Loading
Document Name
Sort Generated Document By
Header Text
Total Credit Requested
$ 0.00
Preview
Create
Viewing:

1234 Main St.
BRICK, NJ 08723
07/20/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
78
Items Inspected
14
Maintenance item
15
Recommendation
6
Safety hazard

1 - Indispensable Information

IN D
1.1 Essential Information
  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
1.1.1 - Essential Information

Vital Information

This report can be read in a full version and a summary version.  It is absolutely necessary that you read all of the full report version to entirely comprehend this home inspection report.

To access and read the full report in the HTML format you must open all the tabs such as Overview, Information, Limitations, and Standards 

If you do not understand how to navigate the HTML Format, all the information is displayed in the PDF Full Report Format.

If you have any questions please contact your Inspector: 

Rick Vecchio 732-232-1092

2 - Important Information/Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Occupancy
Occupied & Furnished
Style
Colonial
Type of Building
Single Family
Elecrticity On/Off
ON
Gas On/Off
ON
Water On/Off
ON
Temperature (approximate)
70 Fahrenheit (F)
Weather Conditions
Clear
Introduction

Home Inspectors are required by state law to follow the NJ Standards of Practice. This document can be found in your report and inspection agreement. The standards are the guidelines for what is and is not to be expected of this home inspection.

This General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods and home inspectors are trained to identify material defects. Material defects are defined by the NJ Home Inspection Advisory Committee as: a condition, or functional aspect, of a structural component or system that is readily ascertainable during a home inspection that substantially affects the value, habitability or safety of the dwelling, but does not include decorative, stylistic, cosmetic, or aesthetic aspects of the system, structure or component.

The inspector will inspect to the best of his ability but since much of the home is hidden behind coverings, or is buried underground, it is possible that the inspector will not identify all deficiencies due to limitations beyond his control and/or responsibility. Knowing this, the inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and/or systems of the dwelling that are not readily accessible or viewable.

This General Home Inspection is not a confirmation of proper installations and does not determine compliance with codes, regulations and/or ordinances.


Special Note For Older Homes

The older the home the less likely it is up to modern standards and codes. 

This home inspection does not determine compliance with codes, regulations and/or ordinances.

Please keep this in mind when reviewing the report.

Home Inspection Contingency Expiration Date

Before the expiration of your Home Inspection Contingency Deadline, the inspector recommends you consult with qualified contractors, persons, or technicians to discuss options and costs of replacements, repairs, or maintenance of the systems or items that are mentioned in this report.

To determine the date that a home inspection contingency should be released, read your purchase contract.  If the contingency expires before you report the inspection findings to the seller, your earnest money deposit may be at risk if you try to cancel the contract based on a defect disclosed in the inspection.


13:40-15.16  NJ STANDARDS OF PRACTICE

 

a) All home inspectors shall comply with the standards of practice contained in this section when conducting home inspections. The scope of home inspection services performed in compliance with the requirements set forth in this section shall provide the client with objective information regarding the condition of the systems and components of the home as determined at the time of the home inspection.

b) Nothing in this section shall be construed to require a home inspector to: 1) Enter any area or perform any procedure which is, in the opinion of the home inspector, unsafe and likely to be dangerous to the inspector or other persons; 2) Enter any area or perform any procedure which will, in the opinion of the home inspector, likely damage the property or its systems or components; 3) Enter any area which does not have at least 24 inches of unobstructed vertical clearance and at least 30 inches of unobstructed horizontal clearance; 4) Identify concealed conditions and latent defects; 5) Determine life expectancy of any system or component; 6) Determine the cause of any condition or deficiency; 7) Determine future conditions that may occur including the failure of systems and components including consequential damage; 8) Determine the operating costs of systems or components; 9) Determine the suitability of the property for any specialized use; 10) Determine compliance with codes, regulations and/ or ordinances; 11) Determine market value of the property or its marketability; 12) Determine advisability of purchase of the property; 13) Determine the presence of any potentially hazardous plants, animals or diseases or the presence of any suspected hazardous substances or adverse conditions such as mold, fungus, toxins, carcinogens, noise, and contaminants in soil, water, and air; 14) Determine the effectiveness of any system installed or method utilized to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; 15) Operate any system or component which is shut down or otherwise inoperable; 16) Operate any system or component which does not respond to normal operating controls; 17) Operate shut-off valves; 18) Determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; 19) Insert any tool, probe or testing device inside electrical panels; 20) Dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of main and sub panels;21) Walk on unfloored sections of attics; and 22) Light pilot flames or ignite or extinguish fires.

c) Home inspectors shall: 1) Inspect the following systems and components in residential buildings and other related residential housing components:  i) Structural components as required by (e) below; ii) Exterior components as required by (f) below; iii) Roofing system components as required by (g) below; iv) Plumbing system components as required by (h) below; v) Electrical system components as required by (i) below; vi) Heating system components as required by (j) below; vii) Cooling system components as required by (k) below; viii) Interior components as required by (l) below; ix) Insulation components and ventilation system as required by (m) below; and x) Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances as required by (n) below; 2) Prepare a home inspection report which shall: i) Disclose those systems and components as set forth in (c)1 above which were present at the time of inspection; ii) Disclose systems and components as set forth in (c)1 above which were present at the time of the home inspection but were not inspected, and the reason(s) they were not inspected; iii) Describe the systems and components specified in these standards of practice; iv) State material defects found in systems or components; v) State the significance of findings where any material defects in the systems and components of (c)1 above were found; and vi) Provide recommendations where material defects were found to repair, replace or monitor a system or component or to obtain examination and analysis by a qualified professional, tradesman, or service technician without determining the methods, materials or cost of corrections; and 3) Retain copies of all home inspection reports prepared pursuant to (c)2 above, for a period of five years upon completion of the report;

d) Subsection (c) above is not intended to limit home inspectors from: 1) Inspecting or reporting observations and conditions observed in systems and components in addition to those required in (c) 1 above and inspecting systems and components other than those mandated for inspection in (c) 1 above as long as the inspection and reporting is based on the licensee's professional opinion, prior work experience, education and training, unless these standards of practice prohibit the home inspector from inspecting such system or component; 2) Contracting with the client to provide, for an additional fee additional inspection services provided the home inspector is educated, trained, certified, registered or licensed, pursuant to the provisions of N.J.A.C. 13:40-15.22 and other applicable statutes and rules; and 3) Excluding systems and components from the inspection if requested in writing by the client.

e) When conducting the inspection of the structural components, the home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Foundation; ii) Floors;  iii) Walls; iv) Ceilings; and v) Roof; 2) Describe: i) Foundation construction type and material; ii) Floor construction type and material; iii) Wall construction type and material; iv) Ceiling construction type and material; and v) Roof construction type and material; 3) Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected unless such probing would damage any finished surface; and 4) Describe in the home inspection report the methods used to inspect under-floor crawl spaces and attics.

f) When conducting the inspection of the exterior components, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Exterior surfaces, excluding shutters, and screening, awnings, and other similar seasonal accessories; ii) Exterior doors excluding storm doors or safety glazing; iii) Windows excluding storm windows and safety glazing; iv) Attached or adjacent decks, balconies, stoops, steps, porches, and their railings; v) Vegetation, grading, drainage, and retaining walls with respect to their immediate detrimental effect on the condition of the residential building, excluding fences, geological and/or soil conditions, sea walls, break-walls, bulkheads and docks, or erosion control and earth stabilization; vi) Attached or adjacent walkways, patios, and driveways; and vii) Garage doors including automatic door openers and entrapment protection mechanisms, excluding remote control devices; and 2) Describe exterior wall surface type and material.

g) When inspecting the roof of a residential building, the home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Roofing surface, excluding antennae and other installed accessories such as solar heating systems, lightning arresters, and satellite dishes; ii) Roof drainage systems; iii) Flashing; iv) Skylights; and v) Exterior of chimneys; 2) Describe: i) Roof surface; ii) Roof drainage systems; iii) Flashing; iv) Skylights; and v) Chimneys; 3) Employ reasonable, practicable and safe methods to inspect the roof such as: i) Walking on the roof; ii) Observation from a ladder at roof level; or iii) Visual examination with binoculars from ground level; and 4) Describe the methods used to inspect the roof.

 

h) When inspecting the plumbing system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Interior water supply and distribution systems including functional water flow and functional drainage, excluding wells, well pumps, well water sampling or water storage related equipment, determination of water supply quantity or quality and water conditioning systems and lawn irrigation systems; ii) All interior fixtures and faucets, excluding shut off valves, wells, well pumps, well water sampling and water storage related equipment; iii) Drain, waste and vent systems; iv) Domestic water heating systems, without operating safety valves or automatic safety controls, and excluding solar water heating systems; v) Combustion vent systems excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; vi) Fuel distribution systems; and  vii) Drainage sumps, sump pumps and related piping; and 2) Describe: i) Predominant interior water supply and distribution piping materials; ii) Predominant drain, waste and vent piping materials; and iii) Water heating equipment including energy sources.

i) When inspecting the electrical system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Service entrance system; ii) Main disconnects, main panel and sub panels, including interior components of main panel and sub panels; iii) Service grounding; iv) Wiring, without measuring amperage, voltage or impedance, excluding any wiring not a part of the primary electrical power distribution system, such as central vacuum systems, remote control devices, telephone or cable system wiring, intercom systems, security systems and low voltage wiring systems; v) Over-current protection devices and the compatibility of their ampacity with that of the connected wiring; vi) At least one of each interior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per room and at least one exterior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per side of house; and vii) Ground fault circuit interrupters; and 2) Describe: i) Amperage and voltage rating of the service; ii) Location of main disconnect, main panels, and sub-panels; iii) Type of over-current protection devices; iv) Predominant type of wiring; v) Presence of knob and tube branch circuit wiring; and vi) Presence of solid conductor aluminum branch circuit wiring.

j) When inspecting the heating system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Installed heating equipment and energy sources, without determining heat supply adequacy or distribution balance, and without operating automatic safety controls or operating heat pumps when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the pumps, and excluding humidifiers, electronic air filters and solar heating systems; ii) Combustion vent systems and chimneys, excluding interiors of flues or chimneys; iii) Fuel storage tanks, excluding propane and underground storage tanks; and iv) Visible and accessible portions of the heat exchanger; and 2) Describe: i) Heating equipment and distribution type; and ii) Energy sources.

k) When inspecting the cooling system, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Central cooling system, excluding electronic air filters and excluding determination of cooling supply adequacy or distribution balance and without operating central cooling equipment when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the cooling equipment; ii) Permanently installed hard-wired, through-wall individual cooling systems; and iii) Energy sources; and 2) Describe: i) Cooling equipment and distribution type; and ii) Energy sources.

l) When inspecting the interior of a residential building, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Walls, ceilings, and floors excluding paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments, carpeting and other non-permanent floor coverings; ii) Steps, stairways, and railings; iii) Installed kitchen wall cabinets to determine if secure;

iv) At least one interior passage door and operate one window per room excluding window treatments; and v) Household appliances limited to: (1) The kitchen range and oven to determine operation of burners or heating elements excluding microwave ovens and the operation of self-cleaning cycles and appliance timers and thermostats; (2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage; and (3) Garbage disposer.

m) When inspecting the insulation components and ventilation system of a residential building, the home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Insulation in unfinished spaces without disturbing insulation; ii) Ventilation of attics and crawlspaces; and iii) Mechanical ventilation systems; and 2) Describe: i) Insulation in unfinished spaces adjacent to heated areas; and ii) Evidence of inadequate attic and crawlspace ventilation. 

n) When inspecting fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, without testing draft characteristics, excluding fire screens and doors, seals and gaskets, automatic fuel feed devices, mantles and non-structural fireplace surrounds, combustion make-up air devices, or gravity fed and fan assisted heat distribution systems; and ii) Chimneys and combustion vents excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; and 2) Describe: i) Type of fireplaces and/or solid fuel burning appliances; ii) Energy source; and iii) Visible evidence of improper draft characteristics.

3 - Roofing

IN D
3.1 Coverings X X
3.2 Roof Drainage Systems X
3.3 Flashings X
3.4 Chimney Exterior X X
3.5 Solar Panels
Inspection Method
Ladder and Walked the Roof
Coverings: Material
Asphalt 3 Tab Shingles
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Aluminum
Flashings: Material
Aluminum
Roof Indroduction

The roof inspection portion of the General Home Inspection is a non-invasive, visual evaluation of the roof structure, roof-covering materials, flashing, and roof penetrations such as; chimneys, mounting hardware for roof-mounted equipment, attic ventilation devices, ducts, and combustion/plumbing vents. Due to its non-invasive nature, limitations of viewable portions, and variations in installation requirements of a large number of different roof-covering materials installed over the years, the home inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified roofing contractor. Home Inspectors are trained to identify common deficiencies and to recognize conditions that could require evaluation by a specialist. This roof portion of the home inspection does not include; leak-testing, certification or warranty of the roof against concealed and/or future leakage, or confirmation of proper installation of systems. Other limitations may apply and will be included in the comments as necessary.

g) When inspecting the roof of a residential building, the home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Roofing surface, excluding antennae and other installed accessories such as solar heating systems, lightning arresters, and satellite dishes; ii) Roof drainage systems; iii) Flashing; iv) Skylights; and v) Exterior of chimneys;

2) Describe: i) Roof surface; ii) Roof drainage systems; iii) Flashing; iv) Skylights; and v) Chimneys;

3) Employ reasonable, practicable and safe methods to inspect the roof such as: i) Walking on the roof; ii) Observation from a ladder at roof level; or iii) Visual examination with binoculars from ground level; and

4) Describe the methods used to inspect the roof.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Coverings

Minor Roof Deterioration

At the time of the inspection, asphalt composition shingles covering the roof exhibited minor general deterioration commensurate with the age of the roof. The inspector recommends budgeting for eventual replacement of the roof coverings. 

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Coverings

Exposed Nails

Under-driven or exposed nails were found in one or more roof coverings. This can let water to enter the roof structure and cause damage. 

Recommend a qualified person caulk all exposed nails with roofing mastic.

Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Coverings

Cracked Shingles/tabs missing

A few shingles were cracked others were missing tabs and need to be replaced or repaired. 

These can eventually cause a leak.

Recommend a qualified roofer inspect the entire roof for such shingles and repair or replace as needed.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Downspouts Discharges to foundation

One or more downspouts drain too close to the home's foundation. This can result in excessive moisture in the soil at the foundation. Recommend a qualified contractor adjust downspout extensions to drain at least 6 feet from the foundation. 

Here is a helpful DIY link and video on draining water flow away from your house. 

Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Chimney Exterior

Cap/cover needs paint

The chimney cover was in need of fresh paint, this protects the cover from corrosion and eventual leaks.

Recommend a qualified contractor paint the cover.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Solar Panels

Solar Panels

Solar Panels were observed on the roof at the time of inspection. This Home inspection does not include an inspection of the solar panels, its electrical system, and its attachment systems, nor does it verify compliance of state and local requirements concerning this installation. The home inspector disclaims responsibility for any concealed leaks or possible future leaks caused by this system.

To understand the costs and benefits of having such a system. The Home Inspector highly recommends that you request all information from the current homeowner on all contractual obligations and agreements on this installation and ownership of these panels and clarifying who is and is not responsible for removing and reinstalling panels in the case of replacing the roof coverings. This should be done before your Home Inspection contingency expiration date.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Exterior

IN D
4.1 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X
4.2 Siding, Flashing & Trim X
4.3 Main Entry Door X
4.4 Exterior Doors/Slider X X
4.5 Decks, Balconies, Porches, and Steps X X
4.6 Walkways, Patios & Driveways X X
4.7 Vegetation, Grading, & Drainage X X
4.8 Basement door
4.9 Garage Door X X
4.10 Shed X
Inspection Method
Visual
Siding, Flashing & Trim : Siding Material
Vinyl
Main Entry Door: Main Entry Door
Fiberglass
Exterior Doors/Slider : Exterior Doors/Slider 1
Wood
Decks, Balconies, Porches, and Steps : Appurtenance
Covered Porch, Front Porch
Decks, Balconies, Porches, and Steps : Material
Concrete
Walkways, Patios & Driveways : Driveway Material
Asphalt
Walkways, Patios & Driveways : Patio Material
Concrete
Walkways, Patios & Driveways : Walkway Material
Concrete
Garage Door: Material
Steel
Garage Door: Type
Automatic
Exterior Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes the inspection of the homes exterior elements and systems that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes the foundation, exterior walls, floor structures, and roof structures. Much of the homes exterior components are hidden behind the roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or is buried underground. Certain areas will not be accessible or visible and because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of, portions and/or systems not readily accessible or viewable.

.


f) When conducting the inspection of the exterior components, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Exterior surfaces, excluding shutters, and screening, awnings, and other similar seasonal accessories; ii) Exterior doors excluding storm doors or safety glazing; iii) Windows excluding storm windows and safety glazing; iv) Attached or adjacent decks, balconies, stoops, steps, porches, and their railings; v) Vegetation, grading, drainage, and retaining walls with respect to their immediate detrimental effect on the condition of the residential building, excluding fences, geological and/or soil conditions, sea walls, break-walls, bulkheads and docks, or erosion control and earth stabilization; vi) Attached or adjacent walkways, patios, and driveways; and vii) Garage doors including automatic door openers and entrapment protection mechanisms, excluding remote control devices; and

2) Describe exterior wall surface type and material.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Exterior Doors/Slider

Needs paint and caulking

The garage door trim needs to be painted and some caulking is needed.

Recommend a qualified painter paint and caulk.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.4.2 - Exterior Doors/Slider

Ripped Screen

The screen door to the sunroom had a ripped screen and needs to be replaced.


Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches, and Steps

Needs landing

The front porch had stairs that terminated in the grass lawn, this is a trip hazard and normally there should be a stable platform to land on at the bottom of the stairs.

Recommend a qualified contractor install a landing platform.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.6.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Walkway/driveway Cracking - Common

Common cracks (1/4-inch or less) were visible in the Walkway and driveway. Cracks should be filled with an appropriate material to avoid continued damage to the surface from freezing moisture.

Credit
Comment
4.7.1 - Vegetation, Grading, & Drainage

Negative or Neutral Grading

Grading is sloping towards the home or not sloped at all in one area. This could lead to water intrusion and foundation issues. Recommend qualified landscaper or foundation contractor regrade, so water flows away from home.

Here is a helpful article discussing negative grading. 

Credit
Comment
4.7.2 - Vegetation, Grading, & Drainage

Shrubs against structure

Shrubs should not be in contact with the home.

Cutting back the shrubs will prevent premature wear and tear of the siding.

Recommend a qualified person cut back the shrubs so there is no contact with the structure. 

Credit
Comment
4.9.1 - Garage Door

Motion Detector Not present

The Motion Detectors were not installed. This is a safety hazard to children and pets. 

Recommend a qualified garage door contractor evaluate and install.

Note: The Motion Detector is in addition and not the Auto Reverse Sensor and it is recommended to have both safety features. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.10.1 - Shed

Roof leaking

The Shed roof had a leak and the roofing material was nearing the end of its life cycle and needs to be replaced.

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Structural Components

IN D
5.1 Foundation, Basement & Crawlspaces X X
5.2 Floor Structure X
5.3 Wall Structure X
5.4 Ceiling Structure X
5.5 Roof Structure & Attic X
Inspection Methods
Attic Access, Crawlspace Access, Visual
Foundation, Basement & Crawlspaces: Foundation system(s)
Basement, crawlspace
Foundation, Basement & Crawlspaces: Material(s)
Concrete, Masonry Block
Floor Structure: Material Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Concrete, Dirt
Floor Structure: Material Floor structures
Wood Joists
Floor Structure: Material Sub-floors
OSB
Wall Structure: Material
Unknown
Ceiling Structure: Material
Wood
Roof Structure & Attic: Material
Wood framed
Roof Structure & Attic: Type
Gable
Structural Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the home structural elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes the foundation, exterior walls, floor structures, and roof structure. Much of the home structure is hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings or is buried underground.  Since certain areas will not be accessible and the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all structural deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that structural problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of, portions and (or) systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.

e) When conducting the inspection of the structural components, the home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Foundation; ii) Floors; iii) Walls; iv) Ceilings; and v) Roof;

2) Describe: i) Foundation construction type and material; ii) Floor construction type and material; iii) Wall construction type and material; iv) Ceiling construction type and material; and v) Roof construction type and material;

3) Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected unless such probing would damage any finished surface; and

4) Describe in the home inspection report the methods used to inspect under-floor crawl spaces and attics.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Foundation, Basement & Crawlspaces

Foundation Cracks - Minor

Minor uniform cracking less than 1/8 inch wide was noted on the outside of the block walls, likely caused by settlement and usually not of any significance to structural integrity.  

Cracks can let moisture traverse the foundation wall and should be sealed with appropriate caulkings by a qualified person.

It is very likely that this assessment is correct, but it does not guarantee that other problems might be the cause of such cracks. 

The only way to guarantee an assessment of these cracks is to have an agreement with a qualified specialist in structure who agrees to inspect, report, and guarantee the accuracy of their report and assessments of what to do or not to do if the crack is of concern or not. These reports are often more expensive than the standard home inspection report.

The home inspector recommends to take in consideration the above statements before making a decision to obtain or not obtain such reports from a specialist.


Here is an informational article on foundation cracks.

6 - Insulation and Ventilation

IN D
6.1 Limitations to confirm presence of insulation X
6.2 Attic Insulation X
6.3 Floor Insulation X
6.4 Wall Insulation X
6.5 Ventilation X
6.6 Exhaust Systems Bathroom X
6.7 Exhaust Systems Dryer X
6.8 Soil cover-Crawl space
Dryer Power Source
Gas
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Fiberglass
Floor Insulation: Insulation Type
Fiberglass
Wall Insulation: Insulation Type
unknown
Ventilation : Ventilation Type
Gable Vents, Ridge Vents
Exhaust Systems Bathroom: Exhaust Fans
Fan Only, Window
Exhaust Systems Dryer: Dryer Vent
Metal
Insulation and Ventilation Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the elements and/or systems that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes insulation and ventilation systems, which are often hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings or buried underground. Certain areas will not be accessible and because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist which are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and/or systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.

m) When inspecting the insulation components and ventilation system of a residential building, the home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Insulation in unfinished spaces without disturbing insulation; ii) Ventilation of attics and crawlspaces; and iii) Mechanical ventilation systems; and 2) Describe: i) Insulation in unfinished spaces adjacent to heated areas; and ii) Evidence of inadequate attic and crawlspace ventilation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Limitations to confirm presence of insulation

Suggested Energy Audit

Since a home inspection is non-invasive, it is impossible to verify the presence of insulation without opening closed cavities, and much of the system is concealed.

 If the client desires to know the dwellings insulation/ventilation systems values and/or performance, the home inspector recommends a comprehensive evaluation by qualified energy consultant/technician.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - Exhaust Systems Dryer

Annual Cleaning

Fires from dryer duct being clogged are a major cause of house fires. 

Recommend annual cleaning by a qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
6.8.1 - Soil cover-Crawl space

No soil cover

No soil cover was installed at the time of the inspection. Soil covers help reduce humidity levels in crawlspaces by limiting moisture evaporation into the air from  the soil. Reducing humidity levels can help maintain a healthy enviroment in the crawl space. Recommend installation by a qualified person

Contractor Qualified Professional

7 - Air Conditioning

IN D
7.1 Cooling Equipment System 1 X X
7.2 Distribution System 1 X
Cooling Equipment System 1: Brand
Goodman
Cooling Equipment System 1: Energy Source
Electric
Cooling Equipment System 1: Type
Split system
Distribution System 1: Distrabution
Duct -Non Insulated, Duct Insulated, Duct (non observable)
Air Conditioning Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the cooling systems and elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. Some of the cooling components and systems are hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or buried underground so certain areas will not be accessible. Since the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for the inspection of portions, and/or systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.


k) When inspecting the cooling system, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Central cooling system, excluding electronic air filters and excluding determination of cooling supply adequacy or distribution balance and without operating central cooling equipment when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the cooling equipment; ii) Permanently installed hard-wired, through-wall individual cooling systems; and iii) Energy sources; and 2) Describe: i) Cooling equipment and distribution type; and ii) Energy sources.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Cooling Equipment System 1

Needs Servicing/Cleaning

A/C system should be cleaned and serviced annually. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean, service and certify.

Credit
Comment
7.1.2 - Cooling Equipment System 1

Condenser unit not elevated

The pad supporting the outdoor condensing unit was not elevated enough above the ground level.

This will cause accelerated deterioration of the component. 

Recommend a competent person elevate, or excavate around the pad, so the unit is not in contact with dirt, leaves, or debris.

8 - Heating

IN D
8.1 Heating Equipment System 1 X
8.2 Heat Distribution System 1 X
8.3 Vent Connectors System1 X
Heating Equipment System 1: Heat - System
Hot Air Furnace
Heating Equipment System 1: Brand
Carrier
Heating Equipment System 1: Energy Source
Gas
Heating Equipment System 1: Filter Type
Disposable
Heat Distribution System 1: Distrabution
Duct -Non Insulated, Duct (Non observable), Duct Insulated
Heating Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the heating systems and elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. Some of the heating components and systems are hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or are buried underground. Certain areas may not be accessible and because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist which are not readily visible, the Inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and (or) systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.


j) When inspecting the heating system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Installed heating equipment and energy sources, without determining heat supply adequacy or distribution balance, and without operating automatic safety controls or operating heat pumps when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the pumps, and excluding humidifiers, electronic air filters and solar heating systems; ii) Combustion vent systems and chimneys, excluding interiors of flues or chimneys; iii) Fuel storage tanks, excluding propane and underground storage tanks; and iv) Visible and accessible portions of the heat exchanger; and 2) Describe: i) Heating equipment and distribution type; and ii) Energy sources.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Heating Equipment System 1

Needs Servicing/Cleaning

The furnace should be cleaned and serviced annually. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean, service and certify furnace.

Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

9 - Electrical

IN D
9.1 Maintenance X
9.2 Service Entrance Conductors X
9.3 Main Disconnect/Panel X
9.4 Branch Circuit Conductors X X
9.5 Connected Devices and Fixtures X
9.6 Polarity and Grounding of Receptacles X
9.7 GFCI X
9.8 Exterior Electrical X X
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Below Ground
Main Disconnect/Panel: Panel Locations
Garage
Main Disconnect/Panel: Service Wire Material
unknown
Main Disconnect/Panel: Service Voltage Ratings (nominal)
240v
Main Disconnect/Panel: Panel Capacity Amperage
150 AMP
Main Disconnect/Panel: Panel Manufacturer
Cutler Hammer
Main Disconnect/Panel: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Branch Circuit Conductors: Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper
Branch Circuit Conductors: Wiring Method
Non metalic sheathing PVC (romex), Metal-Armored Bx
Electrical Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the electrical systems and elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. Much of the electrical components and systems are hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or are buried underground. Certain areas may not be accessible and since the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures.

Due to its non-invasive nature, limitations of viewable portions, and variations in installation requirements of the huge number components and materials installed over the years, and that this home inspection is not a confirmation of proper installation of systems. 

i) When inspecting the electrical system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Service entrance system; ii) Main disconnects, main panel and sub panels, including interior components of main panel and sub panels; iii) Service grounding; iv) Wiring, without measuring amperage, voltage or impedance, excluding any wiring not a part of the primary electrical power distribution system, such as central vacuum systems, remote control devices, telephone or cable system wiring, intercom systems, security systems and low voltage wiring systems; v) Over-current protection devices and the compatibility of their ampacity with that of the connected wiring; vi) At least one of each interior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per room and at least one exterior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per side of house; and vii) Ground fault circuit interrupters; and 2) Describe: i) Amperage and voltage rating of the service; ii) Location of main disconnect, main panels, and sub-panels; iii) Type of over-current protection devices; iv) Predominant type of wiring; v) Presence of knob and tube branch circuit wiring; and vi) Presence of solid conductor aluminum branch circuit wiring.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Maintenance

Periodic Maintenance

Due to its non-invasive nature, limitations of viewable portions, and variations in installation requirements of the huge number components and materials installed over the years, and that this home inspection is not a confirmation of proper installation of systems. The home inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified electrical contractor.

As your Home Inspector, safety is one of my primary concerns. Since defaults in electrical systems are a major safety issue, I strongly advise to follow the Electrical Safety Foundations recommendation, In any of the following situations a licensed electrician should perform a comprehensive electrical inspection: When purchasing a home, When a home is 40 years or older, If an appliance has been added, and When a home has had a major renovation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Branch Circuit Conductors

Extension cords for permanent wiring
Garage

Extension cords over 3 feet used as permanent wiring are not authorized and are a safety issue.

The Fan in the garage was using one.

The inspector recommends evaluation and correction by a qualified electrician

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.4.2 - Branch Circuit Conductors

Improper support not protected

A few electrical wires in the basement closet were not supported/attached/protected correctly.  Anyone leaning or pulling on such wires or boxes could accidentally dislodge it, and this could lead to electrical shock. Highly recommend an electrician inspect the home for any such conditions and add supports/attachments/protect when needed

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.8.1 - Exterior Electrical

No GFCI Protection Installed

No GFCI protection present on the outside outlets. This is a shock hazard.

 Recommend licensed electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles in all places required by current standards.

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. 

10 - Plumbing

IN D
10.1 Maintenance
10.2 Water Ditrabution System X X
10.3 Fuel Gas Distribution Systems X
10.4 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
10.5 Fixtures / Faucets X X
10.6 Water Heater
10.7 Vent Connectors X
10.8 Exterior Plumbing X
10.9 Oil/Gas/Septic Tank
Main Fuel Shut-Off (Location)
Exterior
Main Water Shut-Off Device (Location)
Basement
Water Ditrabution System: Material - Maine Water Supply Pipe
Polyethylene (PE)



Water Ditrabution System: Material - Water Distribution
Copper
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems : Material
Copper
Water Heater: Location
Basement
Water Heater: Manufacturer
Whirlpool
Water Heater: Power Source
Gas
Plumbing Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the plumbing systems and elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. Most of the plumbing is hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or buried underground so certain areas may not be accessible. The General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods and this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist which are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures.

This section does not include confirmation of proper installation or current code compliance. This plumbing inspection does not include leak-testing, nor will it certify or warranty against concealed, and/or future leakage, and it does not guarantee present and future performance of the plumbing systems and its components.

 The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and/or systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable. Other limitations may apply and will be included in as necessary.

h) When inspecting the plumbing system, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect:i) Interior water supply and distribution systems including functional water flow and functional drainage, excluding wells, well pumps, well water sampling or water storage related equipment, determination of water supply quantity or quality and water conditioning systems and lawn irrigation systems; ii) All interior fixtures and faucets, excluding shut off valves, wells, well pumps, well water sampling and water storage related equipment; iii) Drain, waste and vent systems; iv) Domestic water heating systems, without operating safety valves or automatic safety controls, and excluding solar water heating systems; v) Combustion vent systems excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; vi) Fuel distribution systems; and vii) Drainage sumps, sump pumps and related piping; and

2) Describe: i) Predominant interior water supply and distribution piping materials; ii) Predominant drain, waste and vent piping materials; and iii) Water heating equipment including energy sources.


  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - Maintenance

Matinance and certification (Plumbing and fuel gas)

The plumbing portion of this general home inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified licensed plumbing contractor because of variations in installation requirements of a large number of different plumbing materials installed over the years and the need of expertise that a licensed plumber has.

Defaults in the Fuel gas system can be dangerous to life and property.

In light of this information, the inspector recommends considering the costs and benefits of having or not having a qualified licensed plumber inspect and certify proper functioning of the plumbing system and any recommendations of such an inspection.

If the client decides not to have a complete plumbing inspection, the Home Inspector highly recommends for safety reasons to have, at a minimum, the fuel gas system and its components inspected for any deficiencies by a qualified and licensed plumber.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.2.1 - Water Ditrabution System

Low water pressure

The water pressure seemed insufficient if more than one fixture was being used.

The inspector noticed that the main service came in at 1" pipe then reduced to 3/4" pipe and back to 1" pipe. 

This could be a cause of low water pressure. 

Recommend a qualified plumber evaluate the situation and make necessary corrections.


Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.5.1 - Fixtures / Faucets

Shower diverter not functioning properly
Second floor bathroom

The shower diverter was not functioning properly.

Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.5.2 - Fixtures / Faucets

Bathtub drain clogged
Second floor bathroom

The bathtub drain slowly probably clogged with hair. Recommend plunging to dislocate the clog. If the clog persists recommend evaluation and correction by a qualified plumber.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.6.1 - Water Heater

Annual Maintenance Flush Needed

Water heaters should be flushed annually to prevent sediment buildup and maintain efficiency. Recommend a qualified plumber service and flush. 

Here is a DIY link to help

Credit
Comment
10.9.1 - Oil/Gas/Septic Tank

Consideration Of The Possibility of Underground Tanks

The possibility of discovering underground tanks that could have contained oil, gas or septic is not guaranteed with the typical home inspection. The presence of an underground oil or gas tank can considerably affect the conditions of the sale of a home.

As mentioned in the New Jersey standards of practice this home inspection does not certify the existence or not of such tanks.

It is always possible that signs that one exists were not visible at all and in light of this information the home inspector recommends taking into consideration the costs and benefits of obtaining or not obtaining a tank sweep by a qualified technician to confirm the presence or not of such tanks.

Contractor Qualified Professional

11 - Interiors

IN D
11.1 Walls X
11.2 Ceilings X
11.3 Floors X
11.4 Steps, Stairways & Railings X X
11.5 Doors X X
11.6 Windows X
11.7 Bathroom cabinets X
Walls: Wall Material
Drywall
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Gypsum Board
Floors: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Tile
Interiors Indroduction

The General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods.  The inspector will inspect to the best of his ability, but it is possible that this report may not identify all deficiencies since much of the homes interior components are hidden behind floors, walls, and ceiling coverings. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist which are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and (or) systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.

l) When inspecting the interior of a residential building, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Walls, ceilings, and floors excluding paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments, carpeting and other non-permanent floor coverings; ii) Steps, stairways, and railings; iii) Installed kitchen wall cabinets to determine if secure; iv) At least one interior passage door and operate one window per room excluding window treatments; and v) Household appliances limited to: (1) The kitchen range and oven to determine operation of burners or heating elements excluding microwave ovens and the operation of self-cleaning cycles and appliance timers and thermostats; (2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage; and (3) Garbage disposer.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Loose Post

Staircases one in the garage and one in the sunroom had post/railings that were becoming loose. This could eventually pose a safety hazard. 

Recommend a qualified handyman evaluate and repair. 

12 - Built-in Appliances / Kitchen

IN D
12.1 Dishwasher X
12.2 Refrigerator X
12.3 Range/Oven/Cooktop X X
12.4 Countertops & Cabinets X
12.5 Built-in Microwave X
Dishwasher: Brand
Unknown
Refrigerator: Brand
LG
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
Unknown
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Gas
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Laminate


 

l) When inspecting the interior of a residential building, a home inspector shall:

 1) Inspect: i) Walls, ceilings, and floors excluding paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments, carpeting and other non-permanent floor coverings; ii) Steps, stairways, and railings; iii) Installed kitchen wall cabinets to determine if secure; iv) At least one interior passage door and operate one window per room excluding window treatments; and v) Household appliances limited to: (1) The kitchen range and oven to determine operation of burners or heating elements excluding microwave ovens and the operation of self-cleaning cycles and appliance timers and thermostats; (2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage; and (3) Garbage disposer.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
12.3.1 - Range/Oven/Cooktop

Filters missing

The recirculated exhaust hood normally has filters that collect grease.

These filters were missing at the time of inspection recommend a qualified person install filters.

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Fireplaces and Fuel-Burning Appliances

IN D
13.1 Maintenance
13.2 Soild Fuel Fireplaces, Stoves & Inserts X
13.3 Chimney Interior & Vent Systems X
Type
Insert
Fireplaces and Solid Fuel Burning Appliances Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the elements and/or systems that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes fireplaces and solid fuel-appliances. Certain areas may not be accessible and because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and (or) systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.


n) When inspecting fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, without testing draft characteristics, excluding fire screens and doors, seals and gaskets, automatic fuel feed devices, mantles and non-structural fireplace surrounds, combustion make-up air devices, or gravity fed and fan assisted heat distribution systems; and ii) Chimneys and combustion vents excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; and 2) Describe: i) Type of fireplaces and/or solid fuel burning appliances; ii) Energy source; and iii) Visible evidence of improper draft characteristics.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
13.1.1 - Maintenance

Maintenance Inspection level 2

As your Home Inspector, safety is a major concern. Defaults in fuel burning systems can cause a house fire or expose the household to deadly carbon monoxide poisoning. I strongly recommend a Level 2 chimney inspection by a qualified individual if you buy a home and are not familiar with the system performance, even if the home inspection does not report on any visible issue.

A Level 2 inspection is an in-depth look at the entire chimney, stove or furnace system and includes a visual inspection of all internal surfaces and joints. It should be done by a qualified individual using a video camera system to look inside the chimney or flue. This allows for a complete top to bottom visual inspection of your system, then a written report will be produced that details all areas that may be of concern

Contractor Qualified Professional