Loading
Document Name
Sort Generated Document By
Header Text
Total Credit Requested
$ 0.00
Preview
Create
Viewing:

1234 Main St.
Hillsborough NJ 08844
11/13/2018 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
70
Items Inspected
9
Monitor/upgrade
15
Repair/replace
1
Safety hazard

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Occupancy
Furnished
Style
Colonial
Temperature (approximate)
52 Fahrenheit (F)
Type of Building
Detached
Weather Conditions
Clear, Recent Rain

2 - Roof

O NP NI IN
2.1 Coverings X X
2.2 Roof Drainage Systems X X
2.3 Flashings X
2.4 Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations X
Inspection Method
Drone
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Coverings: Material
Asphalt
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Aluminum
Flashings: Material
Aluminum
Roof Photos

(g) When inspecting the roof of a residential building, the home inspector or associate home inspector shall: 1. Inspect: i. Roofing surface, excluding antennae and other installed accessories such as solar heating systems, lightning arresters, and satellite dishes; ii. Roof drainage systems; iii. Flashing; iv. Skylights; and v. Exterior of chimneys; 2. Describe: i. Roof surface; ii. Roof drainage systems; iii. Flashing; iv. Skylights; and v. Chimneys; 3. Employ reasonable, practicable and safe methods to inspect the roof such as: i. Walking on the roof; ii. Observation from a ladder at roof level; or iii. Visual examination with binoculars from ground level; and 4. Describe the methods used to inspect the roof.

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Coverings

Lichen/Moss/Fungal Growth on Roof Surface

Portions of the asphalt shingles covering the roof of the home had lichens growing on them. Lichens are plant like organisms that may do long term, very mild damage to the shingles. They are generally a cosmetic concern only. Efforts to remove them may result in granule loss where they were attached to the shingles. Recommend removal by a licensed contractor if so desired.

Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Coverings

Roof debris

Debris accumulated on the roof at the time of the inspection may damage roof covering materials by retaining moisture. Clearing the roof of debris should be included in annual maintenance.

Credit
Comment
2.1.3 - Coverings

Evidence of Prior Repair

One or more roof areas showed evidence of prior repair. Recommend monitoring the areas for future issues with repairs made as needed by a licensed roofing contractor. 

Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Debris in Gutters

One or more areas of the gutter system had visible debris. This could result in the gutters not being able to  properly carry water away from the house resulting in water damage and possible water intrusion. Recommend cleaning of the gutter system by a licensed contractor. 

Here is a DIY resource for cleaning your gutters. 

Credit
Comment
2.2.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Downspouts Drain Into Underground System

One or more downspouts drain into underground piping. The destination of the water after its entry into the ground is unknown. Recommend discussing drainage and piping with the owner. An evaluation of the underground pipes can not be made since the interior of the pipe is not visible.

Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Chimney Crown Cracking

The left front chimney had minor crown cracking. The cracking could lead to moisture damage of the chimney. Recommend further evaluation by a licensed mason contractor with repairs made based on those findings. 

Credit
Comment
2.4.2 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Presence of Skylights

Several skylights are installed in the home. They should be monitored for future leaks and rectified if leaks do occur in the future. Evidence of current leaks was not found during the inspection. Skylights are common roofing leak areas.

Credit
Comment
2.4.3 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Missing Brick(s)

One or more bricks was/were missing from the chimney. This could lead to moisture damage of the chimney and it also affects the structural integrity.. The inspector recommends repair by a licensed mason..

3 - Exterior

O NP NI IN
3.1 Siding, Flashing & Trim X X
3.2 Exterior Doors X
3.3 Walkways, Patios & Driveways X X
3.4 Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps X X
3.5 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X
3.6 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls X
3.7 Gutters & Downspouts X
Inspection Method
Visual
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Concrete, Wood, Brick
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Wood
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Style
Shakes
Exterior Doors: Exterior Entry Door
Steel, Fiberglass, Glass
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway Material
Asphalt, Concrete, Pavers
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Deck with Steps, Front Porch

(f) When conducting the inspection of the exterior components, a home inspector or associate home inspector shall: 1. Inspect: i. Exterior surfaces, excluding shutters, and screening, awnings, and other similar seasonal accessories; ii. Exterior doors excluding storm doors or safety glazing; iii. Windows excluding storm windows and safety glazing; iv. Attached or adjacent decks, balconies, stoops, steps, porches, and their railings; v. Vegetation, grading, drainage, and retaining walls with respect to their immediate detrimental effect on the condition of the residential building, excluding fences, geological and/or soil conditions, sea walls, break-walls, bulkheads and docks, or erosion control and earth stabilization; vi. Attached or adjacent walkways, patios, and driveways; and vii. Garage doors including automatic door openers and entrapment protection mechanisms, excluding remote control devices; and 2. Describe exterior wall surface type and material.

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Paint Cracking and/or Peeling on Siding & Exterior Trim

The paint or stain finish in some areas was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture. Recommend that a licensed contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the building exterior where necessary and per standard building practices.

Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding/Wall Penetration(s) Not Sealed

One of more siding penetrations were not sealed properly. This could lead to moisture intrusion and damage to the underlayment and interior finishes of the home. Recommend having the hole repaired by a licensed contractor.

Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Vegetation Too Close to Home

Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines was in contact with or close to the building exterior. Vegetation can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend pruning, moving or removing vegetation as necessary to maintain at least 6 inches of space between it and the building exterior.




Credit
Comment
3.1.4 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding-Localized Rot
Left Side

Siding has localized rot. Following repair of the damaged areas (which should be combined with exterior painting/maintenance), proper maintenance of the siding and control of water from roof or surface runoff can avoid further damage.

Credit
Comment
3.1.5 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Unidentifiable Wall Penetration

What appeared to be a metal box or vent was protruding from the left side of the house just below the gable vent. That area of the attic was inaccessible so the inspector was not able to identify it from the other side of the wall. The inspector recommends inquiring about the function of the box with the homeowner prior to closing. 

Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Gap-Driveway to Garage Apron

A large gap was noted where the driveway meets the concrete saddle for the garage. Water can travel into this gap, seeping down into and under the foundation and leading to foundation problems in the future. Recommend repair by a licensed contractor. 

Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Walkway Settled

One or more walkway areas have settled or heaved . This is a trip/fall hazard. It is recommended to have a licensed contractor repair the walkway.

Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck Boards/Post Splitting

One or more deck boards and/or posts was splitting but appeared to be stable. Recommend monitoring the cracks and if they grow larger in the future, the boards should be replaced by a licensed contractor. 

4 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

O NP NI IN
4.1 Foundation X X
4.2 Basements & Crawlspaces X X
4.3 Floor Structure X
4.4 Wall Structure X
4.5 Ceiling Structure X
4.6 Roof Structure & Attic X
Inspection Method
Visual
Foundation: Material
Masonry Block
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Concrete
Floor Structure: Material
Wood Beams
Floor Structure: Sub-floor
Plywood
Roof Structure & Attic: Material
Plywood
Roof Structure & Attic: Type
Gable
Basement Photos
Finished Basement

The basement has been finished. The finished basement is NOT inspected for code compliance. A home inspection is NOT a municipal building code inspection. It should be determined if all necessary permits and permit approvals were obtained for all work performed PRIOR to closing. Permits are typically required for most structural, electrical and plumbing work performed.
Discuss with township building department.

Floor Structure: Floor Covering and Stored Item Limitation

Visibility of the areas of the  basement floor that were covered with furnishings and areas with stored items was limited and those areas were not inspected.

Floor Structure: Joist & Subfloor Limitation

The subfloor was not visible and the floor joists were only partially visible due to the presence of a suspended ceiling. This is a limitation and these items were not inspected.

Foundation: Finished Basement

The basement was partially finished and this restricted viewing of some foundation walls, beams and floor structure. This is a limitation and only the exposed items were inspected.

Wall Structure: Limitation-Finished Basement

The basement was partially finished and this restricted viewing of some foundation walls, beams and floor structure. This is a lmitation and only the exposed items were inspected.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected
Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Foundation

Parge Coat Cracking

One or more cracks were observed in the masonry parge coating. Recommend monitoring the cracks for future expansion and repairs made as necessary by a licensed masonry contractor if the cracks become larger. 

Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Basements & Crawlspaces

Efflorescence

Efflorescence noted on the crawlspace surface. This a white, powdery deposit that is consistent with moisture intrusion. This can compromise the soil's ability to support the home structure and/or lead to mold growth. Recommend a qualified contractor identify source or moisture and correct. 

5 - Heating

O NP NI IN
5.1 Equipment X
5.2 Normal Operating Controls X
5.3 Distribution Systems X
5.4 Vents, Flues & Chimneys X
5.5 Presence of Installed Heat Source in Each Room X
Equipment: Heat Type
Forced Air
Distribution Systems: Ductwork
Insulated, Non-insulated
Equipment: Brand
York, Trane
Equipment: Energy Source
Gas
Equipment: Furnace Age

The home was equipped with a dual zone HVAC system. The high efficiency furnace located in the basement was produced in 2011, was operative and in very good condition. The furnace in the attic was produced in 2005, was operable and was in good condition. Furnaces in our area have a typical service life of 15-20 years. The inspector recommends following a maintenance schedule to get the longest possible life out of the 2 furnaces. 

Equipment: Electronic Air Cleaner Installed

The forced air system had an electronic air cleaner installed instead of a standard filter. Electronic air cleaners are beyond the scope of a NJ Home Inspection. An electronic air filter has special maintenance requirements. Failure to perform the required maintenance will result in poor filter performance and may affect the performance of the heating system or result in unhealthy conditions due to poor indoor air quality. You should read the manual for the filter to become familiar with these requirements.

 (j) When inspecting the heating system, a home inspector or associate home inspector shall: 1. Inspect: i. Installed heating equipment and energy sources, without determining heat supply adequacy or distribution balance, and without operating automatic safety controls or operating heat pumps when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the pumps, and excluding humidifiers, electronic air filters and solar heating systems; ii. Combustion vent systems and chimneys, excluding interiors of flues or chimneys; iii. Fuel storage tanks, excluding propane and underground storage tanks; and         iv. Visible and accessible portions of the heat exchanger, removing the flame roll-out shield if applicable; and 2. Describe: i. Heating equipment and distribution type; and ii. Energy sources. (n) When inspecting fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, a home inspector or associate home inspector shall: 1. Inspect: i. Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, without testing draft characteristics, excluding fire screens and doors, seals and gaskets, automatic fuel feed devices, mantles and non-structural fireplace surrounds, combustion make-up air devices, or gravity fed and fan assisted heat distribution systems; and ii. Chimneys and combustion vents excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; and 2. Describe: i. Type of fireplaces and/or solid fuel burning appliances; ii. Energy source; and iii. Visible evidence of draft characteristics

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected

6 - Cooling

O NP NI IN
6.1 Cooling Equipment X X
6.2 Normal Operating Controls X
6.3 Distribution System X
6.4 Presence of Installed Cooling Source in Each Room X
Cooling Equipment: Location
Exterior West
Distribution System: Configuration
Central
Cooling Equipment: Brand
Trane, York
Cooling Equipment: Cooling Condenser Age-Dual Zone

The home was equipped with a dual zone HVAC system. The cooling condenser located on the left side of the home was produced in 2011. The cooling condenser located on the right side of the home was produced in 2005. Cooling condensers in our area have a typical service life of 10-15 years. The inspector recommends following a maintenance schedule to get the longest possible life out of the 2 cooling condensers.

Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Cooling Equipment: Low Temperature

The air-conditioning system was not tested because the outside temperature was below 67 degrees F. and to test it would risk damaging the coils.

 (k) When inspecting the cooling system, a home inspector or associate home inspector shall: 1. Inspect: i. Central cooling system, excluding electronic air filters and excluding determination of cooling supply adequacy or distribution balance and without operating central cooling equipment when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the cooling equipment; ii. Permanently installed hard-wired, through-wall individual cooling systems; and iii. Energy sources; and 2. Describe: i. Cooling equipment and distribution type; and ii. Energy sources.

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Cooling Equipment

Unit Not Level

The pad supporting the outdoor condensing unit is not level. This can cause accelerated deterioration of components. Recommend licensed HVAC contractor level the unit.

7 - Plumbing

O NP NI IN
7.1 Main Water Shut-off Device X
7.2 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
7.3 Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures X
7.4 Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents X
7.5 Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems X
7.6 Sump Pump X X
Waste System
Public
Water Source
Public
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Distribution Material
Copper
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Supply Material
Copper
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Basement
Sump Pump: Location
Basement
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
Basement
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Power Source/Type
Gas
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Main Gas Meter Location
Basement
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Drain Size
Unknown
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material
Copper, Iron, PVC
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Capacity
75 gallons
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Hot Water Heater Age

The hot water heater was produced in 2005. Hot water heaters have a typical service life of 8-12 years. This unit will most likely need replacement in the near future.

Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
Bradford & White

(h) When inspecting the plumbing system, a home inspector or associate home inspector shall: 1. Inspect: i. Interior water supply and distribution systems including functional water flow and functional drainage, excluding wells, well pumps, well water sampling or water storage related equipment, determination of water supply quantity or quality and water conditioning systems and lawn irrigation systems; ii. All interior fixtures and faucets, excluding shut off valves, wells, well pumps, well water sampling and water storage related equipment; iii. Drain, waste and vent systems; iv. Domestic water heating systems, without operating safety valves or automatic safety controls, and excluding solar water heating systems; v. Combustion vent systems excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; vi. Fuel distribution systems; and vii. Drainage sumps, sump pumps and related piping; and  2. Describe: i. Predominant interior water supply and distribution piping materials; ii. Predominant drain, waste and vent piping materials; and iii. Water heating equipment including energy sources.

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected
Credit
Comment
7.6.1 - Sump Pump

Sump Pump Drains Into Underground System

The sump pump discharged  into underground piping. The destination of the water after its entry into the ground is unknown. Recommend discussing drainage and piping with the owner. An evaluation of the underground pipes can not be made since the interior of the pipe is not visible.

8 - Electrical

O NP NI IN
8.1 Service Entrance Conductors X
8.2 Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device X
8.3 Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses X X
8.4 Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles X X
8.5 GFCI & AFCI X X
8.6 Smoke Detectors X
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Romex, Surface Mounted Distribution
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Below Ground
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Garage
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Manufacturer
Murray
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Electrical Photos
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Location
Garage

 (i) When inspecting the electrical system, a home inspector or associate home inspect shall: 1. Inspect: i. Service entrance system; ii. Main disconnects, main panel and sub panels, including interior components of main panel and sub panels; iii. Service grounding; iv. Wiring, without measuring amperage, voltage or impedance, excluding any wiring not a part of the primary electrical power distribution system, such as central vacuum systems, remote control devices, telephone or cable system wiring, intercom systems, security systems and low voltage wiring systems; v. Over-current protection devices and the compatibility of their ampacity with that of the connected wiring; vi. At least one of each interior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per room and at least one exterior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per side of house; and vii. Ground fault circuit interrupters; and 2. Describe:

i. Amperage and voltage rating of the service; ii. Location of main disconnect, main panels, and sub-panels; iii. Type of over-current protection devices; iv. Predominant type of wiring; v. Presence of knob and tube branch circuit wiring; and vi. Presence of solid conductor aluminum branch circuit wiring.

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Exposed Termination-Exterior

Two wire nuts were observed on the upper left side of the front porch where the siding meets the brick veneer. The wires were not live at the time of inspection and could be low voltage. The inspector recommends finding out from the homeowner what the wires were previously used for. 

Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Incorrect Wiring-Reverse Polarity

One or more electric receptacles had reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires were reversed. This is a shock hazard. Recommend that a licensed electrician repair as necessary.

Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - GFCI & AFCI

No GFCI Protection Installed
Basement Garage Laundry Room

No Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) outlet protection provided for listed areas. Although GFCI protection of bathroom outlets may not have been required at the time in which this home was built, as general knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time,building standards have changed to reflect current understanding.


General guidelines for GFCI - protected receptacles include the following locations:
Outdoors (since 1973)
Bathrooms (since 1975)
Garages (since 1978)
Kitchens (since 1987)
Crawl spaces and unfinished basements (since 1990)
Wet bar sinks (since 1993)
Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005)

The Inspector recommends updating the existing exterior electrical circuits to include GFCI protection by a
licensed electrician.
This can be achieved by:
1. Replacing the current standard outlets with GFCI outlets.
2. Replacing the electrical circuit outlet located closest to the main electrical service panel with a GFCI
outlet.
3. Replacing the breaker currently protecting the electrical circuit that contains these outlets with a GFCI
breaker.

9 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

O NP NI IN
9.1 Attic Insulation X
9.2 Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement) X
9.3 Ventilation X
9.4 Exhaust Systems X
Flooring Insulation
None
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Batt, Fiberglass
Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Gable Vents, Soffit Vents, Whole House Fan
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans
Fan Only
Attic & Insulation

Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the
adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing. Attic ventilation is not an exact science and can change vary with variations in climate and home design. Although this home may have complied with local requirements which were in effect at the time of original construction, approaches to attic ventilation have
sometimes changed over the years. The General Home Inspection is not a code compliance inspection. The Inspector may make suggestions for improved attic ventilation which are in accordance with modern building practices. The standard approach to attic ventilation in temperate climates is to thermally isolate the attic space from the living space using some type of thermal insulation. The attic is then ventilated using ventilation devices which allow natural air movement to carry away excess heat before it can radiate into the living space, increasing cooling costs and reducing comfort levels, or before heat originating in the living space can create roof problems such as ice damming. In accordance with our standards, we do not attempt to enter attics that have less than thirty inches of headroom, are restricted by ducts, or in which the insulation obscures the joists and thereby makes mobility hazardous, in which case we would inspect them as best we can from the access point. In regard to evaluating the type and amount of insulation on the attic floor, we use only generic terms and approximate measurements, and do not sample or test the material for specific identification. Also, we do not disturb or move any portion of it, and it may well obscure water pipes, electrical conduits, junction boxes, exhaust fans, and other components. Stains from condensation are commonly located in most attics. Such stains may contain fungal growth of some type. The home inspector does NOT perform mold testing. A qualified environmental contractor should be contacted for evaluation of the attic for mold growth PRIOR to closing. If it has not rained recently prior to the inspection, it can be quite difficult to determine if moisture stains are active. Although stained areas may be dry during the home inspection, there is the potential for intermittent leaks to be active depending on weather conditions. Active leaks can occur at any time regardless of the age and condition of the roofing. It is advised to monitor the attic during and after rain and snow events to determine if active leaks may be present.

Attic, Insulation & Ventilation Photos
Inadequate Attic Access

Access was lacking to some portions of the attic space. This portion of the attic was not inspected.

 Because attics may contain potential fire or health hazards, other safety defects, or defects which have the potential to cause damage to the home, the Inspector recommends an access hatch be installed and the attic area be inspected before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline

Attic Insulation: Attic Floor Covered by Boards

The attic floor was covered with flooring therefore not all attic insulation was able to be inspected. This is a limitation.

Exhaust Systems: Termination Could Not Be Determined

Attic access was restricted to viewing the attic from the hatch. The termination point of the bath fans could not be determined. This is a limitation and therefore is disclaimed from the inspection. 

(m) When inspecting the insulation components and ventilation system of a residential building, the home inspector or associate home inspector shall: 1. Inspect: i. Insulation in unfinished spaces without disturbing insulation; ii. Ventilation of attics and crawlspaces; and iii. Mechanical ventilation systems; and

2. Describe: i. Insulation in unfinished spaces adjacent to heated areas; and ii. Evidence of inadequate attic and crawlspace ventilation.

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected

10 - Doors, Windows & Interior

O NP NI IN
10.1 Doors X
10.2 Windows X
10.3 Floors X
10.4 Walls X
10.5 Ceilings X
10.6 Steps, Stairways & Railings X X
10.7 Countertops & Cabinets X
Windows: Window Manufacturer
Unknown
Windows: Window Type
Double-hung
Floors: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Hardwood, Tile
Walls: Wall Material
Drywall
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Corian

 (l) When inspecting the interior of a residential building, a home inspector or associate home inspector shall: 1. Inspect: i. Walls, ceilings, and floors excluding paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments, carpeting and other non-permanent floor coverings; ii. Steps, stairways, and railings;

iii. Installed kitchen wall cabinets to determine if secure; iv. At least one interior passage door and operate one window per room excluding window treatments; and

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected
Credit
Comment
10.6.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Handrail Not Continuous
Basement

The handrail to the basement was not continuous for the entire length of the stairway. This is a fall hazard. Recommend installation of a continuous handrail to the top of the stairway by a licensed contractor



11 - Household Appliances

O NP NI IN
11.1 Dishwasher X
11.2 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
Dishwasher: Brand
Maytag
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
Dacor
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Gas

v) Household appliances limited to: (1) The kitchen range and oven to determine operation of burners or heating elements excluding microwave ovens and the operation of self-cleaning
cycles and appliance timers and thermostats; (2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage; and (3) Garbage disposer.

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected

12 - Garage

O NP NI IN
12.1 Ceiling X X
12.2 Floor X
12.3 Walls & Firewalls X
12.4 Garage Door X
12.5 Garage Door Opener X
12.6 Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home) X
Garage Door: Type
Roll-Up
Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Photos
Walls & Firewalls: Stored Items Limitation

Walls were not fully visible and viewing was limited due to the occupants stored items and an epoxy coating on the masonry block foundation wall. There is potential for damage or other issues that are not visible to the inspector. Be sure to check all areas carefully prior to closing

Garage Door: Material
Wood
Floor: Stored Items & Finished Floor Limitation

Floors were not fully visible and viewing was limited due to the occupants stored items and an epoxy coating on the floor. There is potential for damage or other issues that are not visible to the inspector. Be sure to check all areas carefully prior to closing

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected
Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Ceiling

Unsealed Holes in Ceiling

One or more holes were observed in the garage ceiling. This could lead to carbon monoxide entering the attic or living areas of the home. The inspector recommends repair and sealing of the holes by a licensed contractor. 

13 - NJ Standards of Practice

O NP NI IN
NJ Standards of Practice & Material Defect Definition

NEW JERSEY REGISTER

VOLUME 34, NUMBER 11

RULE ADOPTION

LAW AND PUBLIC SAFETY

DIVISION OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS

STATE BOARD OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS AND LAND SURVEYORS

HOME INSPECTION ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Adopted New Rules: N.J.A.C. 13:40-15

Federal Standards Statement

A Federal standards analysis is not required for the adopted new rules because the subject matter

is not subject to Federal standards.

SUBCHAPTER 15. HOME INSPECTION ADVISORY COMMITTEE

NJ ADC 13:40-15.16

13:40-15.16 Standards of practice

(a) All home inspectors and associate home inspectors shall comply with the standards of

practice contained in this section when conducting home inspections. The scope of home

inspection services performed in compliance with the requirements set forth in this section shall

provide the client with objective information regarding the condition of the systems and

components of the home as determined at the time of the home inspection.

(b) Nothing in this section shall be construed to require a home inspector or associate home

inspector to:

1. Enter any area or perform any procedure which is, in the opinion of the home inspector or

associate home inspector, unsafe and likely to be dangerous to the inspector or other persons;

2. Enter any area or perform any procedure which will, in the opinion of the home inspector or

associate home inspector, likely damage the property or its systems or components;

3. Enter any area which does not have at least 24 inches of unobstructed vertical clearance and at

least 30 inches of unobstructed horizontal clearance;

4. Identify concealed conditions and latent defects;

5. Determine life expectancy of any system or component;

6. Determine the cause of any condition or deficiency;

7. Determine future conditions that may occur including the failure of systems and components

including consequential damage;

8. Determine the operating costs of systems or components;

9. Determine the suitability of the property for any specialized use;

10. Determine compliance with codes, regulations and/or ordinances;

11. Determine market value of the property or its marketability;

12. Determine advisability of purchase of the property;

13. Determine the presence of any potentially hazardous plants, animals or diseases or the

presence of any suspected hazardous substances or adverse conditions such as mold, fungus,

toxins, carcinogens, noise, and contaminants in soil, water, and air;

14. Determine the effectiveness of any system installed or method utilized to control or remove

suspected hazardous substances;

15. Operate any system or component which is shut down or otherwise inoperable;

16. Operate any system or component which does not respond to normal operating controls;

17. Operate shut-off valves;

18. Determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private;

19. Insert any tool, probe or testing device inside electrical panels;

20. Dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of main and sub

panels;

21. Walk on unfloored sections of attics; and

22. Light pilot flames or ignite or extinguish fires.

(c) Home inspectors and associate home inspectors shall:

1. Inspect the following systems and components in residential buildings and other related

residential housing components:

i. Structural components as required by (e) below;

ii. Exterior components as required by (f) below;

iii. Roofing system components as required by (g) below;

iv. Plumbing system components as required by (h) below;

v. Electrical system components as required by (i) below;

vi. Heating system components as required by (j) below;

vii. Cooling system components as required by (k) below;

viii. Interior components as required by (l) below;

ix. Insulation components and ventilation system as required by (m) below; and

x. Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances as required by (n) below;

2. Prepare a home inspection report which shall:

i. Disclose those systems and components as set forth in (c)1 above which were present at the

time of inspection;

ii. Disclose systems and components as set forth in (c)1 above which were present at the time of

the home inspection but were not inspected, and the reason(s) they were not inspected;

iii. Describe the systems and components specified in these standards of practice;

iv. State material defects found in systems or components;

v. State the significance of findings where any material defects in the systems and components of

(c)1 above were found; and

vi. Provide recommendations where material defects were found to repair, replace or monitor a

system or component or to obtain examination and analysis by a qualified professional,

tradesman, or service technician without determining the methods, materials or cost of

corrections; and

3. Retain copies of all home inspection reports prepared pursuant to (c)2 above, for a period of

five years upon completion of the report;

(d) Subsection (c) above is not intended to limit home inspectors or associate home inspectors

from:

1. Inspecting or reporting observations and conditions observed in systems and components in

addition to those required in (c)1 above and inspecting systems and components other than those

mandated for inspection in (c)1 above as long as the inspection and reporting is based on the

licensee's professional opinion, prior work experience, education and training, unless these

standards of practice prohibit the home inspector or associate home inspector from inspecting

such system or component;

2. Contracting with the client to provide, for an additional fee additional inspection services

provided the home inspector or associate home inspector is educated, trained, certified, registered

or licensed, pursuant to the provisions of N.J.A.C. 13:40-15.22 and other applicable statutes and

rules; and

3. Excluding systems and components from the inspection if requested in writing by the client.

(e) When conducting the inspection of the structural components, the home inspector or associate

home inspector shall:

l. Inspect:

i. Foundation;

ii. Floors;

iii. Walls;

iv. Ceilings; and

v. Roof;

2. Describe:

i. Foundation construction type and material;

ii. Floor construction type and material;

iii. Wall construction type and material;

iv. Ceiling construction type and material; and

v. Roof construction type and material;

3. Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected unless such probing would

damage any finished surface; and

4. Describe in the home inspection report the methods used to inspect under- floor crawl spaces

and attics.

(f) When conducting the inspection of the exterior components, a home inspector or associate

home inspector shall:

1. Inspect:

i. Exterior surfaces, excluding shutters, and screening, awnings, and other similar seasonal

accessories;

ii. Exterior doors excluding storm doors or safety glazing;

iii. Windows excluding storm windows and safety glazing;

iv. Attached or adjacent decks, balconies, stoops, steps, porches, and their railings;

v. Vegetation, grading, drainage, and retaining walls with respect to their immediate detrimental

effect on the condition of the residential building, excluding fences, geological and/or soil

conditions, sea walls, break-walls, bulkheads and docks, or erosion control and earth

stabilization;

vi. Attached or adjacent walkways, patios, and driveways; and

vii. Garage doors including automatic door openers and entrapment protection mechanisms,

excluding remote control devices; and

2. Describe exterior wall surface type and material.

(g) When inspecting the roof of a residential building, the home inspector or associate home

inspector shall:

1. Inspect:

i. Roofing surface, excluding antennae and other installed accessories such as solar heating

systems, lightning arresters, and satellite dishes;

ii. Roof drainage systems;

iii. Flashing;

iv. Skylights; and

v. Exterior of chimneys;

2. Describe:

i. Roof surface;

ii. Roof drainage systems;

iii. Flashing;

iv. Skylights; and

v. Chimneys;

3. Employ reasonable, practicable and safe methods to inspect the roof such as:

i. Walking on the roof;

ii. Observation from a ladder at roof level; or

iii. Visual examination with binoculars from ground level; and

4. Describe the methods used to inspect the roof.

(h) When inspecting the plumbing system, a home inspector or associate home inspector shall:

1. Inspect:

i. Interior water supply and distribution systems including functional water flow and functional

drainage, excluding wells, well pumps, well water sampling or water storage related equipment,

determination of water supply quantity or quality and water conditioning systems and lawn

irrigation systems;

ii. All interior fixtures and faucets, excluding shut off valves, wells, well pumps, well water

sampling and water storage related equipment;

iii. Drain, waste and vent systems;

iv. Domestic water heating systems, without operating safety valves or automatic safety controls,

and excluding solar water heating systems;

v. Combustion vent systems excluding interiors of flues and chimneys;

vi. Fuel distribution systems; and

vii. Drainage sumps, sump pumps and related piping; and

2. Describe:

i. Predominant interior water supply and distribution piping materials;

ii. Predominant drain, waste and vent piping materials; and

iii. Water heating equipment including energy sources.

(i) When inspecting the electrical system, a home inspector or associate home inspect shall:

1. Inspect:

i. Service entrance system;

ii. Main disconnects, main panel and sub panels, including interior components of main panel

and sub panels;

iii. Service grounding;

iv. Wiring, without measuring amperage, voltage or impedance, excluding any wiring not a part

of the primary electrical power distribution system, such as central vacuum systems, remote

control devices, telephone or cable system wiring, intercom systems, security systems and low

voltage wiring systems;

v. Over-current protection devices and the compatibility of their ampacity with that of the

connected wiring;

vi. At least one of each interior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per room and at

least one exterior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per side of house; and

vii. Ground fault circuit interrupters; and

2. Describe:

i. Amperage and voltage rating of the service;

ii. Location of main disconnect, main panels, and sub-panels;

iii. Type of over-current protection devices;

iv. Predominant type of wiring;

v. Presence of knob and tube branch circuit wiring; and

vi. Presence of solid conductor aluminum branch circuit wiring.

(j) When inspecting the heating system, a home inspector or associate home inspector shall:

1. Inspect:

i. Installed heating equipment and energy sources, without determining heat supply adequacy or

distribution balance, and without operating automatic safety controls or operating heat pumps

when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the pumps, and excluding

humidifiers, electronic air filters and solar heating systems;

ii. Combustion vent systems and chimneys, excluding interiors of flues or chimneys;

iii. Fuel storage tanks, excluding propane and underground storage tanks; and

iv. Visible and accessible portions of the heat exchanger, removing the flame roll-out shield if

applicable; and

2. Describe:

i. Heating equipment and distribution type; and

ii. Energy sources.

(k) When inspecting the cooling system, a home inspector or associate home inspector shall:

1. Inspect:

i. Central cooling system, excluding electronic air filters and excluding determination of cooling

supply adequacy or distribution balance and without operating central cooling equipment when

weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the cooling equipment;

ii. Permanently installed hard-wired, through-wall individual cooling systems; and

iii. Energy sources; and

2. Describe:

i. Cooling equipment and distribution type; and

ii. Energy sources.

(l) When inspecting the interior of a residential building, a home inspector or associate home

inspector shall:

1. Inspect:

i. Walls, ceilings, and floors excluding paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments, carpeting and

other non-permanent floor coverings;

ii. Steps, stairways, and railings;

iii. Installed kitchen wall cabinets to determine if secure;

iv. At least one interior passage door and operate one window per room excluding window

treatments; and

v. Household appliances limited to:

(1) The kitchen range and oven to determine operation of burners or heating elements excluding

microwave ovens and the operation of self-cleaning cycles and appliance timers and thermostats;

(2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage; and

(3) Garbage disposer.

(m) When inspecting the insulation components and ventilation system of a residential building,

the home inspector or associate home inspector shall:

1. Inspect:

i. Insulation in unfinished spaces without disturbing insulation;

ii. Ventilation of attics and crawlspaces; and

iii. Mechanical ventilation systems; and

2. Describe:

i. Insulation in unfinished spaces adjacent to heated areas; and

ii. Evidence of inadequate attic and crawlspace ventilation.

(n) When inspecting fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, a home inspector or associate

home inspector shall:

1. Inspect:

i. Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, without testing draft characteristics, excluding fire

screens and doors, seals and gaskets, automatic fuel feed devices, mantles and non-structural

fireplace surrounds, combustion make-up air devices, or gravity fed and fan assisted heat

distribution systems; and

ii. Chimneys and combustion vents excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; and

2. Describe:

i. Type of fireplaces and/or solid fuel burning appliances;

ii. Energy source; and

iii. Visible evidence of draft characteristics

MATERIAL DEFECT: A condition, or functional aspect, of a structural component or system that is readily ascertainable during a home inspection that substantially affects the value, habitability, or safety of the dwelling, excluding decorative, stylistic, cosmetic, or aesthetic aspects of the system, structure, or component.

  • O = Observations
  • NP = Not Present
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • IN = Inspected