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1234 Main St.
Grayslake, Illinois 60030
11/16/2019 9:00AM

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This Inspection Report is based on a visual, non-intrusive inspection.  While every effort is made to identify and report all current or potential issues with a home, please understand that there are simply areas that cannot be seen- such as within the wall structure, etc.  An inspector is considered to be a "Generalist" in that the job is to identify and report potential issues rather than diagnose the specific cause or repair items.  For this reason, you will find that it is often recommended to seek further evaluation by a qualified professional such as an Electrical, Plumbing, or Roofing contractor.


The report includes Informational data on various components of the home, Limitations that affected the ability to inspect certain items/areas, and Recommendations for items that require immediate or future attention.


Observations and Recommendations are organized into three categories by level of severity: 

1) Minor/Maintenance IssuesPrimarily comprised of small cosmetic items and simple Handyman or do-it-yourself maintenance items.  These observations are more informational in nature and represent more of a future to-do list rather than something you might use as a negotiation or Seller-repair item.  A Summary Report can be created should you choose to view a report without these minor items or informational data.

2) Moderate RecommendationsMost items typically fall into this category.  These observations may require a qualified contractor to evaluate further and repair or replace but the cost is somewhat reasonable.

3) Significant and/or Safety Concerns - This category is composed of immediate safety concerns or items that could represent a significant expense to repair/replace.  


This is meant to be an Honest, Impartial, Third-Party assessment.  Oftentimes, in the mind of a buyer, minor items are given too much weight and significant items are under-appreciated.  That being said, I would be more than happy to discuss anything in more detail.  Please reach out if you have any questions or need further explanation on anything identified in this report.

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Type of Building
Detached, Single Family
Weather Conditions
Cloudy, Recent Rain
Utilities
All Utilities On


Style
Traditional
Overview

Bee Sure Home Inspection Svcs. strives to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the Standards of Practice as set forth by the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) (https://www.nachi.org/sop.htm). As such, I inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of the home as designated in these Standards of Practice. When systems or components designated in the Standards of Practice were present but were not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected will be stated. This inspection is neither technically exhaustive or quantitative.

This report contains observations of those systems and components that, in my professional judgement, were not functioning properly, were found to be significantly deficient, or unsafe. All items in this report that were designated for repair, replacement, maintenance, or further evaluation should be investigated by qualified specialists / tradespeople (licensed where applicable) within the clients contingency period or prior to closing, which is contract applicable, to determine a total cost of said repairs and to learn of any additional problems that may be present during these evaluations that were not visible during a "visual only" Home Inspection. 

This inspection will not reveal every concern or issue that may be present, but only those significant defects that were visible at the time of inspection. This inspection can not predict future conditions, or determine if latent or concealed defects are present. Once again, the statements made in this report reflect the conditions as existing at the time of Inspection only, and expire at the completion of the inspection. Weather conditions and other changes in conditions may reveal problems that were not present at the time of inspection; including roof leaks, or water infiltration into crawl spaces or basements. This report is only supplemental to the Sellers Disclosure. Refer to the Standards of Practice (https://www.nachi.org/sop.htm), and the Inspection agreement regarding the scope and limitations of this inspection.

This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, REGARDING THE CONDITIONS OF THE PROPERTY, INCLUDING THE ITEMS AND SYSTEMS INSPECTED, AND IT SHOULD NOT BE RELIED ON AS SUCH. This inspection is a tool to assist you in your buying decision, it should be used alongside the sellers disclosure, pest inspection report, and quotes and advice from the tradespeople recommended in this report to gain a better understanding of the condition of the home. Some risk is always involved when purchasing a property and unexpected repairs should be anticipated, as this is unfortunately, a part of home ownership.

Some warranties are provided to you as a courtesy and are done so by a third party. These warranties do have limitations which can be read in the policies themselves. These warranties should not be viewed as an Inspection warranty provided by Bee Sure Home Inspection Svcs, LLC. A comprehensive one year warranty is highly recommended, and sometimes is provided by the seller. 


Notice to Third Parties

Notice to Third Parties: This report is the property of Bee Sure Home Inspection Svcs, LLC (www.grayslakehomeinspections.com)and the Client named herein and is non-transferrable to any and all third-parties or subsequent buyers. THE INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT SHALL NOT BE RELIED UPON BY ANY ONE OTHER THAN THE CLIENT NAMED HEREIN. This report is governed by an Inspection agreement that contains the scope of the inspection, including limitations and exclusions. Unauthorized recipients are advised to contact a qualified Home Inspector of their choosing to provide them with their own Inspection and Report.  


Items Not Inspected and Other Limitations

ITEMS NOT INSPECTED - There are items that are not inspected in a home inspection such as, but not limited to; fences and gates, pools and spas, outbuildings or any other detached structure, refrigerators, washers / dryers, storm doors and storm windows, screens, window AC units, central vacuum systems, water softeners, alarm and intercom systems, and any item that is not a permanent attached component of the home. Also drop ceiling tiles are not removed, as they are easily damaged, and this is a non-invasive inspection. Subterranean systems are also excluded, such as but not limited to: sewer lines, septic tanks, water delivery systems, and underground fuel storage tanks.  Any comments regarding these systems in the report are done so as a courtesy to the client and are not comprehensive.

Water and gas shut off valves are not operated under any circumstances. As well, any component or appliance that is unplugged or "shut off" is not turned on or connected for the sake of evaluation. I don't have knowledge of why a component may be shut down, and can't be liable for damages that may result from activating said components / appliances.

Also not reported on are the causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; Any component or system that was not observed; Calculate the strength, adequacy, design or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility. 

Lastly a home inspection does not address environmental concerns such as, but not limited to: Asbestos, lead, lead based paint, radon, mold, wood destroying organisms (termites, etc), cockroaches, rodents, pesticides, fungus, treated lumber, Chinese drywall, mercury, or carbon monoxide.  


Recommended Contractors Information

CONTRACTORS / FURTHER EVALUATION: It is recommended that licensed professionals be used for repair issues as it relates to the comments in this report, and copies of receipts are kept for warranty purposes. The use of the term "Qualified Person" in this report relates to an individual or company whom is either licensed or certified in the field of concern. If I recommend evaluation or repairs by contractors or other licensed professionals, it is possible that they will discover additional problems since they will be invasive with their evaluation and repairs. Any listed items in this report concerning areas reserved for such experts should not be construed as a detailed, comprehensive, and / or exhaustive list of problems, or areas of concern.


CAUSES of DAMAGE / METHODS OF REPAIR: Any suggested causes of damage or defects, and methods of repair mentioned in this report are considered a professional courtesy to assist you in better understanding the condition of the home, and in my opinion only from the standpoint of a visual inspection. The causes of damage/defects and repair methods should not be wholly relied upon. Contractors or other licensed professionals will have the final determination on causes of damage/deficiencies, and the best methods of repairs, due to being invasive with their evaluation. Their evaluation will supersede the information found in this report.


Other Notes - Important Info

INACCESSIBLE AREAS: In the report, there may be specific references to areas and items that were inaccessible. I can make no representations regarding conditions that may be present but were concealed or inaccessible for review. With access and an opportunity for inspection, reportable conditions may be found in these areas.


COMPONENT LIFE EXPECTANCY - Components may be listed as having no deficiencies at the time of inspection, but may fail at any time due to their age or lack of maintenance, that couldn't be determined by the inspector. A life expectancy chart can be viewed by visiting InterNACHI (https://www.nachi.org/life-expectancy.htm)

PHOTOGRAPHS: Several photos are included in your inspection report. These photos are for informational purposes only and do not attempt to show every instance or occurrence of a defect.


TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS: This report is proofread before sending it out, but typographical errors may be present. If any errors are noticed, please feel free to contact me for clarification.


Please acknowledge to me once you have completed reading the report. At that time I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, or provide clarification.


Comment Key - Definitions

This report divides deficiencies into three categories; Significant Defects (in red), Recommendations (in orange), and Maintenance Items/FYI/Minor Defects (in blue). Safety Hazards or concerns will be listed in the Red or Orange categories depending on their perceived danger, but should always be addressed ASAP. 

  • Significant DefectsItems or components that were not functional and/or may require a major expense to correct. Items categorized in this manner require further evaluation and repairs or replacement as needed by a Qualified Contractor
  • Recommendations - Items or components that were found to include a deficiency but were still functional at the time of inspection, although this functionality may be impaired or not ideal. Repairs are recommended to items categorized in this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a Handyman or Qualified Contractor and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs. 
  • Maintenance Items/FYI/Minor Defects - Items or components that were found to be in need of recurring or basic general maintenance and/or may need minor repairs which may improve their functionality. Typically these items are considered to represent a less significant immediate cost than those listed in the previous two categories and can be addressed by a Homeowner or Handyman.  Also included in this section are items that were at the end of their typical service life or beginning to show signs of wear, but were in the opinion of the inspector, still functional at the time of inspection. Items that are at, or past their typical service life will require subsequent observation to monitor performance with the understanding that replacement or major repairs should be anticipated. 

These categorizations are in my professional opinion and based on what I observed at the time of inspection, and this categorization should not be construed as to mean that items designated as "Minor defects" or "Recommendations" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendation in the text of the comment is more important than it's categorization. Due to your opinions or personal experience you may feel defects belong in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once again it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining to each defect that is paramount, not it's categorical placement. 

Occupancy
Furnished, Occupied

For furnished homes, access to some items such as electrical outlets, windows, wall/floor surfaces and cabinet interiors can be restricted by furniture and/or personal belongings. These items are limitations of the inspection and these items may be concealed defects.

Temperature (approximate)
56 Fahrenheit (F)
The outside temperature will impact various portions of the inspection. If its too cool, we will be unable to fully test the A/C. If too warm, same goes for the furnace. Also, ideally we would like an indoor/outdoor temperature differential of 20 or more for best results on portions of an Infrared inspection.
Relative Humidity- Interior
55 %
Except in specialized facilities, the relative humidity in your building should be between 30% and 50%. Condensation on windows, wet stains on walls and ceilings, and musty smells are signs thatrelative humidity may be high.

2 - Orientation Details

Front of Property / Compass
Southwest
Orientation

For the sake of this inspection the front of the home will be considered as the portion of the home facing the road. References to the "left" or "right" of the home should be construed as standing in the front yard and facing the front of the home.

Location References

For the purpose of this report all directions are given as if you are standing facing the front of the house. Items listed as Multiple Locations may not directly reference all effected locations. Examples may be given that should not be construed as the only affected areas. Further evaluation will need to take place to determine every effected location.

3 - Roof

Inspection Method
Binoculars, Ground, Ladder
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Seamless Aluminum
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Chimney type(s)
Brick
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Flue type(s)
Tile, Not Fully Visible
Roof Structure & Attic: Supports
Rafters, 2x8
Roof Type/Style
SaltBox
Coverings: Material
Asphalt, Architectural/Dimensional
General Introduction

The roof inspection portion of the General Home Inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified roofing contractor. Because of variations in installation requirements of the huge number of different roof-covering materials installed over the years, the General Home Inspection does not include confirmation of proper installation. Home Inspectors are trained to identify common deficiencies and to recognize conditions that require evaluation by a specialist. Inspection of the roof typically includes visual evaluation of the roof structure, roof-covering materials, flashing, and roof penetrations like chimneys, mounting hardware for roof-mounted equipment, attic ventilation devices, ducts for evaporative coolers, and combustion and plumbing vents. The roof inspection does not include leak-testing and will not certify or warranty the roof against future leakage. Other limitations may apply and will be included in the comments as necessary.

Limited Inspection- Safety

The Inspector was unable to safely walk the roof due to its steep slope, slippery conditions, and or excessive access height (we carry a 17 foot ladder). Where possible we inspected the roof-covering materials and components from a ladder and from the ground. Not all portions of the roof were visible. A full roof inspection will require special equipment, the use of which exceeds the scope of the General Home Inspection. If you wish to have a more detailed roof inspection, the Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection deadline, you hire a qualified roofing contractor with the equipment required to safely access the entire roof.

Coverings: Dimensional

The roof was covered with laminated fiberglass composition asphalt shingles. Laminated shingles are composed of multiple layers bonded together. Laminated shingles are also called "architectural" or "laminated" shingles. Composition shingles are composed of a fiberglass mat embedded in asphalt and covered with ceramic-coated mineral granules. Shingles with multiple layers bonded together are usually more durable than shingles composed of a single layer.  An average life expectancy for this type of roof covering is 20-25 years.

Coverings: Estimated Age of Roof Covering
5-10 years

This is an estimate, based on visual observances and characteristics.  For an exact or more accurate assessment of the age of the roof covering you should consider consult with a qualified roofing professional.

Underlayment: Underlayment Material
Unknown- Hidden
Roof Drainage Systems: Seamless Aluminum

The aluminum gutter system was a seamless type with gutter seams at corners only. Seams are weak points in gutters and are typically where they fail first. Gutter systems using seamless fabrication may have longer service lives than gutters assembled in sections.

Flashings: General Flashing Description

Flashing is a general term used to describe sheet metal fabricated into shapes and used to protect areas of the roof from moisture intrusion. Inspection typically includes inspection for condition and proper installation of flashing in the following locations: - roof penetrations such as vents, electrical masts, chimneys, mechanical equipment, patio cover attachment points, and around skylights; - junctions at which roofs meet walls; - roof edges; - areas at which roofs change slope; - areas at which roof-covering materials change; and - areas at which different roof planes meet (such as valleys).

Flashings: Material
Aluminum, Rubber
Flashing is used to prevent water penetration at the junction of the roof with another surface, such as a wall or chimney.
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Chimney Cap Material
Unknown Material

Chimney cap or crown appears to have been wrapped in either sheet metal or an EPDM type membrane.  Unable to identify the specific cap material or condition from the eave area.

Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Flue inspection disclaimer

Accurate inspection of the chimney flue (or side vent, if so equipped) lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. Although the Inspector may make comments on the condition of the portion of the flue readily visible from the roof, a full, accurate evaluation of the flue condition would require the services of a specialist. Because the accumulation of flammable materials in the flue as a natural result of the wood-burning process is a potential fire hazard, the inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline you have the flue inspected by a specialist.

Roof Structure & Attic: Sheathing Material
Plywood, Solid Planks
Roof Covering Wet - Limited Inspection

Due to rain or snow the roof surfaces were wet.  The inspector was unable to safely access and walk the roof.  Where possible, the inspector used binoculars to view portions of the roof, or viewed portions of the roof from a ladder at the eaves.  In most cases when a roof cannot be accessed or walked, there are portions of the roof which simply cannot be viewed from the ground or even a ladder at a lower eave.

Coverings: Unable to walk roof - slippery conditions

Due to rain, snow, or ice, the inspector was unable to safely walk the roof.

Underlayment: Disclaimer- Completely Hidden

The underlayment was hidden beneath the roof-covering material. It was not inspected and the Inspector disclaims responsibility for evaluating its condition or confirming its presence.

Flashings: Limited view of roof systems

The flashings were not fully visible due to the roof being non accessible.  

Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Chimney not fully visible

Because the inspector was unable to access the roof, or the height of the chimney above the roof was limiting our view, the inspector was unable to fully assess the condition of the chimney.  The inspection is limited to the visible portion of the chimney from the ground or roof with binoculars.  The West, South, and North sides of the chimney were visible, while the East side, the actual chimney cap, and the flues were not visible from the eaves.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Downspouts Drain Near House

One or more downspouts drain too close to the home's foundation. This can result in excessive moisture in the soil at the foundation, which can lead to foundation/structural movement. Recommend a qualified contractor adjust downspout extensions to drain at least 4-6 feet from the foundation.

Here is a helpful DIY link and video on draining water flow away from your house.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Flashings

Chimney Flashing- Sealant Dependent

Evidence of sealants / roofing tar @ chimney flashings.  Sealants will eventually dry, shrink and crack, allowing moisture intrusion with the potential to cause decay of the roof sheathing or framing, microbial growth, or damage to other home materials. The condition of the sealant should be checked annually and an appropriate sealant reapplied as necessary by a qualified roofing contractor. The Inspector recommends installation of proper flashing and counter-flashing by a qualified contractor.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.2 - Flashings

No Flashing, Sealant Only
Electrical mast / weatherhead

Areas ofthe roof were protected by sealant instead of metal flashing.Sealants have a much shorter lifespan than metal flashing and will eventually dry, shrink and crack, providing a point of entry for moisture intrusion of the roof structure and increased chances of leakage. This sealant should be checked annually and re-applied as necessary. The Inspector recommends installation of properly-installed flashing.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.3 - Flashings

Roof Edge Flashing- Improper Overlap

Roof edge flashing was improperly installed in places. When asphalt-saturated felt paper underlayment is used, it should overlap roof edge flashing at the eves, and be overlapped by the flashing at the rakes. This condition may cause moisture damage to roof sheathing in the affected areas from wood decay and/or delamination. Any corrections should be made by a qualified contractor.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.4 - Flashings

Roof Edge Flashing Missing
North rake edge

Areas of the roof were missing roof edge flashing. Lack of roof edge flashing leaves the edges of roof sheathing and underlayment exposed to potential moisture damage from wood decay and/or delamination.  Water is capable of running behind the gutter systems if no drip edge flashings are installed, which can lead to water damage / rot / decay of the soffit and fascia boards.  The inspector recommends replacement of roof edge flashing in areas where it is missing. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

No Cricket, Over 30"

The chimney may have no cricket.  This could not be verified due to being unable to access the roof or view the East side of the chimney.  A cricket is a small roof built on the uphill side of the chimney to prevent roof drainage from pooling and causing damage from roof leakage. Crickets are recommended for chimneys measuring 30 inches or more in width (measured parallel to the eves). This chimney measured more than 30 inches in width. Recommend Monitoring as this could lead to moisture intrusion.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.5.2 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Missing Spark Arrestor

The chimney(s) had no spark arrestor. The Inspector recommends that all chimneys have an approved spark arrestor installed by a qualified contractor to prevent pest entry and to help protect the roof-covering materials from potential chimney-source ignition.

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor

4 - Exterior

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Brick Veneer, Vinyl
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Trim Material
Wood, Metal
Exterior Doors: Exterior Entry Door- Front
Glass, Wood
Exterior Doors: Exterior Entry Door- Back
Glass, Steel
Exterior Doors: Exterior Entry Door- Garage
Glass, Wood
Window Exteriors: Window Frames
Vinyl
Driveways: Driveway Material
Asphalt
Driveways: Driveway OK

No deficiencies were found in the driveway at the time of inspection.

Patios: Patio Material
Pavers
Walkways: Walkway Material
Pavers
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Deck with Steps, Patio, Front Stoop
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material - Deck
Wood, Composite
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material - Patio
Pavers
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Material
Metal
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Retaining Wall(s)
Block
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Style
Panels, Masonry
Inspection Method
Visual

Inspection of the home exterior typically includes: exterior wall covering materials, window and door exteriors, adequate surface drainage, driveway and walkways, window wells, exterior electrical components, exterior plumbing components, potential tree problems, and retaining wall conditions that may affect the home structure. Note: The General Home Inspection does not include inspection of landscape irrigation systems, fencing or swimming pools/spas unless pre-arranged as ancillary inspections.

Exterior Doors: Exterior Doors OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of exterior doors.

Exterior Doors: Sliding Glass Doors OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of the sliding glass doors.

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Eaves, Soffits and Fascia
The eaves are the edges of the roof which overhang the face of a wall and, normally, project beyond the side of a building. The eaves form an overhang to throw water clear of the walls.  The Soffit is the underside of the eave whereas the Fascia is the outward-facing vertical portion.
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Grading and Drainage
Positive, Negative

Grading is inspected to determine that it allows rainwater to adequately drain away from the structure. The soil is recommended to slope away from the home, with a 6 inch drop in elevation, in the first 10 feet away from the structure (5% grade). Any flat or low areas around the home should be back-filled and sloped away from the foundation, to prevent potential moisture infiltration into areas below grade. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Wood Trim - Due for maintenance and upkeep

Areas of wood trim were observed which are due for routine maintenance such as scraping, painting, and caulking.  Keeping wood surfaces properly coated and sealed will help to prevent rot or decay, and extend the life of the materials.

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.1.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Mildew/Algae
North

There are signs of algae and/or mildew on the siding. This is a cosmetic issue and is not uncommon especially on shaded portions of the home.  Recommend that said areas be washed or cleaned on a regular basis.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.1.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Brick Veneer - Bowing / Uneven
South

Areas of the brick veneer siding were showing signs of minor bowing.  There appear to be no weep systems in place to allow for drainage of moisture from behind the veneer siding components.  The masonry is porous, and may absorb water or moisture.  It is recommended that this be evaluated by a qualified masonry professional and monitored closely.  It is possible that the bowing may become more severe with time, and brick work could eventually start to become loose and experience mortar deterioration.

Brick Masonry, Concrete, Brick & Stone
Credit
Comment
4.6.1 - Walkways

Walkway Settling - Monitor
Front Walkway

Areas of the walkway appear to have pavers which have undergone prior or current settling.  Though there are no concerns currently with the condition of the walkway, it is recommended that it be monitored in the future for signs of damage, potential trip hazards, incorrect pitch toward the home, etc.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
4.7.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Bracing Recommended

For elevated deck and porch structures it is strongly recommended that diagonal bracing be installed perpendicular or parallel to the support beams.  The bracing will help the deck to resist lateral loads and shifting.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.7.2 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck - Post to Beam / Girder connections

The connections between the supporting beams and supporting posts for the deck system do not conform with modern standards for safe deck construction.  It is recommended that the connections be evaluated and upgraded by a qualified deck repair specialist to comply with modern and current deck building standards.  To prevent beam rotation and resist lateral forces it is recommended that the beam or girder be connected to the supporting deck posts with approved metal connectors and hardware.  Though this deck may have been built according to accepted standards at the time of its construction, any recommendations for upgrades or compliance with current standards are ultimately made with your safety in mind, and are recommended for repair.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.7.3 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck Stairs - Stringer Attachment

The stair stringer systems at the rear deck appear to be poorly attached to the deck framing or home.  Stringers should be attached to deck framing with approved stringer hangers rather than via end nailing.  Nailed connections may not provide adequate attachment or sheer strength resulting in a weak connection and stair structure.

A detailed description of the recommended practices for residential deck construction can be found here:  DCA6 - Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction guide - 2015 IRC

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.7.4 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck - Support Posts Undersized

It appears that the elevated deck structure is being supported by posts or columns which may be undersized according to modern accepted deck construction standards.  It is recommended that the support posts be upgraded to a larger dimensional lumber size for added safety and support of the deck structure.  Though these sized columns or posts may have been widely accepted during the era of construction for this deck, current modern accepted building and safety standards call for larger dimensional lumber (minimum 6"x6") to be used in this application.  Consult with a qualified deck repair professional for further evaluation / repair / or replacement. 

House front 1 Deck Contractor
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Comment
4.7.5 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Hand Railing Recommended
Front @ garage, Front to Lake

Steps are recommended to have a hand railing installed for safety.  Lack of guard rail / hand rail may result in potential for trip or fall hazards.

Hardhat General Contractor
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4.7.6 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Joist Hangers
Upper landing of Deck Stairs

Joist hanger(s) are missing or improperly installed. This could cause the deck structure to fail. Recommend that joist hangers be properly installed by qualified contractor.  End nailing or toe nailing may not provide adequate attachment.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
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4.7.7 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Ledger Board Improperly Installed

The ledger board is not properly attached to the building. This can cause the deck to pull away from the building and possibly collapse. Recommend that the deck and/or ledger board be properly attached by qualified contractor.  Fasteners should be properly spaced and staggered across the length of the ledger board.  Flashing is required per current building standards at the ledger to protect from rot / decay and should be strongly considered for addition to older deck systems.  Further information on deck construction can be found at: DCA 6 Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide

House front 1 Deck Contractor
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4.7.8 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Railing Unsafe

There is an unsafe opening in the railing. The spacing on the rail should not exceed 4". An opening greater than 4" is a serious safety hazard especially for children as their head or other body part can become trapped.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
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4.7.9 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck - Joist to Beam Connections

The method of attachment observed between the deck joists and the supporting cross beam appears to be inadequate and / or possibly insufficient.  Each joist is recommended to be attached to the supporting beam by either toe nailing the joists to the beam AND providing blocking between each joist above the beam to prevent rotation - or - by using approved mechanical fasteners between the joist and beam.  Joists may also be installed to the side of the beam with approved hangers, with the tops of the joist being flush with the top of the beam.  

A detailed description of the recommended practices for residential deck construction can be found here:  DCA6 - Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction guide - 2015 IRC

House front 1 Deck Contractor
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4.9.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Negative Grading
East

Grading is sloping towards the home in some areas. This could lead to water intrusion and foundation issues. Recommend qualified landscaper or foundation contractor regrade so water flows away from home.  Where regrading is not possible, measures should be considered for controlling surface drainage to direct it away from the home, such as installation of drainage swales, or in-ground french drains / collection systems.

Here is a helpful article discussing negative grading. 

Foundation Foundation Contractor

5 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

Inspection Method
Visual
Foundation, walls, floors, floor structure: % visible
50%
Foundation: Material
Masonry Block
Basements & Crawlspaces: Foundation Type(s)
Basement
Floor Structure: Material
Wood Beams, Wood Joists
Floor Structure: Sub-floor
Plank
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Concrete
Foundation: Stored Items
Basement

Stored items in the unfinished area of the basement or crawl space prevented full view of the foundation walls.  It is recommended prior to your closing, and after the owner has removed their belongings, that you observe the exposed foundation walls for any signs of cracks, leakage, discoloration, or staining.

Basements & Crawlspaces: Stored Items

Stored items, belongings, and clutter are preventing a full assessment of the basement or crawlspace.  It is recommended prior to your closing, and after the owners belongings have been cleared, that you observe for any abnormalities or concerns that could not be identified during your inspection due to these limitations.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

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5.1.1 - Foundation

Wall(s) Bowing/Leaning
North

Foundation wall observed to be bowing and/or leaning.  Further evaluation is recommended from a qualified foundation specialist or structural engineer.  Amateur repairs are evident using caulks or sealants in an attempt to seal cracks in the block wall foundation.

House construction Structural Engineer
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5.1.2 - Foundation

CMU's - Moderate Cracking
North, West

Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU) foundation walls had moderate cracking and stepped cracking visible in mortar joints.  Cracking should be patched properly to avoid freeze damage and the cause of the cracking should be determined and corrected.  It is recommended that you consult with a qualified foundation repair professional or structural engineer before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline to discuss options and costs for stabilization, correction, or needed repairs.

Foundation Foundation Contractor
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5.2.1 - Basements & Crawlspaces

Evidence of Pest / Rodent Activity
Basement Closets, East

Rodent droppings or bait stations were observed in areas of the home, along with strong odor of ammonia (urine).  This may suggest there have been prior issues with pest control, and it is recommended that you consult with a qualified pest control professional for an evaluation.  Pest control contractors can assess the home to determine if infestations are active, and identify / correct possible entry points.  Recommendations may be made for ongoing treatment programs to control and prevent future problems with rodents, insects, or pests.  Pests and their remnants (scat), such as rodents, raccoons, bats, squirrels, etc may harbor diseases and infestations can potentially cause health concerns for the occupants.

Pest control Pest Control Pro
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5.2.2 - Basements & Crawlspaces

De-Humidifier - Crawlspace or Basement
Basement

It is recommended that you install a quality de-humidifier unit in the basement and or crawlspace area in the home.  Basements and crawlspaces are naturally damp and humid due to direct contact with earth or soil.  Controlling humidity and moisture with a de-humidifier provides multiple benefits.  The appliance will help your air conditioning system by removing some of the humidity in the home, and making it feel more comfortable, thus increasing the efficiency of your HVAC system and reducing stress on the air conditioning.  Secondly, the removal of unwanted moisture and humidity will help to reduce risks of moisture borne fungus such as mold spores and microbial growth, thus improving the overall indoor air quality.  Your de-humidifier will require a power source, and may require the expertise of an electrician to install a proper receptacle unit for the de-humidifier in order to supply power.  It is recommended that the unit be installed where it can drain directly into a floor drain, ejector pit, or sump pit basin.  If this is not possible, it may be necessary to manually empty the unit on a daily basis.  It is recommended that de-humidifer units run continuously from roughly April through the month of October.  Learn more about de-humidifiers here:  15 Reasons Why You Need a De-Humidifier

Tools Handyman/DIY
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5.3.1 - Floor Structure

Sagging Joists - Overspanning / Undersized
Basement

Visible sagging of floor joists in the basement appeared to be the result of inadequate engineering design (overspanning or undersizing of the joists).  You may wish to consult a qualified contractor / framing professional to determine the cost of any needed corrections.  This condition is not uncommon in older / historic homes as building practices were not on par with modern construction and engineering designs.  As a result of the overspanned or undersized joists, some floor areas in the home may show signs of minor sloping or uneveness, or minor cracking may be observed in some wall or ceiling surfaces.  

Although efforts to support sagging joists were visible in the basement area of the home (sistered joists), efforts were not uniform throughout the floor structure.  The floor structure appeared to be basically stable, with some areas more stable than others.

Contractor Qualified Professional

6 - Heating

Equipment 1- Basement: Brand
Luxaire
Equipment 1- Basement: Energy Source
Natural Gas
Equipment 1- Basement: Heat Type
Gas-Fired Heat, Forced Air
Equipment 1- Basement: Effeciency
High
Equipment 1- Basement: Location
Basement
Equipment 1- Basement: Humidifier - Built In
No
Equipment 2 - Attic: Brand
Luxaire
Equipment 2 - Attic: Energy Source
Natural Gas
Equipment 2 - Attic: Heat Type
Gas-Fired Heat, Forced Air
Equipment 2 - Attic: Effeciency
High
Equipment 2 - Attic: Location
attic
Equipment 2 - Attic: Humidifier - Built In
No
Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat
Digital
NG/LP Firelogs & Fireplaces: Fuel & Style
Wood Burning
Distribution Systems: Ductwork
Insulated, Non-insulated, Not fully visible
Disclaimer

Inspection of heating systems is limited to basic evaluation based on visual examination and operation using normal controls. Report comments are limited to identification of common requirements and deficiencies. Observed indications that further evaluation is needed will result in referral to a qualified heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) contractor.

Inspection of heating systems typically includes:

- system operation: confirmation of adequate response to the thermostat;

- proper location;

- proper system configuration;

- component condition

- exterior cabinet condition;

- fuel supply configuration and condition;

- combustion exhaust venting;

- air distribution components;

- proper condensation discharge; and

- temperature/pressure relief valve and discharge pipe: presence, condition, and configuration.

Equipment 1- Basement: Equipment Age & Data Plate Photo(s)

According to the manufacturers data plate, this furnace was manufactured in 2004 and has a 80K BTU capacity.  A well maintained gas forced air furnace unit can expect on average 15-20 years of service life.

Equipment 2 - Attic: Equipment Age & Data Plate Photo(s)
Attic

According to the manufacturers data plate, this furnace was manufactured in 2004 and has a 60K BTU capacity.  A well maintained gas forced air furnace unit can expect on average 15-20 years of service life.

NG/LP Firelogs & Fireplaces: Fireplace OK

At the time of the inspection, no deficiencies were observed in the condition of the fireplace. Full inspection of fireplaces lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. For a full inspection to more accurately determine the condition of the fireplace and to ensure that safe conditions exist, the Inspector recommends that you have the fireplace inspected by an inspector certified by the Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA). Find a CSIA-certified inspector near you at http://www.csia.org/search

Equipment 1- Basement: Heat Exchanger

The heat exchanger should be checked for possible cracks or safety concerns regardless of the age of the furnace unit.  Due to modern furnace designs, the heat exchanger is either sealed and not visible or only a very small portion is visible to the inspector during a non invasive visual inspection.  During your recommended professional servicing of the furnace, it is recommended that particular attention be paid to the heat exchanger.

Equipment 2 - Attic: Heat Exchanger

The heat exchanger should be checked for possible cracks or safety concerns regardless of the age of the furnace unit.  Due to modern furnace designs, the heat exchanger is either sealed and not visible or only a very small portion is visible to the inspector during a non invasive visual inspection.  During your recommended professional servicing of the furnace, it is recommended that particular attention be paid to the heat exchanger.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

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6.1.1 - Equipment 1- Basement

Rust - Signs of leaking

There was rusting and corrosion visible inside the furnace cabinet which suggests leakage may be occuring or has occured in the past from condensate drainage systems.  

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.1.2 - Equipment 1- Basement

High Efficiency Furnace - Obtaining Combustion Air From Indoors
Basement

There is a 95%+ high efficiency (Category IV) furnace unit present in the home.  These units are intended by the manufacturer, in order to achieve peak efficiency, to obtain their combustion air directly from the outdoors.  The unit appears to have been installed without the preferred piping systems in place to obtain combustion air from the outside.  Instead, the unit is obtaining combustion air from the inside of the home.  Most manufacturers will allow for this modification in installation, however it may come at a cost of reduced efficiency and some negligible amount of energy loss in the home.  It is recommended that you consider discussing possible options and costs with your HVAC professional for installing piping systems which would enable combustion air to be taken from outside the building envelope.  This can help to reduce energy loss and improve overall indoor air quality.

Obtaining combustion air from indoors may be causing some negligible negative pressure inside the home, and may be a contributing factor to the water heater showing signs of back drafting.  It is recommended that you consider installing proper piping to obtain combustion air from the exterior of the home to aid in proper venting of flue gases from the water heater.

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.1.3 - Equipment 1- Basement

Improper Condensate Drain Line
Basement

The installed condensate drain line on the HVAC unit is improperly installed.  The line must be provided with a trap and a clean out.  Recommend correction to the drain line from qualified HVAC professional.

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.1.4 - Equipment 1- Basement

Needs Servicing/Cleaning
Basement

Furnace should be cleaned and serviced annually. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean, service and certify furnace prior to closing.

Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.2.1 - Equipment 2 - Attic

Improper Condensate Drain Line
Attic

The installed condensate drain line on the HVAC unit is improperly installed.  The line must be provided with a trap and a clean out.  Recommend correction to the drain line from qualified HVAC professional.

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.2.2 - Equipment 2 - Attic

Needs Servicing/Cleaning
Attic

Furnace should be cleaned and serviced annually. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean, service and certify furnace prior to closing.

Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.2.3 - Equipment 2 - Attic

Attic Furnace - Improper or Missing Catch Pan
Attic

Furnaces installed in attic areas over the living space are recommended to have a proper catch pan installed below the furnace to catch, contain, and properly drain any possible leakage that may occur from the furnace or air conditioning system.  It is further recommended that the catch pan be properly plumbed into the household drain system to prevent overflow of the pan which could cause significant water damage.  

The catch pan installed beneath this furnace does not appear to have been plumbed to the household drain system.  This leaves the home at risk for possible water damage due to a leaking furnace or air conditioning system.  Recommend correction from a qualified HVAC professional.

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.2.4 - Equipment 2 - Attic

Attic Furnace - Supported by Ceiling Framing

The furnace located in the attic rested upon ceiling framing.  This condition may transmit significant noise or vibration to the living space while the furnace is in operation.  The inspector recommends the furnace be supported from the roof framing members to minimize impacts of noise and vibration.

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.2.5 - Equipment 2 - Attic

Attic Furnace - Inadequate Pathway / Platform
Attic

The furnace unit installed in the attic space does not meet modern building and safety standards in regards to a provided pathway and or working platform for servicing or maintaining the unit.  It is recommended that a continuous solid pathway be constructed a minimum of 24" wide, and a platform to be installed in front of the furnace for servicing which should be a minimum of 30"x30".  The pathway should begin at the entrance to the attic space and be no longer than 20 feet.  Lack of adequate pathway and or service platform may create a safety hazard for those who need to access the furnace for service or maintenance, and could result in injury or ceiling damage. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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6.2.6 - Equipment 2 - Attic

Furnace - Active Leaking
Attic

The furnace unit was observed to have an active leak from the condensate drainage systems and is in need of repair from a qualified HVAC professional.

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.4.1 - Distribution Systems

Duct Work - Corrosion / Rust
Basement

Some of the duct work for the HVAC system was observed to have moderate corrosion and rust present.  This may indicate that the duct work is at or nearing the end of its useful lifespan.  It is recommended that you have the duct work evaluated by a qualified HVAC professional to determine the extent of any damage or needed repairs / replacements at this time.  

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.4.2 - Distribution Systems

Building Cavity as Supply or Return
Basement

Current building standards restrict the use of cavity spaces in the home as supply ducts for HVAC systems.  It is not uncommon however to find cavities used as return air pathways, especially in older homes.  The practice is not recommended, and is one of the leading causes of duct leakage in homes today, which equates to energy loss.  It is recommended that you discuss the option of installing dedicated return air plenums and ducting with your HVAC professional, or at a minimum, obtain options and costs for sealing the existing returns which are in building cavities to make the home more energy efficient.

Fire HVAC Professional
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6.6.1 - NG/LP Firelogs & Fireplaces

Flue Cleaning / Inspection

It is recommended that prior to your closing, a certified professional chimney sweep perform a level 2 inspection and cleaning of the fireplace and flue systems.

Fireplace Chimney Sweep

7 - Cooling

Cooling Equipment 1: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Cooling Equipment 2: Brand
Evcon
Cooling Equipment 2: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat
Digital
Distribution System: Configuration
Split
Ceiling Fans: Brand
Hampton Bay, Craftmade
Ceiling Fans: Type
Lighted, Wall Switch, Ceiling Mount
Cooling Equipment 1: Brand
Evcon
Disclaimer

Inspection of home cooling systems typically includes visual examination of readily observable components for adequate condition, and system testing for proper operation using normal controls. Cooling system inspection will not be as comprehensive as that performed by a qualified heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system contractor.  The proper sizing of the unit is not evaluated, nor are engineering / load calculations performed to determine adequacy of tonnage installed, as this falls beyond the scope of a general inspection and requires a trained HVAC specialist.  Report comments are limited to identification of common requirements and deficiencies. Observed indications that further evaluation is needed will result in referral to a qualified HVAC contractor.

Cooling Equipment 1: Split System

The air conditioning system was a split system in which the cabinet housing the compressor, cooling fan and condensing coils was located physically apart from the evaporator coils. As is typical with split systems, the compressor/condenser cabinet was located at the home's exterior so that the heat collected inside the home could be released to the outside air. Evaporator coils designed to collect heat from the home interior were located inside a duct at the furnace and were not directly visible.

Cooling Equipment 1: Equipment Age & Data Plate Photo(s)

According to the manufacturers data plate, this air conditioning unit was manufactured in February 2005, and has a two ton cooling capacity.  The average lifespan today for most air conditioning units is roughly 12-15 years.

Cooling Equipment 2: Split System

The air conditioning system was a split system in which the cabinet housing the compressor, cooling fan and condensing coils was located physically apart from the evaporator coils. As is typical with split systems, the compressor/condenser cabinet was located at the home's exterior so that the heat collected inside the home could be released to the outside air. Evaporator coils designed to collect heat from the home interior were located inside a duct at the furnace and were not directly visible.

Cooling Equipment 2: Equipment Age & Data Plate Photo(s)

According to the manufacturers data plate, this air conditioning unit was manufactured in October 2004, and has a 2.5 ton cooling capacity.  The average lifespan today for most air conditioning units is roughly 12-15 years.

Cooling Equipment 1: Low Temperature

The A/C unit was not tested due to low outdoor temperature.  HVAC manufacturers recommend that equipment not be activated unless temperatures have been 60 degrees or above for a 24 hour period prior to the inspection.  Operation of units during colder temperatures may cause possible damage to the compressor unit and the operation of the unit could not be verified at the time of inspection due to risk of damage.

Cooling Equipment 2: Low Temperature

The A/C unit was not tested due to low outdoor temperature.  HVAC manufacturers recommend that equipment not be activated unless temperatures have been 60 degrees or above for a 24 hour period prior to the inspection.  Operation of units during colder temperatures may cause possible damage to the compressor unit and the operation of the unit could not be verified at the time of inspection due to risk of damage.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

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7.1.1 - Cooling Equipment 1

Aged Unit - Approaching End of Service Life

The air conditioning unit may be approaching or nearing the end of its expected service life, based on statistical averages.  The average lifespan for most air conditioning units today is between 12-15 years.  It is the recommendation of the inspector that you monitor the operation / performance of the unit, and begin budgeting for the replacement of the aged unit in the near future. 

Mag glass Monitor
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7.2.1 - Cooling Equipment 2

Aged Unit - Approaching End of Service Life

The air conditioning unit may be approaching or nearing the end of its expected service life, based on statistical averages.  The average lifespan for most air conditioning units today is between 12-15 years.  It is the recommendation of the inspector that you monitor the operation / performance of the unit, and begin budgeting for the replacement of the aged unit in the near future. 

Mag glass Monitor

8 - Plumbing

Water Source
Public
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Supply Material
Galvanized
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Distribution Material
Copper
Sewage & Drain, Waste, & Vent (DWV) Systems: Material
PVC
Sewage & Drain, Waste, & Vent (DWV) Systems: Sewage System Type
Public
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Power Source/Type
Gas
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Basement
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Capacity
40 gallons
Sump Pump: Location
None
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
Basement
Sewage & Drain, Waste, & Vent (DWV) Systems: Main Drain Size
4"
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Main Gas Shut-off Location
Gas Meter
General

Inspection of the plumbing system typically includes visual examination of:

- water supply pipes;

- drain, waste and vent (DWV) system;

- water heater (type, condition and operation);

- sewage disposal system (designation as public or private);

- gas system; and

- sump pump (confirmation of installation/operation).

*  Plumbing leaks typically begin slowly and may take time to fully reveal themselves.  We are limited to the amount of water we can run during an inspection, and by piping being concealed behind finished wall or ceiling systems.  The passage of time between the inspection and the closing make it crucial that all fixtures be operated and checked at the time of your final walkthrough.

Filters
Cartridge

Follow manufacturers recommendations regarding frequency and type of filter replacements.  For best performance we recommend at least every 6 months, however some water supplies with heavy sediment may require more frequent changes.

Sewage & Drain, Waste, & Vent (DWV) Systems: DWV Mostly OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of the visible drain, waste and vent pipes. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
Richmond

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding. 

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help. 

Note: On older water heaters, operation of the drain valve may result in leakage or drips, especially if the valve has not been operated or used in some time.  If your water heater is more than 8 years old, we do not recommend operating the drain valve for this reason.  The risks outweigh the benefits.  If you notice any leakage from the drain valve, call a qualified plumbing professional for repair.  If you purchase a new water heater, and regularly operate the valve for flushing and servicing as recommended, this is rarely an issue.

Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Water Heater Age / Data Plate Photo(s)

According to the manufacturers data plate, the water heater was manufactured in November of 2000 and has a 40 gallon capacity.  The average lifespan for this type of water heater is roughly 8-12 years.  Most water heater warranties last between 6-10 years.  Units which exceed 12 years of life may be at increased risks for developing possible leaks or even tank failures due to hidden corrosion which may be present inside the tank.  

Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Gas Water Heater

This water heater was gas-fired. Gas water heaters heat water using a gas burner located in a chamber beneath the water tank. The gas control mechanism contains safety features designed to prevent gas from leaking into the living space if the burner should fail for some reason.  Gas-fired water heaters must be properly installed so that the gas fuel is safely delivered to the water heater and so that the water heater safely exhausts the products of combustion to the home exterior. Gas-fired water heaters can be expected to last the length of the stated warranty and after its expiration may fail at any time.  It is recommended that twice per year the tank be flushed to remove build up of accumulated sediment.


Here is a useful guide on how to flush a conventional water heater:  How to flush a water heater

Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Gas Pipes OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of the gas supply pipes. Most pipes were not visible due to interior wall coverings.

Sump Pump: No Drain Tiles / No Sump Pump

This home appears to have no perimeter foundation drain tile system or installed sump pump system.  This is common in older homes, as they were built prior to the development or popularity of these systems.  Because there is likely no provision in place for controlling water around the foundation, this home may be at a higher risk for foundation seepage or water intrusion. 

Many older homes that do not have drain tiles or sump pumps simply were not intended to have the basement or "cellar" areas used as living space, and it was often expected that some water would periodically enter the basement or foundation.  If you intend to use the basement area frequently, or have aspirations of finishing this basement, we strongly recommend you first consult with a qualified foundation waterproofing professional prior to doing so. 

Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Most Not Visible

Most water distribution pipes were not visible due to wall, floor and ceiling coverings. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of pipes not directly visible.

Sewage & Drain, Waste, & Vent (DWV) Systems: Most DWV Pipes Not Visible

Most drain, waste and vent pipes were not visible due to wall, ceiling and floor coverings.  The underground piping from the home to the city sewer or septic connection is not visible during the course of a general home inspection.  It is recommended for homes older than 15 years of age that you have an independent assessment performed of the underground piping by a qualified plumbing and sewer professional to inspect for any damage or deficiencies, ideally prior to your closing.  Specialized equipment and training are needed to perform sewer line scoping, and the condition of these piping systems falls beyond the scope of a general home inspection.

Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Gas Piping - Mostly Concealed

Most of the gas supply piping in the home was concealed behind finished wall, floor, or ceiling systems.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Missing or inoperable drain stopper
1st Floor Bathroom

The fixture was observed to be missing a proper drain stopper, or the installed stopper is not functioning properly.  Repair / replace.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.2.2 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Poor shower divertor
2nd Floor hallway Bathroom

The shower was observed to have a poor divertor mechanism.  The divertor should direct all water flow from the faucet to the shower head, with minimal or no leakage from the tub spigot.  Recommend repair / replacement of worn shower divertor device.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.2.3 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Inadequate Flow
2nd Floor hallway Bathroom - Tub & Shower

Plumbing fixture exhibited insufficient flow. The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline you consult with a qualified contractor to discuss options and costs for correction.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.2.4 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Toilet Loose
2nd Floor hallway Bathroom

Toilet is loose at the base. Recommend a qualified plumber evaluate and repair to prevent risk of leakage or water damage.  Loose bowls over time will wear and deteriorate the wax ring seal, and should be tightened securely to the floor / flange to prevent movement of the bowl.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.2.5 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Whirlpool Tub - Inoperable
2nd Floor Bathroom

Whirlpool tub unit observed which failed to respond to normal operating controls.  The tub was not functional at the time of inspection and is recommended for further evaluation and repair.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Sewage & Drain, Waste, & Vent (DWV) Systems

S-Trap
2nd Floor Bathrooms

A trap beneath a sink was of a type called an "S-trap".  S-traps are no longer allowed to be installed in new construction for safety reasons. A siphon can develop which empties the trap of water; a condition with the potential to allow toxic sewer gas to enter the living space.  Although this type of trap may have been commonly considered safe at the time the home was originally constructed, as general knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time, building standards have changed to reflect current understanding. The Inspector recommends replacement of all such traps in the home by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.3.2 - Sewage & Drain, Waste, & Vent (DWV) Systems

Catch Basin Observed
Basement

A catch basin was observed in the home which should be evaluated further by a qualified plumbing and sewer professional.  Catch basins are considered outdated, and may pose concerns with proper drainage or conforming with current plumbing / sanitary standards.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.3.3 - Sewage & Drain, Waste, & Vent (DWV) Systems

Improper Drain
2nd Floor Bathroom

2nd Floor laundry unit observed to be draining into the bathtub.  This is poor practice and could cause drain clogging in the tub.  Recommend consulting with qualified plumbing professional to discuss alternative drainage options and costs.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

Backdrafting
Basement

This gas-fired water heater showed evidence of prior backdrafting at the time of the inspection. "Backdrafting" is a condition in which the invisible, odorless, tasteless, toxic products of combustion from the water heater flue leak into the living space. Excessive exposure to these products of combustion can result in injury or death (carbon monoxide hazard). The Inspector recommends that an evaluation and corrections be performed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.4.2 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

Flue- Inadequate Clearance from Combustibles
Basement

The exhaust flue for this gas-fired water heater had inadequate clearance from combustibles. This single wall flue requires 6-inch clearance from combustible materials. This condition is a potential fire hazard and all stored items should be moved away from the flue piping.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.4.3 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

Past Useful Design Life

This water heater appeared to be past its design life and may need replacement soon.  The average life of a gas water heater is roughly 8-12 years.  Units over 12 years of age may be at an increased risk for developing leaks or possible tank failures.  This unit is approaching 18 years of age.  Because of its age we recommend you consider replacement.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.4.4 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

No Expansion Tank

No expansion tank was present. Expansion tanks allow for the thermal expansion of water in the pipes. These are required in certain areas for new water heater installs.  The installation of an expansion tank is strongly recommended, even though they may not be required (depending on your area) to help prevent possible damage to water heaters, pipes and plumbing supply systems.  Recommend a qualified plumber evaluate and install.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

9 - Electrical

Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Overhead, Copper, 220 Volts
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Manufacturer
Gould
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wiring
Copper
Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Conduit
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Basement
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Meter OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of the electric meter. Electric meters are installed by electric utility providers to measure home electrical consumption for billing purposes.

Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wiring OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of of visible branch wiring.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Switches OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of switches throughout the home.

GFCI & AFCI: GFCI Protection OK

The home had ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection that appeared to comply with generally-accepted modern safety standards. A representative number of GFCI-protected electrical receptacles were tested and responded in a satisfactory manner at the time of the inspection.  Any exceptions found will be noted in the report.

Exterior Electrical: Receptacles and Lighting

A representative number of the exterior lights and receptacles were inspected for proper operation and safety.  Current building standards require all exterior receptacles to have GFCI protection, and weather proof enclosures.  Any deficiencies observed with the exterior receptacles or lighting will be noted in this report.

Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Circuit Limitation

Home branch circuit wiring consists of wiring distributing electricity to devices such as switches, receptacles, and appliances. Most conductors are hidden behind floor, wall and ceiling coverings and cannot be evaluated by the inspector. The Inspector does not remove cover plates and inspection of branch wiring is limited to proper response to testing of switches and a representative number of electrical receptacles.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Service Entrance Conductors

Attachment and Clearances - Evaluate
Roof

The overhead service-drop conductors were attached directly to the home exterior at the roof. Components anchoring the conductors to the roof appear that they may be inadequate or loose (bulging observed in roofing shingles near anchor point) at the time of the inspection. This could be due to a failing connection, or it could also simply be the way the shingles were installed around the attachment.  The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline, you consult with an electrical professional to evaluate the connection and discuss options and costs for any needed correction. Any work on the service conductors should be performed by a qualified personnel only.  

Ideally the drip loops should have a minimum 18" of clearance above the roof surface, and your utility provider or electrical contractor may recommend raising the electrical mast to achieve greater roof clearance.  Conductors which are too close to the roof may become damaged, or become covered by heavy snowfall.

Usually in most localities, the utility provider is responsible for the wiring from the pole to the house.  The homeowner is responsible for the service mast, weatherhead, and cable attachment.  This may vary depending upon your location and utility provider.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Possible Non Conforming Breakers
Basement

Electrical panel manufacturers stipulate that only their brand of service equipment should be utilized in the electrical panel.  For example, General Electric service panels call for use of General Electric brand circuit breakers.  The use of other manufacturers equipment in the electrical panel is poor practice, may result in poor connections and fire risks, and will void most panel manufacturers warranties.  There were circuit breakers observed to be in use inside the electrical panel(s) which may not be conforming to the panel manufacturer specifications, and further evaluation / replacement is recommended from a qualified electrical professional.


Note:  Some panel manufacturers do allow for interchanging of certain brands and types of circuit protection (especially on older equipment that has been discontinued), however the determination of circuit breaker compatibility lies beyond the scope of a general home inspection and should be verified by an electrical professional.  

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Stairwell Lacking Two-Way Switch
Basement

One or more stairwells in the home were observed to be lacking recommended two-way or three-way switches.  This results in the lighting for the stairwell to only be operational from either the top or bottom of the stairwell and may present a safety hazard for potential trips or falls.  Modern accepted building standards require a means of operating the stairwell lighting from both the top and bottom of the stairwell.  It is recommended that a qualified electrical professional install a proper two-way switch system for stairwell illumination.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.5.1 - GFCI & AFCI

No AFCI Protection

No arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection was installed to protect electrical circuits in bedrooms. Safety standards with which new homes must comply require the installation of AFCI protection of all bedroom electrical receptacles. This type of protection is designed to detect electrical arcing, which is a potential fire hazard. 

Although AFCI protection was not required at the time the home was originally constructed, as general knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time, building standards have changed to reflect current understanding. The Inspector recommends updating the existing bedroom receptacles to provide AFCI protection. Arc-fault protection can be provided using either of two methods: 1. Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCI's) electrical receptacles that have this capability built in. 

2. AFCI circuit breakers installed at the main electrical panel that provide this protection to all non-AFCI outlets on the circuit controlled by that AFCI breaker.  All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.5.2 - GFCI & AFCI

GFCI Failure
Kitchen

A ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electrical receptacle did not respond to testing, did not re-set, was slow to re-set or made a buzzing sound when re-set. The Inspector recommends replacement of the receptacle to ensure that it works correctly when required. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - Exterior Electrical

GFCI Failure
Rear @ Deck

One or more of the exterior GFCI protected electrical receptacles failed to pass a trip test with our instrument.  It is recommended that the receptacle(s) be evaluated for repair or replacement by a qualified electrical professional for your safety.  Condition is common on older model GFCI receptacle units as a result of age, or on receptacles which have been improperly installed or misswired.

Electric Electrical Contractor

10 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

Attic Insulation: Attic Vapor Barrier
Not Visible
Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement): Vapor Retarder - Type
Concrete
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans- Bath
Fan Only
Attic Insulation: R-value
Varies

R-VALUE BY TYPE

The resistance to heat moving through insulation is measured as "R-value", the higher the R-value, the greater the resistance to heat flow through the insulation.

Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Cellulose, Fiberglass, Foam-board
Attic Insulation: Insulation Mostly OK

Few deficiencies were observed in the condition of the thermal insulation at the time of the inspection. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Attic Insulation: Insulation OK

No deficiencies in the condition of the thermal insulation were observed at the time of the inspection.

Ventilation: Attic Ventilation Disclaimer

Attic ventilation disclaimer

The Inspector disclaims confirmation of adequate attic ventilation year-round performance, but will comment on the apparent adequacy of the system as experienced by the inspector on the day of the inspection. Attic ventilation is not an exact science and a standard ventilation approach that works well in one type of climate zone may not work well in another. The performance of a standard attic ventilation design system can vary even with different homesite locations and conditions or weather conditions within a single climate zone.

The typical approach is to thermally isolate the attic space from the living space by installing some type of thermal insulation on the attic floor. Heat that is radiated into the attic from sunlight shining on the roof is then removed using devices that allow natural air movement to carry hot air to the home exterior. This reduces summer cooling costs and increases comfort levels, and can help prevent roof problems that can develop during the winter such as the forming of ice dams along the roof eves.

Natural air movement is introduced by providing air intake vents low in the attic space and exhaust vents high in the attic space.  Thermal buoyancy (the tendency of hot air to rise) causes cool air to flow into the attic to replace hot air flowing out the exhaust vents. Conditions that block ventilation devices, or systems and devices that are poorly designed or installed can reduce the system performance.

Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Gable Vents, Soffit Vents, Turtle Vents

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Exhaust Systems

Bath Exhaust Terminates Near Top Vent
Attic

Bathroom fan(s) were observed to be terminated near an installed roof top turtle vent.  Directional winds can prevent the bath exhaust products from exiting the attic area, which can potentially cause problems with, moisture and mold. Recommend a qualified attic ventilation contractor or roofing professional properly install exhaust fans to terminate to the exterior, via a baffled jack vent.

Roof Roofing Professional

11 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Air Quality: Odor
Basement
Ammonia - Possible Urine

The closet areas on the East side of the basement had a strong odor.

Windows: Window Manufacturer
ClimateGuard
Windows: Windows OK

No observed deficiencies were found with the windows.   

Windows: Window Material
Vinyl
Floors: Floor Coverings
Hardwood, Tile
Walls: Wall Material
Drywall
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Granite
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Interior Mostly OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of the home interior. Notable exceptions will be identified in this report.

Doors: Interior Doors OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of interior doors.

Windows: Window Type
Sliders, Awning Style

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the interior condition and operation of windows of the home.

Floors: Floors Mostly OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of floors in the home. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Walls: Walls OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of walls in the home interior.

Ceilings: Ceilings- OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of ceilings in the home.

Trim: Trim OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition interior trim components. Inspection of interior trim typically includes examination of the following:

- door and window casing;

- baseboard;

- any trim around walls and ceilings;

- any permanently-installed corner or cabinet trim; and

- built-in features such as book cases.

Countertops & Cabinets: Countertops OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of the countertops.

Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of the cabinets.

Windows: Thermal Seals - Insulated Windows

While we make every effort to identify the loss of insulated window seals, the identifying characteristics can vary in magnitude from totally fogged windows to barely visible fogging or condensation, and these characteristics can change from day to day. Weather conditions, sunlight (direct sunlight or the lack of sunlight), curtains, shutters and other obstructions contribute to making identification of these seal failures difficult at times and sometimes impossible. For these reasons we cannot ensure that the insulated seals have not failed on the insulated windows in this house. All references to or omissions of references to failed insulated window seals in this dwelling should not be construed as an exhaustive or authoritative evaluation by this inspection company.  

Floors: Floors not Fully Visible

Due to furniture, area rugs, or personal belongings, not all of the floor areas were fully visible at the time of inspection.  Moving furniture, belongings, or lifting carpets exceeds the scope of the inspection.  No evaluation or comments could be drawn regarding areas with concealed flooring.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Floors

Wood- Moderate Squeaking

Wood floors in the home exhibited moderate squeaking at the time of the inspection.  This is usually due to fastener movement and can be difficult to correct because the flooring is fastened as it is installed in such a manner that fasteners are not visible or accessible once installation is complete.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
11.8.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Staircase- No Handrail
Basement, Attic

Although it had 4 or more risers, this staircase either had no handrail installed, or existing handrail was observed to be improper. This condition is a potential fall hazard. In order to comply with generally-accepted current standards which require a handrail at staircases with 4 or more risers, this staircase would need a handrail installed. Handrail should be continuous and graspable.  The Inspector recommends that a handrail be installed that complies with modern safety standards. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

Hammer Carpentry Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.8.2 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Staircase- Not Compliant to Modern Standards
Basement, Attic

The staircases were older and will not comply with modern safety standards or modern stair designs.  Issues such as tread depth, riser height, steep pitch, and overhead clearances may present possible hazards.  You may wish to discuss options and costs for correction from a qualified general contractor.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
11.8.3 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Stairwell Lighting Recommended
Attic

The attic stairwell was found to have no illumination.  This is a potential safety issue, and it is recommended that all stairwells have proper lighting installed to illuminate the stairwell.  Stairwell lighting is recommended to have two way switch control so that it can be operated from both the top and bottom of the stairwell.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.8.4 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Door Opens Into Stairwell - Safety Hazard
1st Floor @ Basement Landing

There was a stairway present which had a door that opened improperly into the stairwell, or did not provide enough of a landing area.  This may pose a hazard for the occupant and it is recommended that you discuss options and costs for correction with a qualified carpentry professional or general contractor.

Hammer Carpentry Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.10.1 - Tiled Areas- Kitchen, Bath & Laundry

No Access Provided to Whirlpool Mechanicals
2nd Floor hallway Bathroom

There appears to be no access installed for servicing or inspecting the mechanical systems for the bathroom whirlpool tub unit.  If future service is needed, the technician may be forced to cut into walls/ceilings or break apart tile surrounds in order to gain access to the equipment.  It is strongly recommended that a proper panel be installed to provide access to the tub mechanicals in the event of needing future service or repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
11.10.2 - Tiled Areas- Kitchen, Bath & Laundry

Shower Door - Poor Seal
2nd Floor hallway Bathroom

The door to the shower stall did not close or seal properly.  Adjustments are needed to allow for proper closure and water tight seal.

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Appliances

Dishwasher: Brand
Frigidaire
Cooktop/Exhaust Fan: Cooktop Energy Source
Gas
Cooktop/Exhaust Fan: Cooktop Brand
Frigidaire
Cooktop/Exhaust Fan: Cooktop Type
Gas
Cooktop/Exhaust Fan: Exhaust Fan Type
Under Microwave
Cooktop/Exhaust Fan: Exhaust Fan Brand
Frigidaire
Oven: Oven Energy Source
Gas
Oven: Oven Brand
Frigidaire
Oven: Oven Type
Range
Refigerator: Refrigerator Brand
Frigidaire
Garbage Disposal: Disposal Age / Data Plate Picture(s)

The age of the disposal unit is unknown.  Functioning when tested.

Garbage Disposal: Disposal Brand
General Electric
Built-in Microwave: Microwave Brand
Frigidaire
Built-in Microwave: Microwave Type
Door
Clothes Dryer: Brand
General Electric
Clothes Dryer: Dryer Power Source
Gas
Clothes Dryer: Dryer Vent
Metal
Clothes Washer: Clothes Washer Brand
Admiral
General Appliance Operation

Note: Appliances are operated at the discretion of the Inspector and are tested solely for operation and function, not performance.

Dishwasher: Dishwasher Age / Data Plate Picture(s)

According to the manufacturers date plate, this dishwasher was likely manufactured in February of 2006 or 2016.  A call to the manufacturer may be needed to accurately date this appliance.

Cooktop/Exhaust Fan: Cooktop Age / Data Plate Photo(s)

According to the manufacturers data plate, this cook top unit was most likely manufactured in January of 2006.  A call to the manufacturer may be necessary to accurately date this appliance.

Oven: Limited Inspection

The General Home Inspection testing of ovens does not include testing of all oven features, but is limited to confirmation of bake and broil features. You should ask the seller about the functionality of any other features.

Oven: Oven Age / Data Plate Picture(s)

According to the manufacturers data plate, this oven unit appears to have been manufactured in January of 2006.

Oven: Oven OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition and operation of the oven.

Refigerator: Refrigerator data plates / estimated age

According to the manufacturers data plate, the refrigerator appears to have been manufactured in July of 2005.

Garbage Disposal: Disposal OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition and operation of the garbage disposal.

Built-in Microwave: Microwave Age / Data Plate Picture(s)

According to the manufacturers data plate, this microwave unit appears to have been manufactured in February of 2016.

Built-in Microwave: Microwave OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition and operation of the built-in microwave oven. Built-in microwave ovens are tested using normal operating controls. Unit was tested and appeared to be serviceable at time of inspection. Leak and/or efficiency testing is beyond the scope of this inspection. If concerned, you should seek further evaluation by qualified technician prior to closing.

Clothes Dryer: Dryer estimated age / data plate photos

According to the manufacturers data plate, this clothes dryer appears to have been manufactured in May of 2006 

Clothes Washer: Clothes Washer - Estimated Age

According to the manufacturers data plate, the clothes washer appears to have been manufactured in May of 2009

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Dishwasher

No High Loop
Kitchen

The dishwasher drain line was observed to be improperly installed and lacks the manufacturer required High Loop configuration.  The High Loop installation is required by all dishwasher manufacturers as a preventative measure to reduce chances of possible wastewater back flowing into the dishwasher unit.  Lack of a High Loop may present a sanitation concern should blockage or clogging occur with the drain waste systems.  Illinois prohibits connections of dishwashers to food disposer units due to possible sanitary cross connection concerns.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
12.2.1 - Cooktop/Exhaust Fan

Cooktop Burner Inoperable

One or more heating elements did not heat up when turned on. Recommend qualified professional evaluate & repair. 

Here is a DIY resource on possible solutions.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
12.2.2 - Cooktop/Exhaust Fan

Exhaust Fan - Missing Filters
Kitchen

The installed exhaust fan system was observed to be missing proper filters.  The manufacturer requires use of approved filters to keep grease and cooking products from getting into the internal components.

Wash Appliance Repair
Credit
Comment
12.7.1 - Clothes Dryer

Dryer Vent Cleaning

It is recommended that the dryer vent be professionally cleaned on an annual basis to remove build up of lint and debris.  Over time, this can accumulate and pose concerns / hazards for possible fire risks, as well as result in extended drying times / energy consumption.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.7.2 - Clothes Dryer

Dryer Vent - Opening into Interior
Basement

The clothes dryer exhaust ducting had an opening or a device installed which allows dryer exhaust to empty into the living space.  This is poor practice, and can lead to air quality problems, moisture problems, and with gas dryers, could be a potential source of Carbon Monoxide.  Recommend proper repair or removal of in-line devices from dryer exhaust.

Wash Appliance Repair
Credit
Comment
12.7.3 - Clothes Dryer

Appliance Not Level
Basement

The installed appliance is not level, and could cause vibration or noise issues.  Recommend leveling the appliance.

Wash Appliance Repair

13 - Attached Garage

Size/Type
Single
Garage Door(s): Material
Metal
Garage Door(s): Type
Automatic
Garage Door Opener: Number of Openers
1
Garage Introduction

Inspection of the garage typically includes examination of the following:

- general structure;

- floor, wall and ceiling surfaces;

- operation of all accessible conventional doors and door hardware;

- overhead door condition and operation including manual and automatic safety component operation and switch placement;

- proper electrical condition including Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) protection;

- interior and exterior lighting;

- stairs and stairways

- proper firewall separation from living space; and

- proper floor drainage

Garage Mostly OK

At the time of the inspection, few deficiencies were observed in the condition of the garage. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Ceiling: Ceiling OK

At the time of the inspection, no deficiencies were observed in the condition of the garage ceiling.

Ceiling: Low Clearances

This garage was observed to have low clearances overhead, and may create head hazards as well as prevent some vehicles from being able to enter or utilize the garage space.

Floor: Floor OK

At the time of the inspection, no deficiencies were observed in the condition of the garage floor.

Walls & Firewalls: Walls Mostly OK

Few deficiencies were observed in the condition of the garage walls / firewalls. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Garage Door(s): Overhead Door Introduction

Inspection of overhead garage doors typically includes examination for presence, serviceable condition and proper operation of the following components:

- door condition;

- mounting brackets;

- automatic opener;

- automatic reverse;

- photo sensor;

- switch placement;

- track & rollers; and

- manual disconnect.

Garage Door(s): Garage Doors Mostly OK

Few deficiencies were observed in the condition of the garage doors. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Stored Items

The garage was observed to have a heavy volume of stored items, belongings, or clutter, and could not be fully viewed or assessed.

Walls & Firewalls: Stored items

Stored items and belongings in the garage prevented full view of the interior walls.  Prior to closing and after owner has removed their belongings, we recommend you observe the garage for any signs of deficiencies with the wall systems.

Credit
Comment
13.3.1 - Walls & Firewalls

Firewall Separation - Incomplete
Garage

Firewall separating the home and garage is not compliant with modern building standards. Firewalls should be built with materials to prevent the spreading of a fire into the home living space. Though these requirements may have not been in place at the time of construction, it is recommended for safety that you consider repairing these systems and bringing into compliance with modern standards to reduce risks of fire / spreading.


Recommend a qualified contractor evaluate and bring firewall up to standards. 

Link for more info. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
13.4.1 - Garage Door(s)

Springs Lack Safety Cables
Garage

The installed springs for the automatic garage door are lacking required safety cables.  A cable should be routed inside the spring to contain the spring in the event of breakage.  Springs are under tremendous tension and lack of safety cables could result in springs causing serious injury to occupants if nearby when springs break or fail.

Garage Garage Door Contractor
Credit
Comment
13.6.1 - Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home)

Door Does Not Meet Separation Requirements
Garage

Door separating garage and home does not meet safety standards. Doors in firewalls must be at least 1 3/8-inch thick, metal/steel, or a 20-minute fire-rated door. 

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
13.6.2 - Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home)

Not Self-closing
Garage

Door from garage to home should have self-closing hinges to help prevent spread of a fire to living space. Recommend a qualified contractor install self-closing hinges. 

DIY Resource Link.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor