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1234 Main St.
Weaverville NC 28787
12/16/2018 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
2
Monitor items
19
General recommendations
6
Safety hazards

This summary page is not the entire report. The complete report may include additional information of interest or concern to you. It is strongly recommended that you promptly read the complete report. For information regarding the negotiability of any item in this report under the real estate purchase contract, contact your North Carolina real estate agent or an attorney.

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Home Inspector
Occupancy
Furnished, Occupied
Temperature (approximate)
70 Fahrenheit (F)
Type of Building
Single Family
Weather Conditions
Partly Cloudy
Inspection Limitations: Occupied Home
The inspection was limited due to the home being occupied and furnished at the time of inspection. Personal items, rugs, wall hangings, furniture, clothing, etc., limited the visual inspection of the floors, walls, cabinet interiors, and closet walls and floors of the home. It is recommended that these areas be re-inspected after the home has been vacated and all personal property removed.

Introduction: 

This report is a written evaluation that represents the results of a home inspection performed in accordance with The North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Act Standard of Practice. The word "inspect" per the NCHILB SOP means the act of making a visual examination. Home Inspections are limited to visible and accessible areas and are not invasive. The report outlines inspection findings of systems or components so inspected that did not function as intended and are in need of repair, require subsequent observation such as monitoring, or warrant further investigation by a specialist such as an engineer.

The report statements describe the component or system, how the condition is defective, explain the consequences of the condition, and direct the recipient to a course of action with regard to the condition or refer the client to a specialist. If the inspection is a pre-purchase inspection, it is recommended that all items listed in the body and summary of the report be repaired or evaluated to determine the extent of the concern before purchasing the home. It is the client's responsibility to read the complete inspection report and follow-up with repairs and evaluations.


How to Read the Report:

There are several ways to read the report. As the FULL REPORT either in HTML or PDF formats, or as a SUMMARY PDF. You can also view a separate list of Recommendations or Safety/Attention Items. Links to these are in blue and are located just under the photo of the home on the first page. Use the PDF versions to print the report. Note that viewing the PDF version of the FULL REPORT is the only way to view or print out the entire report as one continuous document. The report is intended to be viewed in color. The directional reference of left and right is as facing the front of the home.


Cost Estimates to Resolve Deficiencies: 

Any cost estimates given by the Home Inspector, either verbally or included in the report, for repair of deficiencies found during the inspection are based on visual inspections only, are not invasive and are thus purely speculative. They must not to be relied upon in any way. If complete and accurate cost-of-repair estimates are desired, licensed professionals in the appropriate trade should be consulted. Only licensed professionals in the appropriate trade are qualified to perform thorough visual, destructive or invasive investigations and render accurate cost-of-repair estimates.


If you choose to research costs yourself, there are several free resources online that can be helpful such as Homewyse.com. They can help you estimate costs in your area based on your zip code. But remember, without having the appropriate professional contractors do thorough, invasive examinations of the deficiencies, you may be missing extensive hidden damage.

General Limitations: .1104 GENERAL LIMITATIONS (a) Home inspections done in accordance with this Section are not technically exhaustive. (b) This Section applies to buildings with four or fewer dwelling units, and individually owned residential units within multi-family buildings, and their attached garages or carports.

General Exclusions: .1105 GENERAL EXCLUSIONS: (a) Home inspectors are not required to report on: (1) Life expectancy of any component or system; (2) The causes of the need for a repair; (3) The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; (4) The suitability of the property for any specialized use; (5) Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; (6) The market value of the property or its marketability; (7) The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; (8) Any component or system that was not inspected; (9) The presence or absence of pests such as wood damaging organisms, rodents, or insects; or (10) Cosmetic damage, underground items, or items not permanently installed. (b) Home inspectors are not required to: (1) Offer warranties or guarantees of any kind; (2) Calculate the strength, adequacy, or efficiency of any system or component; (3) Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely affect the health or safety of the home inspector or other persons; (4) Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; (5) Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; (6) Move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility; (7) Determine the presence or absence of any suspected adverse environmental condition or hazardous substance, including toxins, carcinogens, noise, contaminants in the building or in soil, water, and air; (8) Determine the effectiveness of any system installed to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; (9) Predict future condition, including failure of components; (10) Project operating costs of components; (11) Evaluate acoustical characteristics of any system or component; (12) Inspect special equipment or accessories that are not listed as components to be inspected in this Section; or (13) Disturb insulation, except as required in Rule .1114 of this Section. (c) Home inspectors shall not: (1) Offer or perform any act or service contrary to law; or (2) Offer or perform engineering, architectural, plumbing, electrical or any other job function requiring an occupational license in the jurisdiction where the inspection is taking place, unless the home inspector holds a valid occupational license, in which case the home inspector shall inform the client that the home inspector is so licensed, and therefore qualified to go beyond this Section and perform additional inspections beyond those within the scope of the Standards of Practice.

Condominium Exclusions: Condominium common areas and common elements such as Structural, Roofing, Exterior, Insulation and Ventilation, components are not included in Condominium Inspections.

Health Related Concerns: During a home inspection, the home is inspected for moisture concerns and evidence of wood damage related to observation of fungal growth, however, health and environmental issues are beyond the scope of the home inspection. If the client has health related concerns related to the presence of fungal growths, an industrial hygienist should be consulted to determine the exact type of fungal presence and necessary procedures for removal.

2 - Roof

IN NI NP R
2.1 General X
2.2 Roof Coverings X
2.3 Roof Drainage Systems X
2.4 Roof Flashings X
2.5 Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations X X
General: Inspection Method
Walk on
Roof Coverings: Material
Shingles, 3 tab
General: General Limitations, Implications, and Directions

The roof coverings, flashings, and roof drainage items identified in this report that were found to be of concern and are hazardous, create conditions that will stop the system or component from functioning, and/or are safety concerns to the occupants of this home are in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed Roofing or General Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation the roof coverings, flashings, and roof drainage systems. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a Licensed General Contractor should consult a specialist in each trade as needed.

It is important to correct roofing deficiencies to prevent direct water penetration into the building envelope which can result in structural damage and or undesirable environmental conditions.

The verification of fastener type and count forroof covering systems is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The home inspection is limited to visible surfaces and systems only. Hidden or underlying system details such as flashings are beyond the scope of the home inspection.

Determining the age or remaining service life of the roof covering systems is beyond the scope of the home inspection. If the client would like to budget for replacement, a roofing contractor should be consulted to answer questions related to the life expectancy. Flashingand roof gutter system inspections are limited to evidence of past problems unless the inspection is performed during a heavy rain.

If this is a pre-purchase inspection, it is important to have the exterior areas of concern evaluated and/or repaired by a Licensed Roofing or General Contractor prior to purchaseto ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern. All roof drainage and flashing systems should be monitored over the first year of ownership to identify problem areas or areas that may need adjustment or corrections.

.1108 ROOFING (a) The home inspector shall inspect: (1) Roof coverings; (2) Roof drainage systems; (3) Flashings; (4) Skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and (5) Signs of' leaks or abnormal condensation on building components. (b) The home inspector shall: (1) Describe the type of roof covering materials; and (2) Report the methods used to inspect the roofing. (c) The home inspector is not required to: (1) Walk on the roofing; or (2) Inspect attached accessories including solar systems, antennae, and lightning arrestors.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Past Skylight Water Penetration
Main Bathroom/Center Roof/Attic

There are signs of past moisture penetration at or near one or more skylights as evidenced by skylight caulking on the roof and water stains running down the boxed out sheetrock enclosure in the attic behind the insulation. Moisture penetration into the building envelope can cause structural damage and undesirable environmental conditions. Monitoring is recommended. If signs of moisture penetration appear in the future, a Licensed Roofing Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Roof Roofing Professional

3 - Exterior

IN NI NP R
3.1 Wall Cladding, Flashing & Trim X X
3.2 Columns X
3.3 Exterior Entry Doors X
3.4 Windows X
3.5 Decks, Balconies, Stoops, Steps, Areaways, Porches, & Railings X X
3.6 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X
3.7 Driveways, Patio, Walkways, & Retaining Walls X
3.8 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls (Only with respect to their effect on the condition of the building) X
Wall Cladding, Flashing & Trim: Wall Cladding Material
Vinyl
Wall Cladding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Type
Lap
Wall Cladding, Flashing & Trim: Trim Type
Wood, Vinyl
Columns: Materials
Wood, Clad, Underlying Materials Not Visible For Inspection or Description
Decks, Balconies, Stoops, Steps, Areaways, Porches, & Railings: Structure Type
Wood
General Limitations, Implications, and Directions

The exterior items identified in this report that were found to be of concern and are hazardous, create conditions that will stop the system or component from functioning, and/or are safety concerns to the occupants of this home are in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed General Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of the exterior system and components. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a Licensed General Contractor should consult a specialist in each trade as needed.

It is important to correct deficiencies on the exterior of the home to prevent direct water penetration into the building envelope which can result in structural damage and undesirable environmental conditions.

If this is a pre-purchase inspection, it is important to have the exterior areas of concern evaluated and/or repaired by a Licensed General Contractor prior to purchase to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern.

 

.1107 EXTERIOR (a) The home inspector shall inspect: (1) Wall cladding, flashings, and trim; (2) Entryway doors and a representative number of windows; (3) Garage door operators; (4) Decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches and applicable railings; (5) Eaves, soffits, and fascias; (6) Driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls; and (7) Vegetation, grading, and drainage with respect only to their effect on the condition of the building. (b) The home inspector shall: (1) Describe wall cladding materials; (2) Operate all entryway doors; (3) Operate garage doors manually or by using permanently installed controls for any garage door operator; (4) Report whether or not any garage door operator will automatically reverse or stop when meeting reasonable resistance during closing; and (5) Probe exterior wood components where deterioration is suspected. (c) The home inspector is not required to inspect: (1) Storm windows, storm doors, screening, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories; (2) Fences; (3) For the presence of safety glazing in doors and windows; (4) Garage door operator remote control transmitters; (5) Geological conditions; (6) Soil conditions; (7) Recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); except as otherwise provided in 11 NCAC 8.1109(d)(5)(F); (8) Detached buildings or structures; or (9) For the presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Wall Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Stucco Cracking Of Less Than Measurable Width
Numerous Areas

The Stucco has cracking of less than measurable width in one or more places. If the cracks were to widen over time, they could allow moisture penetration into the building envelope, structural damage and undesirable environmental conditions. A Licensed Stucco Contractor should be consulted for further evaluation and repair if deemed necessary.

Stucco Stucco Repair Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Wall Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Deteriorating Trim
Basement Double Door Trim

One or more areas of exterior trim are deteriorating. Deteriorated wood trim can lead to moisture penetration into the building envelope, structural damage, and undesirable environmental conditions. A Licensed General Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Wall Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Siding Damaged
Front Center/Left

One or more areas of siding appeared to have been damaged/cut. Damaged siding can allow moisture penetration into the building envelope from wind driven rain, structural damage and undesirable environmental conditions. A Licensed Siding Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.4 - Wall Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Heavy Caulking
Back Right Near Doors

There is heavy caulking in one or more places evidencing past moisture penetration. Heavy caulking is not a permanent fix. Moisture penetration into the building envelope can cause structural damage over time and undesirable environmental conditions. A Licensed General Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.5 - Wall Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Vinyl Siding Discoloration
Right Side Most Prevalent

The siding in one or more places shows signs of discoloration. Discoloration of vinyl siding can occur from many causes. A Licensed Siding Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair if deemed necessary.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Decks, Balconies, Stoops, Steps, Areaways, Porches, & Railings

Joist Hangers Missing Or Improperly Installed
Back

One or more areas of the deck have missing or improperly installed  joist hangers, or lack of ledger boards, relying on nail connections only. This could cause the deck to collapse under load. A Licensed Deck Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.5.2 - Decks, Balconies, Stoops, Steps, Areaways, Porches, & Railings

Deck Connection
Back

The deck appears to be nailed to the home with no other visible means of attachment. Nails can corrode and fail behind the deck band causing the deck to collapse. Concealed damage to framing and/or siding behind the deck can also result in deck collapse. Unless it can otherwise be demonstrated that the deck attachment to the house is secure, the deck should be directly supported from below or bolted to the house. A Licensed General Contractor or Licensed Structural Engineer ahouls be consulted for a full evaluation of the deck attachment and modify or repair as deemed necessary.

Hardhat General Contractor

4 - Structural Components

IN NI NP R
4.1 Roof/Attic/Ceiling Structure X
4.2 Floor Structure X
4.3 Wall Structure X
4.4 Columns X
4.5 Piers X
4.6 Foundation, Basement & Crawlspace X X
Roof/Attic/Ceiling Structure: Inspection Method - Attic
Walked
Roof/Attic/Ceiling Structure: Roof Type/Style
Gable
Roof/Attic/Ceiling Structure: Roof Structure
Engineered Wood Trusses
Roof/Attic/Ceiling Structure: Sheathing Material
OSB
Floor Structure: Floor Joist Type
Wood Joists
Floor Structure: Girder/Beam Type
Dimensional Lumber: Standard Construction
Floor Structure: Sub-floor Material
OSB
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Dirt
Wall Structure: Wall Structure Type
Finished Areas: Not Accessible For Inspection Or Description
Columns: Column Materials
Not Accessible for Inspection or Description, Wood
Piers: Pier Materials
Masonry Block
Foundation, Basement & Crawlspace: Inspection Method - Crawlspace
Crawled
Foundation, Basement & Crawlspace: Foundation Type
Crawl Space
Foundation, Basement & Crawlspace: Foundation Materials
Masonry Block
General Limitations, Implications, and Directions

The structural items identified in this report that were found to be of concern and are hazardous, create conditions that will stop the system or component from functioning, and/or are safety concerns to the occupants of this home are in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed General Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of the structural system and components. If evaluation and repairs are beyond the scope of the Building Code, a Structural Engineer should be consulted. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a Licensed General Contractor should consult a specialist in each trade as needed.

It is important to correct structural deficiencies of the home to prevent dangerous situations and prevent direct water penetration into the building envelope which can result in structural damage and/or undesirable environmental conditions including abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.

If this is a pre-purchase inspection, it is important to have the structural areas of concern evaluated and/or repaired by a Licensed General Contractor or Structural Engineer as required, prior to purchase to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern.

.1106 STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS (a) The home inspector shall inspect structural components including: (1) Foundation; (2) Floors; (3) Walls; (4) Columns or piers; (5) Ceilings; and (6) Roofs. (b) The home inspector shall describe the type of: (1) Foundation; (2) Floor structure; (3) Wall structure; (4) Columns or piers; (5) Ceiling structure; and (6) Roof structure. (c) The home inspector shall: (1) Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected; (2) Enter under floor crawl spaces, basements, and attic spaces except when access is obstructed, when entry could damage the property, or when dangerous or adverse situations are suspected; (3) Report the methods used to inspect under floor crawl spaces and attics; and (4) Report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
Credit
Comment
4.6.1 - Foundation, Basement & Crawlspace

Intermittent Excessive Moisture Conditions
Crawlspace

There is evidence of intermittent excessive moisture conditions in the crawlspace. Excessive moisture in the crawlspace can lead to undesirable environmental conditions, wood destroying organism growth, structural damage and rusting of metal components of the HVAC systems. A License General Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Hardhat General Contractor

5 - Interiors

IN NI NP R
5.1 Doors X X
5.2 Floors X X
5.3 Walls X
5.4 Ceilings X X
5.5 Steps, Stairways, Balconies, & Railings X X
5.6 Countertops & Cabinets X X
5.7 Windows X
General Limitations, Implications, and Directions

The interior items identified in this report that were found to be of concern and are hazardous, create conditions that will stop the system or component from functioning, and/or are safety concerns to the occupants of this home are in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed General Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of all Interior Systems and Components. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a Licensed General Contractor should consult a specialist in each trade as needed.

The inspection was not invasive and was therefore limited. Personal property such as storage, refrigerators, washers, dryer, rug, furniture, clothes, and wall hangings are not moved and therefore limit the inspection.

The overall floor areas in most furnished rooms are not visible and therefore identifying slopes is not possible. Furniture and personal items can conceal defects and change the overall feel of a home.

The interior rooms of the home were visually inspected. Cosmetic concerns, for example: worn carpets, poor floor finish, open seams in hardwoods, torn wallpaper, poor/damaged paint finish, worn cabinets, worn hinges, damaged window blind/shades, evidence of pets, evidence of smoking are beyond the scope of the home inspection.

One window and one receptacle were tested in each room unless furniture or storage blocked the access. Identifying cloudy windows is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The severity of window hazing varies with season and time of day. Therefore, damaged window may not be visible at the time of the inspection.

Light fixtures were operated from at least one switch. Unless labeled, multiple switch locations may not be identified. Confirmation of multiple position switches is only possible when all switches can be identified and this is not possible if switches are improperly installed.

Every light fixture has specific bulb wattage limitations. During the home inspection it is not possible to verify bulb type and size. Homeowners should verify bulb type and wattage fore each fixture to prevent fixture damage and ensure proper operation.

Determining the functionality of light fixtures that have missing bulbs or burnt out light bulbs is beyond the scope of the home inspection. Homeowners should replace burnt out or missing light bulbs to verify the functionality of light light fixtures when light bulbs are either missing or not lighting.

The inspection of the garage does not include moving personal property and or storage. The verification of fire separations systems between the house and the garage such as door and ceilings is beyond the scope of the home inspection.

The presence of a washer and dryer greatly limit the inspection of laundry areas. Washing machines and dryers are considered personal property and the inspection of these appliances are beyond the scope of the home inspection. Washing machines often leak resulting in hidden damage to areas that are not visible to the home inspector and household fires related to clothes dryers are common.

If this is a pre-purchase inspection, the buyer should view the laundry room for damage or concerns after the washer and dryer have been removed and prior to the purchase of the home. Before the installation of a washer and dryer, the installer should inspect and verify the washer drain, the dryer exhaust duct, and the electrical service receptacles.

The buyer should view the home when furnishings and personal items have been removed, A General Contractor should be consulted if additional concerns are discovered at that time.

It is important to have the interior areas of concern evaluated and/or repaired by a Licensed General Contractor prior to purchase to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern.

.1113 INTERIORS (a) The home inspector shall inspect: (1) Walls, ceiling, and floors; (2) Steps, stairways, balconies, and railings; (3) Counters and a representative number of built-in cabinets; and (4) A representative number of doors and windows. (b) The home inspector shall: (1) Operate a representative number of windows and interior doors; and (2) Report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components. (c) The home inspector is not required to inspect: (1) Paint, wallpaper, and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors; (2) Carpeting; or (3) Draperies, blinds, or other window treatments.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Doors

Door Does Not Latch
Master Bathroom Sliding Door

One or more interior doors do not latch properly. A Door Repair and Installation Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Floors

Floor Not Installed To Industry Standards
Lower Level Bath And Hallway

One or more areas of the flooring are not installed to industry standards with gaps between pieces and overlapping of pieces. A Licensed Flooring Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Flooring Flooring Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.2.2 - Floors

Loose Vinyl Trim
Kitchen Floor

The vinyl trim is loose in one or more places. A Licensed Flooring Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Flooring Flooring Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.2.3 - Floors

Tile Not Installed To Industry Standards
Kitchen Backsplash

The tile has not been grouted to industry standards. A Licensed Tile Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Tile Tile Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Ceilings

Loose Tape
Master Bathroom

One or more areas of the sheet rock taping are coming loose. A Drywall Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.5.1 - Steps, Stairways, Balconies, & Railings

Loose Handrail
Lower Lever Stairway

The stair handrail is loose in one or more places. Loose handrails are a safety hazard and should be repaired as soon as possible. A Licensed General Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Countertops & Cabinets

Evidence Of Past Leaking
Kitchen Sink Base

There is evidence of past leaking in one or more cabinet sink bases. This may be from a plumbing leak or from leaking bottles that have been stored under the sink. Recommend continued monitoring.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
5.6.2 - Countertops & Cabinets

Cabinet Kick Plate Missing

The main bathroom sink cabinet is missing it's kick plate. This plate should also have a duct register in it as the HVAC is venting out the front of the cabinet. A Licensed cabinet contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

House building Cabinet Contractor

6 - Built-in Kitchen Appliances

IN NI NP R
6.1 Range(s)/Oven(s)/Cooktop(s) X X
6.2 Dishwasher X
6.3 Garbage Disposal(s) X
General Limitations, Implications, and Directions

The items related to build-in kitchen appliances identified in this report that were found to be of concern and are hazardous, create conditions that will stop the system or component from functioning, and/or are safety concerns to the occupants of this home are in need of further evaluation and repair by a Certified Appliance Repair Technician. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a Licensed General Contractor should be consulted to contact a specialist in each trade as needed.

Built in appliances are operated to determine if the units respond and operate to normal operating controls.

The determination of the effectiveness of the appliance settings or cycles, such as cleaning ability of the dishwasher, grinding efficiency of the disposal, or calibration of the oven is beyond the scope of the home inspection.

Appliance clocks and timers, refrigeration units and washing machines are beyond the scope of the home inspection.

If this is a pre-purchase inspection, it is important to have built-in kitchen appliance areas of concern evaluated and/or repaired by a Certified Appliance Repair Technician prior to purchase to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern.

.1115 BUILT-IN KITCHEN APPLIANCES (a) The home inspector shall inspect and operate the basic functions of the following kitchen appliances: (1) Permanently installed dishwasher(s), through a normal cycle; (2) Range(s), cook top(s), and permanently installed oven(s); (3) Trash compactor(s); (4) Garbage disposal(s); (5) Ventilation equipment or range hood(s); and (6) Permanently installed microwave oven(s). (b) The home inspector is not required to inspect: (1) Clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven functions, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation; (2) Non built-in appliances; or (3) Refrigeration units. (c) The home inspector is not required to operate: (1) Appliances in use; or (2) Any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Range(s)/Oven(s)/Cooktop(s)

Range Not Fastened With Anit-Tilt Device

The range was not securely fastened to an anti tilt device. This poses a safety hazard, especially to children. A Qualified Professional should be consulted for evaluation and repair or installation of an approved anti tilt device. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

7 - Electrical

IN NI NP R
7.1 Service Entrance Conductors X
7.2 Main Distribution Panel X
7.3 Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses X
7.4 Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles X X
7.5 GFCI Recepticles X X
7.6 Smoke Detectors X
7.7 Permanently Installed Carbon Monoxide Detectors X
7.8 Polarity & grounding of receptacles within 6' of interior plumbing fixtures, all receptacles in garage, carport & exterior walls X
Service Entrance Conductors: Service Entrance Conductors
Aluminum, 220 Volts, Underground
Main Distribution Panel: Panel Location
Basement
Main Distribution Panel: Ampacity
200 AMP
Main Distribution Panel: Main Overcurrent Device
200 amp
Main Distribution Panel: Grounding Equipment
Grounding Rod
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper
Smoke Detectors: Present?
Yes
Permanently Installed Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Present?
No
General Limitations, Implications, and Directions

The electrical items identified in this reportthat were found to be of concern and are hazardous, create conditions that will stop the system or component from functioning, and/or are safety concerns to the occupants of this home are in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed Electrical Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of the Electrical System and Components.If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a Licensed General Contractor should consult a specialist in each trade as needed.

Electrical issues are safety concerns and should be repaired immediately. When repairs are made, the complete electrical system should be evaluated.

During a home inspection, it is not possible to place a home under a full loading condition that would evaluate the capacity of the electrical system. The electrical system was evaluated based on current systems and components and no consideration was made to future expansion or modernization.

The inspection of light fixtures will be limited if there are missing or burnt out light bulbs at the time of inspection. The functioning of these light sockets can not be determined.

As with any system, the addition of new systems and appliances may require electrical system replacement, modification, and/or upgrades.

If this is a pre-purchase inspection, it is important to have the electrical areas of concern evaluated and/or repaired by a Licensed Electrical Contractor prior to purchase to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern.

1110 ELECTRICAL (a) The home inspector shall inspect: (1) Electrical service entrance conductors; (2) Electrical service equipment, grounding equipment, main overcurrent device, and main and distribution panels; (3) Amperage and voltage ratings of the electrical service; (4) Branch circuit conductors, their overcurrent devices, and the compatibility of their ampacities; (5) The operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling’s exterior walls; (6) The polarity and grounding of all receptacles within six feet of interior plumbing fixtures, and all receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected structures; (7) The operation of ground fault circuit interrupters; and (8) Smoke detectors and permanently installed carbon monoxide alarms. (b) The home inspector shall describe: (1) Electrical service amperage and voltage; (2) Electrical service entry conductor materials; (3) The electrical service type as being overhead or underground; and (4) The location of main and distribution panels. (c) The home inspector shall report in writing the presence of any readily accessible single strand aluminum branch circuit wiring. (d) The home inspector shall report in writing on the presence or absence of smoke detectors, and permanently installed carbon monoxide alarms in any homes with fuel fired appliances or attached garages, and operate their test function, if accessible, except when detectors are part of a central system. (e) The home inspector is not required to: (1) Insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels; (2) Test or operate any overcurrent device except ground fault circuit interrupters; (3) Dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels; or (4) Inspect: (A) Low voltage systems; (B) Security systems and heat detectors; (C) Telephone, security, cable TV, intercoms, or other ancillary wiring that is not a part of the primary electrical distribution system; (D) Built-in vacuum equipment; (E) Back up electrical generating equipment; or (F) Other alternative electrical generating or renewable energy systems such as solar, wind or hydro power.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
Credit
Comment
7.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Light Inoperable
Master Bathroom

One or more lights were not operational at the time of inspection. The light bulb(s) should be replaced and the light fixtures retested. If the light still does not operate, a Licensed Electrical Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.4.2 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Loose Light Fixture
Living Room

One or more can light fixtures are loose in the ceiling. A Licensed Electrical Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.4.3 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Inaccessible Light Switch
Front Left Basement

The light switch to the front right basement store room is inaccessible since it is located in the area where the HVAC air handler and water heater are located (under the stairs). A chalk board panel must be removed to access the switch to this light as well as the air handler and water heater.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - GFCI Recepticles

No GFCI Protection Installed
Lower Bathroom

The outlet in the lower bathroom does not appear to be GCFI protected. This is a shock hazard. A Licensed Electrical Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.5.2 - GFCI Recepticles

Outlet(s) Not GCFI Protected
Kitchen Left And Right Of Range

This is for your information. One or more outlets withing 6 feet of a water source are not GCFI protected. Although this may not have been required at the time of construction, it is now considered standard building practice. Outlets that are not GFCI protected within 6 feet of a water source is considered a shock hazard. A Licensed Electrical Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Electric Electrical Contractor

8 - Plumbing

IN NI NP R
8.1 Main Water Shut-off Device X
8.2 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X X
8.3 Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures X X
8.4 Hot Water Systems, Normal Operating Controls; Chimneys, Flues & Vents; Automatic Safety Controls X
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Piping Materials
PVC
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Trap Materials
Plastic
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Supply Materials
Copper
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Distribution Materials
Pex, Polybutylene
Hot Water Systems, Normal Operating Controls; Chimneys, Flues & Vents; Automatic Safety Controls: Energy Source
Electric
Hot Water Systems, Normal Operating Controls; Chimneys, Flues & Vents; Automatic Safety Controls: Capacity
50 gallons
Hot Water Systems, Normal Operating Controls; Chimneys, Flues & Vents; Automatic Safety Controls: Location
Basement
General Limitations, Implications, and Directions

The plumbing and water heating items identified in this report that were found to be of concern and are hazardous, create conditions that will stop the system or component from functioning, and/or are safety concerns to the occupants of this home are in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed Plumbing or General Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation the Plumbing and Hot Water System and Components. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a Licensed General Contractor should be consulted to contact specialists in each trade as needed. 

Repairs are needed to prevent leaks and ensure proper sanitation. The majority of the water supply and the waste lines are concealed from visual inspector and the general condition cannot be determined.

The plumbing was inspected for functional flow and drainage, however it is not possible to fully evaluate the plumbing system to determine proper venting, sizing, or functional design during a home inspection when the system cannot be put under the same load as presented by a family.

The inspection of water heaters does not include evaluating unit capacities for functional use based on the number of bathrooms or fixtures. The hot water requirement for daily use varies with each family and thus the home inspector cannot deturmine weather or not the hot water system for this home is adequate.

The inspection does not include verification of anti-scald fixtures. The inspection does not assure that the plumbing systems and components of the home will meet the demands of your family. Determining the quality and quantity of the water supply is beyond the scope of the home inspection. This includes determining if water supply is acidic or has high mineral content.

Fixtures are not identified as defective as the result of hard water or mineral stains. The effectiveness of the toilet flush and the verification of the drain for the washing machine are beyond the scope of the home inspection. The main water turn-off valve location is identified if located, but not operated. The functional flow of the water supply at each accessible fixture was tested. Functional flow is not found and reported as defective unless water flow drops below 50% when two fixtures are operated simultaneously.

Waste and supply lines are evaluated by running water inside the home. The condition of the inside of the plumbing pipes cannot be determined. Verification of the surface defects on plumbing fixtures such as shower/tubs/sinks is beyond the scope of the inspection.

If the home has a private well, determining if the water supply is potable or of good quality is beyond the scope of the home inspection. Wells require regular maintenance and can become contaminated with bacteria or other contaminants. It is recommended that the local health department or a Licensed Well Contractor be consulted for system evaluation and testing.

Back flow protection is not a requirement for all homes, and determining the presence or absence of back flow protection is beyond the scope of the home inspection. Annual service and inspection of the main waste line will prevent system clogging and backup.

The plumbing inspection is a limited functional evaluation made under little to no system load. If the client would like to know the condition of the interior of the plumbing lines, the client should consult a licensed Plumbing Contractor.

If this is a pre-purchase inspection, it is important to have the plumbing system areas of concern evaluated and/or repaired by a Licensed Plumbing Contractor prior to purchase to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern.

Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
Basement, Right

1109 PLUMBING (a) The home inspector shall inspect: (1) Interior water supply and distribution system, including: piping materials, supports, and insulation; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections; (2) Interior drain, waste, and vent system, including: traps; drain, waste, and vent piping; piping supports and pipe insulation; leaks; and functional drainage; (3) Hot water systems including: water heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; and chimneys, flues, and vents; (4) Fuel storage and distribution systems including: interior fuel storage equipment, supply piping, venting, and supports; leaks; and (5) Sump pumps. (b) The home inspector shall describe: (1) Water supply and distribution piping materials; (2) Drain, waste, and vent piping materials; (3) Water heating equipment, including fuel or power source, storage capacity, and location; and (4) The location of any main water supply shutoff device. (c) The home inspector shall operate all plumbing fixtures, including their faucets and all exterior faucets attached to the house, except where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance. (d) The home inspector is not required to: (1) State the effectiveness of anti-siphon devices; (2) Determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; (3) Operate automatic safety controls; (4) Operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets; (5) Inspect: (A) Water conditioning systems; (B) Fire and lawn sprinkler systems; (C) On-site water supply quantity and quality; (D) On-site waste disposal systems; (E) Foundation irrigation systems; (F) Bathroom spas, except as to functional flow and functional drainage; (G) Swimming pools; (H) Solar water heating equipment; or (6) Inspect the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems

Leaking Pipe
Water Heater Area/Behind Counter

A drain pipe shows signs of a past leak. This piping does not appear to be connected to anything at this time. If the pipe is put in use in the future, a Licensed Plumbing Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Polybutylene Distribution Lines

This home has a plumbing supply system that uses polybutylene plastic distribution lines and compression band fittings. Even though this plumbing system was installed in many homes from 1978 until mid-1990s, it is no longer an approved plumbing system due to a history of material failures. The failures were related to improper installation, improper handling, improper storage, and plastic deterioration due to chemical reactions with the water supply. Due to the nature of this latent defect, it was not possible to adequately assess the condition of the plumbing system during the home inspection. A Licensed Plumbing Contractor should be consulted for a complete evaluation of the plumbing system to determine the significance of this concern.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

9 - Insulation & Ventilation

IN NI NP R
9.1 Insulation And Ventilation In Unfinished Spaces: All Accessible Areas X
9.2 Vapor Retarders In Unfinished Spaces: All Accessible Areas X
9.3 Kitchen, Bath, & Laundry Venting Systems X
9.4 Radon Mitigation Systems X
Insulation And Ventilation In Unfinished Spaces: All Accessible Areas: Attic Ventilation Description
Soffit Vents, Ridge Vents
Insulation And Ventilation In Unfinished Spaces: All Accessible Areas: Attic Insulation Description
Batt, Blown, Fiberglass
Insulation And Ventilation In Unfinished Spaces: All Accessible Areas: Crawlspace Ventilation Description
Foundation Vents
Insulation And Ventilation In Unfinished Spaces: All Accessible Areas: Crawlspace Insulation Description
Batt, Fiberglass
Vapor Retarders In Unfinished Spaces: All Accessible Areas: Crawl Space Floor Vapor Retarder Materials
Ground Plastic
Vapor Retarders In Unfinished Spaces: All Accessible Areas: Attic Vapor Retarder Materials
None
Vapor Retarders In Unfinished Spaces: All Accessible Areas: Floor Vapor Retarder Materials
Kraft Faces Fiberglass Batt
General Limitations, Implications, and Directions

The Insulation and Ventilation items identified in this report that were found to be of concern and are hazardous, create conditions that will stop the system or component from functioning, and/or are safety concerns to the occupants of this home are in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed General Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of the Insulation and Ventilation System and Components. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a Licensed General Contractor should consult a specialist in each trade as needed.

Insulation concerns should be evaluated and corrected as needed to ensure the integrity of the thermal envelope of the home.

The insulation in accessible areas was inspected for indications of defects/damage only and not insulation effectiveness or R value. Determining the energy efficiency of the home is beyond the scope of the home inspection.

The inspection or determination of the absence or presence of insulation in concealed areas such as wall cavities is not possible. Insulation is not moved in the attic areas. Insulation is moved in the crawl space or foundation areas where plumbing drain and waste pipes penetrate floors, adjacent to earth filled stoops and porches, and at exterior doors where conditions are not hazardous.

The presence of insulation prevents the inspection of the ceiling, roofing, and floor components that are concealed or covered. Defects in the insulation system can lead to air infiltration, condensation, and elevated operational costs. The adequacy and proper function of ventilation systems depend on design specifications that cannot be verified during a home inspection.

Inspection procedures related to ventilation involve identifying defects present in systems and components located in ventilated areas. Active defects such as winter attic condensation will not be visible during the summer inspection unless the condensation has stained or corroded adjacent materials. Where the inspection of ventilated areas should be considered seasonally dependent, and the client should request a second inspection when seasons change. 

If this is a pre-purchase inspection, it is important to have the insulation and ventilation areas of concern evaluated and/or repaired by a Licensed General Contractor prior to purchase to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern.

1114 INSULATION AND VENTILATION (a) The home inspector shall inspect: (1) Insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces; (2) Ventilation of attics and foundation areas; (3) Kitchen, bathroom, and laundry venting systems; and (4) The operation of any readily accessible attic ventilation fan, and, when temperature permits, the operation of any readily accessible thermostatic control. (b) The home inspector shall describe: (1) Insulation in unfinished spaces; and (2) The absence of insulation in unfinished space at conditioned surfaces. (c) The home inspector is not required to report on: (1) Concealed insulation and vapor retarders; or (2) Venting equipment that is integral with household appliances. (d) The home inspector shall: (1) Move insulation where readily visible evidence indicates the possibility of a problem; and (2) Move floor insulation where plumbing drain/waste pipes penetrate floors, adjacent to earth-filled stoops or porches, and at exterior doors.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Kitchen, Bath, & Laundry Venting Systems

Bathroom Ventilation Fan Not Present
Lower Level Bathroom

There is no ventilation fan in one or more bathrooms without windows. This is not to industry standards. A Licensed General Contractor should be consulted for evaluation and repair. 

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Radon Mitigation Systems

Radon Mitigation System Is Installed In This Home

Similar to a HVAC system, radon mitigation systems require annual maintenance and fan service/replacement every 5 years. The inspection of the mitigation system, including the determination of the functionality and or the effectiveness, is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The homeowner should be asked for more information concerning system warranties and maintenance history. A qualified radon mitigation specialist should be consulted for a complete system evaluation.
Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Heating/Air Conditioning

IN NI NP R
10.1 Heating, Cooling & Air Handling Equipment X
10.2 Normal Operating Controls X
10.3 Distribution System X
10.4 Presence Of Installed Heating & Cooling Source For Each Habitable Space X
10.5 Vents, Flues & Chimneys X
Heating, Cooling & Air Handling Equipment: System Type
Heat Pump
Heating, Cooling & Air Handling Equipment: Location Exterior
Exterior Right
Heating, Cooling & Air Handling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Heating, Cooling & Air Handling Equipment: Configuration
Split System
Distribution System: Ductwork
Inaccessible for inspection or description
Heating, Cooling & Air Handling Equipment: Location Interior
Basement
General Limitations, Implications, and Directions

The Heating/Cooling Systems items identified in this report that were found to be of concern and are hazardous, create conditions that will stop the system or component from functioning, and/or are safety concerns to the occupants of this home are in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed HVAC Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of the HVAC System.If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a Licensed General Contractor should consult a specialist in each trade as needed.

The seasonal inspection of the HVAC systems during a home inspection is a non-invasive visual inspection that may not reveal internal problems. If a complete invasive inspection is desired, an Licensed HVAC Contractor should be consulted.

If this is a pre-purchase inspection, it is important to have Heating and Cooling System areas of concern evaluated and/or repaired by a Licensed HVAC Contractor prior to purchase to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern. The homeowner should also be asked for disclosure related to the performance, service, and maintenance history of the Heating and Cooling Systems.

The removal of the unit covers to view coils and fans provided for service by a qualified service technician is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The purpose of a home inspection is to determine if a system or component is functioning as intended. During a winter inspection, when outside temperatures are below 60 degrees F, it is not possible to evaluate if the system will properly cool the home, therefore, the air conditioning component of the system is visually inspected but not operated. It is not possible for the home inspector to draw conclusions regarding the functionality of the air conditioning component of the system during a winter inspection.

If the client would like more information concerning the functionality of the system, and invasive inspection by a HVAC Contractor should be requested.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations