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1234 Main St.
Laurelton NJ 08723
02/15/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
77
Items Inspected
7
Maintenance item
30
Recommendation
11
Safety hazard

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Occupancy
Vacant
Style
Multi-level
Temperature (approximate)
50 Fahrenheit (F)
Type of Building
Condominium
Weather Conditions
Clear, Recent Rain
Elecrticity On/Off
ON
Gas On/Off
ON
Water On/Off
ON
Introduction (PLEASE READ IMPORTANT INFORMATION)

This General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods and home inspectors are trained to identify material defects. Material defects are defined by the NJ Home Inspection Advisory Committee as: a condition, or functional aspect, of a structural component or system that is readily ascertainable during a home inspection that substantially affects the value, habitability or safety of the dwelling, but does not include decorative, stylistic, cosmetic, or aesthetic aspects of the system, structure or component.

The inspector will inspect to the best of his ability but since much of the home is hidden behind coverings, or is buried underground, it is possible that the inspector will not identify all deficiencies due to limitations beyond his control and/or responsibility. Knowing this, the inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and/or systems of the dwelling that are not readily accessible or viewable.

This General Home Inspection is not a confirmation of proper installations and does not determine compliance with codes, regulations and/or ordinances.

Furthermore, this General Home Inspection does not determine the presence of any potentially hazardous plants, animals, diseases, suspected hazardous substances, adverse conditions such as mold, fungus, toxins, carcinogens, noise, or contaminants in the soil, water, and air. This Inspection will not determine the effectiveness of any system installed and/or method utilized to control or remove suspected hazardous substances.

Home Inspectors are required by state law to follow the NJ Standards of Practice. This document can be found in your report and inspection agreement. The standards are the guidelines for what is and is not to be expected of this home inspection.

Special Note For Older Homes

The older the home the less likely it is up to modern standards and codes. 

This home inspection does not determine compliance with codes, regulations and/or ordinances.

Please keep this in mind when reviewing the report.

Home Inspection Contingency Expiration Date

Before the expiration of your Home Inspection Contingency Deadline, the inspector recommends you consult with qualified contractors, persons, or technicians to discuss options and costs of replacements, repairs, or maintenance of the systems or items that are mentioned in this report.

To determine the date that a home inspection contingency should be released, read your purchase contract.  If the contingency expires before you report the inspection findings to the seller, your earnest money deposit may be at risk if you try to cancel the contract based on a defect disclosed in the inspection.


13:40-15.16  NJ STANDARDS OF PRACTICE

 

a) All home inspectors shall comply with the standards of practice contained in this section when conducting home inspections. The scope of home inspection services performed in compliance with the requirements set forth in this section shall provide the client with objective information regarding the condition of the systems and components of the home as determined at the time of the home inspection.

b) Nothing in this section shall be construed to require a home inspector to: 1) Enter any area or perform any procedure which is, in the opinion of the home inspector, unsafe and likely to be dangerous to the inspector or other persons; 2) Enter any area or perform any procedure which will, in the opinion of the home inspector, likely damage the property or its systems or components; 3) Enter any area which does not have at least 24 inches of unobstructed vertical clearance and at least 30 inches of unobstructed horizontal clearance; 4) Identify concealed conditions and latent defects; 5) Determine life expectancy of any system or component; 6) Determine the cause of any condition or deficiency; 7) Determine future conditions that may occur including the failure of systems and components including consequential damage; 8) Determine the operating costs of systems or components; 9) Determine the suitability of the property for any specialized use; 10) Determine compliance with codes, regulations and/ or ordinances; 11) Determine market value of the property or its marketability; 12) Determine advisability of purchase of the property; 13) Determine the presence of any potentially hazardous plants, animals or diseases or the presence of any suspected hazardous substances or adverse conditions such as mold, fungus, toxins, carcinogens, noise, and contaminants in soil, water, and air; 14) Determine the effectiveness of any system installed or method utilized to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; 15) Operate any system or component which is shut down or otherwise inoperable; 16) Operate any system or component which does not respond to normal operating controls; 17) Operate shut-off valves; 18) Determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; 19) Insert any tool, probe or testing device inside electrical panels; 20) Dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of main and sub panels;21) Walk on unfloored sections of attics; and 22) Light pilot flames or ignite or extinguish fires.

c) Home inspectors shall: 1) Inspect the following systems and components in residential buildings and other related residential housing components:  i) Structural components as required by (e) below; ii) Exterior components as required by (f) below; iii) Roofing system components as required by (g) below; iv) Plumbing system components as required by (h) below; v) Electrical system components as required by (i) below; vi) Heating system components as required by (j) below; vii) Cooling system components as required by (k) below; viii) Interior components as required by (l) below; ix) Insulation components and ventilation system as required by (m) below; and x) Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances as required by (n) below; 2) Prepare a home inspection report which shall: i) Disclose those systems and components as set forth in (c)1 above which were present at the time of inspection; ii) Disclose systems and components as set forth in (c)1 above which were present at the time of the home inspection but were not inspected, and the reason(s) they were not inspected; iii) Describe the systems and components specified in these standards of practice; iv) State material defects found in systems or components; v) State the significance of findings where any material defects in the systems and components of (c)1 above were found; and vi) Provide recommendations where material defects were found to repair, replace or monitor a system or component or to obtain examination and analysis by a qualified professional, tradesman, or service technician without determining the methods, materials or cost of corrections; and 3) Retain copies of all home inspection reports prepared pursuant to (c)2 above, for a period of five years upon completion of the report;

d) Subsection (c) above is not intended to limit home inspectors from: 1) Inspecting or reporting observations and conditions observed in systems and components in addition to those required in (c) 1 above and inspecting systems and components other than those mandated for inspection in (c) 1 above as long as the inspection and reporting is based on the licensee's professional opinion, prior work experience, education and training, unless these standards of practice prohibit the home inspector from inspecting such system or component; 2) Contracting with the client to provide, for an additional fee additional inspection services provided the home inspector is educated, trained, certified, registered or licensed, pursuant to the provisions of N.J.A.C. 13:40-15.22 and other applicable statutes and rules; and 3) Excluding systems and components from the inspection if requested in writing by the client.

e) When conducting the inspection of the structural components, the home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Foundation; ii) Floors;  iii) Walls; iv) Ceilings; and v) Roof; 2) Describe: i) Foundation construction type and material; ii) Floor construction type and material; iii) Wall construction type and material; iv) Ceiling construction type and material; and v) Roof construction type and material; 3) Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected unless such probing would damage any finished surface; and 4) Describe in the home inspection report the methods used to inspect under-floor crawl spaces and attics.

f) When conducting the inspection of the exterior components, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Exterior surfaces, excluding shutters, and screening, awnings, and other similar seasonal accessories; ii) Exterior doors excluding storm doors or safety glazing; iii) Windows excluding storm windows and safety glazing; iv) Attached or adjacent decks, balconies, stoops, steps, porches, and their railings; v) Vegetation, grading, drainage, and retaining walls with respect to their immediate detrimental effect on the condition of the residential building, excluding fences, geological and/or soil conditions, sea walls, break-walls, bulkheads and docks, or erosion control and earth stabilization; vi) Attached or adjacent walkways, patios, and driveways; and vii) Garage doors including automatic door openers and entrapment protection mechanisms, excluding remote control devices; and 2) Describe exterior wall surface type and material.

g) When inspecting the roof of a residential building, the home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Roofing surface, excluding antennae and other installed accessories such as solar heating systems, lightning arresters, and satellite dishes; ii) Roof drainage systems; iii) Flashing; iv) Skylights; and v) Exterior of chimneys; 2) Describe: i) Roof surface; ii) Roof drainage systems; iii) Flashing; iv) Skylights; and v) Chimneys; 3) Employ reasonable, practicable and safe methods to inspect the roof such as: i) Walking on the roof; ii) Observation from a ladder at roof level; or iii) Visual examination with binoculars from ground level; and 4) Describe the methods used to inspect the roof.

 

h) When inspecting the plumbing system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Interior water supply and distribution systems including functional water flow and functional drainage, excluding wells, well pumps, well water sampling or water storage related equipment, determination of water supply quantity or quality and water conditioning systems and lawn irrigation systems; ii) All interior fixtures and faucets, excluding shut off valves, wells, well pumps, well water sampling and water storage related equipment; iii) Drain, waste and vent systems; iv) Domestic water heating systems, without operating safety valves or automatic safety controls, and excluding solar water heating systems; v) Combustion vent systems excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; vi) Fuel distribution systems; and  vii) Drainage sumps, sump pumps and related piping; and 2) Describe: i) Predominant interior water supply and distribution piping materials; ii) Predominant drain, waste and vent piping materials; and iii) Water heating equipment including energy sources.

i) When inspecting the electrical system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Service entrance system; ii) Main disconnects, main panel and sub panels, including interior components of main panel and sub panels; iii) Service grounding; iv) Wiring, without measuring amperage, voltage or impedance, excluding any wiring not a part of the primary electrical power distribution system, such as central vacuum systems, remote control devices, telephone or cable system wiring, intercom systems, security systems and low voltage wiring systems; v) Over-current protection devices and the compatibility of their ampacity with that of the connected wiring; vi) At least one of each interior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per room and at least one exterior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per side of house; and vii) Ground fault circuit interrupters; and 2) Describe: i) Amperage and voltage rating of the service; ii) Location of main disconnect, main panels, and sub-panels; iii) Type of over-current protection devices; iv) Predominant type of wiring; v) Presence of knob and tube branch circuit wiring; and vi) Presence of solid conductor aluminum branch circuit wiring.

j) When inspecting the heating system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Installed heating equipment and energy sources, without determining heat supply adequacy or distribution balance, and without operating automatic safety controls or operating heat pumps when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the pumps, and excluding humidifiers, electronic air filters and solar heating systems; ii) Combustion vent systems and chimneys, excluding interiors of flues or chimneys; iii) Fuel storage tanks, excluding propane and underground storage tanks; and iv) Visible and accessible portions of the heat exchanger; and 2) Describe: i) Heating equipment and distribution type; and ii) Energy sources.

k) When inspecting the cooling system, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Central cooling system, excluding electronic air filters and excluding determination of cooling supply adequacy or distribution balance and without operating central cooling equipment when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the cooling equipment; ii) Permanently installed hard-wired, through-wall individual cooling systems; and iii) Energy sources; and 2) Describe: i) Cooling equipment and distribution type; and ii) Energy sources.

l) When inspecting the interior of a residential building, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Walls, ceilings, and floors excluding paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments, carpeting and other non-permanent floor coverings; ii) Steps, stairways, and railings; iii) Installed kitchen wall cabinets to determine if secure;

iv) At least one interior passage door and operate one window per room excluding window treatments; and v) Household appliances limited to: (1) The kitchen range and oven to determine operation of burners or heating elements excluding microwave ovens and the operation of self-cleaning cycles and appliance timers and thermostats; (2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage; and (3) Garbage disposer.

m) When inspecting the insulation components and ventilation system of a residential building, the home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Insulation in unfinished spaces without disturbing insulation; ii) Ventilation of attics and crawlspaces; and iii) Mechanical ventilation systems; and 2) Describe: i) Insulation in unfinished spaces adjacent to heated areas; and ii) Evidence of inadequate attic and crawlspace ventilation. 

n) When inspecting fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, without testing draft characteristics, excluding fire screens and doors, seals and gaskets, automatic fuel feed devices, mantles and non-structural fireplace surrounds, combustion make-up air devices, or gravity fed and fan assisted heat distribution systems; and ii) Chimneys and combustion vents excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; and 2) Describe: i) Type of fireplaces and/or solid fuel burning appliances; ii) Energy source; and iii) Visible evidence of improper draft characteristics.

2 - Roofing

IN D
2.1 Coverings X X
2.2 Roof Drainage Systems X X
2.3 Flashings X X
2.4 Chimney Exterior X X
2.5 Skylights/Lightshafts (Exterior) X X
Inspection Method
Ladder and Walked the Roof
Coverings: Material
Asphalt
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Aluminum
Flashings: Material
Aluminum
Roof Indroduction

The roof inspection portion of the General Home Inspection is a non-invasive, visual evaluation of the roof structure, roof-covering materials, flashing, and roof penetrations such as; chimneys, mounting hardware for roof-mounted equipment, attic ventilation devices, ducts, and combustion/plumbing vents. Due to its non-invasive nature, limitations of viewable portions, and variations in installation requirements of a large number of different roof-covering materials installed over the years, the home inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified roofing contractor. Home Inspectors are trained to identify common deficiencies and to recognize conditions that could require evaluation by a specialist. This roof portion of the home inspection does not include; leak-testing, certification or warranty of the roof against concealed and/or future leakage, or confirmation of proper installation of systems. Other limitations may apply and will be included in the comments as necessary.

g) When inspecting the roof of a residential building, the home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Roofing surface, excluding antennae and other installed accessories such as solar heating systems, lightning arresters, and satellite dishes; ii) Roof drainage systems; iii) Flashing; iv) Skylights; and v) Exterior of chimneys;

2) Describe: i) Roof surface; ii) Roof drainage systems; iii) Flashing; iv) Skylights; and v) Chimneys;

3) Employ reasonable, practicable and safe methods to inspect the roof such as: i) Walking on the roof; ii) Observation from a ladder at roof level; or iii) Visual examination with binoculars from ground level; and

4) Describe the methods used to inspect the roof.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Coverings

Exposed Nails

Under-driven or exposed nails were found in one or more roof coverings. Recommend a qualified person caulk with roofing mastic.

Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Coverings

Cracked/Broken/Buckled/Missing

The roof had one or more cracked/broken/buckled/missing shingle/s. Recommend a qualified roof contractor repair or replace to prevent moisture intrusion. 

Credit
Comment
2.1.3 - Coverings

Moderate Roof deterioration with deficiencies

At the time of the inspection, asphalt composition shingles covering the roof exhibited moderate general deterioration commensurate with the age of the roof.

The inspector recommends budgeting for and replacing the roof coverings as soon as possible.

 The inspector also recommends if the roof is not replaced immediately, to repair any roof deficiencies listed, so any near future deterioration will be limited until a new roof covering is installed.



Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Debris

Debris has accumulated in the gutters. Recommend cleaning to facilitate water flow.

Here is a DIY resource for cleaning your gutters. 

Credit
Comment
2.2.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Gutter Damaged

In some areas, the gutters were damaged and the aluminum nails holding the gutter were backing out in others. This can result in excessive moisture in the soil at the foundation, which can lead to foundation/structural movement. 

Recommend a qualified contractor evaluate and repair.

Credit
Comment
2.3.1 - Flashings

Missing

Flashings were missing in one area. Flashings provide protection against moisture intrusion. 

Recommend a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and remedy. 

Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Chimney Exterior

Chimney Crown Missing

No chimney crown was observed. This is important to protect from moisture intrusion and protect the chimney. 

Recommend a qualified roofer or chimney expert install.

Credit
Comment
2.4.2 - Chimney Exterior

Chimney Masonry Paint/Stucco Deteriorated

The Chimney masonry paint/stucco showed signs of being deteriorated. To extend the lifespan of the chimney and to ensure that safe conditions exist, the Inspector recommends evaluation and any necessary work be performed by a qualified masonry contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - Skylights/Lightshafts (Exterior)

Caulking Deteriorated

Caulking around the skylights flashing showed signs of deterioration

If the roof is not replaced immediately recommend re-caulking by a qualified person to reduce the chances of leakage.. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

3 - Exterior

IN D
3.1 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X
3.2 Siding, Flashing & Trim X X
3.3 Main Entry Door X
3.4 Exterior Doors/Slider X X
3.5 Decks, Balconies, Porches, and Steps X X
3.6 Walkways, Patios & Driveways X X
3.7 Vegetation, Grading, & Drainage X X
3.8 Garage Door X X
Inspection Method
Visual
Siding, Flashing & Trim : Siding Material
Vinyl, Brick Veneer
Main Entry Door: Main Entry Door
Steel
Exterior Doors/Slider : Exterior Doors/Slider 1
Glass, Steel
Decks, Balconies, Porches, and Steps : Appurtenance
Covered Porch
Decks, Balconies, Porches, and Steps : Material
Concrete, Wood, Brick
Walkways, Patios & Driveways : Driveway Material
Concrete, Brick pavers
Walkways, Patios & Driveways : Patio Material
Brick, Concrete, Pavers
Walkways, Patios & Driveways : Walkway Material
Brick, Concrete
Garage Door: Material
Metal
Garage Door: Type
Automatic
Exterior Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes the inspection of the homes exterior elements and systems that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes the foundation, exterior walls, floor structures, and roof structures. Much of the homes exterior components are hidden behind the roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or is buried underground. Certain areas will not be accessible or visible and because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of, portions and/or systems not readily accessible or viewable.

.


f) When conducting the inspection of the exterior components, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Exterior surfaces, excluding shutters, and screening, awnings, and other similar seasonal accessories; ii) Exterior doors excluding storm doors or safety glazing; iii) Windows excluding storm windows and safety glazing; iv) Attached or adjacent decks, balconies, stoops, steps, porches, and their railings; v) Vegetation, grading, drainage, and retaining walls with respect to their immediate detrimental effect on the condition of the residential building, excluding fences, geological and/or soil conditions, sea walls, break-walls, bulkheads and docks, or erosion control and earth stabilization; vi) Attached or adjacent walkways, patios, and driveways; and vii) Garage doors including automatic door openers and entrapment protection mechanisms, excluding remote control devices; and

2) Describe exterior wall surface type and material.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Weep Holes Missing

Weep holes were not apparent on the brick or stone veneer siding. 

Weep holes are small holes in the base of a brick or stone veneer walls, they are exit points for humidity that has permeated into the walls.

Excessive humidity can deteriorate prematurely the wall structure. 

Recommended qualified siding contractor evaluate and correct.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Caulking deteriorations

Caulkings around the exterior showed signs of deterioration.  These caulkings keep water from entering the wall cavities.  

Recommend assessment of all caulkings and re-caulking where needed by a qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Exterior Doors/Slider

Slider tracks debris

The tracks of the sliding door had debris accumulating.

Recommend cleaning of track and weep holes to prevent any water from entering the home.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches, and Steps

Post Deteriorated

The base of the post holding up the front porch was rotted due to contact with the mulch pile.

Recommend a qualified person repair the post and make the necessary corrections to keep the mulch from covering the post.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

(Walkway) Trip hazard

Trip hazards (vertical difference of 3/8 or higher) in the (walkway) appeared to be the result of the expansion or contraction (heaving or settling) of the underlying soil. For safety reasons and at a minimum, I highly recommend beveling the edge to a slope no steeper than a 1:2 ratio. Recommend a complete evaluation by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.6.2 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

General settlement and heaving

The driveway and walkways showed signs of settlement and heaving.

This is a common occurrence.

The inspector recommends a qualified contractor assess and make any repairs as deemed necessary.

Also recommend at minimum if nothing else is done,  to caulk any cracks or openings with a masonry caulk to limit the process of further deterioration. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.6.3 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Brick Paver Deterioration

Bricks were used as pavers in the front of the house and show signs of deterioration. 

Most notably the mortar joints.

Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Vegetation, Grading, & Drainage

Trees near dwelling

Trees were observed within 10 ft of the dwelling. Trees should be more than 10ft from a home. The tree's root system can put pressure on the foundation, and exposed roots can be a trip hazard. Recommend evaluation and correction by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.8.1 - Garage Door

Auto Reverse Sensor Not Working

The auto reverse sensor was not responding or not adjusted correctly at time of inspection. This is a safety hazard to children and pets. 

Recommend a qualified garage door contractor evaluate and repair/replace. 

Note: The Auto Reverse Sensor is in addition and not the Motion Detector

Credit
Comment
3.8.2 - Garage Door

Missing Saftey Cables

Installing garage door safety cables can help reduce the risk of damage and serious injury should a garage door spring break when it is under pressure. The garage door safety cable will prevent the spring from flying across the garage if it breaks. If a spring breaks it is usually when it is under pressure, and that is when it is most dangerous. 

Recommend installation of safety cables by a qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Structural Components

IN D
4.1 Foundation, Basement & Crawlspaces X
4.2 Floor Structure X
4.3 Wall Structure X
4.4 Ceiling Structure X
4.5 Roof Structure & Attic X X
Inspection Methods
Attic Access, Visual
Foundation, Basement & Crawlspaces: Foundation system(s)
slab
Foundation, Basement & Crawlspaces: Material(s)
Concrete, Masonry Block
Floor Structure: Material Floor structures
Concrete, Wood Joists
Floor Structure: Material Sub-floors
Unknown
Wall Structure: Material
Unknown
Ceiling Structure: Material
Wood
Roof Structure & Attic: Material
Wood trusses
Roof Structure & Attic: Type
Gable
Structural Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the home structural elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes the foundation, exterior walls, floor structures, and roof structure. Much of the home structure is hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings or is buried underground.  Since certain areas will not be accessible and the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all structural deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that structural problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of, portions and (or) systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.

e) When conducting the inspection of the structural components, the home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Foundation; ii) Floors; iii) Walls; iv) Ceilings; and v) Roof;

2) Describe: i) Foundation construction type and material; ii) Floor construction type and material; iii) Wall construction type and material; iv) Ceiling construction type and material; and v) Roof construction type and material;

3) Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected unless such probing would damage any finished surface; and

4) Describe in the home inspection report the methods used to inspect under-floor crawl spaces and attics.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Roof Structure & Attic

Sheathing damage

The sheathing showed visible signs of damage near the firewalls separating the dwelling units.

The sheathing near the dormers also seemed to be weak and soft when the inspector was walking on the roof.

A unit nearby was being re-roofed and the workers were asked by the inspector if they were aware of similar problems on the unit that they were working on. 

They said that the fire rated plywood deteriorates much more rapidly than normal plywood and that the plywood found in areas that are covering vaulted ceilings are prone to deterioration from lack of ventilation.

These conclusions seem consistent with what was observed.

The inspector recommends qualified contractor asses the situation and repair as necessary.




Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.5.2 - Roof Structure & Attic

Missing reinforcements

It appears at the time of the construction certain trusses were installed to facilitate the possibility of dormers or eventual skylights.

They usually need extra supports added if no opening is made.

It appears the extra supports may be installed incorrectly and missing altogether in some areas.

Recommend a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as nessisary

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Insulation and Ventilation

IN D
5.1 Limitations to confirm presence of insulation X
5.2 Attic Insulation X X
5.3 Floor Insulation X
5.4 Wall Insulation X
5.5 Ventilation X X
5.6 Exhaust Systems Bathroom X
5.7 Exhaust Systems Dryer X X
Dryer Power Source
220 Electric
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Fiberglass
Floor Insulation: Insulation Type
Unknown
Wall Insulation: Insulation Type
unknown
Ventilation : Ventilation Type
Ridge Vents, Thermostatically Controlled Fan
Exhaust Systems Bathroom: Exhaust Fans
Fan with Light
Exhaust Systems Dryer: Dryer Vent
Metal
Insulation and Ventilation Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the elements and/or systems that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes insulation and ventilation systems, which are often hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings or buried underground. Certain areas will not be accessible and because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist which are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and/or systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.

m) When inspecting the insulation components and ventilation system of a residential building, the home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Insulation in unfinished spaces without disturbing insulation; ii) Ventilation of attics and crawlspaces; and iii) Mechanical ventilation systems; and 2) Describe: i) Insulation in unfinished spaces adjacent to heated areas; and ii) Evidence of inadequate attic and crawlspace ventilation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Limitations to confirm presence of insulation

Suggested Energy Audit

Since a home inspection is non-invasive, it is impossible to verify the presence of insulation without opening closed cavities, and much of the system is concealed.

 If the client desires to know the dwellings insulation/ventilation systems values and/or performance, the home inspector recommends a comprehensive evaluation by qualified energy consultant/technician.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Attic Insulation

Displaced insulation

Insulation in one or more areas has been displaced.

This will lead to additional energy consumption.

Recommend a qualified contractor install insulation where needed.  

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.2.2 - Attic Insulation

Non insulated attic access

The attic access trap was not insulated. To reduce heat loss through this area, recommend installing an insulated access panel.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.5.1 - Ventilation

Attic Ventilation Insufficient

Attic venting seemed insufficient at the time of inspection. 

Modern standards recommend 1.5 square feet of venting area for every 300 square feet of attic floor space. 

Evidence of past condensation was visible in areas. (water stained wood)

The sheathing appeared to be deteriorated in areas where the ceiling is vaulted. (More than likely due to insufficient and/or no ventilation in these areas.)

Baffles, which permit air to flow above the insulation were missing in certain areas.

A new attic vent fan appeared to be installed recently and seems to have helped reduce the general humidity since no excessive humidity was measured in the wood sheathing at the time of inspection.

Nonetheless, recommend a qualified contractor evaluate and remedy.

Credit
Comment
5.7.1 - Exhaust Systems Dryer

Ducts loose

Excessive lint was found around the dryer, this could be a result of loose ductwork or clogged ductwork.

Fires from unkept dryer vents are a major cause of household fires.

Recommend a qualified person evaluate repair and clean ductwork as necessary.

6 - Air Conditioning

IN D
6.1 Cooling Equipment System 1 X X
6.2 Distribution System 1 X
Cooling Equipment System 1: Brand
York
Cooling Equipment System 1: Energy Source
Electric
Cooling Equipment System 1: Type
Split system
Distribution System 1: Distrabution
Duct (non observable)
Air Conditioning Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the cooling systems and elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. Some of the cooling components and systems are hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or buried underground so certain areas will not be accessible. Since the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for the inspection of portions, and/or systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.


Cooling Equipment System 1: Low Temperature

The A/C unit was not tested due to low outdoor temperature. If operated under tempartures below 65 degrees this could cause damage to the unit.

k) When inspecting the cooling system, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Central cooling system, excluding electronic air filters and excluding determination of cooling supply adequacy or distribution balance and without operating central cooling equipment when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the cooling equipment; ii) Permanently installed hard-wired, through-wall individual cooling systems; and iii) Energy sources; and 2) Describe: i) Cooling equipment and distribution type; and ii) Energy sources.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Cooling Equipment System 1

Needs Servicing/Cleaning

A/C system should be cleaned and serviced annually. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean, service and certify.

Credit
Comment
6.1.2 - Cooling Equipment System 1

Condenser unit not elevated

The pad supporting the outdoor condensing unit was not elevated enough above the ground level.

This is causing accelerated deterioration of the component. 

Recommend a competent person excavate around the pad so the unit is not in contact with dirt, leaves, or debris.

7 - Electrical

IN D
7.1 Maintenance X
7.2 Service Entrance Conductors X
7.3 Main Disconnect/Panel X X
7.4 Branch Circuit Conductors X X
7.5 Connected Devices and Fixtures X
7.6 Polarity and Grounding of Receptacles X
7.7 GFCI
7.8 Exterior Electrical X
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Below Ground
Main Disconnect/Panel: Panel Locations
Garage
Main Disconnect/Panel: Service Wire Material
Aluminium
Main Disconnect/Panel: Service Voltage Ratings (nominal)
240v
Main Disconnect/Panel: Panel Capacity Amperage
Unknown
Main Disconnect/Panel: Panel Manufacturer
General Electric
Main Disconnect/Panel: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Branch Circuit Conductors: Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper
Branch Circuit Conductors: Wiring Method
Conduit, Non metalic sheathing PVC (romex), Metal-Armored Bx
Electrical Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the electrical systems and elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. Much of the electrical components and systems are hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or are buried underground. Certain areas may not be accessible and since the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures.

Due to its non-invasive nature, limitations of viewable portions, and variations in installation requirements of the huge number components and materials installed over the years, and that this home inspection is not a confirmation of proper installation of systems. 

i) When inspecting the electrical system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Service entrance system; ii) Main disconnects, main panel and sub panels, including interior components of main panel and sub panels; iii) Service grounding; iv) Wiring, without measuring amperage, voltage or impedance, excluding any wiring not a part of the primary electrical power distribution system, such as central vacuum systems, remote control devices, telephone or cable system wiring, intercom systems, security systems and low voltage wiring systems; v) Over-current protection devices and the compatibility of their ampacity with that of the connected wiring; vi) At least one of each interior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per room and at least one exterior installed lighting fixture, switch, and receptacle per side of house; and vii) Ground fault circuit interrupters; and 2) Describe: i) Amperage and voltage rating of the service; ii) Location of main disconnect, main panels, and sub-panels; iii) Type of over-current protection devices; iv) Predominant type of wiring; v) Presence of knob and tube branch circuit wiring; and vi) Presence of solid conductor aluminum branch circuit wiring.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Maintenance

Periodic Maintenance

Due to its non-invasive nature, limitations of viewable portions, and variations in installation requirements of the huge number components and materials installed over the years, and that this home inspection is not a confirmation of proper installation of systems. The home inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified electrical contractor.

As your Home Inspector, safety is one of my primary concerns. Since defaults in electrical systems are a major safety issue, I strongly advise to follow the Electrical Safety Foundations recommendation, In any of the following situations a licensed electrician should perform a comprehensive electrical inspection: When purchasing a home , When a home is 40 years or older, If an appliance has been added, and When a home has had a major renovation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Main Disconnect/Panel

Rust in Panel

Corrosion was observed in the panel. Moisture can deteriorate the electrical equipment. This is a fire hazard. 

Recommend that a licensed electrician inspect and repair as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.4.1 - Branch Circuit Conductors

Improper Wiring (Support)

Improper wiring (wires and electrical boxes not supported or attached correctly) was observed at the time of inspection in the attic. This can be a shock hazard. Recommend a licensed electrician evaluate the whole house and make necessary repairs. 

Credit
Comment
7.7.1 - GFCI

No GFCI Protection Installed

No GFCI protection present in the kitchen.

Recommend licensed electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles in all places required by current standards.

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. 

8 - Heating

IN D
8.1 Heating Equipment System 1 X
8.2 Heat Distribution System 1 X
8.3 Vent Connectors System1 X
Heating Equipment System 1: Heat - System
Hot Air Furnace
Heating Equipment System 1: Brand
York
Heating Equipment System 1: Energy Source
Gas
Heating Equipment System 1: Filter Type
Disposable
Heat Distribution System 1: Distrabution
Duct (Non observable)
Heating Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the heating systems and elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. Some of the heating components and systems are hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or are buried underground. Certain areas may not be accessible and because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist which are not readily visible, the Inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and (or) systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.


j) When inspecting the heating system, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Installed heating equipment and energy sources, without determining heat supply adequacy or distribution balance, and without operating automatic safety controls or operating heat pumps when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause damage to the pumps, and excluding humidifiers, electronic air filters and solar heating systems; ii) Combustion vent systems and chimneys, excluding interiors of flues or chimneys; iii) Fuel storage tanks, excluding propane and underground storage tanks; and iv) Visible and accessible portions of the heat exchanger; and 2) Describe: i) Heating equipment and distribution type; and ii) Energy sources.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Heating Equipment System 1

Needs Servicing/Cleaning

Furnace should be cleaned and serviced annually. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean, service and certify furnace.

Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

Credit
Comment
8.1.2 - Heating Equipment System 1

Slight odor of gas

At the time of inspection, there was a slight odor of gas in the utility room.

This could be a safety issue.

I strongly recommend informing as soon as possible the owner of the property to have a competent contractor or the local utility company inspect and take necessary actions to remediate the problem.


Contractor Qualified Professional

9 - Plumbing

IN D
9.1 Water Ditrabution System X
9.2 Fuel Storage & Fuel Distribution Systems X
9.3 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
9.4 Fixtures / Faucets X X
9.5 Water Heater X
9.6 Vent Connectors X
9.7 Exterior Plumbing X
Main Fuel Shut-Off (Location)
Exterior
Main Water Shut-Off Device (Location)
Main Level
Water Ditrabution System: Material - Water Distribution
Copper
Water Ditrabution System: Material - Maine Water Supply Pipe
Copper



Water Ditrabution System: Source
Public
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems : Material
PVC
Water Heater: Location
Utility Room
Water Heater: Manufacturer
Bradford & White
Water Heater: Power Source
Gas
Plumbing Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the plumbing systems and elements that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. Most of the plumbing is hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or buried underground so certain areas may not be accessible. The General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods and this report may not identify all deficiencies. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist which are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. Also, because of variations in installation requirements of a large number of different plumbing materials installed over the years, the plumbing portion of the general home inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified plumbing contractor. This portion does not include confirmation of proper installation or current code compliance. This plumbing inspection does not include leak-testing and will not certify or warranty against concealed, and/or future leakage. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and/or systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable. Other limitations may apply and will be included in the comments as necessary.


h) When inspecting the plumbing system, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect:i) Interior water supply and distribution systems including functional water flow and functional drainage, excluding wells, well pumps, well water sampling or water storage related equipment, determination of water supply quantity or quality and water conditioning systems and lawn irrigation systems; ii) All interior fixtures and faucets, excluding shut off valves, wells, well pumps, well water sampling and water storage related equipment; iii) Drain, waste and vent systems; iv) Domestic water heating systems, without operating safety valves or automatic safety controls, and excluding solar water heating systems; v) Combustion vent systems excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; vi) Fuel distribution systems; and vii) Drainage sumps, sump pumps and related piping; and

2) Describe: i) Predominant interior water supply and distribution piping materials; ii) Predominant drain, waste and vent piping materials; and iii) Water heating equipment including energy sources.


  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Fixtures / Faucets

BathTub needs caulking

The caulkings in the bathroom tubs second-floor main bathroom and master bathroom are deteriorated.

To prevent water from entering the wall cavity, recommend recaulking by a qualified person

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.4.2 - Fixtures / Faucets

Toilet not secured well

The toilet in the main bathroom 2nd floor was not secured well and have a little movement. Recommend a qualified plumber secure the toilet

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.5.1 - Water Heater

Annual Maintenance Flush Needed

Water heaters should be flushed annually to prevent sediment buildup and maintain efficiency. Recommend a qualified plumber service and flush. 

Here is a DIY link to help

10 - Interiors

IN D
10.1 Walls X X
10.2 Ceilings X
10.3 Floors X X
10.4 Steps, Stairways & Railings X X
10.5 Doors X X
10.6 Windows X
10.7 Skylights/Lightshafts (Interiors) X
10.8 Bathroom cabinets X
Walls: Wall Material
Drywall
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Gypsum Board
Floors: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Laminate, Tile, Vinyl
Interiors Indroduction

The General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods.  The inspector will inspect to the best of his ability, but it is possible that this report may not identify all deficiencies since much of the homes interior components are hidden behind floors, walls, and ceiling coverings. Upon observing indicators that problems may exist which are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and (or) systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.

l) When inspecting the interior of a residential building, a home inspector shall: 

1) Inspect: i) Walls, ceilings, and floors excluding paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments, carpeting and other non-permanent floor coverings; ii) Steps, stairways, and railings; iii) Installed kitchen wall cabinets to determine if secure; iv) At least one interior passage door and operate one window per room excluding window treatments; and v) Household appliances limited to: (1) The kitchen range and oven to determine operation of burners or heating elements excluding microwave ovens and the operation of self-cleaning cycles and appliance timers and thermostats; (2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage; and (3) Garbage disposer.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - Walls

Sheetrock Crack
Common area 3rd floor

A crack along sheetrock seams in the wall was visible at the time of the inspection.

This problem is often reoccurring and very common when sheetrock is fixed directly to wood framing members.

Recommend repair by a qualified contractor

Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Floors

Tiles cracked
Master Bathroom

The floor tiles in the bathroom had cracks. 

Recommend repair by a qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.3.2 - Floors

Missing flooring

Laminate flooring was missing in the broom closet (kitchen)

Recommend installation by a qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Baluster Spaces Too Wide

The baluster space is not up to modern safety standards. The space between balusters should not allow passage of a 4 inch sphere for child safety. Recommend a qualified contractor repair and bring up to current standards. 

Credit
Comment
10.4.2 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Loose Post

A stair case post was becoming loose. This could eventually pose a safety hazard. 

Recommend a qualified handyman evaluate and repair. 

Credit
Comment
10.5.1 - Doors

Bi-fold door needs adjustment
Main Bathroom 2nd Floor

Bi-fold door was not operating correctly and needs adjustments by a competent person.


Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.5.2 - Doors

Doorknob loose

The door to the attic area had a doorknob that was loose and needs to be tightened by a qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional

11 - Built-in Appliances / Kitchen

IN D
11.1 Dishwasher X
11.2 Refrigerator X
11.3 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
11.4 Countertops & Cabinets X X
11.5 Garbage Disposal X
11.6 Built-in Microwave X
Dishwasher: Brand
GE
Refrigerator: Brand
GE
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
GE
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Electric
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Granite


 

l) When inspecting the interior of a residential building, a home inspector shall:

 1) Inspect: i) Walls, ceilings, and floors excluding paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments, carpeting and other non-permanent floor coverings; ii) Steps, stairways, and railings; iii) Installed kitchen wall cabinets to determine if secure; iv) At least one interior passage door and operate one window per room excluding window treatments; and v) Household appliances limited to: (1) The kitchen range and oven to determine operation of burners or heating elements excluding microwave ovens and the operation of self-cleaning cycles and appliance timers and thermostats; (2) Dishwasher to determine water supply and drainage; and (3) Garbage disposer.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Countertops & Cabinets

Cabinet Hinges Loose

Approximately 40% of the cabinet hinges were loose.

 Recommend a qualified handyman or cabinet contractor repair any loose hinges.

Here is a helpful DIY article on cabinet repairs.

12 - Fireplaces and Solid Fuel-Burning Appliances

IN D
12.1 Maintenance X
12.2 Soild Fuel Fireplaces, Stoves & Inserts X
12.3 Chimney Interior & Vent Systems X
Type
Wood
Fireplaces and Solid Fuel Burning Appliances Introduction

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the elements and/or systems that were readily accessible and visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes fireplaces and solid fuel-appliances. Certain areas may not be accessible and because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all deficiencies. The Inspector disclaims responsibility for inspection of portions, and (or) systems of the dwelling not readily accessible or viewable.


n) When inspecting fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, a home inspector shall: 1) Inspect: i) Fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances, without testing draft characteristics, excluding fire screens and doors, seals and gaskets, automatic fuel feed devices, mantles and non-structural fireplace surrounds, combustion make-up air devices, or gravity fed and fan assisted heat distribution systems; and ii) Chimneys and combustion vents excluding interiors of flues and chimneys; and 2) Describe: i) Type of fireplaces and/or solid fuel burning appliances; ii) Energy source; and iii) Visible evidence of improper draft characteristics.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Maintenance

Periodic Maintenance

As your Home Inspector, safety is a major concern. Defaults in fuel burning systems can cause a house fire or expose the household to deadly carbon monoxide poisoning. I strongly recommend a Level 2 chimney inspection by a qualified individual if you buy a home and are not familiar with the system performance, even if the home inspection does not report on any visible issue.

A Level 2 inspection is an in-depth look at the entire chimney, stove or furnace system and includes a visual inspection of all internal surfaces and joints. It should be done by a qualified individual using a video camera system to look inside the chimney or flue. This allows for a complete top to bottom visual inspection of your system, then a written report will be produced that details all areas that may be of concern

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13 - Garage (Fire Containment)

IN D
13.1 Recommended Update X
13.2 Walls & Ceilings X
13.3 Ducts X
13.4 Floors X
13.5 Doors X
Fire Containment Introduction

This section (Garage /Fire Containment) does not determine complete compliance with codes, regulations and/or ordinances, but for safety reasons, it may make recommendations from observations that might indicate a need to consider updating the existing condition to meet current fire barrier requirements.

Please keep this in mind when reviewing this section.

This section (Garage /Fire Containment) does not determine complete compliance with codes, regulations and/or ordinances, but for safety reasons, it may make recommendations from observations that might indicate a need to consider updating the existing condition to meet current fire barrier requirements.

  • IN = Inspected
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
13.1.1 - Recommended Update

Consider update

Fires that begin in garages which are physically attached to a house can spread to living areas. For this reason, combined with the multitude of flammable materials commonly found in garages, attached garages should be adequately sealed from living areas. A properly sealed attached garage will ideally restrict the potential spread of fire long enough to allow the occupants time to escape the home or building.

Link for additional info: https://www.nachi.org/attached-garage-fire-hazards.htm

The older the home the less likely it is up to modern fire standards and codes. This section (Garage /Fire Containment) does not determine complete compliance with codes, regulations and/or ordinances. In light of the information provided and possible concerns about fire safety, the inspector recommends to consider a comprehensive evaluation by a qualified contractor and updating any existing condition(s) that does(do) not meet current fire barrier requirements for garages.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
13.5.1 - Doors

Door (Fire Containment)


The Fire door in the Garage appeared not to meet the following standards and/or recommendations.

R309.1 Opening Penetration

Openings from a private garage directly into a room used for sleeping purposes shall not be permitted. Other openings between the garage and the residence shall be equipped with solid wood doors not less than 1-3/8 (35 mm) in thickness, solid- or honeycomb-core steel doors not less than 1-3/8 (35 mm) thick, or 20-minute fire-rated doors.

  • While not required by the IRC, it is helpful if there is at least one step leading up to the door from the garage. Gasoline fumes and other explosive gases are heavier than air, and they will accumulate at ground level. Their entry beneath a door will be slowed by an elevation increase.
  • Doors should have tight seals around their joints to prevent seepage of fumes into the living areas of the house. Carbon monoxide, with the same approximate density as air (and often warmer than surrounding air), will easily rise above the base of an elevated door and leak through unsealed joints.
  • Doors should be self-closing. Many homeowners find these doors inconvenient, but they are safer than doors that can be left ajar. While this requirement is no longer listed in the IRC, it is still a valuable recommendation.
  • If doors have windows, the glass should be fire-rated.
  • Pet doors should not be installed in fire-rated doors. Pet doors will violate the integrity of a fire barrier. 


Link for more info: https://www.nachi.org/attached-garage-fire-hazards.htm

Although this may not have been required at the time the home was originally constructed, as general knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time, building standards have changed to reflect current understanding. For safety reasons, consider updating the existing condition to meet current fire barrier requirements.

Recommend evaluation and corrective actions by a qualified contractor.

 

Contractor Qualified Professional