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1234 Main St.
Fort Collins, CO 80525
07/20/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
39
Recommendation
6
Safety hazard

1 - Interior Features

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1.1.1 - Kitchen

GFCI trip test failed

Recommend installation of GFCI outlets within 6 feet of a water source. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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1.1.2 - Kitchen

Drain line leaks under sink

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1.1.3 - Kitchen

Stains from presumed past leaks noted

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1.1.4 - Kitchen

Cabinet hardware loose

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1.1.5 - Kitchen

Cabinet sealed shut

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1.1.6 - Kitchen

Sink drain has substandard plumbing repairs

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1.2.1 - Plumbing & Laundry

Washing machine over finished living space with no catch pan and drain installed

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1.2.2 - Plumbing & Laundry

Sink drain has substandard plumbing repair

Recommend standard plumbing box installation for Washing machine supply and drain pipes

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1.4.1 - Bath

GFCI trip test failed

Hot/Neutral reversed. Have electrician evaluate.

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1.4.2 - Bath

Tub/shower area needs caulk / grout

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1.4.3 - Bath

Sink drain plug needs repair or replacement

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1.4.4 - Bath

Stains under sink noted from presumed past leaks

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1.5.1 - Bath #2

No operable exhaust fan in bathroom with shower

Even if a window that opens exists, this may not be adequate ventilation during the cold weather. Recommend repairing vented bathroom exhaust fan.

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1.5.2 - Bath #2

No GFCI outlets visible
Basement Bathroom

Which is common for a home of this age. Consider installing protected outlets after purchase.
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1.5.3 - Bath #2

Stains under sink noted from presumed past leaks

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1.8.1 - Interior Electric

Bad Ground

Electric Electrical Contractor
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1.9.1 - Doors

Door doesn't latch properly

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1.9.2 - Doors

Door doesn't lock properly

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1.9.3 - Doors

Door binds in jamb or floor

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2 - Garage, Basement & Attic

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2.1.1 - Attic

Insulation averages about 4

6 inches in depth; more recommended.
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2.1.2 - Attic

Electrical Box Covers missing or damaged

Which is a potential shock or electrocution hazard.
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2.1.3 - Attic

Exhaust fan duct appears to terminate in attic

Have duct routed to exterior to minimize moisture an possible development of mold.
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2.1.4 - Attic

Evidence of past or present leaks

Dry at time of the inspection. Monitor for leaks &/or have roofing contractor evaluate.
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2.4.1 - Garage

Garage house door does not close automatically

This is to act as a fire stop, and keeps exhaust fumes out.

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3 - Electric, Heat, Water Heater

HVAC Unit Information
Trane, natural gas furnace
Main Electrical Panel Location
Underground Service, 100 Amp Service, Cutler-Hammer, Panel box located in garage, Main Disconnect at meter
HVAC Unit: Furnace Age (Average Life Expectancy 15-25 years)
8/9/1999

The average life expectancy of furnaces in homes today is between 16 and 25 years.

Water Heater: Water Heater Age (Average Life Expectancy 6-12 years)
8/7/2007

The average life expectancy of water heaters in homes today is between 8 and 15 years

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3.1.1 - Electrical Panel

Double tapped breaker(s) inside panel box (more than one electrical conductor attached)

This is not standard practice, and may cause overheating or even an electrical fire. Recommend evaluation by an electrician. Double tapping and lugging can create hot spots on breakers and neutral bars because they are not tightened to the correct torque--especially if two different size conductors are used. Because the hot [black] and neutral [white]wires are both current carrying conductors, the chance is then greater for potential hot spots. If the double tap or lug becomes loose, it begins to arc. As it arcs it builds up carbon. Carbon is then resistance and with more carbon buildup the more difficult it is for the conductor to make contact, thus increasing the current. The end result can be the breaker tripping because of the loose connection [current exceeding the rating of the breaker], or signs of overheating such as discolored wires, melted wires, etc, or even fire.
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3.2.1 - HVAC Unit

Recommend installation of carbon monoxide alarm in the home

Recommend installation of carbon monoxide alarm in the home and monthly testing of smoke alarms to ensure proper operation.

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3.2.2 - HVAC Unit

Fuel Furnace Service

Last service date is over one year ago, or is unable to be determined. Although this unit appears to be operating properly from controls, there are areas which cannot be seen without specialized equipment and training. One such area is the combustion chamber / heat exchanger where cold air blows across the "fire box", becoming the hot air that circulates throughout your home. During the life span of any furnace, this metal wall may develop a crack or a broken weld, allowing carbon monoxide to circulate throughout the home. This is why furnace specialists recommend a complete inspection annually; consider having unit inspected by certified HVAC technician.
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3.2.3 - HVAC Unit

No Smoke Detector in vicinity

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3.2.4 - HVAC Unit

Filter dirty

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4 - Exterior Areas

Drives & Walks Information
Concrete driveway, Concrete sidewalk.
Gutters & Grading Information
Aluminum Gutters
Roof Information
Composition shingles
Siding
Composition wood siding; wood frame construction; concrete foundation
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4.4.1 - Drives & Walks

Moderate cracks in driveway

Repair and / or monitor for expansion and development of trip hazards.
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4.4.2 - Drives & Walks

Concrete spalling noted at driveway

This loosening of the top, smooth layer of the cement is a common occurrence, possibly due to an improper curing process, age, or use of snow-melting materials.
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4.4.3 - Drives & Walks

Potential trip hazard at sidewalk

Monitor as necessary.

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4.4.4 - Drives & Walks

Minor cracks in patio area

Which is a common occurrence but should be monitored for expansion.
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4.6.1 - Gutters & Grading

Extensions / Splash blocks missing or insufficient

Install to divert water away from the foundation.
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4.7.1 - Roof

Shingles damaged

See roofer's notes

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4.7.2 - Roof

Exposed nails on roofing material

Recommend sealing all fastener heads.
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4.7.3 - Roof

Flashing deficiency

See photo.
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4.8.1 - Siding

Some areas need priming and repainting

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4.8.2 - Siding

Caulk and seal all gaps

Cracks and openings.
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4.8.3 - Siding

Dryer vent cover not connected completely

Recommend adding a proper sealing to put piping and connection

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4.8.4 - Siding

Cracks 1/4" or less present in foundation

Consider sealing them to prevent water infiltration. Generally speaking, cracks that are less than 1/4" are not commonly regarded as being structurally significant.
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4.9.1 - Vegetation

Trim trees that are in contact or proximity to home

As branches can abrade roofing or siding.

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5 - General Notes

Other: Thank You
Thank you for your business, and for your trust!
Other: Not a Guarantee

Anything can fail at any time. This inspection report is only reporting on the conditions as observed at the time of the inspection, and is not intended to be considered as a guaranty or warranty, expressed or implied, of the adequacy of, or performance of, systems or structures, or their component parts, or of their remaining life expectancy or usefulness. Systems, equipment and components can, and do, fail randomly and without prior warning.

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5.1.1 - Other

Final Walk

Through: This report is a snapshot in time, at the time and date of the inspection. Conditions in a house can change at any time, for any number of reasons (think about your vehicle suddenly breaking down!). For this reason, we recommend a complete walk-through of the vacant house before closing. If you or your representative are not available for such a walk through (or if you would like a professional to accompany you), we ask that you provide us with 3 days notice. We provide this service for only $95.

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5.1.2 - Other

Pictures

Pictures are included to help you understand and see what I saw at the time of the inspection. They are intended to show an example or illustration of an area of concern but may not show every occurrence and may not accurately depict its severity. Also note that not all areas of concern will be pictured. Do not rely on pictures alone. Please read the complete inspection report before your inspection contingency period expires.
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5.1.3 - Other

Fire and carbon monoxide protection By todays standards

The installation of smoke alarm(s) is required inside of all bedrooms and in any rooms designated for the purpose of sleeping, and outside within the proximity of the doors to those rooms. Test all alarms and detectors weekly or monthly per manufacture instructions. The installation of carbon monoxide (CO) detector(s) is required in homes with fuel-fired appliances at every floor elevation and any areas where fuel-fired equipment is located. The installation of Type ABC fire extinguisher(s) at the kitchen, laundry, and garage, if applicable, is also advised. Test all of these devices monthly. Install new batteries yearly. Initiate and practice plans of escape and protection for all occupants in case any emergencies arise. Failure to repair defective or install absent alarms, detectors, and other safety equipment immediately can result in serious injury or death. For further information about fire safety and CO poisoning, consult your local fire department.

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