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1234 Main St.
Raleigh, NC 27614
12/05/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name

This report is a written report that is designed to assist the client in understanding the home. It is recommended that the client read the entire report and not just the summary. Photos should only be considered limited examples used to assist in explaining a defect or concern. 

Pease note: When viewing the "Full Report" in PDF format, the summary page only offers a brief description of defects and safety hazards listed in this report. Please see the body of the report for full descriptions, defects, implications, and directions. For a summary page that includes details and photos, please select the PDF Summary page.  

-Safety Hazards- Items or components that should be corrected (immediately or within the initial time in the home) or implemented to aid in the prevention of harm to people in and around the home. Items categorized in this manner require further evaluation and repairs or replacement as needed by a contractor qualified in that area of expertise.

-Concern Recommendations- Items or components that were found to include a deficiency. These items may have been functional at the time of inspection, but this functionality may be impaired, not ideal, or the defect may lead to further problems (most defects fall into this categorization). Repairs or replacement is recommended to items categorized in this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a handyman or contractor qualified in that area of expertise and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs.

-Minor/Maintenance/Monitor- Items or components that were found to be in need of minor repairs to improve their functionality and/or recurring or basic general maintenance. These items will ultimately lead to further damage this and other components and systems if left neglected for extended periods of time. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a handyman, contractor qualified in that area of expertise or DIY repairs.

These categorizations are in the inspectors professional judgement and based off what was observed at the time of the inspection. These categories are only related to the defect and how it affects the home. These categorizations are not in anyway categorized based on the estimated expense of repair. This categorization should not be construed as to mean items designated as Minor/Maintenance/Monitor or Concern Recommendations do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendation on each category is more important than its categorization. Due to your perception, opinions or personal experience, you may feel defects belong in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchase decision. 


**Photos are only limited examples and not intended to show all areas of defect or concern.**

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Occupancy
Furnished
Style
Multi-level
Type of Building
Single Family
Temperature During Inspection
65 Degrees F
Weather Conditions
Clear
Introduction

This report is a written evaluation that represents the results of a home inspection performed according to North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Act Standard of Practice. These results represent the conditions found at the time of the inspection. The word "inspect" per the NCHILB SOP means the act of making a visual examination. Home Inspections are limited to visible and accessible areas and are not invasive. The inspection may be limited by vegetation, furnishings, and personal items. Not all defects will be discovered or documented in this report. The report outlines inspection findings of any systems or components so inspected that did not function as intended and are in need of repair, require subsequent observation such as monitoring, or warrants further investigation by a specialist such as an engineer. The report statements describe the component or system and how the condition is defective, explain the consequences of the condition, and direct the recipient to a course of action with regard to the condition or refer the client to a specialist. This report does not identify specific code or cosmetic concerns. It is recommended that all items listed in the body and summary of the report be repaired or evaluated to determine the extent of the concern before purchasing the home. It is the client's responsibility to read the complete inspection report and follow-up with repairs and evaluations. THIS REPORT WAS INTENDED TO BE VIEWED IN COLOR. THE DIRECTIONAL REFERENCE OF LEFT AND RIGHT IS AS FACING THE FRONT OF THE HOME. Photos are only limited examples and not intended to show areas of defect or concern.   

Orientation

Note that the reference point is from the street facing the house. The right, front, left, and back are all references from the street view.

Limitations: Personal Items

There were personal items present in the home at the time of inspection. These personal items blocked visual accessibility of some walls and floors, receptacles, air registers, closets, and cabinets. This inspection is limited to readily visual portions only, and furniture/rugs/personal items are not moved. It is recommended that these areas be evaluated prior to closing after personal items have been removed.

Limitations: Mold/Discolored Material

When building components have surface discolorations and decay typical of fungal growths, such as mold, mildew, and wood destroying fungi, the home inspection focuses only on moisture concerns and evidence of wood damage. Health issues related to the presence of mold are beyond the scope of the home inspection. If the client has concerns beyond the scope of the home inspection, a certified professional such as an industrial hygienist should be consulted prior to purchasing the home.

2 - Roof

Roof Inspection Method
Binoculars, Ground
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Roof Material
Asphalt/Fiberglass shingles
Flashings/Boots Material
Aluminum, Plastic boot with neoprene
Gutter Material
Aluminum
Type of Chimney(s)
Not present
General

The roof covering, flashings, and roof drainage items listed or identified below were found to be of concern and in need of further evaluation and repair by Licensed Roofing or General Contractor. It is important to correct roofing deficiencies to prevent direct water penetration into the building envelope which can result in structural damage and or undesirable environmental conditions. The verification of fastener type and count for the roofing covering system is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The home inspection is limited to visible surfaces and systems only, hidden or underlying system details such as nails, underlayment condition, and flashings are beyond the scope of the home inspection. Determining the age or remaining service life of the roof covering systems is beyond the scope of the home inspection. If the buyer would like to budget for replacement, a roofing contractor should be consulted to answer questions related to the life expectancy. Flashings and Roof gutter system inspections are limited to evidence of past problems unless the inspection is performed during a heavy rain. All roof drainage and flashing systems should be monitored over the first year of ownership to identify problems areas or areas that may need adjustment or corrections. Roofing systems and components should be inspected and maintained annually.

Methods: Not Walking

The roof covering was inspected using binoculars / zoom camera and from a ladder at the roof eaves. Walking on the roof surface is beyond the scope of this home inspection. If an invasive or complete surface inspection of the roof covering is desired, the buyer should consult a licensed roofing contractor prior to purchase.

Serviceable - Original Roof

The roof covering appears serviceable and original to the house. Recommend routine maintenance and inspections.

Limitations: Downspout Buried

The downspout extensions for the gutter system were buried underground. The exit points for the drain extensions could not be tested or located. Recommend monitoring the downspouts and underground drains during heavy rains to verify they properly divert water away from the structure.  

Limitations: Limited Visibility

Due to the slope of the yard, vegetation, or the pitch of the roof, some areas of the roof were not visible from the ground and were not inspected. If the client would like more information about the condition of the roof then recommend consulting with a qualified contractor.

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall inspect: Roof coverings; Roof drainage systems; Flashings; Skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and Signs of leaks or abnormal condensation on building components. The home inspector shall: Describe the type of roof covering materials; and Report the methods used to inspect the roofing. The home inspector is not required to: Walk on the roofing; or Inspect attached accessories including solar systems, antennae, and lighting arrestors.   

Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Coverings

Discoloration
Front

Roof shingles were discolored, which can be caused by moisture, rust or soot. Recommend a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and remedy with a roof cleaning or repair.

Here is a helpful article on common roof stains.

Roof Roofing Professional

3 - Exterior

Siding Material
Cement- Horizontal Lap, Cement- Shingle/Shake, Adhered Masonry
Trim Material
Composite Wood
Fascia/Soffits/Eaves Material
Composite Wood
Exterior Columns Material
Composite
Driveway Material
Concrete
Walkway Material
Concrete
Porch/Stoop/Balcony
Front
Covered Porch, Masonry w/ Concrete Surface
Deck
Rear
Attached, Composite Surface, Vinyl Railing
Patio
Not Present
Fence Material
Not present
Retaining Wall Material
Not present
Exterior Doors
Exterior

Single Doors at front and garage. Sliding glass door at sunroom. 

General

For the purpose of this report, all concerns related to exterior systems listed below or identified to be deficient are in need of further evaluation and or repair by a Licensed General Contractor. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, the General Contractor should consult specialist in each trade as needed. If the Contractor discovers that exterior defects extend to the structure of the home, an Engineer should be consulted to outline necessary repairs. It is important to correct deficiencies on the exterior of the home to prevent direct water penetration into the building envelope which can result in structural damage and or undesirable environmental conditions. Repairs and evaluations should be made prior to closing to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern. Exterior systems and components should be inspected and maintained annually.

Detached Structures
None present

The detached structures were not inspected and are outside the scope of the home inspection.

Limitations: Sunroom Limitation

The deck inspection was limited due to stored personal items and exterior finishes the covered portions of the framing. It appears that this sunroom was added after the original construction of the home. It is recommended that this client consult the seller as to appropriate permits and approved construction.  

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall inspect: Wall cladding, flashings, and trim; Entryway doors and a representative number of windows; Garage door operators; Decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches and applicable railings; Eaves, soffits, and fascias; Driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls; and Vegetation, grading, and drainage with respect only to their effect on the condition of the building. The home inspector shall: Describe wall cladding materials; Operate all entryway doors; Operator garage doors manually or by using permanently installed controls for any garage door operator; Report whether or not any garage door operator will automatically reverse or stop when meeting reasonable resistance during closing; and Probe exterior wood components where deterioration is suspected. The home inspector is not required to inspect: Storm windows, storm doors, screening, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories; Fences; For the presence of safety glazing in doors and windows; Garage door operator remote control transmitters; Geological conditions; Soil conditions; Recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); Detached buildings or structures; or For the presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks.   

Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Flashing: No Kick-out
Sunroom

There was no kick out flashing observed. When there is a roof to side wall intersection, most siding manufactures recommend this type of flashing be used to prevent water runoff from flowing behind the siding and causing damage to the homes building components. Since there is obviously no kick out flashing installed in these locations, it is recommended to have a licensed general contractor evaluate and repair as needed.

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Flashing/Trim Improperly Installed

It was observed that house wrap has been used as flashing between the wood structure and the front porch. This material is not designed to be utilized as flashing, which could result in moisture intrusion and damaging leaks. Recommend a licensed general contractor or qualified siding contractor fully evaluate and repair as needed.

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding: Fiber cement
Right

There was a small crack observed in the siding. This condition could indicate impact, movement or siding that was not properly installed. Gaps and cracks in the siding will allow moisture to enter behind the siding and possibly damage the internal structure. Recommend that the siding be evaluated and repaired by a general contractor. 

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.4 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding/Trim: Caulking

Multiple areas noted on the exterior of the home that are not properly sealed, which could allow moisture penetration and possibly cause hidden damage to the siding and structure. Recommend that all gaps/penetrations be properly sealed to prevent damage and a licensed general contractor evaluate the home for any hidden damage.

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.5 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Trim: Damaged
Front, Rear, Right, Left, Deck

Damaged trim was noted in multiple locations. Damaged and deteriorated trim could allow moisture intrusion behind the siding and cause hidden damage in the structure. Recommend a complete evaluation of all exterior cladding/trim and structure, and repair as necessary by a licensed general contractor or qualified contractor.

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Driveway: Minor Cracks

The driveway surface was noted to be damaged in multiple areas.  There were also hairline cracks observed. Although this does not affect the structural stability of the house, recommend repair by a qualified contractor to prevent further damage. 

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Grading & Drainage

Siding: General Clearances

Proper flashings or clearances not installed per the manufacturer's instructions to allow for proper drainage to prevent moisture damage. Recommend further evaluation of the siding/flashing and repair as deemed necessary by a qualified contractor.

Hardhat General Contractor

4 - Foundation

Method of Inspection
Entered crawlspace and viewed with a flashlight
Foundation Type
Crawlspace
Foundation Wall Material
Brick, Masonry Block, Wood Framed
Columns/Piers Material
Brick, Masonry Block
Floor Joists Material
Wood I-Joists, Wood Girder, LVL Girder
Subfloor Material
OSB
Floor System Insulation
Batts/Rolled
Ventilation
Vents Open
Wall Structure
Undetermined Due To Exterior & Interior Finishes.
General Structural Information

For the purpose of this report, all concerns related to structural items identified to be deficient in the following section are in need of further evaluation by a Licensed General Contractor or Engineer. Items in need of repair should be referred to a General Contractor. Items in need of design consideration, evaluation of significance / cause, and or determination of adequacy should be referred to an Engineer. All structural concerns should be evaluated and corrected as needed to ensure the durability and stability of the home. Repairs and evaluations should be made prior to closing to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern. Where accessible foundations, piers, columns, roof, and floor framing systems are inspected for visual defects such as broken, cracked, decayed, or damaged members; however, the evaluation of the system for design points such as correct span, load transfer, and or building code compliance is beyond the scope of the home inspection.

Structure Inspection Methods

When accessible and safe the inspector entered attic and crawl space inspection areas with small probe, camera, and a standard flash light. Where visible and accessible; floor and roof framing systems were inspected for visual defects such as broken, cracked, decayed, or damaged members; however, the evaluation of the system for design points such as correct span, load transfer, and or building code compliance is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The inspection of the attic was limited by available walking surfaces and the presence of insulation covering wood components. The inspection of the foundation footings was limited by being below grade and soil covering the components.

Wall Structure

The wall structure was not visible due to interior cladding and was not inspected.

Limitations: Joist Too Close: Limited Viewing
Front

The joist in the crawl space were installed too close to the rim joist to allow for viewing of the rim joist. The installed insulation in these areas also did not allow for inspection of the rim joist in these areas. If the client has concerns about these areas, it is recommended that a licensed general contractor evaluate these areas and replace any damaged insulation as a result of the evaluation.

Limitations: First and Second Floor Ceiling/Floor

The ceiling/floor structures for the first and second floors could not be viewed for inspection due to installed interior finishes. See the interior floor/ceiling sections fo this report for further information.  

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall inspect structural components including: Foundation; Floors; Walls; Columns or piers; Ceilings; and Roofs. The home inspector shall describe the type of: Foundation; Floor structure; Wall structure; Columns or piers; Ceiling structure; and Roof structure. The home inspector shall: Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected; Enter under floor crawl spaces, basements, and attic spaces except when access is obstructed, when entry could damage the property, or when dangerous or adverse situations are suspected; Report the methods used to inspect under floor crawl spaces and attics; and Report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.   

Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Foundation

Efflorescence
Front

Efflorescence noted on the foundation wall. Efflorescence are start stains that are evidence of past and/or present elevated moisture in the wall that could potentially cause moisture issues. It is recommended that a licensed general contractor evaluate the foundation and adjacent areas, determine course of action and repair as needed. 

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.1.2 - Foundation

Foundation Wall Cracks Minor
Left Rear

Cracks were noted in the foundation wall. At the time of inspection, unable to determine if the cracks are active.  There were no cracks observed on the interior portion of the foundation wall or interior of the home in this area. Foundation can cracks indicate movement in the homes foundation and footings. These conditions could compromise the structural integrity of the home. Recommend a qualified structural engineer evaluate and advise on how to remedy.

House construction Structural Engineer
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Crawlspaces

Efflorescence
Crawlspace Right and Front

Efflorescence noted on the crawlspace surface. This a white, powdery deposit that is consistent with moisture intrusion. This can compromise the soil's ability to support the home structure and/or lead to mold growth. Recommend a qualified contractor identify source or moisture and correct.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Crawlspaces

Fungal growth
Crawlspace Front

Some fungal growth observed in the crawlspace. If the client has any health related concerns due to the presence of fungal growth then recommend consulting with an industrial hygienist.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.3.1 - Floor Structure

"I" Joist Flange Notched
Crawlspace Front

An engineered lumber I joists has been notched or cut in the flange area. Most engineered lumber system designs do not allow notching of the I joist in the flange. An engineer should be consulted for further evaluation to determine the significance of the concern and outline necessary repairs to ensure the stability of the structure.

House construction Structural Engineer
Credit
Comment
4.3.2 - Floor Structure

"I" Joist Webbing Cut
Crawlspace Front Right

An engineered lumber I joists has been cut in the webbing area. Most engineered lumber system designs have predesignated areas for holes (knockouts) for utility passage and do not allow additional notching of the I joist in the webbing. Additional cutting of the web can result in joist failure. An engineer should be consulted for further evaluation to determine the significance of the concern and outline necessary repairs to ensure the stability of the structure.

House construction Structural Engineer

5 - Heating

Brand
Carrier
Heat Type
Forced Air Gas Furnace
Energy Source
Natural Gas
Manufacture Date
2005, Original to the house


Heating Equipment Location
Exterior left side
Supply Source in Each Habitable Room

There is a supply source for heating/cooling in each habitable room.

Thermostat: Thermostat Location
Living Room
Ductwork: Ductwork
Used for Heating and Cooling, Insulated Flex
Zoning: Zoning
First Floor
Heating: General

For the purpose of this report, the HVAC systems were visually inspected and operated based on the seasonally correct cycle. All heating system concerns listed or identified below were found to be of concern and in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed HVAC Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of the HVAC system. The seasonal inspection of the HVAC systems during a home inspection is a non-invasive visual inspection that may not reveal internal problems for the system that was not operated. Winter inspections include the operation of the heating components only. Summer inspections include the operation of the air conditioning components only. If a complete invasive inspection is desired a HVAC contractor should be consulted prior to purchase. All HVAC systems and components should be serviced and evaluated annually by a licensed HVAC contractor. All concerns are in need of further evaluation by a Licensed HVAC Contractor.

Life Expectancy - Gas Pack

Systems of this type have a life expectancy of 10-15 years.The home inspector develops no conclusions concerning the lifetime of this system and the heat exchanger was not inspected.If the buyer desires more information concerning the HVAC system(s), a licensed HVAC contractor should be consulted for a complete invasive system evaluation prior to purchase.

Air filter: Air filter

Recommend routine replacement of the air filters for improved air-quality and to increase the life of the system.

Photos: General Photos

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall observe permanently installed heating and cooling systems including: Heating equipment; Central air conditioning and through-the-wall installed cooling systems; Normal operating controls; Automatic safety controls; Chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible; Solid fuel heating devices; Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and The presence of an installed heat and cooling source for each habitable space. The home inspector shall describe: Energy source; and Heating and Cooling equipment and distribution type. The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls. The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector is not required to: Operate heating or cooling systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; Operate automatic safety controls; Ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or Ignite a pilot light. The home inspector is not required to inspect: The interior of flues; Fireplace insert flue connections; Heat exchanger; Humidifiers; Electronic air filters; or The uniformity or adequacy of heat or cooling supply to the various rooms; or Solar space heating equipment, or Window air conditioners.   

Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Equipment

Gas Furnace: Burn Chamber Rust Observed
Right

Rust and deterioration observed which is a sign of possible hidden damage. A damaged heat exchanger could allow dangerous carbon monoxide to enter the living space and cause harm to the occupants. Recommend that a licensed HVAC contractor be consulted to perform a complete invasive system evaluation, including the heat exchanger, and make any necessary repairs.

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.1.2 - Equipment

Gas Pack: Shroud Damage

The metal shroud between the gas back in the exterior of the home has slight deterioration and rusting. Rusting results in holes and corrosion in the metal and could allow for water penetration into the gas pack and foundation areas. It is recommended that a licensed HVAC contractor evaluate and repair as needed

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor

6 - Heating 2

Brand
Carrier
Heat Type
Forced Air Gas Furnace
Energy Source
Natural Gas
Manufacture Date
2005


Heating Equipment Location
Attic
Supply Source in Each Habitable Room

There is a supply source for heating/cooling in each habitable room.

Thermostat: Thermostat Location
Second Floor Hallway
Ductwork: Ductwork
Used for Heating and Cooling, Insulated Flex
Vents, Flues & Chimneys: Metal Vent
Attic
Air filter: Filter Sizes
Unable to verify
Zoning: Zoning
Single Zone, Second Floor
Heating: General

For the purpose of this report, the HVAC systems were visually inspected and operated based on the seasonally correct cycle. All heating system concerns listed or identified below were found to be of concern and in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed HVAC Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of the HVAC system. The seasonal inspection of the HVAC systems during a home inspection is a non-invasive visual inspection that may not reveal internal problems for the system that was not operated. Winter inspections include the operation of the heating components only. Summer inspections include the operation of the air conditioning components only. If a complete invasive inspection is desired a HVAC contractor should be consulted prior to purchase. All HVAC systems and components should be serviced and evaluated annually by a licensed HVAC contractor. All concerns are in need of further evaluation by a Licensed HVAC Contractor.

Life Expectancy - Furnace

Fuel Furnaces have a life expectancy of 15-20 years. The home inspector develops no conclusions concerning the lifetime of this system and the heat exchanger was not inspected.If the buyer desires more information concerning the HVAC system(s), a licensed HVAC contractor should be consulted for a complete invasive system evaluation prior to purchase.

Air filter: Air filter

Recommend routine replacement of the air filters for improved air-quality and to increase the life of the system.

Limitations: Bonus Room

Bonus rooms are subjected to large heating and cooling loads due to attic placement and the exposure to adjacent garage areas. Bonus rooms are often difficult to heat and cool and do not reflect the same comfort levels and other rooms in the home. The heating and cooling of bonus rooms are difficult to evaluate unless the home inspection happens to fall on an extreme temperature day. The owners should be asked for disclosure related to heating and cooling performance and seasonal comfort levels.

Limitations: Duct Not Viewed

Due to the limited attic access, some duct in the attic could not be viewed due to distance and access limitations. 

Photos: General Photos
Attic

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall observe permanently installed heating and cooling systems including: Heating equipment; Central air conditioning and through-the-wall installed cooling systems; Normal operating controls; Automatic safety controls; Chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible; Solid fuel heating devices; Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and The presence of an installed heat and cooling source for each habitable space. The home inspector shall describe: Energy source; and Heating and Cooling equipment and distribution type. The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls. The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector is not required to: Operate heating or cooling systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; Operate automatic safety controls; Ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or Ignite a pilot light. The home inspector is not required to inspect: The interior of flues; Fireplace insert flue connections; Heat exchanger; Humidifiers; Electronic air filters; or The uniformity or adequacy of heat or cooling supply to the various rooms; or Solar space heating equipment, or Window air conditioners.   

7 - Cooling

Brand
Carrier
Energy Source/Type
Electric, Central Air Conditioner
Location
Exterior Left
Photos: General Photos
Cooling: General

For the purpose of this report, all cooling system concerns listed or identified below were found to be of concern and in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed HVAC Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of the HVAC system. Winter inspections do not include the operation of the air conditioning system. If the buyer would like more information concerning the functionality of the system, an invasive inspection by a HVAC technician should be requested prior to purchase. All concerns are in need of further evaluation by a Licensed HVAC Contractor. The homeowner should be asked for disclosure related to the performance, service, and maintenance history of the HVAC systems.

Life Expectancy

Systems of this type have a life expectancy of 10-15 years.The home inspector develops no conclusions concerning the lifetime of this system.If the buyer desires more information concerning the HVAC system(s), a licensed HVAC contractor should be consulted for a complete invasive system evaluation prior to purchase.

Manufacture Date
2005

Systems of this type have a life expectancy of 10-15 years. The home inspector develops no conclusions concerning the lifetime of this system. If the buyer desires more information concerning the HVAC system(s), a licensed HVAC contractor should be consulted for a complete invasive system evaluation prior to purchase.

Limitations: Limited Visual Inspection

The inspection of the Cooling system was limited to a visual inspection of the accessible components and operation with normal controls when weather permits. The air conditioning system was operated and visually inspected; however, the removal of coil and fan covers provided for service by a qualified service technician is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The system operated and met the requested thermostat settings for the cooling cycle.

Limitations: Bonus Room

Bonus rooms are subjected to large heating and cooling loads due to attic placement and the exposure to adjacent garage areas. Bonus rooms are often difficult to heat and cool and do not reflect the same comfort levels and other rooms in the home. The heating and cooling of bonus rooms are difficult to evaluate unless the home inspection happens to fall on an extreme temperature day. The owners should be asked for disclosure related to heating and cooling performance and seasonal comfort levels.

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall observe permanently installed heating and cooling systems including: Heating equipment; Central air conditioning and through-the-wall installed cooling systems; Normal operating controls; Automatic safety controls; Chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible; Solid fuel heating devices; Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and The presence of an installed heat and cooling source for each habitable space. The home inspector shall describe: Energy source; and Heating and Cooling equipment and distribution type. The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls. The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector is not required to: Operate heating or cooling systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; Operate automatic safety controls; Ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or Ignite a pilot light. The home inspector is not required to inspect: The interior of flues; Fireplace insert flue connections; Heat exchanger; Humidifiers; Electronic air filters; or The uniformity or adequacy of heat or cooling supply to the various rooms; or Solar space heating equipment, or Window air conditioners.   

Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Cooling Equipment

Passed the Life Expectancy

Systems of this type have a life expectancy of 10-15 years. This unit is near the end or passed the life expectancy, recommend budgeting for replacement in the near future. At the time of the inspection, the home inspector develops no conclusions concerning the lifetime of this system. If the buyer desires more information concerning the HVAC system(s), a licensed HVAC contractor should be consulted for a complete invasive system evaluation prior to purchase.

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor

8 - Cooling 2

Brand
Carrier
Energy Source/Type
Electric, Central Air Conditioner
Location
Exterior Left
Cooling: General

For the purpose of this report, all cooling system concerns listed or identified below were found to be of concern and in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed HVAC Contractor to ensure safe, proper, and reliable operation of the HVAC system. Winter inspections do not include the operation of the air conditioning system. If the buyer would like more information concerning the functionality of the system, an invasive inspection by a HVAC technician should be requested prior to purchase. All concerns are in need of further evaluation by a Licensed HVAC Contractor. The homeowner should be asked for disclosure related to the performance, service, and maintenance history of the HVAC systems.

Life Expectancy

Systems of this type have a life expectancy of 10-15 years.The home inspector develops no conclusions concerning the lifetime of this system.If the buyer desires more information concerning the HVAC system(s), a licensed HVAC contractor should be consulted for a complete invasive system evaluation prior to purchase.

Manufacture Date
2005, Appears to be original

Systems of this type have a life expectancy of 10-15 years. The home inspector develops no conclusions concerning the lifetime of this system. If the buyer desires more information concerning the HVAC system(s), a licensed HVAC contractor should be consulted for a complete invasive system evaluation prior to purchase.

Limitations: Limited Visual Inspection

The inspection of the Cooling system was limited to a visual inspection of the accessible components and operation with normal controls when weather permits. The air conditioning system was operated and visually inspected; however, the removal of coil and fan covers provided for service by a qualified service technician is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The system operated and met the requested thermostat settings for the cooling cycle.

Limitations: Duct Not Completely Visible

Due to the limited attic access, some duct in the attic could not be viewed due to distance and access limitations.

Photos: General Photos
Attic and Exterior

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall observe permanently installed heating and cooling systems including: Heating equipment; Central air conditioning and through-the-wall installed cooling systems; Normal operating controls; Automatic safety controls; Chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible; Solid fuel heating devices; Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and The presence of an installed heat and cooling source for each habitable space. The home inspector shall describe: Energy source; and Heating and Cooling equipment and distribution type. The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls. The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector is not required to: Operate heating or cooling systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; Operate automatic safety controls; Ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or Ignite a pilot light. The home inspector is not required to inspect: The interior of flues; Fireplace insert flue connections; Heat exchanger; Humidifiers; Electronic air filters; or The uniformity or adequacy of heat or cooling supply to the various rooms; or Solar space heating equipment, or Window air conditioners.   

Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Cooling Equipment

Condensate Drain Next to Foundation
Rear

The Condensate drain empties next to the foundation wall. This condition places moisture against the foundation and could lead to undesirable conditions such as foundation settlement, pest, etc. It is recommended that an HVAC contractor evaluate and make repairs as needed. 

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor

9 - Plumbing

Water Source
Public
Filters
None
Main Water Shut-off Location
Foyer Closet
Water Supply Material
Pex
Water Distribution Material
Pex
Waste/Vent Material
PVC
Sump Pump Location
Not present
Water Heater: Manufacturer
State
Water Heater: Capacity
50 gallons


Water Heater: Power Source/Type
Gas - Direct Vent
Water Heater: Location
Garage
Water Heater: Drain Pan
Not Present
Water Heater: Expansion Tank
Present by Water Heater
Plumbing: General

For the purpose of this report, all plumbing and water heating items listed or identified below were found to be of concern and in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed Plumbing or General Contractor. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a general contractor should be consulted to contact specialist in each trade as needed. Repairs are needed to prevent leaks and ensure proper sanitation. The majority of the water supply and the waste lines are concealed from visual inspection and the general condition cannot be determined. The plumbing was inspected for functional flow and drainage; however, it is not possible to fully evaluate the plumbing system to determine proper venting, sizing, or functional design during a home inspection when the system cannot be put under the same load as presented by a family. The inspection of the water heater does not include evaluating the unit capacity for functional use based on the number bathrooms or fixtures. The hot water requirement for daily use varies with each family and the home inspector has not developed an opinion whether or not the hot water system for this home is adequate. The inspection does not include verification of anti-scald fixtures. The inspection does not assure that the plumbing systems and components of the home will meet the demands of your family. Determining the quality and quantity of the water supply is beyond the scope of the home inspection, this includes determining if water supply is acidic or has high mineral content. Fixtures are not identified as defective as the result of hard water or mineral stains. The effectiveness of the toilet flush and the verification of the drain for the washing machine are beyond the scope of the home inspection. The main water turn off valve location is identified if located, but not operated. The functional flow of the water supply at each accessible fixture was tested. Functional flow is not reported as defective unless water flow drops below 50% when two fixtures are operated simultaneously. Waste and supply lines are evaluated by running water inside the home, the condition of the inside of the plumbing pipes cannot be determined. Verification of the surface defects on plumbing fixtures such as shower/tubs/sinks is beyond the scope of the inspection. Thermal expansion and backflow protection are not a requirement for all homes, and determining the presence or absence of the related devices is beyond the scope of the inspection. Determining if the water supply and waste systems are private or public is beyond the scope of the home inspection.
Annual service and inspection of the main waste line will prevent system clogging and backup. The plumbing inspection is a limited functional evaluation made under little to no system load. If the buyer would like to know the condition of the interior of the pluming lines, the buyer should consult a licensed plumbing contractor prior to purchase.

Main Gas Shut-off Location
Gas Meter

We do not check function of any type of valve. If you smell gas in your home immediately get completely away from the home and call your gas provider.

Water Heater: Manufacture Date
2005

Water heaters of this type have a life expectancy of 8-12 years.The home inspector develops no conclusions concerning the lifetime of this water heater.

Water Heater: No drain pan in unfinished space
Attached Garage

There is not a drain pan underneath the water heater, but the water heater is located in unfinished space. Although a drain pan is not required in this application, recommend not storing items in close proximity that may be susceptible to water damage.

Limitations: Water Heater Limited Visibility

The viewing of the water heater was limited due to stored items around the water heater. It is recommended that the water heater be fully inspected when personal storage is removed. 

Photos: General Photos

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall inspect: Interior water supply and distribution system, including: piping materials, supports, and insulation; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections; Interior drain, waste, and vent system, including: traps; drain, waste, and vent piping; piping supports and pipe insulation; leaks; and functional drainage; Hot water systems including: water heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; and chimneys, flues, and vents; Fuel storage and distribution systems including: interior fuel storage equipment, supply piping, venting, and supports; leaks; and Sump pumps. The home inspector shall describe: Water supply and distribution piping materials; Drain, waste, and vent piping materials; Water heating equipment, including fuel or power source, storage capacity, and location; and The location of any main water supply shutoff device. The home inspector shall operate all plumbing fixtures including their faucets and all exterior faucets attached to the house, except where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance. The home inspector is not required to: State the effectiveness of anti-siphon devices; Determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; Operator automatic safety controls; Operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets. The home inspector is not required to inspect: Water conditioning systems; Fire and lawn sprinkler systems;; On-site water supply quantity and quality; On-site waste disposal systems; Foundation irrigation systems; Bathroom spas, except as to functional flow and functional drainage; Swimming pools; Solar water heating equipment; or Inspect the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.   

Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Water Supply

Pex Fittings Corrosion
Crawlspace Front

The visible plumbing lines in this home are cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) with brass fittings. Evidence of localized low water pressure and or discolored/corroded fittings was noted during the inspection. This could be the result of dezincification of the brass alloy. Dezincification occurs when zinc leaches from the brass leaving the fittings in a weakened state. As the zinc leaches, it can also form a build-up inside the fitting restricting water flow and ultimately leaving the plumbing system prone to failure. A licensed plumbing contractor should be consulted for a complete evaluation of the plumbing system to determine the significance of this concern and to make necessary repairs.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Fuel Systems

Corrosion at Gas Supply Line
Garage

 At the water heater located in the garage, there was corrosion noted on the CSST lines where they connect to the steel gas line.  Although there was no leaking at the time, this condition can result in leaking and failure of the fitting. It is recommended to consult a licensed plumbing contractor for further evaluation and repairs. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

10 - Electrical

Electrical Service Conductors
Below Ground, Copper, 220 Volts
Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Main Panel Location
Left, Main disconnect by electric meter
Panel Manufacturer
Eaton
Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper
Sub Panel Location
Garage
Smoke Detectors: Smoke Detector Location
In all bedrooms, First Floor Hallway, Second Floor Hallway, Bonus room, Loft
Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Carbon Monoxide Location
Not Present (Upgrade Recommended)
Electric: General

For the purpose of this report, all electrical items listed below were found to be of concern and in need of further evaluation and repair by a Licensed Electrical Contractor. When repairs are made, the complete electrical system should be evaluated. Electrical issues are safety concerns and should be repaired immediately. During a home inspection, it is not possible to place a home under a full loading condition that would evaluate the capacity of the electrical system. The electrical system was evaluated based on current systems and components and no consideration was made to future expansion or modernizations. As with any system, the addition of new systems and appliances may require electrical system replacement, modifications, and or upgrades.

Smoke Detectors: Limited Lifetime

Smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors have a limited lifetime, typically between 7-10 years. Recommend replacement of the smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors per the manufacturer's instructions.

Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Garage and Fuel Burning Appliances Not Present

All homes with gas appliances should have a carbon monoxide detector. A properly functioning CO detector is vital to the safety of a home with gas appliances

Limitations: AFCI Testing

The AFCI breakers are only tested on vacant homes to prevent disrupting power to the owners equipment. GFCI circuits and breakers are tested.  Recommend verifying that the AFCI breakers function as intended when the home is vacant prior to closing. 

Photos: General Photos

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall inspect: Electrical service conductors; Electrical service equipment, grounding equipment, main overcurrent device, and main and distribution panels; Amperage and voltage ratings of the electrical service; Branch circuit conductors, their overcurrent devices, and the compatibility of their ampacities; The operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected structures; The operation of ground fault circuit interrupters; and Smoke detectors and permanently installed carbon monoxide alarms. The home inspector shall describe: Electrical service amperage and voltage; Electrical service entry conductor materials; The electrical service type as being overhead or underground; and The location of main and distribution panels. The home inspector shall report in writing the presence of any readily accessible single strand aluminum branch circuit wiring. The home inspector shall report in writing on the presence or absence of smoke detectors, and permanently installed carbon monoxide alarms in any homes with fuel fired appliances or attached garages, and operate their test function, if accessible, except when detectors are part of a central system. The home inspector is not required to: Insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels; Test or operate any overcurrent device except ground fault circuit interrupters; Dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels. The home inspector is not required to inspect: Low voltage systems; Security systems and heat detectors; Telephone, security, cable TV,intercoms, or other ancillary wiring that is not a part of the primary electrical distribution system; Built-in vacuum equipment; Back up electrical generating equipment; or Other alternative electrical generating or renewable energy systems such as solar, wind, or hydro power.   

Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Missing cover plate
Crawlspace Right Rear

Recommend replacing the missing cover plate on the outlet under the breakfast area to prevent the exposed wiring from being a shock hazard.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Ceiling Fan did not work
2nd Floor Front Right

The ceiling fan did not respond to the wall controls and/or remote.  This condition could be a result of damaged ceiling fan or improper wiring.  To ensure safe and proper operation is recommended to contact an electricial contractor for further evaluation and repair.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.4.2 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Damaged Outlet
Living Room

 The outlet was noted to be loose and recessed in the wall. Loose outlets can loosen electrical conductors and can be a shock hazard. Recommend evaluation and repair of the loose outlet by an electrical contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.4.3 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Outlet Did Not Work
Bounus Room

The outlet did not work and did not appear to be controlled by a switch. Recommend evaluation and repair by a licensed electrical contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.4.4 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Lighting Fixture in Ceiling Fan not Operational
Sunroom

 The light fixture or some of the bulbs in the ceiling fan were not operational. This could be due to fixture damage, improper wiring or bad bulbs. It is recommended that a licensed electrical contractor evaluate and repair as needed. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.7.1 - Carbon Monoxide Detectors

CO Detector Not Present

This home contains fuel burning appliances or an attached garage. Carbon monoxide is produced from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. A carbon monoxide detector can warn occupants and prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. Recommend installation of a permanently installed carbon monoxide detector in close proximity to the sleeping areas for increased safety.

Electric Electrical Contractor

11 - Attic

Attic Access
Entered Attic, Walk in Door, Pulldown Stairs, Access door
Ceiling Framing
Trusses
Roof Framing
Trusses, Stick Built
Roof Decking
OSB
Attic Ventilation
Ridge Vents, Soffit Vents
Insulation Type
Batt, Blown, Cellulose, Fiberglass, R30
General Structural Information

For the purpose of this report, all concerns related to structural items identified to be deficient in the following section are in need of further evaluation by a Licensed General Contractor or Engineer. Items in need of repair should be referred to a General Contractor. Items in need of design consideration, evaluation of significance / cause, and or determination of adequacy should be referred to an Engineer. All structural concerns should be evaluated and corrected as needed to ensure the durability and stability of the home. Repairs and evaluations should be made prior to closing to ensure that the buyer understands the full scope or extent of the concern. Where accessible foundations, piers, columns, roof, and floor framing systems are inspected for visual defects such as broken, cracked, decayed, or damaged members; however, the evaluation of the system for design points such as correct span, load transfer, and or building code compliance is beyond the scope of the home inspection.

Structure Inspection Methods

When accessible and safe the inspector entered attic and crawl space inspection areas with small probe, camera, and a standard flash light. Where visible and accessible; floor and roof framing systems were inspected for visual defects such as broken, cracked, decayed, or damaged members; however, the evaluation of the system for design points such as correct span, load transfer, and or building code compliance is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The inspection of the attic was limited by available walking surfaces and the presence of insulation covering wood components. The inspection of the foundation footings was limited by being below grade and soil covering the components.

Limitations: Ventilation Adequacy

The calculation of ventilation adequacy in the attic is not part of this inspection. At the time of inspection, there were no signs of poor attic ventilation; however, this can vary based on the weather conditions (temperature, wind, humidity, cloud cover, etc.) for that day and the days prior. If the client observes unusually high temperatures or moisture in the attic, it is recommended that a licensed general contractor make further evaluations and repairs.

Limitations: Framing not visible- partial
Knee Wall Attic Spaces

Some parts of the roof framing system were not visible due to interior finishes, insulation and/or radiant barrier and were not inspected.

Limitations: Not Readily Accessible - Attic
Attic 2nd Floor

Some areas of the attic or not entered and inspected due to limited clearance and/or storage of personal items and were not readily accessible.

Photos

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall inspect: Insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces; Ventilation of attics and foundation areas; Kitchen, bathroom, and laundry venting systems; and The operation of any readily accessible attic ventilation fan, and, when temperature permits, the operation of any readily accessible thermostatic control. The home inspector shall describe: Insulation in unfinished spaces; and The absence of insulation in unfinished space at conditioned surfaces. The home inspector is not required to report on: Concealed insulation and vapor retarders; or Venting equipment that is integral with household appliances. The home inspector shall: Move insulation where readily visible evidence indicates the possibility of a problem; and Move floor insulation where plumbing drain/waste pipes penetrate floors, adjacent to earth-filled stoops or porches, and at exterior doors.    

Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Attic Insulation

Insufficient Insulation
Attic 2nd Floor

Compared to standard building practices, insulation depth was inadequate which will allow the loss of conditioned air.  It is recommend a qualified contractor install additional insulation against conditioned surfaces that meet modern standards for increased energy efficiency.

Hardhat General Contractor

12 - Interior

Window Type
Single-hung, Vinyl
Wall Material
Drywall
Ceiling Material
Drywall
Kitchen Countertop Material
Stone/Cultured Stone
Floor Coverings
Carpet, Engineered Wood, Tile, Vinyl
Fireplace
Direct Vent, Natural Gas
Interior: With Garage

For the purpose of this report, the interior areas of the home were visually inspected. The inspection was not invasive and therefore was limited. One window and one receptacle were tested in each room unless furniture or storage prevented access. Identifying hazed or cloudy windows is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The severity of the hazing varies with season and time of the day; therefore, damaged windows may not be visible at the time of the inspection. Light fixtures were operated from at least one switch. Unless labeled, multiple switch locations may not be identified. Confirmation of multiple position switches is only possible when all switches can be identified and this is not possible if switches are improperly installed. Every light fixture has specific bulb wattage limitations. During the home inspection it is not possible to verify bulb type and size. Clients should verify bulb type and wattage for each fixture to prevent fixture damage and ensure proper operation. Cosmetic concerns for example: worn carpets, poor floor finish, open seams in hardwoods, torn wallpaper, poor/damaged paint finish, worn cabinets, worn hinges, damaged window blinds/shades, evidence of pets, and evidence of smoking are beyond the scope of the home inspection. Personal property such as storage, washers, dryers, rugs, furniture, clothes, and wall hangings are not moved and therefore limit the inspection. The overall floor areas in most furnished rooms are not visible and therefore identifying slopes may not be possible. Furniture and personal items can conceal defects and change the overall feel of a home. The buyer should view the home when furnishing and personal items have been removed prior to the purchase. It is especially important to view the areas behind the refrigerator and the washer/dryer. The inspection of the garage does not include moving personal properly and or storage. The verification of fire separation systems between the house and the garage such as doors and ceilings is beyond the scope of the home inspection. The washing machine and the dryer are considered personal property and the inspection of these appliances are beyond the scope of the home inspection. Washing machines often leak resulting in hidden damage to areas that are not visible to the home inspector. The home inspectors does not identify if the dryer power service is gas or electric or if the duct is metal or plastic. The presence of the washer and dryer greatly limit the inspection of the laundry area. After the washer and the dryer have been removed and prior to the purchase of the home, the buyer should view the laundry room for damage or concerns. Before the installation of your washer and dryer, the installer should inspect and verify the washer drain, the dryer exhaust duct, gas connection and/or the electrical service receptacles. All appliances listed or identified below were found to be of concern or in need of a full evaluation and repair by a certified appliance repair technician. If additional concerns are discovered during the process of evaluation and repair, a general contractor should consulted to contact a specialist in each trade as needed. Built in appliances are operated to determine if the units respond and operate to normal operating controls. The determination of the effectiveness of the appliance settings or cycles, such cleaning ability of the dishwasher, grinding efficiency of the disposal, or calibration of the oven is beyond the scope of the home inspection. Refrigeration units, washing machines, and dryers are beyond the scope of the home inspection.

Limitations: Ceiling: Room Above

The ceiling structures are not visible for inspection or reporting a structural description due to installed interior finishes and limited access points

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall inspect: Walls, ceiling, and floors; Steps, stairways, balconies, and railings; Counters and a representative number of built-in cabinets; and A representative number of doors and windows. The home inspector shall: Operate a representative number of windows and interior doors; and Report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components. The home inspector is not required to inspect: Paint, wallpaper, and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings and floors; Carpeting; or Draperies, blinds, or other window treatments.    

Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Doors

Door Doesn't Latch
2nd Floor Left, 1st Floor 1/2 Bathroom, Master Bedroom Closet

Doors did not latch properly. Recommend general repair specialist repair latch and/or strike plate.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
12.1.2 - Doors

Poor Weather-stripping
Kitchen Eating Area, Garage Pedestrian Door

At the time of the inspection, weather-stripping at interior doors was generally damaged or deteriorated. The Inspector recommends replacement/installation of effective weather-stripping components as necessary by a qualified contractor.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
12.2.1 - Exterior Doors

Sliding Screen Door
Sunroom

The sliding screen door did not slide easily. This condition could cause damage to the door while operating. It is recommended to consult a general repair person for evaluation and repairs to ensure proper operation of the door. 

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
12.3.1 - Windows

Possible Failed Seal
Sunroom

The seal appeared to be damaged in one or more windows and/or doors. Condensation between the window panes can lead to fogged windows and elevated moisture.  Due to weather conditions, a failed seal is not necessarily always visible. Recommend a qualified contractor evaluate all windows/doors & and repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.4.1 - Floors

Damaged flooring
Living Room

Damaged or loose flooring observed.  Although this is primarily cosmetic, recommend repair to prevent further damage.

Flooring Flooring Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.6.1 - Ceilings

Minor Damage
Foyer

Minor damage or deterioration to the ceiling was visible at thetime of the inspection.

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Bathrooms

Limitations: Cabinet Inspection Limited

Some areas in the cabinets were not visible due to the storage of personal items and these areas were not inspected.

Credit
Comment
13.1.1 - Tub/Shower

Caulking

Recommend maintaining the caulking around the shower/tub faucets, countertops, plumbing fixtures, tubs, and controls to prevent water from draining behind the walls which could cause hidden damage.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
13.2.1 - Sinks, Countertops, Cabinets

Stopper did not function properly
2nd Floor Hall Bathroom

Recommend repair of the sink stopper so that it will open and close as intended and to help prevent clogs in the drain and so the sink will drain properly. 

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
13.3.1 - Toilets

Toilet is Loose
1/2 Bathroom

Toilet is not properly attached to floor. This can cause leaks which can result in moisture damage. Recommend evaluation and repair by a licensed plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

14 - Kitchen

Dishwasher
Frigidaire
Built-in Microwave
LG
Refrigerator
Samsung
Range/Oven Brand
Kenmore
Range/Oven Energy Source
Gas
Ventilation Type
Microwave recirculates
Limitations: Limited visibility cabinets

Some areas in the cabinets were not readily visible due to the storage of personal items and were not inspected. 

In accordance with the Standards of Practice of the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board, The home inspector shall inspect and operate the basic functions of the following kitchen appliances: Permanently installed dishwasher(s), through a normal cycle; Range(s), cook top(s), and permanently installed oven(s); Trash compactor(s); Garbage disposal(s); Ventilation equipment or range hood(s); and Permanently installed microwave oven(s). The home inspector is not required to inspect: Clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven functions, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation; Non built-in appliances; or Refrigeration units. The home inspector is not required to operate: Appliances in use; or Any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.    

Credit
Comment
14.1.1 - Dishwasher

Excessive noise
Kitchen

Although the dishwasher appeared to function, it was excessively noisy. If the client would like more information then consult with a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
14.2.1 - Built-in Microwave

Missing Filter
Kitchen

 The filters are missing in the bottom of the built-in microwave. These filters help ensure that grease and other debris do not enter the ventilation system for the microwave. It is recommended that the microwave be checked for excessive buildup in the ventilation area and the filters be replaced.

Contractor Qualified Professional

15 - Laundry

Dryer
220 Electric, Present (Not Tested)
Dryer Vent Material
Rigid Metal
Washer
Present (Not Tested)
Dryer Vent

Recommend periodically inspecting dryer vent for any obstructions.  Blocked dryer exhaust duct is a fire hazard and all obstructions should be removed to reduce risk of fire.

16 - Garage

Limitations: Remotes not tested

Garage door remotes and/or keypads are not tested during a home inspection.

Photos: General Photos
Limitations: Limited inspection

Some areas of the garage walls and floor were not readily visible and not inspected due to the storage of personal items and vehicles.

Limitations: Garage Floor Coating

 The garage floor has a coating that prevents viewing of the condition of the concrete.