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1234 Main St.
Saco, Maine 04072
12/07/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
4
Maintenance item
52
Recommended improvement
22
Safety/major concern

IMPORTANT: A Home Inspection is NOT intended to reveal minor defects. Please familiarize yourself with the Standards-of-Practice for home inspections and read the Inspection agreement for limitations.

You have contracted with Blue Lobster Home Inspection Inc to perform a generalist inspection in accordance with the standards of Practice of InterNACHI http://nachi.org/sop.htm. The inspection is based on observations of the visible and apparent condition of the building and its components on the date of the inspection. This report is not valid without a signed pre-inspection agreement. The results of this home inspection are not intended to make any representation regarding latent or concealed defects that may exist and no warranty or guaranty is expressed or implied. If your home inspector is not a licensed structural engineer or other professional whose license authorizes the rendering of an opinion as to the structural integrity of a building or its component parts, you may be advised to seek a professional opinion as to any defects or concerns mentioned in this report. This report is the exclusive property of Blue Lobster Home Inspection Inc and the client whose name appears herewith, and its use by any unauthorized persons is strictly prohibited.

Inspectors working for Blue Lobster Home Inspection Inc inspect properties in accordance with the Standards of Practice of InterNACHI and our Inspection Agreement. Items that are not listed in this report were not inspected. The observations and opinions expressed within the report take precedence over any verbal comments. It should be understood that the inspector is only on-site for a few hours and will not comment on insignificant deficiencies, but confine the observations to truly significant defects or deficiencies that significantly affect the value, desirability, habitability or safety of the structure.

A home inspection is limited in scope and lower in cost than many individual inspections. Client is hereby informed that exhaustive inspections are available from specialists in a multitude of disciplines such as roofing, plumbing, pools, heating and air conditioning, decking, electrical, fenestration (windows and doors) and environmental quality among others. Additional inspections by specialists in a particular field will be more exhaustive and thorough, and likewise cost significantly more than a home inspection. A home inspection is intended to identify evidence of problems which exist. Since home inspections are non-destructive, the home inspector can only report on what was observable at the time of the inspection. A home inspection is specifically not exhaustive in nature, and therefore cannot identify defects that may be discovered only through more rigorous testing than a home inspection allows. A generalist inspection is essentially visual and does not include the dismantling of any component, or the sampling of air and inert materials. Consequently, a generalist inspection and report will not be as comprehensive or technically exhaustive as that by a specialist, and it is not intended to be.

A home inspection does not include mold, air, contaminate, radon, asbestos, lead, drug residue or other sampling unless otherwise agreed to. Mold testing services are available by other companies for an additional fee. DO NOT RELY ON THIS REPORT FOR IDENTIFICATION OF MOLD OR OTHER ALLERGENS. BLUE LOBSTER HOME INSPECTION INC SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY MOLD RELATED ISSUES.

Components and systems shall be operated with normal user controls, and not forced or modified to work. Those components or systems that are found not to work at time of inspection will be reported, and those items should be inspected and repaired or replaced by a qualified specialist in that field.

Detached structures such as patio covers, garages, and decks are not inspected.

Client must obtain estimates for any items noted in the report that require further evaluation or repair. The inspector cannot know what expense would be considered significant by client, as everyone's budget is different. It is client's responsibility to obtain quotations prior to the end of the contingency period. CLIENT SHOULD CONSIDER ALL DEFECTS IDENTIFIED IN THE REPORT AS SIGNIFICANT. It is client's responsibility to call a licensed professional immediately and provide them with a copy of this report.

HOW TO READ THIS REPORT

The observations and opinions expressed within this report are those of Blue Lobster Home Inspection Inc and supersede any alleged verbal comments. We inspect all of the systems, components, and conditions described in accordance with the standards of practice set forth by the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI), and those that we do not inspect are clearly disclaimed in the contract and/or in the aforementioned standards. Additional pages or hyperlinks may be attached to this report. This report may not be complete without the attachments. Furthermore, photographs have been included in the inspection report to help you to understand what was observed during the inspection. When describing defects, photos are intended to show an example of a defect, but may not show every occurrence of the defect. When correcting these problems, you should have a qualified specialist carefully check for all similar occurrences. If you have any questions about the content in this report, or wish to have clarification on any comment, you must contact the inspector within 3 days of the inspection.

When a "Repair or Replace" action is indicated, you should consider having a licensed expert in that field perform a further evaluation of that entire system. For example, if a failed window is noted in the report, this may indicate that other windows may have failed. All windows should be checked BEFORE THE END OF YOUR CONTINGENCY PERIOD.

Your report includes many photographs which help to clarify where the inspector went, what was looked at, and the condition of a system or component at the time of the inspection. Some of the pictures may be of deficiencies or problem areas, these are to help you better understand what is documented in this report and may allow you see areas or items that you normally would not see. A pictured issue does not necessarily mean that the issue was limited to that area only, but may be a representation of a condition that is in multiple places. Not all areas of deficiencies or conditions will be supported with photos. Photo inclusion is at the discretion of the inspector and in no way is meant to emphasize or highlight the only conditions that were seen. We always recommend full review of the entire inspection report. Numerous pictures may be taken of a house but not all photographs will necessarily be included with the report.

Due to personal items such as towels, clothing, personal items, hygiene and/or cleaning products, a full evaluation of the cabinets and closets could not be made. I recommend you carefully inspect the cabinets and closets prior to close of escrow. The home inspector does not move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, or debris that obstructs access or visibility.

CLIENTS DUTY: Client agrees to read the entire written report when it is received and promptly call Inspector with any questions or concerns regarding the inspection or the written report. The written report shall be the final and exclusive findings of Inspector. Client acknowledges that Inspector is a generalist and that further investigation of a reported condition by an appropriate specialist may provide additional information which can affect Clients purchase decision. Client agrees to obtain further evaluation of reported conditions before removing any investigation contingency and prior to the close of the transaction.

This report meets or exceeds the National Association of Home Inspectors standard of practices. (http://nachi.org/sop.htm)

This is not a wood destroying organism inspection (termite, rodent, dry rot, etc.). This is not a building code, ordinance, energy audit, or permit compliance inspection. It is not an inspection of modifications to the property and will not determine if in fact modifications exist and if they were performed with or without permits.

This is not a product recall report. Blue Lobster Home Inspection Inc does not research product recalls or notices of any kind. A basic home inspection does not include the identification of, or research for, appliances and other items installed in the home that may be recalled or have a consumer safety alert issued about it. Any comments made in the report are regarding well known notices and are provided as a courtesy only. Blue Lobster Home Inspection Inc recommend visiting the following internet site if recalls are a concern to you (http://www.cpsc.gov/cpsclist.asp). Product recalls and consumer product safety alerts are added almost daily. The CPSC web site is very easy to use and has an on-line subscription service for notification of any recalls or safety concerns. There are many subscription choices, including subscribing to recalls involving only selected products, e.g., infant/child products, sports and recreation products, outdoor products, household products, and specialty products. There are literally thousands of recalls and safety concerns that have been released since the Consumer Product Safety Commission began operating in 1973, and they all are listed. Not all recalls and safety concerns make the headlines of your local newspaper. Blue Lobster Home Inspection recommends that you subscribe to all CPSC press releases, including recalls. This will alert you to all recalls and safety concerns of products on the market today.

This is not a MOLD or ENVIRONMENTAL inspection. It is recommended that this property be fully tested and inspected by a mold specialist before close of the inspection contingency period.

BY ACCEPTANCE OF OUR INSPECTION REPORT YOU AGREE TO THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT AND THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THE CONTRACT

"How much does it cost to replace?" This is a home inspection question that is often asked. Here is a good reference source for estimating costs for home repairs and services. Find the service you need and enter the zip code. It will give you a price range. Let us know if you find this helpful in your Real Estate transactions. http://www.homewyse.com/sitemap.html

1 - General Information

Inspector
Matthew Blain
Type of Home
Single Family
Payment Method
Credit Card
Present
Client, Realtor, Septic
Weather
Cloudy
Temp
Cold
Ground
Frozen, Snow Covered
Foundation
Unfinished Basement, Crawl Space
Excluded
Well, Sheds
Occupied
Yes

Definitions:

FURNISHED - Access to some items such as electrical outlets/receptacles, windows, wall/floor surfaces, and cabinet interiors may be restricted by furniture or personal belongings. Any such items are excluded from this inspection report. 

OCCUPIED - Similar to FURNISHED. Potentially more areas of restricted acces due to furniture and personal belongs. Areas that are restricted are excluded from this inspection report.

UNOCCUPIED - The home was not being lived in and was empty of furniture at the time of the inspection.

VACANT - Access to plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems may be limited due to those systems being turned off. Access to other parts of the home may be limited due to locked doors, barricades or usage conditions. Any items or areas that are not accessible for the above reasons will be excluded from this report.

STAGED - The home was unoccupied, but had been staged with furniture at the time of the inspection. Homes that are not used on a full-time basis may have problems, such as plumbing leakage, that will not be identified without regular use.

UTILITIES OFF - The utilities were shut off to the house at the time of the inspection. The plumbing, electrical and heating systems could not be fully evaluated and should be completely evaluated after the utilities are turned on and prior to settlement.

Excluded: Furniture, Stored Items - Some

Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.

General Warnings: Pre - 1979

Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:

General Warnings: CO Alarms

This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and should have at least one carbon monoxide alarm for each floor. If missing recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions.

For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

 

General Warnings: Updated GFCI Comment

One or more electric receptacles (outlets) had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. 

General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:

Outdoors (since 1973)
Bathrooms (since 1975)
Garages (since 1978)
Kitchens (since 1987)
Crawl spaces and unfinished basements (since 1990)
Wet bar sinks (since 1993)
Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005)

For more information, visit:
https://www.cpsc.gov/s3fs-public/099_0.pdf

2 - Exterior

Footing Material
Not Visible
Foundation Material
Stone, Concrete Block, Concrete
Wall Structure
Wood Frame
Wall Cover
Vinyl
Driveway
Asphalt
Sidewalk
None
Exterior Door Material
Solid Core Wood, Solid Core Fiberglass, Glass Panel
Walkways, Sidewalks, and Patios: Walkway/Patio Material
Brick, Snow/Ice Covered
Gutters: Gutter & Downspout Material
None
Exterior Limitations

The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings, foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris, wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying.

Deck/Patio Cover: Deck Material
Composite, Wood

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Foundation

Cracks - Minor

One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:

  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). 
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).

Here is an informational article on foundation cracks.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.2.2 - Foundation

Repoint joints

Some of the mortar joints in the concrete blocks and/or stonework foundation need to be repointed.

Brick Masonry, Concrete, Brick & Stone
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Walkways, Sidewalks, and Patios

Trip Hazard

One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - Soil Contact

Soil within 6" of Siding/Trim
Garage, Front, Back

Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.6.1 - Vegetation

<1' From Exterior

Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.10.1 - Siding

Deteriorated

Siding and or trim is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.10.2 - Siding

Mildew/Algae/Moss
Back

There are signs of algae, moss and/or mildew on the siding. This is a cosmetic issue and is not uncommon especially on shaded portions of the home. Recommend that the area(s) be washed or cleaned on a regular basis.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
2.10.3 - Siding

Multiple Layers of Siding

There appears to be multiple layers of siding present.  This condition can lead to premature deterioration of the siding and add excess weight to the structure. Often flashing and housewrap are not properly installed if there are multiple layers of siding.
Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.10.4 - Siding

Warping/Buckling

Vinyl siding was warping or buckling in areas. This is often as a result of nailing siding boards to tight to the home, preventing expansion/contraction. This is also sometimes caused by heat; either from a portable grill, or sunlight reflecting off nearby windows.Recommend a qualified siding contractor evaluate and repair.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.10.5 - Siding

Siding in contact with roof

Siding is in contact with the roof covering material. This can allow moisture to enter the siding resulting in long-term damage. Recommend siding be trimmed to allow for an approximately 1" gap allowing water to flow down the roof flashing.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.10.6 - Siding

Flashing Missing/Incorrect

One or more areas of the exterior are missing flashing or the flashing is installed incorrectly. Flashing is used in order to prevent water intrusion to inside components of the house. Recommend having a qualified contractor assess the area and install, fix, or repair flashing. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.13.1 - Deck/Patio Cover

No footings at support posts

One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. There is no indication of proper concrete piers or pads that extend below the frost line. This will lead to the deck structure shifting over time as the ground freezes/thaws. Recommend proper support be added to ensire the long-term stability of the deck.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.13.2 - Deck/Patio Cover

Joist Hangers

Joist hanger(s) are missing or improperly installed. This could cause the deck structure to fail. Recommend that joist hangers be properly installed by qualified contractor.
House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.14.1 - Stairs

Non-Standard - Warning

Stairs are unsafe due to a non-standard configuration, such as too-high riser heights and/or too-narrow tread depths. Standard building practices call for riser heights not to exceed eight inches and tread depths to be at least nine inches but preferably 11 inches. Riser heights should not vary more than 3/8 inch on a flight of stairs. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should repair or replace stairs so they conform to standard building practices.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.18.1 - Paint & Caulk

Paint or Stain Failing - Some Areas

The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.18.2 - Paint & Caulk

Trim Deteriorated paint with rot

Wood siding and/or trim is rotten in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.18.3 - Paint & Caulk

Wood Window is missing Paint

One or more wood windows is missing paint. Recommend having a handyman address in order to prevent potential wood rot. 

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
2.18.4 - Paint & Caulk

Open Cell Foam Used To Seal Exterior

Open cell foam is used in one or more places to seal the exterior. Open cell foam collects water and will cause further damage. 

Hardhat General Contractor

3 - Roofing

Roof Inspection Method
Not Inspected, From Eves
Roof Layers
One
Roof Type
Cross-Gable
Roof Covering
Composition
Noticeable Leaks
No
Roof Vents
Average
Ridge Caps
Not Visible
Roof Ventilation
Adequate
Roofing Limitations

The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access, solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions performed adequately or were leak-free.

Excluded: Snow Obscures - Completely

The roof was completely obscured by snow and couldn't be fully evaluated. Please refer to seller's disclosure for any pertinent information regarding the age and condition of the roof.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspector’s opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Flashing

Missing Kickout Flashing

Kickout flashing diverts rainwater away from wall surfaces that abut a roof. Sometimes called diverter flashing, it provides excellent protection against the penetration of water into the building envelope when installed properly.The following are locations where kickout flashing is critical:
  • anywhere a roof and exterior wall intersect, where the wall continues past the lower roof-edge and gutter. If a kickout flashing is absent in this location, large amounts of water may miss the gutter, penetrate the siding, and become trapped inside the wall; and
  • where gutters terminate at the side of a chimney.
Recommend a qualified contractor install kickout flashing where it is missing.
Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Flashing

Drip Edge Missing
Garage

One or more areas of the roof were missing the drip edge flashing. The purpose of drip edge flashing is to prevent water from wicking under the roof covering by providing a point for the water to drip from. Recommend having missing flashing installed.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Skylight(s)

Old, Replace Soon

Skylights were old, weather-deteriorated and may leak soon. Replacement will be relatively expensive. The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your inspection contingency period you consult with a qualified contractor to gain an idea of options and costs for replacement. 

Wash Appliance Repair

4 - Garage

Garage Limitations

The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities.

Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Garage Deficiencies

Garage Moisture Stains

Stains and/or standing water were found in one or more areas. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
4.6.1 - Exterior Entry Door

Deteriorated Entry

One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.8.1 - Stairs

Substandard Attachment

One or more set of deck stairs appear to have substandard attachment to framing. This can lead to the stairs not supporting their carrying load properly or in an extreme situation even pulling away from the floor. Recommend evaluation and repair be performed by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.10.1 - Guardrails

Missing

Guardrails are missing from one or more sections of decks or elevated surfaces with high drop-offs. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require guardrails to be installed at drop-offs higher than 30 inches, but in some cases it is advised to install them at shorter drop-offs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails as necessary and as per standard building practices.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.11.1 - Electrical

Cover Plates Missing

Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

Wrench DIY

5 - Kitchen

General: Kitchen Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters, appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.

General: Kitchen Area Photos
Range/Oven/Stove top: Storage Present in Oven
The oven was being used for storage. The inspector was not able to inspect the oven.

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Dishwasher

No High Loop or Air Gap

The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop" or "air gap". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices.

Also, no "air gap" is installed. Air gaps are another device meant to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. These are required in some municipalities for new construction and when remodeling. The client(s) should consult with a qualified contractor to determine if an air gap should be installed.
Wash Appliance Repair
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Range Hood

Light Inoperable

The light in range hood is inoperable. Recommend replacing light bulb(s) or having repairs made by a qualified contractor as necessary.
Wash Appliance Repair
Credit
Comment
5.4.2 - Range Hood

Vents Indoors

The range hood fan vents into the kitchen rather than outdoors. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary as per standard building practices so the range hood fan vents outdoors.
Wash Appliance Repair
Credit
Comment
5.15.1 - Cabinets

Water Damage Below Sink - Minor

Water stains and/or minor water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made.
House building Cabinet Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.20.1 - Receptacles

Loose
Kitchen

One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.21.1 - GFCI Receptacles

Non-GFCI Within 6' of Sink

One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.22.1 - Cover Plates

Missing

Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

Wrench DIY

6 - Bathrooms

Bathroom Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks, heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.

Bathroom Photos
Bathtubs: Tub Overflow
Bathroom

The overflow device on all tubs in the home have not been tested for leaks due to the possibility of causing damage to the surrounding area. I did not see any signs of previous issues relating to the overflow.  It is highly recommended that the tub should be monitored while filling so as to not force the overflow into use.  The gaskets that seal the overflow become dry with time and no longer provide a watertight seal; this is why they are not tested.

Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - Bathtubs

Enamel Deteriorated

The enamel coating on one or more bathtubs is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the bathtub(s) should be refinished or replaced.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
6.8.1 - Showers

Caulk Missing or Deteriorated - Around Surround

Caulk is missing or deteriorated around one or more shower surrounds. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
6.11.1 - Environmental

MicroBio Growth

Microbial growths were found at one or more locations. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to identify what substance or organism this staining is. However such staining is normally caused by excessively moist conditions, which in turn can be caused by plumbing or building envelope leaks and/or substandard ventilation. These conducive conditions should be corrected before making any attempts to remove or correct the staining. Normally affected materials such as drywall are removed, enclosed affected spaces are allowed to dry thoroughly, a mildewcide may be applied, and only then is drywall reinstalled. For evaluation and possible mitigation, consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or mold/moisture mitigation specialist.

For more information, visit:
https://www.cdc.gov/mold/
https://www.epa.gov/mold

Hardhat Mold Inspector

7 - Interior Rooms

Interior Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems, communications wiring, central vacuum systems, elevators and stair lifts, cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment, deficiencies relating to interior decorating, low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.

Interior Room Photos

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steam generating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Receptacles

Receptacles - Loose
2nd Floor Hall

One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Cover Plates

Cover Plates - Missing

Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
7.6.1 - Wiring

Wiring - Exposed

Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.7.1 - Smoke Detectors

Smoke Alarms - > 10 Years Old

Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.8.1 - Door Bell

None

Credit
Comment
7.10.1 - Ceiling

Cosmetic Defects

While cosmetic defects do not affect the integrity of the home, they should be noted and repaired as necessary. One or more areas have cosmetic defects including poor patching or small cracks.

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.11.1 - Walls

Minor Cracks/Damage

Minor cracks/damage was found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.11.2 - Walls

Dry Stains, Monitor

Stains were found in one or more wall areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.12.1 - Windows (Representative Number)

Screens - Missing

Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.12.2 - Windows (Representative Number)

Wearher Strip falling out

The weather strip on one or more windows is coming off and should be repaired or replaced as necessary. 

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.13.1 - Doors (Representative Number)

Entry Door - Deteriorated Entry

One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.13.2 - Doors (Representative Number)

Entry Door - Weatherstrip Missing or Deteriorated
Front Center

The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.13.3 - Doors (Representative Number)

Door Rubs on floor
1st Floor Bathroom, 2nd Floor Back Left Bedroom

One or more door rubs on the floor while operating it. Recommend fixing or replacing as necessary. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
7.14.1 - Stairs

Low Headroom Clearance

The headroom in all parts of a stairway should not be less than 6 feet 8 inches. It is measured vertically from the sloped plane adjoining the tread nosing or from the floor surface of the landing or platform. The low headroom can lead to individuals hitting their head on the stairway causing personal injury. Extra care should be taken when using the staircase unless modifications are made to increase the headroom clearance.

Credit
Comment
7.14.2 - Stairs

Narrow Stairway

One or more narrow stairway is present on the property. Stairways should be at least 36 inches wide. This is measured at all points above the handrail height and below the required headroom height. Extra care should be taken when using a narrow stairway.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.15.1 - Handrails

Missing

One or more flights of stairs with more than three risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

Hammer Carpentry Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.16.1 - Guardrails

Missing

Guardrails are missing from one or more sections of decks or elevated surfaces with high drop-offs. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require guardrails to be installed at drop-offs higher than 30 inches, but in some cases it is advised to install them at shorter drop-offs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails as necessary and as per standard building practices.

Hammer Carpentry Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.16.2 - Guardrails

Wobbly

Guardrails are loose and/or wobbly in one or more areas. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing new fasteners or hardware, installing additional fasteners and/or installing additional railing components as necessary so they are securely attached.

Hammer Carpentry Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.17.1 - Floors

Not Level/Unstable
2nd Floor

Floors in one or more areas are not level or are unstable and bounce while being walked on. Repairs may be needed to make floors level & or stable, such as repairs to the foundation or structure. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.17.2 - Floors

Refinish Wood Floor

Wood flooring in one or more areas is worn, damaged and/or cupping. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and refinish wood flooring as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.22.1 - Light Switches

Loose
Kitchen

One or more electric switches and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Electric Electrical Contractor

8 - Fireplace, Wood Stoves and Chimneys

Chimney Type
Masonry
Fireplace Type
N/A
Wood Stove Type
Metal Insert
Annually for All

All solid fuel burning appliances (wood stoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.

Fireplace, Wood Stove and Chimney Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.

Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Chimney

Missing Screen & Rainproof Cover

One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

*Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
*Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
*Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
*Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.2.2 - Chimney

Crown Deteriorated

The masonry chimney crown is deteriorated (cracked or broken) and needs repairs or replacement. The crown is meant to keep water off of the chimney structure.  The chimney can be damaged by wet masonry going through freeze-thaw cycles. A properly constructed chimney crown should:

  • Be constructed using either pre-cast concrete slabs, cast-in-place steel reinforced concrete, solid stone, or metal
  • Be sloped down from the flue a minimum of 3 inches of fall per foot of run
  • Extend a minimum of 2-1/2 inches beyond the face of the chimney on all sides
  • Not directly contact the flue liner (if installed), and this gap should be filled with flexible caulk
  • Have flashing installed between the bottom of the crown and the top of the brick chimney

A qualified chimney service contractor or mason should evaluate  and repair or replace the crown as necessary.

Fire Fireplace Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Clean Flue

Pellet Stove

A significant amount of creosote is visible in the pellet stove flue and discoloration is apparent on the outside of the house around the vent. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.

Fire Fireplace Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Wood Stove

Eval and Verify Safe Installation

The inspector was unable to determine if the wood stove and flue are installed safely, and in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications. The manufacturer's information label(s) were illegible and/or missing. Recommend having a qualified stove and/or chimney service contractor evaluate to determine if the wood stove and flue are in installed in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications, and make repairs and/or modifications if necessary.

Fire Fireplace Contractor

9 - Plumbing and Laundry

Location of Main Water Shut-Off
Basement
Location of Main Water Meter
None
Service Pipe
Plastic
Distribution Pipe
Copper
Vent Pipe
Plastic
Drain Pipe
Plastic
Waste Pipe
Plastic
Pressure Regulator
Yes
Laundry: Laundry Area Photos
Plumbing and Laundry Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment, private sewage disposal systems, hot tubs or spas, main, side and lateral sewer lines, gray water systems, pressure boosting systems, trap primers, incinerating or composting toilets, fire suppression systems, water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems, plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs, underground utilities and systems, overflow drains for tubs and sinks, backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determining the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.

Water Source
Well

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Copper Supply

Pin Holes or Corrosion
Kitchen

Pin holes and/or corrosion were visible on one or more areas of copper water supply pipes. This most often occurs with acid water with a pH of less than 6.5. Leaks may result because of this. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace water supply components as necessary. The client(s) should consult with a qualified plumber regarding the possibility of acidic water, and what solutions may be available to neutralize the pH.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - Laundry

Dryer Duct - Plastic or Foil

The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct.

For more information, visit:
https://www.cpsc.gov/s3fs-public/5022.pdf

Wash Appliance Repair
Credit
Comment
9.8.1 - Sump Pump

Inoperable

The sump pump appeared to be inoperable. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the risk of water accumulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.8.2 - Sump Pump

No Check Valve

No check valve is visible on the sump pump's discharge pipe. While not every installation requires a check valve, they are recommended where the discharge pipe is long, the vertical discharge is more than seven or eight feet, or the sump pump has a small pit. Check valves prevent water in the discharge pipe from flowing back down into the sump pit after the pump shuts off. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a check valve.

For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=installing+a+sump+pump
http://www.google.com/search?q=check+valve+required+for+sump+pump

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.8.3 - Sump Pump

Broken Discharge Pipe

The discharge pipe for the sump pump was broken at the time of the inspection. This can lead to water not properly being removed from the basement. Recommend repairing pipe to ensure water is removed from the foundation area.

Wrenches Handyman

10 - Heating and Cooling

Heating Estimated Age
> 30 Years
Cooling Estimated Age
N/A
Location of Main Fuel Shut-Off
At Tank, At Boiler
Primary Heat Energy Source
Oil
Thermostat Location
1st Floor, 2nd Floor
Primary Heat Type
Baseboard
Primary A/C Energy Source
N/A
Primary A/C Type
N/A
Distribution
Metal Pipe
Filter Location
None
Last Service Date
Unknown
Oil Heater: Oil Fill location
Front
Heating Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, solar, coal or wood fired heat systems, thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions, heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas, underground utilities and systems, safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating system components, does not determine if heating systems are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks.

Thermostat - Old

The property appears to be using an older, inefficient and outdated thermostat. Recommend replacing thermostat with a more economical digital set back thermostat.

Hot Water Off Oil Boiler

There is no separate water heater for the house. The hot water is provided by a mixing valve on the heating system boiler.

Manufacturer
Crown

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65° Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

Credit
Comment
10.2.1 - Age

Older boiler

The boiler is older, deteriorated and needs to be replaced in the near future. Recommend contacting a licensed HVAC tech to evaluate boiler condition fully.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Service

Now & Annually (Gas or Oil)

The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future.

For more information visit:
https://energy.gov/energysaver/furnaces-and-boilers

Fire HVAC Professional

11 - Attic

Ceiling Structure
Ceiling Beams
Insulation Material
Fiberglass Roll/Batt, Cellulose Loose
Roof Structure
Rafters
Attic Insulation: Approximate average depth of insulation
16
Attic Limitations

The following items or areas are not included in this inspection-areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access, areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.

Inspection Method
View from hatch
Excluded: Some Areas Inaccessible

Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

Credit
Comment
11.2.1 - Access Hatch

Undersize

The access to the attic is smaller than the standard size of 22x30 inches. This can make it difficult to enter the attic to perform any required maintenance.
Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.5.1 - Electrical

Wiring - Loose

Some wiring is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.8.1 - Moisture Stains on Wood

Dry Stains

Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. Stains can also be treated and cleaned to ensure any potential future issues are more easily spotted.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
11.9.1 - Rodent Evidence

Light to Moderate

Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome. HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hantavirus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

Pest control Pest Control Pro

12 - Basement/Crawlspace

Inspection Method
Traversed, Partially Traversed
Insulation Material
Not Visible
Pier/Support Post Material
Wood, Masonry
Beam Material
Solid Wood, Built Up Wood
Floor Structure Above
Wood Joists
Vapor Barrier Present
Not Visible
Basement Limitations

Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by under-floor insulation are excluded from this inspection. The inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the basement in the future. Complete access to all basement areas during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector attempts to locate all basement access points and areas. Access points may be obscured or otherwise hidden by furnishings or stored items. In such cases, the client should ask the property owner where all access points are that are not described in this inspection, and have those areas inspected. Note that basementareas should be checked at least annually for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.

Basement Access Location
Kitchen
Excluded: Some Areas Inaccessible

Some basement/crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

Credit
Comment
12.3.1 - Electrical

Cover Plates - Missing

Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.3.2 - Electrical

Wiring - Splices Not In Box

One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

Electric Electrical Contractor

13 - Water Heater

Manufacturer
From oil boiler
Energy Source
Off Boiler
Estimated Age
10 to 15 years
Water Temperature
=>120°F
Capacity
39
Water Heater Limitations

Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: water recirculation pumps, solar water heating systems, Energy Smart or energy saver controls, catch pan drains. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.

Obscured By: Insulated Jacket

A permanently installed insulated jacket is installed on the water heater. It obscures the manufacturer's information label and most of the water heater. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.

Credit
Comment
13.8.1 - Water Temperature High

Water Temperature >120 Degrees F

The hot water reached a temperature in excess of 120 F. The following will give you a sense for how hot water can injure. Note that these are for average adults, not small children or the very elderly.

  • Water at 100 F or below is unlikely to scald an adult occupant at any exposure time.
  • Water at 120F for 5 minutes can cause 2nd & 3rd degree burns on adult skin
  • Water at 130F for 30 seconds can cause 2nd & 3rd degree burns on adult skin
  • Water at 140F for 5 seconds can cause 2nd & 3rd degree burns on adult skin
  • Water at 150F for 1.5 seconds can cause 2nd & 3rd degree burns on adult skin
  • Water at 160F for .5 seconds can cause 2nd & 3rd degree burns on adult skin


We recommend adjusting the hot water temperature limit to 120F or lower.

14 - Electrical

Service Type
Overhead
Protection
Breakers
Amperage
100
Voltage
120/240
Location of Main Service Switch
Basement
Location of Main Disconnect
Top
Location of Sub-Panels
N/A
Service Entrance Conductor Material
Aluminium
System Ground
Ground Rod
Main Disconnect Rating
100
Branch Circuit Wiring Type
NM Sheathed
Aluminum Wiring Present
No
Smoke Detectors
Yes
Meter: Location
Front
Electrical Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection- generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring, underground utilities and systems, low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings or stored items are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested, these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke detectors is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors should be verified and batteries should be changed. Smoke detectors have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.

Service and/or Panel: Panel Manufacturer
Siemens

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panel boards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the service entrance conductors’ insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panel board, sub-panels, distribution panel boards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panel board cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any time controlled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

Credit
Comment
14.8.1 - Service Mast

Cracked/Missing Sealant

The top of the meter box had cracked and/or missing sealant on it at the time of the inspection. It should be resealed With an approved sealant such as mastic duct sealant.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.10.1 - Service and/or Panel

Missing or Inadequate Legend

The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.10.2 - Service and/or Panel

Rusted Breakers

The electrical panel has significant rust on it. Repairs should be made as necessary to prevent water from leaking into the panel.

Electric Electrical Contractor

15 - Free Home Manager App

16 - Get a 18 Month Home Warranty for Price of 12 Months

6 Months Free Home Warranty Offer

Order your warranty here and get 18 months of coverage for the price of 12 months just for using Blue Lobster Home Inspection.

Sign Up Here

The Simple Warranty by Residential Warranty Services represents the broadest coverage available in the market today. All options are included, no known preexisting conditions and we offer a best coverage guarantee. In fact, if you are ever denied coverage for a claim that can be verified eligible by any other policy we will either cover it or give you 100% of your premiums back. Pricing is based on a simple square footage system, and you'll never experience any up charges. To see details of this policy, please download the brochure here.

https://signup.residentialwarrantyservices.com/forms/SimpleBrochure.pdf

17 - 90 Day Warranty +

90 Day Warranty Plus

Clients want more than just a home inspection, they need professionals they can depend on even after the job is done. Thats why we back all of our inspections with a 90-Day Structural and Mechanical Buyers Home Warranty.

The 90-Day Warranty comes with your home inspection. This warranty is valid 90 days from the date of inspection or 22 days after closing, whichever comes later. You will always have at least 22 days worth of coverage.

This warranty covers repairs to the items the home inspector found to be in good working condition at the time of inspection and are specifically listed within our warranty.

You will never have a deductible to pay, and claims will be handled within 72 hours of completion. And if you already have a warranty, no problem. Ours can work in conjunction with an existing warranty.

For warranty claims or questions call 800-544-8156.

Click to see policy for complete terms and conditions

18 - Platinum Roof Protection Plan

5 Year Roof Leak Protection Plan

This service contract is for the repair of leaks to your home's (Detached Homes Only) roof for a period of 5 years following the date of inspection. This service contract covers only those items specifically listed and excludes all others, subject to the terms and conditions herein.

This policy covers all residential roof types, including asphalt singles, slate roofs, metal roofs, tiles roofs, and non-commercial flat roof types. This policy applies only to the home itself, and specifically excludes other structures. 

For warranty claims or questions call 800-544-8156.

Click to see policy for complete terms and conditions

19 - SewerGard Coverage

SewerGard Coverage

With every full home inspection (detached homes only), we have Sewer Line Protection from SewerGard - the world leader in underground repair coverage. Buy with confidence and worry less knowing that main water and sewer collapses and breaks are covered, up to $4000.

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20 - Free Concierge Service

Free Concierge Service

Concierge Video Overview

Our partners work with over 150,000 Real Estate Professionals throughout the U.S. and Canada and deliver over 140,000 services for real estate transactions, new moves, and new service installs monthly giving us the Guaranteed Best pricing and service in the industry.

Blue Lobster Home Inspection Inc / ISG Full Concierge is the only service of its kind with an in-house utility team, solar team, communications, satellite & cable team, and access to more services than any other Utility Connection Provider anywhere.  ISG and the ISG Full Concierge serve more than 1 in 5 home buyers throughout North America.

 

21 - Home Owners Resource

Home Owners Resource

Home Owners Resource is a membership based service that provides homeowners with easy access to the information they need to properly maintain and manage their property. Login to your account to get in touch with our team of experts who are here to help with any question you have about your home, from maintenance and repair questions to project advice, we are here to help. Home Owners Resource is offered exclusively by home inspectors approved by Home Owners Resource.

You may register for FREE HERE by providing your name and the zip code of the property you had inspected along with a username and password that you will use to log into the site. As a member of the Home Owners Resource you will have access to our website where you can find answers to any home maintenance/repair question you may have.

 

22 - Porch Home Assistant Gold Membership

23 - MoldSafe Coverage

MoldSafe Coverage

You're covered! We offer way more than just an inspection! If mold is found in your home that was not present at the time of inspection, you are covered for remediation, up to $2000.

Click Here to see policy for complete terms and conditions

24 - Review Us on Online

Review Us on Online

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Thank you for taking the time to help improve our company! It helps me to improve on my service to future customers and I am grateful for your review. It would be greatly appreciated!