foundation / Structure & Pests

IN NI NP O
11.1 General Information X
11.2 Foundation Exterior Structure X
11.3 Roof Exterior Structure X
11.4 Wall Structure - (Framing) X
11.5 Floor / Ceiling Structure (Framing) X
11.6 Attic Structure (Roof Framing) X
11.7 Crawlspace Structure (Framing) X
11.8 Foundation Interior Structure X
11.9 Pests Conducive Conditions X
11.10 Pests Visual Evidence X X
Foundation Exterior Structure: Foundation Type
Crawlspace
Foundation Exterior Structure: Material
Brick
Floor / Ceiling Structure (Framing): Floor / Ceiling Joist Type
Unable To Determine, Wooden Joist
Attic Structure (Roof Framing): Roof Sheeting
OSB (Oriented Strand Board)
Crawlspace Structure (Framing): Flooring System Over Head
Dimensional Lumber
Crawlspace Structure (Framing): Columns
Masonry Block
General Information: Introduction Notes

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the home structural elements that were readily visible at the time of the review. The examination typically consists of the foundation, exterior walls, floor structures, and roof structure. Much of the home's structure is hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or buried underground. Because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all structural deficiencies. We do not perform a structural engineering survey. If we observe or suspect movement, we advised the client to consult with a Structural Engineer who can identify causes and determine what corrective steps, if any, should be implemented.

General Information: Suggested Maintenance (Grading)

I recommend directing the rain runoff water or drainage away from all sides of the foundation with adequate grade slopes or a drainage system. Moisture near or under the foundation or support columns makes settling and movement of the structure more likely to occur. In many cases, floor coverings or stored articles prevent recognition of signs of settlement and cracking in all but the most severe cases. 

Attic Structure (Roof Framing): Conventional Roof Framing

I observed that the roof framing structure of the home was primarily conventionally framed (rafters and ridge).

Pests Conducive Conditions: What We Look For (WDO)

A licensed pest control specialist will likely perform a more thorough evaluation than a general home inspector. Please see the attached images for where we generally look for wood-destroying organism activity (WDO) and conducive conditions for WDO while performing a home inspection. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
11.10.1 - Pests Visual Evidence

Wasp / Insect Nest Present

A wasp/Insect nest was visible at the home exterior (shown in the attached images). I recommend nest removal.

12 - Heating & Cooling

IN NI NP O
12.1 General Information X X
12.2 Natural Gas / Propane X X
12.3 Thermostat & HVAC - Distribution X
12.4 A.C. # 1 (Exterior Compressor) X
12.5 A.C. # 2 (Exterior Compressor) X X
12.6 Furnace (Attic) X
12.7 Furnace (Crawl Space) X X
12.8 Condensate X
12.9 Flues - Exhaust, & Combustion Air X
12.10 Gas Fireplace X X
12.11 Wood Fireplace X
Natural Gas / Propane: Fuel Line Material
Black Iron, Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST)
Thermostat & HVAC - Distribution : Basement Thermostat - Location & Temperature Differential
Not Present
Thermostat & HVAC - Distribution : Ductwork Insulation
Insulated
A.C. # 2 (Exterior Compressor) : Air Conditioner Type
Central Air Conditioning
Furnace (Attic): Energy Source/Type
Natural Gas
Furnace (Crawl Space): Energy Source/Type
Natural Gas
Gas Fireplace: Type
Gas Logs
Gas Fireplace: Smoke / CO Detector
Smoke Detector Present
General Information : Introduction Notes

The general home inspection does not include any heating/cooling system warranty or guarantee. The examination will not be as thorough or exhaustive as a specialist would typically perform. The inspection of the HVAC system may show the unit(s) to be operating adequately at the time of the test, but this does not guarantee the future life or failure of the equipment. The inspection of heating/cooling systems by our general home inspector is limited to visual evaluation and operation using standard controls. Report comments are limited to the identification of the most basic and standard requirements and deficiencies. If concerned, or if the client desires a more exhaustive evaluation, the client may wish to have the heating/cooling equipment cleaned, evaluated, and serviced by a specialist. As part of ongoing home care, I recommend regular service and maintenance on all HVAC equipment, at least on an annual basis. 


Natural Gas / Propane: Main Gas Shut-off Location
Gas Meter, Exterior Right

In case of an emergency, you should know where the gas shut valve is and how to operate it. Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link

Thermostat & HVAC - Distribution : Main Floor Thermostat - Location & Temperature Differential
Entry Way Hallway
Programable, A.C. Not Tested (Below 65 Degrees)
Thermostat & HVAC - Distribution : Upstairs Thermostat - Location & Temperature Differential
Hallway
Programable, A.C. Not Tested (Below 65 Degrees)
Thermostat & HVAC - Distribution : Temperature Differential Information

Measuring temperature differentials is one method home inspectors typically use to access the air conditioner or heat pump's performance. In cooling mode, the generally accepted "normal range" of operation, is a drop in temperature of between 14-23 degrees Fahrenheit measured from the return air supply, or ambient room temperature, to the supply ductwork. (see the attached photo).

A.C. # 1 (Exterior Compressor) : Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the air conditioner are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

A.C. # 1 (Exterior Compressor) : Air Conditioner Type
Central Air Conditioning

"Tons" is a term commonly used to describe the capacity of an air conditioner. In our climate, 1 ton can cool approximately 450 - 700 square feet of living area. A ton of refrigeration is equivalent to 12,000 BTU per hour. Determining the appropriate size for an air conditioner is dependant upon many factors; including, the size of the home, how well the home is insulated, the number of windows and doors, etc. These calculations are beyond the scope of a general home inspection.  

A.C. # 1 (Exterior Compressor) : Scope of Inspection

Pressure tests of the cooling system and inspecting the evaporator coil inside the plenum are outside the scope of a general home inspection. We make no guarantee regarding the coolant charge or line integrity. I recommend regular service and maintenance of the cooling equipment at least once annually by a qualified cooling equipment specialist.

A.C. # 2 (Exterior Compressor) : Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the air conditioner are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Furnace (Attic): Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the furnace are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.  

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Furnace (Crawl Space): Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the furnace are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.  

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Condensate: General Information

Air conditioners and high-efficiency gas furnaces produce condensate, which requires proper discharged. 

Flues - Exhaust, & Combustion Air: Chimney / Flue Maintenance

Most homeowners are aware of the need for chimney cleaning and inspection if they own a wood-burning stove or regularly use their fireplace. Still, many don't realize that a gas heating appliance-whether it is a furnace, boiler, or even a water heater also often uses the chimney for proper venting of the exhaust. Appliances fueled by natural gas or propane may not produce the visible soot that other fuels do, but they can deposit corrosive substances in the chimney. In many cases, these acids may wreak havoc on the chimney without producing any external symptoms until the problem has become dangerous or expensive to repair.

Gas Fireplace: Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the fireplace are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.  

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

General Information : Below 65 Degrees - A.C. Not Operated

Cooling equipment should not be checked for performance or operated when the outside air temperature is less than 65 degrees Fahrenheit because testing could cause damage to the compressor or other components. In colder weather conditions, our examination of the cooling equipment is limited to visual observations only.

General Information : Over 65 Degrees - Heat Pump Not Operated

We do not operate heat pumps when the outside temperature is above 65 degrees because operation at these temperatures could cause damage to the equipment. The examination of the heat pumps in warm weather is limited to visual observations only. 

Furnace (Attic): Disclaim Heat Exchanger

Because inspection of the heat exchanger is not ordinarily possible without disassembly of the unit, this component is beyond the scope of a general home inspection. Regular service and maintenance of the heating equipment should be performed annually by a qualified heating/cooling equipment specialist.

Furnace (Crawl Space): Disclaim Heat Exchanger

Because inspection of the heat exchanger is not ordinarily possible without disassembly of the unit, this component is beyond the scope of a general home inspection. Regular service and maintenance of the heating equipment should be performed annually by a qualified heating/cooling equipment specialist.

Wood Fireplace not present.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - General Information

Register Cover Missing

A register cover was missing and should be replaced.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
12.2.1 - Natural Gas / Propane

(Exterior) Rust / Corrosion

Gas pipes at the home's exterior exhibited moderate general corrosion. If this condition continues, it may eventually cause gas pipes to leak. I suggest cleaning and painting gas pipes located on the exterior of the home to help prolong their life. Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link

$
Credit
Comment
12.5.1 - A.C. # 2 (Exterior Compressor)

Mismatched Breaker Size

I observed mismatched breaker sizes between the exterior cooling equipment's (Max/Min Amperage Rating) and the disconnect or breaker in the service panel. (see photos) Incompatible electrical components may affect performance or cause damage to the HVAC equipment. I recommend further evaluated and correction as needed by a qualified professional.

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
12.7.1 - Furnace (Crawl Space)

Broken Condensate Line / Pump

High-efficiency furnace exhaust produces condensate fluid, which requires proper discharge. The condensate line or pump was not working as intended and leaking at the time of the inspection. I recommend repair or replacement by a qualified heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) contractor.

Fire HVAC Professional
$
Credit
Comment
12.10.1 - Gas Fireplace

Gas Fireplace Not Vented

(For Informational Purposes Only) A ventless gas fireplace was present in the home. Proper use and maintenance will help ensure that safe conditions exist. The concern with a ventless gas appliance is that it may allow combustion byproducts to enter the living space. I recommend adding a carbon monoxide detector within the same room as the fireplace and having a professional service the unit annually. Here is a link to a helpful article online, Article Link.

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
12.10.2 - Gas Fireplace

No Response / Inoperable

The gas fireplace (shown in the attached images) did not respond to standard operating controls indicating that it may need service. Other possibilities include 

  • The gas valve may not be off at the unit. 
  • The igniter may not be operating as intended. 
  • The thermocouple may need replacement. 
  • The inspector may be unable to locate the remote or switch. 
  • The inspector may be unfamiliar with the exact sequence of procedures required to light this fireplace. 

I suggest first trying to verify regular operation with the owner. If the owner is unable to show the fireplace in good working condition, I recommend service and repairs as needed by a qualified professional. 

13 - Plumbing System & Fixtures

IN NI NP O
13.1 General Information / Water Main X
13.2 Exterior Plumbing X X
13.3 Kitchen Sink / Faucet X
13.4 Lavatories / Faucet X
13.5 Toilets X
13.6 Tubs, Showers & Enclosures X X
13.7 Laundry Room Plumbing X
13.8 Water Heater & Controls X
13.9 Water Heater Safety Devices X
13.10 Water Supply & Distribution System X
13.11 Drain, Waste, & Vent System X X
General Information / Water Main: Main Water Supply Material
Pex
Water Heater & Controls: Power Source
Natural Gas
Water Heater & Controls: Capacity / Type
Tankless
Water Supply & Distribution System: Water Supply Pipe Material
PEX, Copper
Drain, Waste, & Vent System: Waste Pipe Materials / System
PVC
General Information / Water Main: Introduction Notes

We inspected the visible plumbing water supply and drain system according to today's InterNACHI Standards of Practice. Portions of the plumbing system that were concealed by finishes, stored items, below grade, or in or under the foundation were not visible and, therefore, not inspected. Inspection of the plumbing system typically includes a visual examination of; 

  • Water supply pipes; 
  • Drain, waste, and vent (DWV) system; 
  • Water heater (type, condition, and operation); 
  • Sewage disposal system (designation as public or private); 
  • Gas system; and 
  • Sump pump (if present) - confirmation of installation / operation. 
    The general home inspection does not include any plumbing system or component warranty or guarantee. The examination may show the plumbing system or fixture to be operating as expected when checked, but this does not guarantee the future life or failure of the system, component, or equipment. The examination will not be as thorough or exhaustive as a specialist would typically perform. If concerned, the client may wish to consider having a licensed plumber conduct a more thorough investigation.
General Information / Water Main: Location of Main Water Shut Off
Outside At Meter

Sometimes the only readily accessible water shut off is at the main water meter outside. The meter is usually in the front yard by the street and has a small access cover. I recommend purchasing a Water Key Tool so that you can quickly shut off the water at the meter in case of a plumbing emergency. The tool is inexpensive and found at most hardware stores. 

General Information / Water Main: Water Supply / Waste Water (Source)
Private Septic System

The inspector does his or her best to determine if a public or private system services the home. On occasion, this information is not readily apparent. I suggest carefully reading the seller's disclosure, asking the seller, or further investigation if needed.  

Exterior Plumbing: Water Pressure
Above 90 psi

If the water pressure is below 40 psi or above 80 psi, it is outside of the "normal" acceptable range, and I suggest further evaluation and correction as needed. High water pressure is generally considered a safety concern if it is above 100 psi.  

Exterior Plumbing: Anti- Siphon Device At Hose Faucets

I recommend installing anti-siphon devices on all exterior water supply faucets to help prevent contaminants from entering the water supply system. Although a non-removable anti-siphon is preferred, a simple brass retrofit part can be purchased at most hardware stores for less than $10 and screwed onto existing hose bibs. (see images) Here is a link to an online article for further information online. Article Link

Water Heater & Controls: Appliance Information Pictures

Pictures of the water heater are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls.  

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to about 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding.

Water Heater & Controls: Location
Garage, Crawlspace
Water Heater & Controls: Tankless Water Heater Notes

Hot water for the home was supplied by a tankless water heater, which does not store water in a tank as conventional water heaters do. When a hot water fixture is on, water flows into the water heater, where gas burners heat it before running to the open hot water fixture. Many tankless water heaters require a minimum flow of about 1/2 gallon per minute to initially turn on. It also usually takes longer for hot water to reach individual fixtures than it would with a traditional hot water tank. Tankless water heaters save energy by avoiding the standby losses associated with conventional water heaters, which always maintain minimum water temperature in the tank. Due to calcium build-up on components, tankless water heaters typically require service annually. Failure to service the water heater on time usually results in a reduced hot water flow rate or other problems. 

Water Heater Safety Devices: Water Pressure Regulator (Expansion Tank)

I recommend installing an expansion tank at the water heating equipment.

NOTE: Water expands when heated, therefore in a closed system, it creates pressure on the water tank (and pipes).

PREVENTION: Expansion tanks help to absorb the force of expanding water and extend the life of the water heater tank.


Water Supply & Distribution System: Water Supply Insulation

Although we live in a moderate climate, freezing pipes and damage is possible during periods of unusually cold weather. I suggest that water supply pipes in the attic, garage, basement, or crawlspace which hang below the floor joists insulation be wrapped with insulation to help protect them from freezing.

General Information / Water Main: Concealed Plumbing

Finished construction prevents visual inspection of plumbing located in or below concrete slabs. Pipes that are concealed in foundations, below grade, under flatwork, inside walls or attics, between ceilings, covered by insulation, or hidden by other finishes are outside the scope of a home inspection.

Laundry Room Plumbing: Unable To View Washer / Dryer Connections

The washer and dryer were full of personal belongings at the time of the inspection. As a result, the plumbing and venting to these fixtures could not be thoroughly inspected or evaluated. (see photos)

Water Heater Safety Devices: TPR Inspected Not Tested

The water heating equipment TPR valve was inspected and verified but not tested. It is common for TPR drain valves to fail and leak during or after testing.

Drain, Waste, & Vent System: Most Not Visible

Most drain, waste, and vent pipes were not visible due to wall, ceiling, and floor coverings. Buried or concealed sewer and waste drain components are not visible and, therefore, not inspected.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
13.2.1 - Exterior Plumbing

High Water Pressure (Above 90 psi)

I tested the water pressure for the home with a gauge at an exterior hose spigot. The home's water pressure exceeded 90 pounds per square inch (psi) at the time of the inspection. (see photos) Normal water pressure is generally accepted to be between 40 and 80 psi. When water pressure exceeds the recommended level, there is a higher chance of damage to the plumbing pipes and fixtures in the home. I recommend lowering the water pressure with the existing regulator if present, or having a qualified plumbing professional install one if needed. Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link

$
Credit
Comment
13.2.2 - Exterior Plumbing

Anti- Siphon Device At Hose Spigot

I recommend installing anti-siphon devices on all exterior water supply faucets to help prevent contaminants from entering the water supply system. Although a non-removable anti-siphon is preferred, a simple brass retrofit part can be purchased at most hardware stores for less than $10 and screwed onto existing hose bibs. (see images) Here is a link to an online article for further information online. Article Link

$
Credit
Comment
13.6.1 - Tubs, Showers & Enclosures

Drain Stop Missing / Inoperable

The drain stop for the bathtub(s) was missing or not operating as intended at the time of the inspection. (see photos)

$
Credit
Comment
13.11.1 - Drain, Waste, & Vent System

Leaking Waste / Drain Pipe

A drain/waste pipe was leaking at the time of the inspection. (see photos) I recommend a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as needed. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
13.11.2 - Drain, Waste, & Vent System

Possible Septic System

There were indications that the home may have a septic system installed, which typically consists of a tank, leach field, and related components. The inspection of this system lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection, and the Inspector did not inspect it. Because these systems can be expensive to repair or replace, I suggest further investigation to determine if the home does have a private septic system installed. If a septic tank is present, consider having the system inspected by a qualified contractor before the expatriation of your inspection contingency. The presence of a septic tank on the property is not a defect. This item is labeled orange to make the client aware of its possible existence. Here is a link to a helpful article online Article Link 

Mag glass Monitor

14 - Electrical System & Fixtures

IN NI NP O
14.1 General Information X
14.2 Electrical Meter & Service Entrance Conductors X
14.3 Grounding & Bonding X
14.4 Light Fixtures / Switches & Disconnects X X
14.5 GFCI & AFCI Protection X X
14.6 Receptacles (Outlets) X X
14.7 Main Electrical Panel X
14.8 Sub Panel X X
14.9 Circuits, Breakers & Fuses X
14.10 Branch Wiring X
14.11 Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors X
Electrical Meter & Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Meter Locatioin
Back, Left
Electrical Meter & Service Entrance Conductors: Service Entrance
Underground
Light Fixtures / Switches & Disconnects : Door Bell Installed
Yes
Main Electrical Panel : Main Panel Location
Exterior
Main Electrical Panel : Panel Amperage
200 AMP
Sub Panel: Sub Panel Location
Laundry Room
Sub Panel: Panel Amperage
200 AMP
Branch Wiring: Branch Wiring Material - Method
NM Romex, Copper
General Information: Introduction Notes

I inspected the electrical system, components, and fixtures according to today's InterNACHI's Standards of Practice. Some portions of the electrical system were concealed and, therefore, not accessible or inspected. The general home inspection does not include any electrical system warranty or guarantee. The examination will not be as thorough or exhaustive as a specialist would typically perform. The review of the electrical system by a general home inspector is limited to visual evaluation and operation using standard controls. Report comments are limited to the identification of the most common requirements and deficiencies. If concerned, the client may wish to consider having a licensed electrician perform a more thorough investigation.

Grounding & Bonding: Grounding
Grounding Electrodes

The earth grounding system uses a wire to connect the service box to the earth with water pipes, ground rods, etc. The grounding system discharges surges in the electrical system from static electricity and lightning strikes. It also serves as a protection in the event of a ground fault or short circuit. 

Grounding & Bonding: GEC Bonded / Clamped to Rod And Panel

The electrical panel had a grounding electrode conductor (GEC) visible that was bonded and clamped to the top of a driven rod that serves as the grounding electrode. Driven rods are typically an 8-foot copper or steel rod forced into the soil for its full length. The inspector was unable to confirm the length of the driven rod. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the service ground would require the services of a qualified electrical contractor using special instruments.

GFCI & AFCI Protection: GFCI Outlets Information

Modern standards recommend that all exterior, garage, crawlspace, and unfinished basement receptacles have ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. Interior outlets in kitchens, bathrooms, and within 6 feet of a plumbing fixture should also have GFCI protection to help avoid potential electric shock or electrocution hazards.

Main Electrical Panel : Panel Information Pictures

Pictures of the main panel are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls. 

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Sub Panel: Panel Information Pictures

Pictures of the Sub-panel are provided for informational purposes, personal records, and to check for any possible manufacturer recalls. 

Manufacture

Model #

Serial Number

Plate Data

Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Breaker Information

A circuit breaker helps to protect an electrical circuit from damage caused by excessive current/overload, or short circuit. 

Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Smoke / CO Detectors Inspected
Smoke Detectors Present
Receptacles (Outlets): 2 Prong / 220 Outlets (Limited Inspection)

Because modern electrical testing tools are for three-prong receptacles, we do not entirely evaluate two-prong outlets as part of a standard home inspection. If two-prong outlets are present in the home, we check a representative number, only to verify that the outlet has electricity. 220-volt outlets are also visually inspected, and checked if accessible with a non-contact voltage tester to verify that power to the outlet is present. 

Branch Wiring: Concealed Electrical Components

Concealed electrical components behind finished surfaces, under insulation, or not accessible because of personal property are not inspected. The inspection does not include remote control devices, alarm systems, low voltage wiring, ancillary wiring, or speaker/intercom systems.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
14.4.1 - Light Fixtures / Switches & Disconnects

Light Fixture(s) Inoperable

Light fixtures, or individual bulbs within a light fixture, did not turn on when I flipped the switch. (see the attached images for representative examples) Most likely, new light bulbs are needed. If, after replacing the light bulb, it still fails to respond, I suggest that the fixture be evaluated and corrected as required by a qualified professional. 

$
Credit
Comment
14.4.2 - Light Fixtures / Switches & Disconnects

Switch Unknown / Inoperable?

I was unable to identify the light or other electrical fixture operated by one or more switches in the home (mainly shown in the attached images). These switches may connect to outlets that I did not test or to exterior lights, which are controlled by photo sensors and, as a result, only operates at night. Switches sometimes control only the upper or lower half of an outlet. Tracing the devices controlled by all switches exceeds the scope of the general home inspection. If the client is concerned, he or she could have the switches checked and traced by a qualified electrician. It is not uncommon to need to identify the function of some switches in a home. I suggest first asking the seller about the switches in question. Here is a link to a helpful article online Inoperative Switch

$
Credit
Comment
14.5.1 - GFCI & AFCI Protection

GFCI Kitchen Counters

I recommend that all kitchen countertop receptacles have GFCI protection for safety reasons. The ground fault circuit interrupter was either missing or not functioning as intended at the time of the inspection. GFCI outlets or breakers are relatively inexpensive to retrofit. Here is a link to a helpful article online GFCI Outlets

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
14.5.2 - GFCI & AFCI Protection

Exterior GFCI Reset Location

For Informational Purposes Only:

Often one GFCI can protect several other standard looking outlets on the same circuit, and finding the "master" GFCI to reset when necessary can be challenging. The attached image shows the reset location. 

$
Credit
Comment
14.6.1 - Receptacles (Outlets)

Outlet - Loose / Damaged

I observed electrical outlet(s) that were loose or damaged at the time of the inspection. (mainly shown in the attached images) I recommend repair or replacement for safety reasons. Here is a link to a helpful article online Damaged Outlet

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
14.8.1 - Sub Panel

Panel Cover Screws Missing

I observed missing screws at the electrical sub-panel cover or dead-front. I recommend installing the proper screws as needed. It is CRITICAL TO USE BLUNT SCREWS specifically manufactured for electrical panel covers. (see images) Here is a link to a helpful article online Panel Screws

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
14.8.2 - Sub Panel

Bonding Screw Sub Panel

I recommend removing the bonding screw from the neutral bus bar in all electrical sub-panels. Bonding is a requirement in the main service panel and not allowed in sub-panels. (see photos) The neutral and ground wires should be separate or isolated by a qualified electrical specialist. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

15 - Radon Testing

IN NI NP O
15.1 General Information X
15.2 Monitor Type X
15.3 Radon Level X X
General Information: Start Time
10:15

Radon tests are set to run continuously for 48 hours.

Monitor Type: Radon Machine

AirThings Pro Corentium

Monitor Type: Serial Number (1)

2700007281

General Information: Radon Test Explanation

Radon explanation

The home is in an area known to have elevated radon levels. Radon is a colorless, naturally occurring radioactive gas formed deep underground from the decay of uranium. Lighter than air, radon rises through cracks and fissures in the ground and may enter a home's living space through a crawlspace, basement or slab-on-grade. The only foundation type which will not allow radon to accumulate is a raised foundation through which natural air movement occurs freely. Because radon levels are related to the structure of the soil beneath the home, they are home site-specific and may vary widely among households that are closely situated. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), radon causes 21,000 lung cancer deaths per year in the United States (U.S.). Radon is the second most frequent cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. Radon-induced lung cancer is thought to be the 6th leading cause of cancer death overall. Mitigation techniques are available, which typically reduce indoor levels to within the acceptable range. I suggest that you negotiate with the seller for the cost of any needed mitigation. The average outdoor level of radon is 0.4 pCi/L, and the average indoor level in the united states is about 1.3 pCi/L. The EPA recommends remediation if the average level over a 48 hour test period is over 4.0 pCi/L. For additional information about radon levels, please visit Radon Information

General Information: Monitor Location
Master Bedroom
Main Level
General Information: Radon Test Underway

A radon test was underway at the time this report was generated. A testing device was located at the location shown in the attached image.

Radon Level: EPA Resources

This report includes test results from a radon-testing device that records the levels of radon gas in an air sample. The actual radon levels in the home may vary depending on many factors including, time, temperature, season, barometric pressure, ventilation, and other factors. Homes tested using the EPAs protocol should not be mitigated based on a single short term test as used for real estate transactions. A follow-up test is necessary for mitigation decision making regardless of the initial test result. Consulting with a professional radon mitigation specialist is your best option for retesting if there is a concern for mitigation to reducing the level of radon in the home. The EPA recommends fixing your home if the radon level is equal to or greater than 4.0 pCi/L. (The Action Level) Consider remediation for your house if the radon level is higher than 2.0 pCi/L. I recommend checking your home every few years to make sure radon levels are lower than the 4.0 pCi/L level set by the EPA.

More information can be found directly at the EPA's website. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
15.3.1 - Radon Level

Radon Level Below 2.0 pCi/L (48 Hour Average)

The complete radon report is attached to the main home inspection report. It is colored blue and located on the left side if you scroll to the bottom of the page. Here is an additional link to the report Radon Test

The 48-hour average radon level in the home was below 2.0 pCi/L (pico-curies per liter), which is well below the level at which the EPA recommends remediation. If the radon levels average 4.0 pCi/L  or higher over the 48-hour test, the EPA recommends remediation to lower it in the home. 

For Informational Purposes: The average outdoor level of radon is 0.4 pCi/L, and the average indoor level in the united states is about 1.3 pCi/L.

Bq/m3 is the metric measurement for radon. 1 pCi/L = 37 Bq/m3

The radon test is an average radon level for 48 hours and is usually not available when we first publish the home inspection. We will add a link to the results as soon as possible. Typically, about two days after the home inspection. 

16 - Mold / Indoor Air Quality

IN NI NP O
16.1 General Information X
16.2 Mold Testing X X
Mold Testing: Location of Sample # 4
Not Sampled
General Information: Temperature Outside
57 Degrees Fahrenheit
General Information: Humidity Outside
36 Percent
General Information: Temperature Inside
64 Degrees Fahrenheit
General Information: Humidity Inside
50 Percent
General Information: Introduction Notes

Mold is a non-scientific term for many types of fungi found both indoors and outdoors. Active mold growth requires moisture. Actively growing mold damages the material it lives on, thereby impairing structural integrity. Also, mold is associated with some adverse health effects in humans, including allergies, headaches, fatigue, and infections. There are hundreds of different kinds of fungi or mold found both indoors and outdoors. Because mold grows in damp, dimly-lit areas, it is often in places like attics, basements, crawl spaces, and bathrooms. 


General Information: Mold Testing Explanation

The standard mold / Indoor air quality test involves taking at least three samples of air with a special pump and containers. One is taken outside as a control, and we collect two or more additional samples from inside the home. The control sample from the exterior is essential to establish a baseline reference for the area. The plastic containers are shipped overnight to a lab for analysis. In the lab, microbiologists compare the samples to determine if the levels inside the home are considered elevated. There is some mold everywhere in nature, and we are exposed to and breathe some mold spores regularly. Normal levels of mold are generally not harmful to human health. When mold spores in the air are above normal levels and concentrated in a home, adverse health effects are possible, especially for those with compromised immune systems, allergies, or asthma. The report will identify the type of mold present and the concentration levels present. 

Mold Testing: Location of Sample # 1
Outside
Mold Testing: Location of Sample # 2
Main Level
Mold Testing: Location of Sample # 3
2nd Floor, Hallway
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
16.2.1 - Mold Testing

Not Elevated - Mold Testing / Indoor Air Quality Results

Here is a link to the indoor air quality test results. Report Link

I sent the samples taken during the inspection to a laboratory for analysis, and the report for the Indoor Air Quality or Mold Testing is complete. The level of mold spores in the tested area(s) of the home was within the normal range and found not elevated.

The mold report is highlighted in blue at the bottom of the page on the left side. 

For additional information on mold and mold testing, please open the following link. Mold Information

17 - Photo Journal / Conclusion

General Information: Photo Journal Explanation

The pictures in this section are not present to show defects. Some photos clarify where the inspector has been, and others illustrate what I inspected. Some images are to help you better understand the report and may allow you to see areas or items that you usually would not see. I provided the pictures in this section for informational purposes only. Select any image to view full screen.

Photo Journal Information

The Photo Journal in this section is for informational purposes only and not intended to show defects or deficiencies. 

Select any image to view fullscreen

Exterior Home Pictures
Landscaping and Features
Roof Pictures
Interior Main Floor Pictures
Interior Upper Floor Pictures
Interior Garage Pictures
Interior Attic Pictures
Interior Crawlspace Pictures
Thermal Images Main Floor Interior

Thermal images included in this inspection report are limited to certain portions of the home. The inspector chooses the parts of the house to be scanned or photographed, and the photographs included in the report are up to the Inspector's sole discretion.

Thermal Images Upper Floor Interior

Thermal images included in this inspection report are limited to certain portions of the home. The inspector chooses the parts of the house to be scanned or photographed, and the photographs included in the report are up to the Inspector's sole discretion.

Conclusion: Report Conclusion

We are proud of our service and trust that you will be happy with the quality of our report. We have made every effort to provide you with an accurate assessment of the condition of the property and its components and to alert you to any significant defects or adverse conditions. However, we may not have tested every outlet and opened every window and door or identified every problem. We work hard to perform the best inspection we can with the access/visibility restrictions we face, and within the relatively short time, which allotted for the review. Also, because our inspection is primarily visual, latent defects could exist. We can not see behind or through walls, floors, or ceilings. Therefore, you should not regard our inspection as a guarantee or warranty. It is merely a report on the general condition of a property at a given point in time. As a homeowner, you should expect routine maintenance, items needing repair, and other problems to occur. Roofs will leak, basements may have water problems, and systems may fail without warning.

We can not predict future events. It is simply not reasonable to expect a general home inspection to eliminate all risks of homeownership. For these reasons, you should keep a comprehensive insurance policy current. A home inspector is a generalist. When appropriate, a home inspector may recommend further evaluation or correction by a specialist similar to a general family doctor recommending further evaluation by a cardiologist. A specialist will be able to perform a more complete and exhaustive evaluation than a general home inspector. He or she will likely also be able to provide solutions and cost estimates for any repairs which may be needed. We recommend that the client obtain at least two professional opinions/evaluations for any more substantial or significant items. When a specialist is recommended by us to evaluate or correct a specific item, we also recommend that they check for other related repairs. A specialist can often identify issues that may be beyond the scope of a general home inspection. The client is further encouraged to have additional inspections performed by specialists when appropriate, such as a structural engineer, an electrician, or a roofing contractor. This report was written exclusively for our client, and it is not transferable. The home inspection report is only supplemental to a seller's disclosure. Thank you for taking the time to read this report and call us if you have any questions or concerns. We are always attempting to improve the quality of our service. 


Conclusion: Pre-Closing Walk Through

PRE-CLOSING WALKTHROUGH: The walk-through before closing is the time for the client to inspect the property. Conditions can change between the time of a home inspection and closing. Restrictions that existed during the first inspection, such as furniture and personal property, are usually not present for the final walk-through. As a result, defects or problems not found during the home inspection may be visible during a thorough walk-through. I recommend negotiating with the owner/seller of the property before closing concerning any problems encountered. Purchasing the property with a known defect or problem releases Apple Tree Inspections of all responsibility. The following are recommendations for the pre-closing walk-through of your new house. Consider hiring a certified home inspector to assist you. The client assumes responsibility for all known defects after settlement.

  1. Check the heating and cooling system. Turn the thermostat to heat mode and turn the temperature setting up. Confirm that the heating system is running and making heat. Turn the thermostat to off and wait 20 minutes. Turn the thermostat to cool mode and turn the temperature setting down. Confirm the condenser is spinning, and the system is making cold air. Do not operate the cooling system if the temperature is below 65 degrees. You should not operate a heat pump in the heating mode when it is over 65 degrees outside. 
  2.  Operate all appliances. 
  3.  Run water at all fixtures and flush toilets. Look for plumbing leaks. 
  4.  Operate all exterior doors, windows, and locks. 
  5.  Test the smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. 
  6.  Ask for all remote controls to any garage door openers, fans, gas fireplaces, etc. 
  7.  Inspect the areas restricted at the time of the inspection. 
  8.  Ask seller questions about anything not covered during the home inspection. 
  9.  Ask the seller about prior infestation treatment and warranties that may be transferable. 
  10.  Read the seller's disclosure.

Thank you again for trusting Apple Tree Inspections with your home inspection. 

Conclusion: Report Summary

The Report Summary section is a tool to assist our clients and their representative(s) in preparing a repair request, if and when applicable. THIS REPORT IS NOT A LIST OF MANDATORY REPAIRS BUT A LIST OF SUGGESTED REPAIRS OR UPGRADES. The Report Summary follows the flow of the main body of the Property Inspection Report. The order of repair priority is up to the sole discretion of the client. This summary contains only those items identified as deficient. You should read and understand the entire Home Inspection Report before completing any repair request. This report provides technical information. If you are unclear about any of the information it contains, please give us a call.