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1234 Main St.
Raleigh, NC 27615
06/17/2019 9:00AM

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agent

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Agency Name

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent, Inspector
Temperature (approximate)
35 Fahrenheit (F)
Type of Building
Single Family
Weather Conditions
Active Rain
Definitions
Explained

All comments by the inspector should be considered before purchasing this home. Any findings / comments that are listed under "Recommendation"" by the inspector suggests a second opinion or further inspection by a qualified contractor. All costs associated with further inspection fees and repair or replacement of item, component or unit should be considered before you purchase the property.

Occupancy
Furnished, Occupied
For furnished homes, access to some items such as electrical outlets, windows, wall/floor surfaces and cabinet interiors can be restricted by furniture and/or personal belongings. These items are limitations of the inspection and these items may be concealed defects.
Overview
Inspection Overview

This residential home inspection report is compiled in accordance with the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice (NCHILB SOP). According to the NCHILB SOP, this report shall provide the Client with a better understanding of the Property's condition as observed at the time of the Home Inspection. A home inspection is limited to visible and accessible areas and are not invasive. The report outlines inspection findings of systems or components, so inspected, that did not function as intended, need repair, require subsequent observation (such as monitoring) and/or warrant further investigation by a licensed specialist. Please review your signed residential home inspection contract for additional information on the standard exclusions and limitations set forth by the NCHILB SOP. It is recommended that all items listed in the body and summary of the report be repaired or evaluated to determine the extent of the concern before purchasing the home, so that the client understands the full scope or extent of concern. It is the clients responsibility to read the complete inspection report and follow-up with repairs and evaluations.

Perspective
Locations

For the purpose of this report, all directional references (Left, Right, Front, Back) are based on when facing the front of the structure as depicted in the cover image above.

Use Of Photos
Photos

Your report includes many photographs. Some pictures are intended as a courtesy and are added for your information. Some are to help clarify where the inspector has been, what was looked at, and the condition of the system or component at the time of the inspection. Some of the pictures may be of deficiencies or problem areas, these are to help you better understand what is documented in this report and may allow you to see areas or items that you normally would not see. Not all problem areas or conditions will be supported with photos.

2 - Structural Components

IN NI NP R
2.1 Foundation (Structure) X X
2.2 Floor (Structure) X
2.3 Wall (Structure) X
2.4 Columns/Piers (Structure) X
2.5 Ceiling (Structure) X
2.6 Attic (Structure) X
Foundation (Structure): Type
Crawlspace
Floor (Structure): 1st Floor
Standard dimensional lumber
Floor (Structure): 2nd Floor
Not visible due to finished surfaces
Floor (Structure): Back Deck
Standard dimensional lumber
Floor (Structure): Front Porch
Concrete slab
Wall (Structure): Type
Not visible due to finished surfaces
Columns/Piers (Structure): Back Deck
Wooden Posts
Columns/Piers (Structure): Crawlspace
Concrete masonry unit and brick piers
Columns/Piers (Structure): Front Porch
Boxed Columns
Attic (Structure): Access Type
Master Bedroom Closet
Scuttle Hole
Attic (Structure): Inspection Method
From Entry
Attic (Structure): Structure
engineered roof truss system
What's Inspected

According to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice the home inspector shall do the following in relation to structural components. The home inspector shall inspect structural components including the foundation, floors, walls, columns or piers, ceilings, and roofs.  The home inspector shall describe the type of foundation, floor structure, wall structure, columns or piers, ceiling structure, and roof structure.  The home inspector shall probe structural components where deterioration is suspected; enter under floor crawl spaces, basements, and attic spaces except when access is obstructed, when entry could damage the property, or when dangerous or adverse situations are suspected; report the methods used to inspect under floor crawl spaces and attics; and report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on buildings components.

Ceiling (Structure): 1st Floor
Not visible due to finished surfaces

Because of interior ceiling coverings, not all structural members were able to be fully inspected. At the time of inspection the ceiling structure and material appeared to be in good condition. Any specific defects will be listed in the report.

Ceiling (Structure): 2st Floor
Engineered Wood Trusses

Because of interior ceiling coverings, not all structural members were able to be fully inspected. At the time of inspection the ceiling structure and material appeared to be in good condition. Any specific defects will be listed in the report.

Attic (Structure): Limitations
Limited access based on construction type and limited flooring

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the home structural elements that were readily visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes the foundation, exterior walls, floor structures and roof structure. Much of the home structure is hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or is buried underground. Because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all structural deficiencies. Upon observing indications that structural problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Foundation (Structure)

Brick Step Cracks
Front right of home

There are stair-step cracks in the brick veneer. This may indicate differential settlement of the home, differential brick expansion or be in response to steel lentil expansion or sag. Brick veneer is a protective exterior siding (weather barrier) and does not provide structural support to the home. Repair is recommended to prevent further cracking and allow water penetration behind the brick leading to potential damage of the exterior wall assembly. Please consult a general contractor for further evaluation and direction for repair as necessary.


Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Foundation (Structure)

Efflorescence
Crawlspace multiple locations

Efflorescence (salt stains) was noted on the foundation wall. The stains indicate that the foundation has been cyclically wet and dry. While efflorescence is a common cosmetic issue that does not pose a problem itself, it can be an indication of moisture intrusion possibly due to an absent or damaged waterproofing and/or foundation drain system. Please consult a water proofing contractor for further evaluation and direction for repairs as necessary.

Credit
Comment
2.1.3 - Foundation (Structure)

Efflorescence (Garage)
Garage left wall

Efflorescence (salt stains) was noted on the foundation wall in the garage. The stains indicate that the foundation has been cyclically wet and dry. Garage slabs typically have more shallow depth foundations and are more subject to movements in the soil, based upon seasonal changes in temperature, humidity and ground water conditions. Efflorescence is a common cosmetic issue and should not pose a problem unless the capillary (water wicking) actions comes into contact with the framing. The current visible evidence suggests that it does not come into contact with the framing. Please monitor this condition over time and if the efflorescence starts to contact wood framing, please consult a waterproofing contractor for further evaluation.

Credit
Comment
2.1.4 - Foundation (Structure)

Minor Cracking, Garage
Garage floor

When concrete cures (dries and hardens) it shrinks and wants to crack, which is a reason why control joints are used (i.e. provide a weak spot where the concrete can crack without affecting aesthetics, strength, or safety). Cracks may form with or without control joints. Garage slabs typically have more shallow depth foundations and are more subject to movements in the soil, based upon seasonal changes in temperature, humidity and ground water conditions. These cracks should be sealed to prevent potential water penetration into the slab, which can lead to further cracking. Please monitor these cracks over time and if they become larger than 1/8 inch in width, vertical/horizontal displacement is evident on either sides of the crack further evaluation by a general or concrete contractor is recommended.

Credit
Comment
2.1.5 - Foundation (Structure)

Soil erosion
Crawlspace Back Wall

There is moderate soil erosion in the back of the crawlspace along the footing that is a result of excessive water intrusion at some point in time. Recommend a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as needed. 


3 - Exterior

IN NI NP R
3.1 Siding, Flashing & Trim X X
3.2 Exterior Doors X X
3.3 Windows X X
3.4 Garage Door Opener X
3.5 Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps X X
3.6 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X
3.7 Walkways, Patios & Driveways X X
3.8 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls X X
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Vinyl
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Trim Material
Vinyl, Wood
Windows: Window Material
Vinyl
Windows: Window Type
Single-hung
Exterior

According to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice the home inspector shall do the following in relation to exterior components.  The home inspector shall inspect:  wall cladding, flashings, and trim; entryway doors and a representative number of windows; garage door openers; decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches and applicable railings; eaves, soffits, and fascias; driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls; and vegetation, grading, and drainage with respect only to their effect on the condition of the building.  The home inspector shall: describe wall cladding materials; operate all entryway doors; operate garage doors manually or by using permanently installed controls for any garage door operator; report whether or not any garage door operator will automatically reverse or stop when meeting reasonable resistance during closing; and probe exterior wood components where deterioration is suspected.  The home inspector is not required to inspect:  storm windows, storm doors, screening, shutters, awnings, and similar season accessories; fences; for the presence of safety glazing in doors and windows; garage door operator remote control transmitters; geological conditions; soil conditions; recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); detached buildings or structures; or for the presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding - Gap Vinyl
Right side of home

There are gaps in the siding planks, which can allow water penetration behind the siding causing damage to the exterior wall assembly and possibly entering the interior of the home. Please consult a siding or general contractor for further evaluation and repair.

Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Trim Rotted
Above back door

The trim above the back door is soft to the touch and decayed/damaged, which can allow additional water penetration behind the siding causing damage to the exterior structure or interior of the home. Recommend a qualified contractor repair or replacement as needed. 


Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Trim loose
Back door

The trim on the left side of the back door is loose, which can allow water penetration behind the siding causing damage to the exterior structure or interior of the home. Recommend a qualified contractor repair or replacement as needed. 

Credit
Comment
3.1.4 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Trim damage
Front porch and garage door

The wood trim above the front porch and around the garage overhead door appears to show visible signs of mild decay/rot. If unrepaired, this can allow water penetration behind the trim causing damage to the structure behind it. Recommend consulting a general contractor for repair or replacement of the damaged materials.

Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Exterior Doors

Crawspace door damage
Back right of home

The crawl space door has minor damage, which currently does not prevent it from functioning as intended. Please monitor the condition of the door over the life of the home and consult a general contractor for repair when necessary.

Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Windows

Window - Vinyl - Damaged
Front Left, back left

The vinyl window casing has some minor damage, which may allow water penetration behind the siding. Please consult a general contractor for repair to prevent potential water penetration.

Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Brick steps repoint
Front steps

The bricks on the steps are missing mortar between the bricks, which can allow the bricks to become loose over time and allow water penetration into the steps. Please have any missing mortar repointed by a general contractor.

Credit
Comment
3.5.2 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck - Joist Hanger
Garage entry deck

A joist on the garage deck is missing a joist hanger. This could cause the deck structure to fail. Recommend that joist hanger be properly repaired by qualified contractor.

Credit
Comment
3.5.3 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck - damaged
Back deck

Some of the deck flooring boards are damaged/decayed, which means they are not offering the appropriate support. Please have any damaged flooring boards replaced. Please consult a general contractor for further evaluation and repair.

Credit
Comment
3.5.4 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck Support Decay
Right Back

The deck support posts are deteriorated where they contact the ground and can be easily probed through the post. The affected posts may no longer bear the appropriate weight from the remainder of the deck, which is a safety concern. Please consult a general contractor for further evaluation and repair or replacement of the damaged support posts.


Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Driveway Cracking - Minor
Right side of driveway

The concrete has minor cracking, which is a common occurrence and does not affect the functionality of the concrete. This cracking may fluctuate based upon seasonal variations in temperature and humidity. The cracks should repaired using concrete patching or sealant.

Credit
Comment
3.8.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Erosion

There is major erosion under the deck due to the gutter draining directly below the deck. Erosion can lead to structural defects if enough soil is displaced. Please consider installing gutter extensions and/or yard drainage systems to prevent excessive erosion.

Credit
Comment
3.8.2 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Vegitation on Siding
Right Back corner of home

Vegetation was noted growing into and/or against the vinyl siding. Vegetation can separate the siding from the home and possibly allow moisture intrusion behind the siding. Recommend removal and monitoring.

4 - Roof

IN NI NP R
4.1 Coverings X
4.2 Roof Drainage Systems X X
4.3 Flashings X
4.4 Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations X X
Inspection Method
Ground, Camera with Zoom Lens
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Coverings : Material
Asphalt
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Metal/Aluminum
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Chimney Material
None
Roofing Components

 According to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice the home inspector shall do the following in relation to roofing components.  The home inspector shall inspect:  roof coverings; roof drainage systems; flashings; skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and signs of leaks or abnormal condensation on building components.  The home inspector shall:  describe the type of roof covering materials and report the methods used to inspect the roofing.  The home inspector is not required to:  walk on the roofing or inspect attached accessories including solar systems, antennae, and lightning arrestors.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Downspouts Drain Near Foundation
Left side of home, front of home, under back deck

One or more downspouts drain too close to the foundation which may cause water to enter into the home. Recommend a general contractor add/adjust downspout extensions to drain at least 6 feet from the foundation.

Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Gutter Damaged
Back left corner of home

The gutter is damaged, which may allow water to spill over the front of the gutter, which prevents the intended drainage of rain water. Please consult a general contractor for repair.

Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Chimney Crown Rust
Chimney

The chimney crown top plate shows visible moderate/substantial rusting, which can lead to leaking at the chimney. Please consult a general contractor for repair/replacement of the top plate.

5 - Plumbing

IN NI NP R
5.1 Water Supply, Distribution Systems X X
5.2 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X X
5.3 Fixtures & Faucets X X
5.4 Shower, Tubs & Sinks X X
5.5 Hot Water Systems X X
5.6 Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems X X
5.7 Radon Mitigation System X
Water Source
Public
Water Supply, Distribution Systems: Distribution Material
PB
Water Supply, Distribution Systems: Water Source
Public
Water Supply, Distribution Systems: Water Supply Material
PVC, PB
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: DWV Material
PVC
Hot Water Systems: Capacity
40 gallons
Hot Water Systems: Location
Garage
Hot Water Systems: Power Source/Type
Natural Gas
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Fuel Line Material
Black Iron, CSST
Water Supply, Distribution Systems: Main Shut Off Valve
Crawlspace
Hot Water Systems: Manufacturer
Whirlpool
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Main Gas Shut-off Location
Gas Meter
Plumbing

According to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice the home inspector shall do the following in relation to plumbing components.  The home inspector shall inspect:  interior water supply and distribution system, including: piping materials, supports, and insulation; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections; interior drain, waste, and vent system, including: traps; drain, waste, and vent piping; piping supports and pipe insulation; leaks; and functional drainage; hot water systems including: water heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; and chimneys, flues, and vents; fuel storage and distribution systems including: interior fuel storage equipment, supply piping, venting, and supports; leaks; and sump pumps.   The home inspector shall describe: water supply and distribution piping materials; drain, waste, and vent piping materials; water heating equipment, including fuel or power source, storage capacity or tankless point of use demand systems, and location; and the location of any main water supply shutoff device.  The home inspector shall operate all plumbing fixtures, including their faucets and all exterior faucets attached to the house, except where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance.  The home inspector is not required to:  state the requirement for or effectiveness of anti-siphon devices; determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private or the presence or absence of backflow devices; operate automatic safety controls; operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets; inspect: water conditioning systems; fire and lawn sprinkler systems; on-site water supply quantity and quality; on-site waste disposal systems; foundation irrigation systems; bathroom spas, whirlpools or air jet tubs except as to functional flow and functional drainage; swimming pools; solar water heating equipment; or fixture overflow devices or shower pan liners; or inspect the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials. Water meter evaluation is not part of this inspection.
 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems

PB

The following is recommended language provided by the NCHILB:  Polybutylene plumbing supply lines (PB) are installed in this house. PB was used as water distribution piping in many homes built from the mid 1980s until the mid 1990s. The piping and associated fittings have had a failure rate and subsequent leakage sufficient to have been the subject of several nationwide class action lawsuits. Copper and brass fittings used in later years seem to have reduced the failure rate, but the piping may still fail due to problems with poor installation, improper handling, or chemical reaction with the water supply. The piping in this house has copper fittings. You may wish to have the plumbing system evaluated by a licensed plumbing contractor.

Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems

Accordian pipe
Kitchen sink

The sink drain uses an accordion style drain pipe, which is not approved for drain or waste applications since it can harbor debris and bacterial growth. The drain pipe should be replaced with a smooth wall PVC type material. Please consult a plumbing contractor for repair.

Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Fixtures & Faucets

Fixture Stopper Inoperable
Master Bathroom Right

When the faucet lift arm is raised the stopper for the sink will not close. Please have the stopper assembly and lift arm repaired so that the stopper can be raised and properly seal the sink as intended.

Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - Fixtures & Faucets

Hose Bibb Leaking
Front Left ,Back Left

Multiple hose bibb valves were noted as leaking when turned on. Recommend a qualified contractor repair or replace as necessary.

Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Shower, Tubs & Sinks

Tup Stop Broken
2nd floor hall bathroom

The tub stop in the 2nd floor hallway bathroom was damaged/ not connected. Recommend qualified contractor repair or replace and ensure it is functioning properly.

Credit
Comment
5.5.1 - Hot Water Systems

Draft hood loose
Garage

The draft hood for the hot water heater is loose and appears to be secured with duct tape, which can prevent the proper flow of combustion gases and carbon monoxide from entering the vent and exiting the home. This can potentially allow higher levels of carbon monoxide in the home, which is a safety concern. Please consult a plumbing contractor for repair.

Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems

Gas Odor - Severe
Right side of home

A gas leak was noted at the regulator of the gas meter on the right side of the home. Recommend consulting with your local utility company or qualified gas company to repair and evaluate for potential leaks.

6 - Electrical

IN NI NP R
6.1 Service Entrance Conductors X
6.2 Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device X X
6.3 Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses X X
6.4 Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles X X
6.5 GFCI & AFCI X
6.6 Smoke Detectors X
6.7 Carbon Monoxide Detectors X
Service Entrance Conductors: Conductor Material
Aluminum
Service Entrance Conductors: Service Entrance
Underground
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Left Exterior
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Amperage
Unknown
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Manufacturer
Unknown
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Voltage
120/240
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wiring
Aluminum, Copper
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Romex
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Location
Laundry Room
Electrical

According to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice the home inspector shall do the following in relation to electrical components. The home inspector shall inspect:  electrical service entrance conductors; electrical service equipment, grounding equipment, main overcurrent device, and interiors of panelboard enclosures unless unsafe conditions are reported; amperage and voltage ratings of the electrical service; branch circuit conductors, their overcurrent devices, and the compatibility of their ampacities at the interiors of panel board enclosures unless unsafe conditions are reported; the operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwellings exterior walls; the polarity and grounding of all receptacles within six feet of interior plumbing fixtures, and all receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected structures; the operation of ground fault circuit interrupters; and smoke detectors and installed carbon monoxide alarms.  The home inspector shall describe:  electrical service amperage and voltage; electrical service entry conductor materials; the electrical service type as being overhead or underground; and the location of main and distribution panels.  The home inspector shall report in writing the presence of any readily accessible single strand aluminum branch circuit wiring.  The home inspector shall report in writing on the presence or absence of smoke detectors, and installed carbon monoxide alarms in any homes with fuel fired appliances or attached garages, and operate their test function, if accessible, except when detectors are part of a central system.  The home inspector is not required to:  insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels; test or operate any overcurrent device except ground fault circuit interrupters; dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of panelboard enclosures; or inspect:  low voltage systems; security systems and heat detectors; telephone, security, cable TV, intercoms, or other ancillary wiring that is not a part of the primary electrical distribution system; built-in vacuum equipment; back up electrical generating equipment; or other alternative electrical generating or renewable energy systems such as solar, wind or hydro power; battery or electrical automotive charging systems; or electrical systems to swimming pools or spas, including bonding and grounding.

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Data Tag Missing

The electrical panel is missing the panel data tag. This tag provides information on the enclosure type, amperage rating and allowable circuit breakers. Without this tag this information about the panel cannot be determined. You may wish to consult an electrical contractor to verify this information.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation
Credit
Comment
6.2.1 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Moisture In Electrical Panel
Left side of home

The interior of the electrical panel has dust/debris and rust build up on some of the circuit breaker components. This dust/debris and indications of water penetration (from the rust/moisture) can act as a conductor, which can lead to electric shock, arc flash accidents and potentially cause a fire. Please consult an electrical contractor to clean the interior of the panel and repair/replace components as necessary to prevent these conditions.

Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Damaged sheathing/ exposed electrical
Garage Right Side

There are loose, uncapped, live electrical wires as well as wire with damaged sheathing, which is a safety hazard. Please consult an electrical contractor to properly terminate the wiring in an approved junction box and repair any damaged wire. 

Credit
Comment
6.3.2 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Surface Mounted Wiring
Garage Right

The electrical wires are not properly secured at the appropriate intervals to the framing or are surface mounted, which can lead to damage of the wiring. Please consult an electrical contractor to review the current configuration and make repairs as necessary.

Credit
Comment
6.3.3 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Exposed connection
Attic rear of home , Basement Back Door, Basement Left Side

There is an electrical wire connection made outside of a junction box, which is a shock hazard and safety concern. Please consult an electrical contractor for repair.

Credit
Comment
6.3.4 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Improper wiring - garbage disposal
Under kitchen sink

Electrical feeder for garbage disposal is not properly secured and is run behind a plumbing flange. This could lead to problems including electrical shorts if something would snag the cable. Recommend qualified contractor repair/secure as needed.

Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Cover Plates Missing/Loose
Attic by entrance, crawlspace back middle

Electrical box cover plates are not secured or are missing, which is a potential shock hazard and safety concern. Please have the missing/loose face plate replaced/repaired.

Credit
Comment
6.4.2 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Receptacles - Loose Interior
2nd floor loft hall

The receptacle box is loose, which can cause damage to the wiring and is a safety concern. Please consult a general contractor for repair.

7 - Heating

IN NI NP R
7.1 Equipment X
7.2 Normal Operating Controls X
7.3 Distribution Systems X
7.4 Vents, Flues & Chimneys X
7.5 Fireplaces X
Equipment: Energy Source
Natural Gas
Equipment: Heat Type
Forced Air Furnace with Cooling Unit (aka Gas Pack)
Distribution Systems: Ductwork
Insulated
Fireplaces: Type
Gas
Equipment: Heat Unit 1
Trane
Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Hallway
Heating

According to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice the home inspector shall do the following in relation to heating components. The home inspector shall inspect permanently installed heating systems including:  heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible; solid fuel heating devices; heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and the presence or absence of an installed heat source for each habitable space. The home inspector shall describe the:  energy source; and heating equipment and distribution type.  The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls appropriate to weather conditions at the time of the inspection. The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector shall report the method of inspection used to inspect the heating system and whether or not access panels were removed. The home inspector is not required to:  operate heating systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage or when inappropriate to weather conditions at the time of the inspection; operate automatic safety controls; ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or ignite a pilot light; or inspect: the interior of flues; fireplace insert flue connections; heat exchanges; humidifiers; electronic air filters; the uniformity or adequacy of heat supply to the various rooms; or solar space heating equipment.

Heating System

All heating system concerns listed or identified below need further evaluation and repair by a licensed HVAC contractor to ensure safe, proper and reliable operation of the heating system. The purpose of the home inspection is to determine if the unit is functioning/operating at the time of the inspection and look for visual non-invasive indicators of potential problems. If you would like more information concerning the functionality of the system, an invasive inspection by a HVAC contractor should be completed. Also, please note that this visual inspection is a snapshot in time and conditions may change over time or based upon external weather conditions.

HVAC Supply Register(s)

Conditioned air supply was present in all Bedrooms and bathrooms unless noted otherwise in this report.

Fireplaces: Not Inspected / Not Tested

The gas fireplace would not turn on at the time of the inspection. Please ask the homeowner for any specific operating instructions and retest. If the fireplace will not turn on please consult a general contractor for repair. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation

8 - Cooling

IN NI NP R
8.1 Cooling Equipment X
8.2 Normal Operating Controls X
8.3 Distribution System X
Cooling Equipment: AC Unit 1
Trane
Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Hallway
Distribution System: Configuration
Central
Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Central Air Conditioner
Cooling

According to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice the home inspector shall do the following in relation to air conditioning components.  The home inspector shall inspect:  central air conditioning and through-the-wall ductless installed cooling systems including:  cooling and air handling equipment; and normal operating controls.  Cooling distribution systems including:  fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with associated supports, dampers, insulation, air filters, registers, fan-coil units; and the presence or absence of an installed cooling source for each habitable space.  The home inspector shall describe the:  energy sources; and cooling equipment type.  The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls appropriate to weather conditions at the time of the inspection.  The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector shall report the method used to inspect the air conditioning system and whether or not access panels were removed. The home inspector is not required to:  operate cooling systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; inspect window air conditioners; or inspect the uniformity or adequacy of cool-air supply to the various rooms.
 

Cooling System

All cooling system recommendations listed or identified below need further evaluation and repair by a licensed HVAC contractor to ensure safe, proper and reliable operation of the cooling system. The removal of the unit covers to view coils and fans provided for service by a qualified service technician is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The purpose of the home inspection is to determine if the unit is functioning/operating at the time of the inspection and look for visual non-invasive indicators of potential problems. If you would like more information concerning the functionality of the system, an invasive inspection by a HVAC contractor should be completed. Also, please note that this visual inspection is a snapshot in time and conditions may change over time or based upon external weather conditions.

Cooling System Not Tested - Temperature

Due to temperature below65 degrees, cooling system was not tested. Recommend full test by qualified HVAC technician before summer.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation

9 - Interior

IN NI NP R
9.1 Walls X X
9.2 Ceilings X X
9.3 Floors X X
9.4 Steps, Stairways & Railings X X
9.5 Countertops & Cabinets X X
9.6 Doors X X
9.7 Windows X X
Windows: Window Type
Single-hung
Interior

According to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice the home inspector shall do the following in relation to air interior components.  The home inspector shall inspect:  walls, ceiling, and floors; steps, stairways, balconies, and railings; counters and a representative number of built-in cabinets; and a representative number of doors and windows.  The home inspector shall:  operate a representative number of windows and interior doors; and report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.  The home inspector is not required to inspect:  paint, wallpaper, and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors; carpeting; or draperies, blinds, or other window treatments; or coatings on and hermetic seals between panes of glass in windows and doors.

Visibility

Some visibility and access of the walls, floors and windows were blocked by furniture, rugs, storage items, floor coverings and wall hanging items.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Walls

Trim loose
2nd floor hallway bathroom

The trim in the 2nd floor hallway bathroom behind the toilet is loose. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.

Credit
Comment
9.1.2 - Walls

Hole in trim
2nd Floor Front Right Bedroom

There is a hole in the baseboard in the 2nd floor right bedroom. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.

Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Ceilings

Ceiling (Minor Damage/Specific)
2nd Floor loft above closet 2nd Floor hallway near bedrooms

Minor damage or deterioration to the ceiling was visible in the 2nd floor loft and 2nd floor hallway at the time of the inspection. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.

Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Floors

Tiles (Cracked)

The master bathroom had a cracked floor tile visible at the time of the inspection. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor to reduce further damage and possible moisture intrusion in the floor. 

Credit
Comment
9.3.2 - Floors

Creaking
Master bathroom, top of stairs

The floor makes a creaking and popping sound when being walked on. This is not usually a structural concern and may be due too loose subfloor materials or subfloor attachment to the floor joists. Please consult a general contractor for further evaluation to determine the cause for the concern and repair as necessary.

Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Stair step loose
Garage

One of the steps in the garage stairwell is loose and could pose a trip hazard. Recommend a qualified contractor repair as needed to secure. 

Credit
Comment
9.5.1 - Countertops & Cabinets

Cabinet Door(s) Won't Close
Kitchen

Cabinet doors are not closing all the way on 1 or more of the cabinets. This may be due to poor hinges or normal usage wear and tear. Recommend qualified contractor repair as needed. 

Credit
Comment
9.5.2 - Countertops & Cabinets

Cabinets (Minor Damage)
Kitchen rotating hutch

The rotating corner cabinet in the kitchen has minor damage along the bottom of the door. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor as necessary.  

Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - Doors

Door Doesn't Latch
Master Bedroom

The double doors leading into the master bedroom would not close and latch as intended (i.e. the latch mechanism is not aligned with the strike plate on the door frame). Please consult a general contractor to adjust the alignment of the strike plate.

Credit
Comment
9.6.2 - Doors

Interior Door (rubbing on threshold)
2nd Floor hallway bathroom

The 2nd floor bathroom door rubs on the threshold during operation, which can damage the flooring and/or the door. Please consult a general contractor for repair.

Credit
Comment
9.6.3 - Doors

Interior Door (Out of Square)
Front Door

The front door is visibly out of square/ not aligned properly possibly due to the top hinge not being properly secured to the frame. Recommend a qualified contractor repair as necessary to prevent future damage to the door or frame. 

Credit
Comment
9.6.4 - Doors

Surfaces (Light Damage/Specific)
2nd Floor Front Left Bedroom

There is minor damage to the closet door in the 2nd floor left bedroom. Please consult a general contractor for repair.

Credit
Comment
9.6.5 - Doors

Door not sealing

The exterior door in the family room is not sealing completely at the bottom when closed as daylight can be seen through the crack. Recommend a qualified contractor repair as needed to reduce possible moisture intrusion and conditioned air leakage. 

Credit
Comment
9.7.1 - Windows

Difficult To Open/Close
2nd Floor Front Left Bedroom

Windows were difficult to open/close during inspection which may cause damage to the window during opening if not repaired. Recommend a qualified contractor repair the window so that it may easily open.

Credit
Comment
9.7.2 - Windows

Hardware Damaged
Living Room Middle Front

Multiple windows had hardware was damaged and the window would not "click" or lock in. Please consult a window or general contractor for further evaluation and repair.

Credit
Comment
9.7.3 - Windows

Window Does Not Stay Open
2nd floor loft right window, 2nd Floor Front Right Bedroom

The window will not stay open when raised, which can cause damage when the window falls back down. Please consult a window or general contractor for further evaluation and repair.

Credit
Comment
9.7.4 - Windows

Windows Seal
2nd Floor Front Right Bedroom

The window has visible condensation, fogging and/or rust between the panes of glass, which indicates a broken seal. A broken seal can reduce the insulation capabilities of the window and in severe cases lead to leaking. Also, please note that other windows in the home may also have broken seals, but were not readily visible at the time of the inspection. Please consult a window specialist or general contractor for review of the windows and repair or replace any windows with broken seals.

Credit
Comment
9.7.5 - Windows

Window frame damaged
Family room left of fireplace

The window frame and sash of the window to the left of the fireplace have holes drilled in them which could allow moisture intrusion into the wall below the window. Recommend a qualified contractor repair as needed. 

10 - Insulation & Ventilation

IN NI NP R
10.1 Attic Ventilation X
10.2 Attic Insulation X
10.3 Crawlspace Insulation/ Ventilation X
10.4 Exhaust Systems X X
Attic Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Ridge Vents, Soffit Vents
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Blown
Crawlspace Insulation/ Ventilation: Insulation Type
Batt
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans in Bathrooms
Fan Only
Insulation and Ventilation Components

According to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board Standards of Practice the home inspector shall do the following in relation to air insulation and ventilation components.  The home inspector shall inspect:  insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces; ventilation of attics and foundation areas; kitchen, bathroom, and laundry venting systems; and the operation of any readily accessible attic ventilation fan, and, when temperature permits, the operation of any readily accessible thermostatic control.  The home inspector shall describe: insulation in unfinished spaces; and the absence of insulation in unfinished space at conditioned surfaces.  The home inspector is not required to report on: concealed insulation and vapor retarders; or venting equipment for household appliances that are not required to be inspected pursuant to the North Carolina Home Inspector Standards of Practice. The home inspector shall:  move insulation where readily visible evidence indicates a problem; and move floor insulation where plumbing drain/waste pipes penetrate floors, adjacent to earth-filled stoops or porches, and at exterior doors.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation
Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Exhaust Systems

Dryer vent stuck
Right side of home

The dryer exhaust vent appears to be clogged, which is preventing the damper from closing when it is not exhausting. This can cause pest intrusion into the ducts. The vent exhaust should be cleaned and then check to ensure the damper can properly close the duct.

11 - Appliances

IN NI NP R
11.1 Dishwasher X
11.2 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
11.3 Garbage Disposal X
11.4 Microwave Ovens X
11.5 Ventilation equipment/ range hood X X
Dishwasher: Brand
General Electric (GE)
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
GE
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Type
Drop-In
Garbage Disposal: Brand
Badger
Microwave Ovens: Brand
General Electric (GE)
Ventilation equipment/ range hood: Exhaust hood type
Vented
About Conveyance

Some appliances may not "convey" or be included with the home. This should be spelled out in your contract. Typically appliances that are permanently installed and directly wired to the electrical or plumbing system may be considered as "fixtures". Your home inspector doesn't determine what should be included with the sale of the home. If you are not certain about what is include or "conveys" check the contract or ask your agent.

Built-In Kitchen Appliances

The home inspector shall inspect and operate the basic functions of the following kitchen appliances:  installed dishwasher through a complete cycle, range/cook top/oven, trash compactor, garbage disposal, ventilation equipment or range hood, and installed microwave ovens.  The home inspector is not required to inspect clocks, timers, self-cleaning functions, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation, non-built-in appliances, or refrigeration units. The inspector is not required to operate appliances in use or any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendation
Credit
Comment
11.5.1 - Ventilation equipment/ range hood

Vent fan is not vented
Kitchen

The vent fan above the cook top is not vented to the exterior and there is no duct work. This will allow smoke and fumes from the stove top to be released into the kitchen. This vent hood should be replaced with a recirculating vent hood or vented to the exterior of the home.  Recommended qualified contractor repair/install vent work as needed.