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6
Maintenance items/fyi/minor defects
43
Maintenance recommendations, items to monitor, further evaluation recommended
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In need of immediate attention or repair or saftey concern

1 - Information

General: Time In
10:00 A.M.
General: Tme Out
5:00 P.M.
General: Temperature
90°F
General: Weather Conditions
Clear
General: Heading
North
General: Occupancy
Vacant
General: In Attendance
Buyer, Buyers Agent
General: Inspections Provided by this Inspector
Home Inspection, Wood Destroying Insect Inspection, Sprinkler Inspection, Thermal Imaging Inspection, Foundation Evaluation
General: Type of Building
Single Family
General: Additional Information

THIS REPORT IS PAID AND PREPARED FOR THE PERSONAL, PRIVATE AND EXCLUSIVE USE BYAlex Touma & Lavina Touma THIS IS A COPYRIGHTED REPORT AND IS NOT VALID WITHOUT THE SIGNED INSPECTION AGREEMENT ATTACHED. THIS REPORT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE FROM THE CLIENT NAMED ABOVE.

This report contains representative pictures of certain deficiencies (not every area of deficiency) identified during the inspection. Additional photos, if any, can be viewed at the end of this report located in the PHOTO SUMMARY section,

Whenever a defect and/or deficiency of any kind is noted in a system and/or any part and/or item of this structure, we recommend that a properly licensed/certified specialist/technician to inspect, repair and/or service the entire system or part.  Sometimes noted defects and/or deficiencies are symptoms of other and sometimes more serious conditions and/or defects. 

It is also recommended that the buyer walks through the property the day before closing to assure conditions have not changed since inspection.

All  areas of the home that are talked about in the report are oriented from the prospective of looking at the home from the front facing the home.

Do look through the report because technology is a wonderful thing and there may be areas where there is a box that has not been checked that we thought was checked or a box that is checked that shouldn't be. Also if a comment is used and it just doesn't make sense PLEASE give us a call and we will go through the report and answer these questions and revise the report. We are human and try to make as little mistakes as possible but then again we are human and we want to make sure that everything is professional and worded properly so again don't hesitate to question anything that doesn't seem right because that just helps us stay accountable. We appreciate our clients and we want feed back because that helps us get better at our jobs that we do.


SCOPE OF INSPECTION

These standards of practice define the minimum levels of inspection required for substantially completed residential improvements to real property up to four dwelling units.  A real estate inspection is a non-technically exhaustive, limited visual survey and basic performance evaluation of the systems and components of a building using normal controls and does not require the use of specialized equipment or procedures.  The purpose of the inspection is to provide the client with information regarding the general condition of the residence at the time of inspection.  The inspector may provide a higher level of inspection performance than required by these standards of practice and may inspect components and systems in addition to those described by the standards of practice. 

GENERAL LIMITATIONS

The inspector is not required to:
(A) inspect:
(i) items other than those listed within these standards of practice;
(ii) elevators;
(iii) detached buildings, decks, docks, fences, or waterfront structures or equipment;
(iv) anything buried, hidden, latent, or concealed;
(v) sub-surface drainage systems;
(vi) automated or programmable control systems, automatic shut-off, photoelectric sensors, timers, clocks, metering devices, signal lights, lightning arrestor system, remote controls, security or data distribution systems, solar panels or smart home automation components; or
(vii) concrete flatwork such as; driveways, sidewalks, walkways, paving stones or patios;
(B) report:
(i) past repairs that appear to be effective and workmanlike except as specifically required by these standards;
(ii) cosmetic or aesthetic conditions; or
(iii) wear and tear from ordinary use;
(C) determine:
(i) insurability, warrantability, suitability, adequacy, compatibility, capacity, reliability, marketability, operating costs, recalls, counterfeit products, product lawsuits, life expectancy, age, energy efficiency, vapor barriers, thermostatic performance, compliance with any code, listing, testing or protocol authority, utility sources, or manufacturer or regulatory requirements except as specifically required by these standards;
(ii) the presence or absence of pests, termites, or other wood-destroying insects or organisms;
(iii) the presence, absence, or risk of asbestos, lead-based paint, mold, mildew,  corrosive or contaminated drywall Chinese Drywall or any other environmental hazard, environmental pathogen, carcinogen, toxin, mycotoxins, pollutant, fungal presence or activity, or poison;
(iv) types of wood or preservative treatment and fastener compatibility; or
(v) the cause or source of a conditions;
(D) anticipate future events or conditions, including but not limited to:
(i) decay, deterioration, or damage that may occur after the inspection;
(ii) deficiencies from abuse, misuse or lack of use;
(iii) changes in performance of any component or system due to changes in use or occupancy;
(iv) the consequences of the inspection or its effects on current or future buyers and sellers;
(v) common household accidents, personal injury, or death;
(vi) the presence of water penetrations; or
(vii) future performance of any item;
(E) operate shut-off, safety, stop, pressure or pressure-regulating valves or items requiring the use of codes, keys, combinations, or similar devices;
(F) designate conditions as safe;
(G) recommend or provide engineering, architectural, appraisal, mitigation, physical surveying, realty, or other specialist services;
(H) review historical records, installation instructions, repair plans, cost estimates, disclosure documents, or other reports;
(I) verify sizing, efficiency, or adequacy of the ground surface drainage system;
(J) verify sizing, efficiency, or adequacy of the gutter and downspout system;
(K) operate recirculation or sump pumps;
(L) remedy conditions preventing inspection of any item;
(M) apply open flame or light a pilot to operate any appliance;
(N) turn on decommissioned equipment, systems or utility services; or
(O) provide repair cost estimates, recommendations, or re-inspection services.

The Client, by accepting this Property Inspection Report or relying upon it in any way, expressly agrees to the SCOPE OF INSPECTION, GENERAL LIMITATIONS and INSPECTION AGREEMENT included in this inspection report.
This inspection report is made for the sole purpose of assisting the purchaser to determine his and/or her own opinion of feasibility of purchasing the inspected property and does not warrant or guarantee all defects to be found.  If you have any questions or are unclear regarding our findings, please call our office prior to the expiration of any time limitations such as option periods.  
This report contains technical information.  If you were not present during this inspection, please call the office to arrange for a consultation with your inspector.  If you choose not to consult with the inspector, this inspection company cannot be held liable for your understanding or misunderstanding of the reports content. Also it is important that you read through the report! If we are driving down the road giving you the highlights there may be some thing that we did not say due to being preoccupied with driving and it will be in the report so please read the report so that you get an understanding or everything that was found.
This report is not intended to be used for determining insurability or warrantability of the structure and may not conform to the Texas Department of Insurance guidelines for property insurability.  This report is not to be used by or for any property and/or home warranty company.
The digital pictures in this report are a sample of the damages in place and should not be considered to show all of the damages and/or deficiencies found.  There will be some damage and/or deficiencies not represented with digital imaging. It is important to read the full report to gain the most knowledge that you can about the home. When one or two like deficiencies are found they will be listed, when three to six or more  like deficiencies are found the term various or multiple will be used .  This eliminates the exhaustive reporting of like defects. Also look at the Pictures of this report the majority will be labeled unless on the roof, in the attic, or crawlspace as to where the  area in question is located. in the HTML version of the report at the bottom of the photo there will be a "conversation bubble" when you hover over that box it will tell you the location or just open the picture and it will be listed below the photo. In the PDF Version the photos are labeled, I have noticed that there are times where the PDF does not have the label below it as it was written in the HTML. 


This report is lengthy due to the current inspection standards that are required by T.R.E.C. to be applied regardless of a home's age. There will also be many areas in this report that will be marked deficient. this does not necessarily mean that this is a bad home  the word deficient means that things are not as they should be and therefore we mark this box if there is an issue in a certain area, we recommend that if the deficient box is marked that you look into this section and see what wasn't up to par it may not be a major concern but do look at the area and see how you want to move forward with it. As with any home, some safety, electrical and plumbing issues are always present, some due to code and building procedure changes that occur each year. Should you desire for me to meet you at the home to discuss any of the report contents please just let me know. 

Comment Key - Definitions

This report divides deficiencies into three categories In need of immediate attention or repair or Saftey Concern (in red), Maintenance Recommendations, Items To Monitor, Further Evaluation Recommended (in orange), and Maintenance Items/FYI/Minor Defects (colored in blue). Safety Hazards or concerns will be listed in the Red or Orange categories depending on their perceived danger, but should always be addressed ASAP.

In need of immediate attention or repair or Saftey Concern - Items or components that were not functional, may pose a dangerous situation in the future/or may require a major expense to correct. Items categorized in this manner require further evaluation and repairs or replacement as needed by a Qualified Contractor.

Maintenance Recommendations, Items To Monitor, Further Evaluation Recommended - Items or components that were found to include a deficiency but were still functional at the time of inspection, although this functionality may be impaired or not ideal. Repairs are recommended to items categorized in this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a Handyman or Qualified Contractor and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs.

 Maintenance Items/FYI/Minor Defects - Items or components that were found to be in need of recurring or basic general maintenance and/or may need minor repairs which may improve their functionality. Typically these items are considered to represent a less significant immediate cost than those listed in the previous two categories and can be addressed by a Homeowner or Handyman. Also included in this section are items that were at the end of their typical service life or beginning to show signs of wear, but were in the opinion of the inspector, still functional at the time of inspection. Items that are at, or past their typical service life will require subsequent observation to monitor performance with the understanding that replacement or major repairs should be anticipated.

These categorizations are in my professional opinion and based on what I observed at the time of inspection, and this categorization should not be construed as to mean that items designated as "Minor defects" or "Recommendations" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendation in the text of the comment is more important than it's categorization. Due to your opinions or personal experience you may feel defects belong in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once again it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining to each defect that is paramount, not it's categorical placement.

Water Course:
Comment on the nearby water course is not within the scope of our inspection. The owner/occupant may have information regarding the volume of water during adverse weather and if there has been flooding or erosion in the past. It is important to inquire about water intrusion in areas such as the garage of homes, this is an issue that may not be obvious unless there is rain on the day of inspection.
Hillside
We are not soil, geotechnical, civil, or structural engineers and cannot render an opinion regarding soil stability, potential soil and/or structural movement. If desired, qualified specialists should be consulted on these matters.
New construction lumber shrinkage
Lumber in a new house takes up to five years to 'dry' or reach an equilibrium. During that time, minor cracks may appear in the drywall at intersections of structural elements. They can be eliminated during the course of routine maintenance.
Not visual out of scope
Buyers Advisory Notice: The Inspector has attempted to discover and report conditions requiring further evaluation or repair. However; determining the condition of any component that is not visible and/or accessible, such as plumbing components that are buried, beneath the foundation, located within construction voids or otherwise concealed, and reporting any deficiency that does not appear or become evident during our limited cursory and visual survey is outside the scope of this inspection.
Courtesy Photos
Your inspector may choose to include photos in your inspection report. There are times when only a picture can fully explain the condition or if the client is unable to attend the inspection. Photo inclusion is at the discretion of the inspector and in no way is meant to emphasize or highlight the only conditions that were seen. We always recommend full review of the entire inspection report.
Roof covering
 Life expectancy of the roofing material is not covered by this property inspection report. If any concerns exist about the roof covering life expectancy or potential for future problems, a roofing specialist should be consulted. The Inspector cannot offer an opinion or warranty as to whether the roof has leaked in the past, leaks now or may be subject to future leaks ... either expressed or implied.
We make efforts to note visible staining on roof sheathing and visible defects and maintenance that is needed on the roof structure.
It is important to understand that flashings, fasteners, and underlayment are not readily visible in most cases on the roof covering surface. We cannot give an opinion on what we cannot readily see. As deficiencies are noted in this report it is recommended that the entire roof covering be evaluated by a roofing contractor and your insurance carrier, prior to the end of any option periods or time  limitations to assure condition, life expectancy, and insurability.
Important:
It is recommended that you research your property casualty insurance (home insurance) carefully. Many insurance providers offer actual cash value (ACV) instead of replacement cash value (RCV) policies. ACV means they deduct their estimate of depreciation from the settlement and this shifts more cost to you. Google what is ACV versus RCV and understand the differences. If a hail storm destroys the roof you might be paid only the depreciated value less the deductible. This can be a significant expense. Additionally, many providers include policy limitations that exclude their opinion of damage to cosmetic items (dented gutters for example). Be aware of your deductible amount, it can be expensive. Lastly, know that some companies will cancel coverage if they think your roof is more than 15 to 20 years old (a variable number). All of these considerations can mean your roof may have very little insurance coverage. This home inspection does not determine the age of the roof or its insurability. You should have your insurance company approve the roof to their underwriting standards prior to the end of any option periods in your real estate contract, and be aware of the policy language. Also be aware that they can change policy language and coverage; do not take them for granted.
Flipped house:
If the property appears to be a 'flipped' property the home may be in visibly good cosmetic condition, the client must understand that new paint and carpet does not make a new house, there are things that may not be able to be seen in this home due to patching and repair that may have been able to be seen earlier prior to remodeling.

Manufactured Housing:
This inspection is based in part upon the United States Housing and Urban Development (HUD standards), the Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards Title 24, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 3280. The standards within this inspection shall be referenced as The Standard or HUD Code.
1976- Mobile homes built since June 15, 1976, must conform to the National Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards established under a law passed by the U. S. Congress. The Standards are administrated by the U. S. Department of Housing & Urban Development. Mobile Homes are the only homes with a National Building Code. These homes are the only homes (Manufactured homes) as defined by HUD since June 15, 1976.

The manufactures certified label (HUD insignias) on this home are located on the North side of the home. The data plate containing specific manufacturing information is located in the left side kitchen sink lower cabinet. Every manufacture is required to provide instructions on site preparation, installation and anchoring.

Plumbing:

During this inspection the inspector will check the supply piping and drain lines for leaks and corrosion of the piping where readily visible. There are issues that may not be present or visible at the time of inspection and could manifest themselves over time and even after the inspection is over. Seals and valves will fail especially in older home and leaks will likely occur in the future.  Seals and packing on valve stems/handles will eventually give way and need replacement.  We would like to help you understand, These are all part of living in a home and it is not a matter of if these issues will come up, it is when they will come up. If you remodel your bathrooms, spend a little extra money on fixtures with a lifetime warranty so that when these issues occur you can have the manufacturer send the parts to you for replacement. 

Mechanical Systems:
Mechanical components like dishwashers, ovens, stoves, water heaters, HVAC units, ect. can and will break down. A home inspection tells you the condition of the component at the time of the home inspection. The inspector is not required to determine life expectancy of any system or component. [Rule 535.227(b)(3)(C)(i)]
There is not any "fool proof" way to determine the future performance of any mechanical systems.
All areas of the home are inspected in a time frame of a few hours of one day and are not representative of regular full load,  every day use by occupants. We strive to find the obvious visible deficiencies in our home inspections and report on such deficiencies. We cannot see items that are behind walls, under a slab, or otherwise concealed from view.
Bonding and Grounding:
Bonding conductors cannot be observed in finished buildings to determine serviceability, continuity or connecting fittings and clamps. While we may be able to identify missing Grounding and Bonding, we cannot affirm, nor do we warranty, that all pipes, either gas, including CSST, or water, plumbing, metal flues, metal framing, appliances or similar conductive materials are bonded.
We recommend that a certified electrician be contacted to assure proper bonding and grounding installation in the home.
Pest Control:
Our observations regarding evidence of pests is not a substitute for inspection by a licensed pest control operator or exterminator. We report current visible conditions only and cannot render an opinion regarding their cause or remediation.

Lead Based Paint:
Homes Constructed before the 1980s should be tested for lead before purchasing or renovating--Lead wasn't the paint itself, lead was used as a pigment and drying agent in alkyd oil-based paint. Whereas, the newer Latex type water-based paints generally have not contained lead and are much safer. Unless properly sealed or encapsulated, lead based paint can leach through other paint coatings/ surfaces and adhere to those as well. About two-thirds of the homes built before 1940 have lead based paint issues. Approximately one-half of the homes built from 1940 to 1960 contain heavily-leaded paint. Some homes built after 1960 also contain heavily-leaded paint. It may be on any interior or exterior surface, particularly on woodwork, doors, and windows. In 1978, the US CPSC lowered the legal maximum lead-content in most kinds of paint to 0.06% (which is a trace amount). 

Does this home have lead based paint? We cannot tell you that it does or does not. Providing lead based paint inspections is beyond the scope of the Texas Real Estate Commissions Standards of Practice and thus, not accomplished.

SCOPE 22 TAC 535.227(a) (1) These standards of practice apply when a professional inspector or real estate inspector who is licensed under this chapter accepts employment to perform a real estate inspection for a prospective buyer or seller of real property. (2) These standards of practice define the minimum requirements for a real estate inspection conducted on a one to four family unit that is substantially completed. Substantially completed means the stage of construction when a new building, addition, improvement, or alteration to an existing building can be occupied or used for its intended purpose . (3) For the purposes of these standards of practice a real estate inspection : (A) is a limited visual survey and basic performance evaluation of the systems and components of a building using normal controls that provides information regarding the general condition of a residence at the time of inspection; (B) is not intended to be a comprehensive investigation or exploratory probe to determine the cause or effect of deficiencies noted by the inspector; and (C) does not require the use of: (i) specialized equipment, including but not limited to : (I) thermal imaging equipment; (II) moisture meters; (III) gas or carbon monoxide detection equipment; (IV) environmental testing equipment and devices; (V) elevation determination devices; or (VI) ladders capable of reaching surfaces over one story above ground surfaces; or (ii) specialized procedures, including but not limited to: (I) environmental testing; (II) elevation measurement; (III) calculations; or (IV) any method employing destructive testing that damages otherwise sound materials or finishes. (4) These standards of practice do not prohibit an inspector from providing a higher level of inspection performance than required by these standards of practice or from inspecting components and systems in addition to those listed under the standards of practice. DEFINITIONS 22 TAC 535.227(b) (1) Accessible -In the reasonable judgment of the inspector, capable of being approached, entered, or viewed without: (A) hazard to the inspector; (B) having to climb over obstacles, moving furnishings or large, heavy, or fragile objects; (C) using specialized equipment or procedures; (D) disassembling items other than covers or panels intended to be removed for inspection; (E) damaging property, permanent construction or building finish; or (F) using a ladder for portions of the inspection other than the roof or attic space. (2) Chapter 1102 - Texas Occupations Code, Chapter 1102. (3) Component - A part of a system. (4) Cosmetic - Related only to appearance or aesthetics, and not related to performance, operability, or water penetration. (5) Deficiency - In the reasonable judgment of the inspector, a condition that: (A) adversely and materially affects the performance of a system, or component; or (B) constitutes a hazard to life, limb, or property as specified by these standards of practice. (6) Deficient--Reported as having one or more deficiencies. (7) Inspect - To operate in normal ranges using ordinary controls at typical settings, look at and examine accessible systems or components and report observed deficiencies as specified by these standards of practice. (8) Performance - Achievement of an operation, function or configuration relative to accepted industry standard practices with consideration of age and normal wear and tear from ordinary use. (9) Report - To provide the inspector's opinions and findings on the standard inspection report form as required by 535.222 and 535.223 of this title. (10)Standards of practice - 535.227 - 535.233 of this title. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 22 TAC 535.227(c) The inspector shall: (1) operate fixed or installed equipment and appliances listed herein in at least one mode with ordinary controls at typical settings; (2) visually inspect accessible systems or components from near proximity to the systems and components, and from the interior of the attic and crawl spaces; and (3) complete the standard inspection report form as required by 535.222 and 535.223 of this title. GENERAL LIMITATIONS 22 TAC 535.227(d) The inspector is not required to: (1) inspect: (A) items other than those listed within these standards of practice; (B) elevators; (C) detached buildings, decks, docks, fences, or waterfront structures or related equipment; (D) anything buried, hidden, latent, or concealed; (E) sub-surface drainage systems; (F) automated or programmable control systems, automatic shut-off, photoelectric sensors, timers, clocks, metering devices, signal lights, lightning arrestor system, remote controls, security or data distribution systems, solar panels or smart home automation components; or (G) concrete flatwork such as driveways, sidewalks, walkways, paving stones or patios; (2) report: (A) past repairs that appear to be effective and workmanlike except as specifically required by these standards; (B) cosmetic or aesthetic conditions; or (C) wear and tear from ordinary use; (3) determine: (A) the presence or absence of pests, termites, or other wood-destroying insects or organisms; (B) the presence, absence, or risk of: (i) asbestos; (ii) lead-based paint; (iii) mold, mildew; (iv) corrosive or contaminated drywall "Chinese Drywall"; or (v) any other environmental hazard, environmental pathogen, carcinogen, toxin, mycotoxin, pollutant, fungal presence or activity, or poison; (C) types of wood or preservative treatment and fastener compatibility; or (D) the cause or source of a condition; (E) the cause or effect of deficiencies; (F) any of the following issues concerning a system or component: (i) insurability or warrantability; (ii) suitability, adequacy, compatibility, capacity, reliability, marketability, or operating costs; (iii) recalls, counterfeit products, or product lawsuits; (iv) life expectancy or age; (v) energy efficiency, vapor barriers, or thermostatic performance; (vi) compliance with any code, listing, testing or protocol authority; (vii) utility sources; or (viii)manufacturer or regulatory requirements, except as specifically required by these standards; (4) anticipate future events or conditions, including but not limited to: (A) decay, deterioration, or damage that may occur after the inspection; (B) deficiencies from abuse, misuse or lack of use; (C) changes in performance of any component or system due to changes in use or occupancy; (D) the consequences of the inspection or its effects on current or future buyers and sellers; (E) common household accidents, personal injury, or death; (F) the presence of water penetrations; or (G) future performance of any item; (5) operate shut-off, safety, stop, pressure or pressure-regulating valves or items requiring the use of codes, keys, combinations, or similar devices; (6) designate conditions as safe; (7) recommend or provide engineering, architectural, appraisal, mitigation, physical surveying, realty, or other specialist services; (8) review historical records, installation instructions, repair plans, cost estimates, disclosure documents, or other reports; (9) verify sizing, efficiency, or adequacy of the ground surface drainage system; (10) verify sizing, efficiency, or adequacy of the gutter and downspout system; (11) operate recirculation or sump pumps; (12) remedy conditions preventing inspection of any item; (13) apply open flame or light a pilot to operate any appliance; (14) turn on decommissioned equipment, systems or utility services; or (15) provide repair cost estimates, recommendations, or re-inspection services. CONFLICTS 22 TAC 535.227(e) In the event of a conflict between the general provisions set out in this section, and specific provisions specified elsewhere in the standards of practice, specific provisions shall take precedence. DEPARTURE PROVISION 22 TAC 535.227(f) (1) An inspector may depart from the inspection of a component or system required by the standards of practice only if: (A) the inspector and client agree the item is not to be inspected; (B) the inspector is not qualified to inspect the item; (C) in the reasonable judgment of the inspector, the inspector determines that: (i) conditions exist that prevent inspection of an item; (ii) conditions or materials are hazardous to the health or safety of the inspector; or (iii) the actions of the inspector may cause damage to the property (D) the item is a common element of a multifamily development and is not in physical contact with the unit being inspected, such as the foundation under another building or a part of the foundation under another unit in the same building. (2) If an inspector departs from the inspection of a component or system required by the standards of practice, the inspector shall: (A) notify the client at the earliest practical opportunity that the component or system will not be inspected; and (B) make an appropriate notation on the inspection report form, stating the reason the component or system was not inspected. (3) If the inspector routinely departs from inspection of a component or system required by the standards of practice, and the inspector has reason to believe that the property being inspected includes that component or system, the earliest practical opportunity for the notice required by this subsection is the first contact the inspector makes with the prospective client.  ENFORCEMENT 22 TAC 535.227(g) Enforcement. Failure to comply with the standards of practice is grounds for disciplinary action as prescribed by Chapter 1102.

2 - I. Structural Systems

IN NI NP D
2.1 A. Foundations X X
2.2 B. Grading and Drainage X X
2.3 C. Roof Covering Materials X X
2.4 D. Roof Structure & Attic X X
2.5 E. Walls (Interior and Exterior) X X
2.6 F. Ceilings and Floors X X
2.7 G. Doors (Interior and Exterior) X X
2.8 H. Windows X X
2.9 I. Stairways (Interior and Exterior) X X
2.10 J. Fireplaces and Chimneys X X
2.11 K. Porches, Balconies, Decks, and Carports X
2.12 L. Other X X
2.13 M. Cabinets X X
2.14 N. Sidewalks & Driveways X
2.15 O. Fences X
Inspection Method
Visual

This inspection is one of first impressions.  The inspector was not provided with any historical information pertaining to the structural integrity of the inspected real property. This is a limited cursory and visual survey of the accessible general conditions and circumstances present at the time of this inspection. Opinions are based on general observations made without the use of specialized tools or procedures. Therefore, the opinions expressed are one of the apparent condition and not of absolute fact and are only good on 08/17/2019.
The inspection of the foundation may show it to be providing adequate support for the structure or having movement typical to this region, at the time of the inspection. This does not guarantee the future life or failure of the foundation. The Inspector is not a structural engineer. This inspection is not an engineering report or evaluation and should not be considered one, either expressed or implied. If any cause of concern is noted on this report, or if you want further evaluation, you should consider an evaluation by an engineer of your choice.


BUYERS NOTICE:

Keep in mind, as noted this report will have many items in it and they will be marked deficient.

This does not mean it is a bad house, some things are not correct.  In these areas of the home, it may be a simple repair. If you have questions PLEASE GIVE US A CALL FOR CLARITY. We will be happy to answer any questions you might have.

Structural Opinion
This home appears to be in generally stable condition however this home has areas that are in need of further evaluation or repair as listed throughout this report
A. Foundations: Foundation Statement

Buyers Advisory Notice:
These opinions are based solely on the observations of the inspector which were made without sophisticated testing procedures, specialized tools and/or equipment. Therefore the opinions expressed are of apparent conditions and not absolute fact and are only good on 08/17/2019.

A. Foundations: Type of Foundation(s)
Monolithic Post Tension Style Slab On Grade
A. Foundations: The foundation of this home at the time of inspection appeared to be:
In functional condition with no major signs of movement or settlement.
B. Grading and Drainage: Comments
C. Roof Covering Materials: Comments
C. Roof Covering Materials: Roof life span
Bottom Third
C. Roof Covering Materials: Types of Roof Covering
Composition
C. Roof Covering Materials: Viewed From
Roof
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Comments
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Approximate Depth Of Insulation
10"-13", Loose filled insulation
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Material
Wood
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Type of Roof
Gable
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Type of Roof Decking
Plywood & 1 x 4 slats
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Type of Ventilation
Soffit Vents, Gable Vents, Ridge Vents
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Viewed From
Decked portion of the attic due to amount of insulation
E. Walls (Interior and Exterior): Exterior Wall Covering Material
Brick, Wood
E. Walls (Interior and Exterior): Interior wall covering
Drywall
F. Ceilings and Floors: Comments

Visible portions of the interior wall, floor, and ceiling surfaces were inspected looking for indications of moisture intrusion, settlement, or other significant defects. Cosmetic and minor deficiencies are not typically reported on, but may be noted while looking for significant defects. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. In occupied homes there may be areas that are not visible due to furniture and other belongings covering these areas up at the time of inspection. Do know that we can not move personal belongings and there may be areas that will show damage after the home is empty.

G. Doors (Interior and Exterior): Comments

When reading this section of the inspection if there are no comments below, the doors were operating as intended at the time of inspections and may have had minor paint and caulking blemishes that are cosmetic in nature and can be repaired as a maintenance item. In this report there may also be references to doors not operating properly.
If deficiencies are noted below such as doors rubbing in the frame, doors out of square in the frame, or that they are not latching properly this may be a sign of typical structural movement. We recommend that the doors be adjusted to compensate for typical structural movement. If there is major movement you will see it noted throughout this report with recommendations for repair and/or further evaluation.

All locks on home should be changed or rekeyed before moving in. After new locks have been installed, ensure that jambs at striker plates are cut deep enough to allow new deadbolt locks to fully engage and lock. Dead bolt locks are not locked unless bolt is fully extended.

H. Windows: Comments
H. Windows: Windows:

The windows were inspected by operating a representative number (I will try and operate every window in the home, but personal belongings may block accessibility to some). They are inspected by testing their operation, looking for damage, broken glass, failed seals, etc. No reportable deficiencies were present unless otherwise noted in this report.

I. Stairways (Interior and Exterior): Comments

Stairways appear to be in functional condition with no major need for repair unless otherwise noted below.

J. Fireplaces and Chimneys: Comments

We do NOT light a fire or run the fireplace during a VISUAL home inspection and that is beyond the scope of this type of inspection and our insurance has strict rules forbidding inspectors from lighting fires and pilot lights or turning on gas valves on appliances at the time of inspection. It is impossible for a visual home inspection to determine with any degree of certainty whether a flue is free of defects and that a fireplace will burn properly. . The NFPA (National Fire Prevention Association) recommends that all chimneys be inspected before buying or selling a home. In our opinion this is a prudent recommendation. We recommend having a Certified Chimney Specialist conduct a Level II inspection of the chimney and flue, etc. prior to closing of escrow.

 

http://www.csia.org/

K. Porches, Balconies, Decks, and Carports: Comments

Porches, Decks, balconies, and Carports appeared to be is good condition unless otherwise noted in the comments below in this report.

L. Other: Comments
A. Foundations: First Impression

This inspection is one of first impression and the inspector was not provided with any historical information pertaining to the structural integrity of the inspected real property. This is a limited cursory and visual survey of the accessible general conditions and circumstances present at the time of this inspection. Opinions are based on general observations made without the use of specialized tools or procedures. Therefore, the opinions expressed are one of apparent conditions and not of absolute fact and are only good for the date and time of this inspection.
The inspection of the foundation may show it to be providing adequate support for the structure or having movement typical to this region, at the time of the inspection. This does not guarantee the future life or failure of the foundation. The Inspector is not a structural engineer. This inspection is not an engineering report or evaluation and should not be considered one, either expressed or implied. If any cause of concern is noted on this report, or if you want further evaluation, you should consider an evaluation by an engineer of your choice.

B. Grading and Drainage: Water Course Disclaimer

Comment on the nearby water course is not within the scope of our inspection. The owner/occupant may have information regarding the volume of water during adverse weather and if there has been flooding or erosion in the past. It is important to inquire about water intrusion in areas such as the garage of homes, this is an issue that may not be obvious unless there is rain on the day of inspection

C. Roof Covering Materials: Recommemd a roofing company inspect roof

We recommend a roofing company inspect roof  and give price quotes and advice on needed repairs prior to the end of option period or other time limitations in the real estate purchase process,  due to areas noted below.

H. Windows: Flashing Limitations

The visible flashings were inspected however, there is are many areas where flashing is not visible at the time of inspection and can not be opined upon due to finishes covering terminations.

Windows should have Z-flashing at the top of them and should be visible under the window trim but there are different methods of flashing windows that could not be seen such as a seal tape or self flashing windows that would only be visible before the wall cladding was installed.

FOUNDATIONS 22 TAC 535.228(a) (1) The inspector shall: (A) render a written opinion as to the performance of the foundation; and (B) report: (i) the type of foundations; (ii) the vantage point from which the crawl space was inspected; (C) report present and visible indications of adverse performance of the foundation, such as: (i) binding, out-of-square, or non-latching doors; (ii) framing or frieze board separations; (iii) sloping floors; (iv) window, wall, floor, or ceiling cracks or separations; and (v) rotating, buckling, cracking, or deflecting masonry cladding. (D) report as Deficient: (i) deteriorated materials; (ii) deficiencies in foundation components such as; beams, joists, bridging, blocking, piers, posts, pilings, columns, sills or subfloor; (iii) deficiencies in retaining walls related to foundation performance; (iv) exposed or damaged reinforcement; (v) crawl space ventilation that is not performing; and (vi) crawl space drainage that is not performing. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) enter a crawl space or any area where headroom is less than 18 inches or the access opening is less than 24 inches wide and 18 inches high; (B) provide an exhaustive list of indicators of possible adverse performance; or (C) inspect retaining walls not related to foundation performance.


GRADING AND DRAINAGE 22 TAC 535.228(b) (1) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (A) drainage around the foundation that is not performing; (B) deficiencies in grade levels around the foundation; and (C) deficiencies in installed gutter and downspout systems. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) inspect flatwork or detention/retention ponds (except as related to slope and drainage); (B) determine area hydrology or the presence of underground water; or (C) determine the efficiency or performance of underground or surface drainage systems.


ROOF COVERING MATERIALS 22 TAC 535.228(c) (1) The inspector shall: (A) inspect the roof covering materials from the surface of the roof; (B) report: (i) type of roof coverings; (ii) vantage point from where the roof was inspected; (iii) evidence of water penetration; (iv) evidence of previous repairs to the roof covering material, flashing details, skylights and other roof penetrations; and (C) report as Deficient deficiencies in: (i) fasteners; (ii) adhesion; (iii) roof covering materials; (iv) flashing details; (v) skylights; and (vi) other roof penetrations. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) inspect the roof from the roof level if, in the inspector's reasonable judgment, the inspector: (i) cannot safely reach or stay on the roof; or (ii) significant damage to the roof covering materials may result from walking on the roof; (B) determine: (i) the remaining life expectancy of the roof covering; or (ii) the number of layers of roof covering material; (C) identify latent hail damage; (D) exhaustively examine all fasteners and adhesion, or (E) provide an exhaustive list of locations of deficiencies and water penetrations.


ROOF STRUCTURES AND ATTICS 22 TAC 535.228(d) (1) The inspector shall: (A) report: (i) the vantage point from which the attic space was inspected; (ii) approximate average depth of attic insulation; (iii) evidence of water penetration; (B) report as Deficient: (i) attic space ventilation that is not performing; (ii) deflections or depressions in the roof surface as related to adverse performance of the framing and decking; (iii) missing insulation; (iv) deficiencies in (I) installed framing members and decking; (II) attic access ladders and access openings; and (III) attic ventilators. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) enter attics or unfinished spaces where openings are less than 22 inches by 30 inches or headroom is less than 30 inches; (B) operate powered ventilators; or (C) provide an exhaustive list of locations of deficiencies and water penetrations.


INTERIOR WALLS, CEILINGS, FLOORS, AND DOORS 22 TAC 535.228(e) (1) The inspector shall: (A) report evidence of water penetration; (B) report as Deficient: (i) deficiencies in the condition and performance of doors and hardware; (ii) deficiencies related to structural performance or water penetration; and (iii) the absence of or deficiencies in fire separation between the garage and the living space and between the garage and its attic. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) report cosmetic damage or the condition of floor, wall, or ceiling coverings; paints, stains, or other surface coatings; cabinets; or countertops, or (B) provide an exhaustive list of locations of deficiencies and water penetrations.


EXTERIOR WALLS, DOORS, AND WINDOWS 22 TAC 535.228(f) (1) The inspector shall: (A) report evidence of water penetration; (B) report as Deficient: (i) the absence of performing emergency escape and rescue openings in all sleeping rooms; (ii) a solid wood door less than 1-3/8 inches in thickness, a solid or honeycomb core steel door less than 1-3/8 inches thick, or a 20-minute fire-rated door between the residence and an attached garage; (iii) missing or damaged screens; (iv) deficiencies related to structural performance or water penetration; (v) deficiencies in: (I) weather stripping, gaskets or other air barrier materials; (II) claddings; (III) water resistant materials and coatings; (IV) flashing details and terminations; (V) the condition and performance of exterior doors, garage doors and hardware; and (VI) the condition and performance of windows and components. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) report the condition of awnings, blinds, shutters, security devices, or other nonstructural systems; (B) determine the cosmetic condition of paints, stains, or other surface coatings; or (C) operate a lock if the key is not available. (D) provide an exhaustive list of locations of deficiencies and water penetrations.


EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR GLAZING 22 TAC 535.228(g) (1) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (A) insulated windows that are obviously fogged or display other evidence of broken seals; (B) deficiencies in glazing, weather stripping and glazing compound in windows and doors; and (C) the absence of safety glass in hazardous locations.(2) The inspector is not required to: (A) exhaustively inspect insulated windows for evidence of broken seals; (B) exhaustively inspect glazing for identifying labels; or (C) identify specific locations of damage.


INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR STAIRWAYS 22 TAC 535.228(h) (1) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (A) spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles, or rails for steps, stairways, guards, and railings that permit passage of an object greater than 4 inches in diameter, except that on the open side of the staircase treads, spheres less than 4-3/8 inches in diameter may pass through the guard rail balusters or spindles; and (B) deficiencies in steps, stairways, landings, guardrails, and handrails. (2) The inspector is not required to exhaustively measure every stairway component.


FIREPLACES AND CHIMNEYS 22 TAC 535.228(i) (1) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (A) built-up creosote in accessible areas of the firebox and flue; (B) the presence of combustible materials in near proximity to the firebox opening; (C) the absence of fireblocking at the attic penetration of the chimney flue, where accessible; and (D) deficiencies in the: (i) damper; (ii) lintel, hearth, hearth extension, and firebox; (iii) gas valve and location; (iv) circulating fan; (v) combustion air vents; and (vi) chimney structure, termination, coping, crown, caps, and spark arrestor. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) verify the integrity of the flue; (B) perform a chimney smoke test; or (C) determine the adequacy of the draft.


PORCHES, BALCONIES, DECKS AND CARPORTS 22 TAC 535.228(j) (1) The inspector shall: (A) inspect: (i) attached balconies, carports, and porches; (ii) abutting porches, decks, and balconies that are used for ingress and egress; and (B) report as Deficient: (i) on decks 30 inches or higher above the adjacent grade, spacings between intermediate balusters, spindles, or rails that permit passage of an object greater than four inches in diameter; and (ii) deficiencies in accessible components. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) exhaustively measure every porch, balcony, deck, or attached carport components; or (B) enter any area where headroom is less than 18 inches or the access opening is less than 24 inches wide and 18 inches high.



  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficient
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Comment
2.1.1 - A. Foundations

Slab - Corner Crack/Pop

One or more of the foundation perimeter beam corners were observed to be either cracked, or sheared off (corner pop). This is a common condition in slab on grade foundations. This condition does not adversely affect the performance of the foundation. However, in some cases, some cosmetic improvements may be necessary

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
2.1.2 - A. Foundations

Slab- Trees Too Close To The Home

 Tree(s) in close proximity of the foundation was observed.  Client should consider the installation of a root barrier to reduce the possibility of damage to the foundation from tree roots and moisture removal, or have the trees taken down so that they do not damage the property over time.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
2.2.1 - B. Grading and Drainage

Drainage- Sub Surface

There is a sub surface draining system around this property. It is unknown whether the drainage system works properly and will be only really be evident when there is a good rain. If the drains are having problems when it rains We recommend that you have a plumber come out and clean the drain lines.

Mag glass Monitor
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Comment
2.2.2 - B. Grading and Drainage

Foliage Next To The Home

 There is foliage next to the home that should be trimmed away from the home periodically, we recommend that foliage be kept approximately 6 inches from the walls of the home to prevent damage to the exterior cladding.

Wrench DIY
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Comment
2.2.3 - B. Grading and Drainage

Grading- High Soil/Mulch Next To The Home

The soil/mulch levels were high against isolated areas of the foundation grade beam. When soil or mulch levels and vegetation are high against the face of the foundation it promotes water penetration, wood rot and insect infestation. Brick veneer wall cladding should have about 4 of clearance between the soil/mulch and the first course of bricks, and other materials should have 6 of clearance between other materials and the soil/mulch.When siding is installed directly on the ground it is important to note that inspectors cannot see the foundation grade beam and there is more of a chance for water to enter the home in times of heavy rains. It is very important to check with the Owner to make sure there has not been flooding into the home and if there has, That proactive measures should be taken to make sure that the water issues have been repaired.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
2.2.4 - B. Grading and Drainage

Gutter- Partial

Gutters were not present on all areas of horizontal facia around this structure  at the time of inspection. We recommend as a structural upgrade that gutters be installed on all horizontal fascia this home and that downspouts be ran so that they take water at least 3'-5' away from the home to help channel water away from the foundation of the home.


Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor
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Comment
2.3.1 - C. Roof Covering Materials

Debris

Debris was noted on the roof surface of this home. We recommend that all debris be removed from the roof covering surface periodically.

Leaves and pine needles in this area of the country can allow water to accumulate in valleys and next to side walls of the home (if present) due to debris damming up water flow on the roof. The debris on the roof and against the side walls of the home can cause damage, by allowing water to seep under the roof covering and wick into the siding, causing  leaks and damage in various areas where accumulation is present.

In most cases with a single story home or homes with out dormers or sidewalls in contact with the roof structure, twigs and other debris can damage the roof covering more than people realize and it is strongly recommended that the roof covering be cleaned now and periodically in the future.

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Comment
2.3.2 - C. Roof Covering Materials

Exposed Nails

Under-driven or exposed nails were found in one or more areas of the roof coverings. Recommend sealing nail heads periodically to prevent potential leaks in the future.

Roof Roofing Professional
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Comment
2.3.3 - C. Roof Covering Materials

Fasteners- Satelite Dish On Roof

There is/are satellite dish(es) or mounting brackets installed on the roof top surface. These units are designed for roof top installation. Care should be taken however, to insure the unit does not become loose and cause leaks around the connections.

Maintenance:  Items mounted to the roof such as satellites, antennas, basketball backboards, etc., may allow water penetration. As these items move (wind, adjustments to position, use, etc.), screws and bolts may enlarge mounting holes. While not in immediate need of repair, we recommend closely monitoring these areas and making repairs as soon as possible when necessary.

Mag glass Monitor
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Comment
2.3.4 - C. Roof Covering Materials

Shingles- Granule Loss Noted On Roof

There were areas of granule loss noted on the roof covering of this home that is typical.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
2.3.5 - C. Roof Covering Materials

Shingles Overhanging Drip Edge

The shingles of this home or hanging over the edge of the roof structure too far and curling over the edge the proper overhang for shingles should be 1/2 to 3/4. There is not really anything that can be done at this point and it should not affect the weather resistance of the roof, however it could cause the shingles at the edge of the roof to deteriorate or become damaged faster that the rest of the shingles on the roof structure.

Roof Roofing Professional
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Comment
2.3.6 - C. Roof Covering Materials

Shingles- Ridge Damaged (architectural)

The ridge cap of this home is covered in architectural  shingles, these shingles have been damaged and will need replacement.

Roof Roofing Professional
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Comment
2.4.1 - D. Roof Structure & Attic

Framing- Purlin supports should not be notched

Purlins shall be continuous and shall be supported by 2"x 4" braces installed to bearing walls at a slope of not less than 45 degrees from the horizontal. The braces shall be spaced not more than 4 feet on center and the length not to exceed 8 feet. And may not be cut or notched in any manner.
This is fairly typical in this area of the state to see purlin supports notched, this does not appear to be having an adverse affect on the roof structure, however, we do recommend that you monitor this framing over time and if movement occurs we recommend the advice of a qualified contractor.

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Comment
2.5.1 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Cracks - Major

Major cracking observed in wall structure. This could be from moisture intrusion at the structure and/or soil movement. Recommend a qualified structural engineer evaluate and advise on course of action. 

House construction Structural Engineer
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Comment
2.5.2 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Cracks moderate

There are cracks in the wall that are indicative of some movement and should be patched and further evaluated if movement returns. Cracks in drywall are typical in an older home, and will need repair periodically.

If these cracks are concerning to you we recommend that you contact a foundation repair company/structural engineer for further evaluation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
2.5.3 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Fungal growth on the home

There are areas of a fungal growth on the exterior of this home. These areas are in need of cleaning. This is due to moisture  not having enough sunshine to dry out the area during the day. We recommend that you pressure wash and clean these areas with a fungicide.

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Comment
2.5.4 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Interior walls have moisture damage

Areas on the interior of this property have moisture intrusion in at the walls. This appearance is due to damaged drywall.

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
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Comment
2.5.5 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Mortar improvements needed

There are areas on the exterior brick of the home that are in need of mortar patching "re-pointing" to prevent moisture intrusion into the wall cavity.

These areas could ha sustained damage that can not be seen without destructive testing which is outside the scope of this visual inspection. Keep this in mind if and when remodeling work is performed and know that there may be hidden defects in the wall cavity that are not readily visible at this time.

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Comment
2.5.6 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Paint and patching on walls throughout the home

Paint and patching was noted on walls throughout the home.

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
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2.5.7 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Code For Weepholes

International Residential Code for One & Two-Family Dwellings

R703.7.6 Weepholes.

Weep holes shall be provided in the outside wythe of masonry walls at a maximum spacing of 33 inches (838 mm) on center. Weep holes shall not be less than 3/16 inch (5 mm) in diameter. Weep holes shall be located immediately above the flashing.

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2.6.1 - F. Ceilings and Floors

There are areas where patching or repairs have been performed

There are areas where patching has been performed on the ceilings of the home.

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Comment
2.7.1 - G. Doors (Interior and Exterior)

Hardware - Double cylinder dead bolts need to be replaced

There are one or more doors that are in need of dead bolt replacement.

The dead bolts should be replaced with dead bolts that have a thumb latch on them for safety and ease of egress in the event of an emergency.

This is an easy repair, you will just need to replace the deadbolt with one that has a thumb latch.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
2.7.2 - G. Doors (Interior and Exterior)

Safety glazing not present

There were one or more windows in the doors of this home that did not have safety glazing installed in them.  We recommend that these doors be replaced with solid core doors with safety glazing in the window portion of the door.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
2.7.3 - G. Doors (Interior and Exterior)

WATER DAMAGE TO WOOD

WATER DAMAGE TO WOOD

The door(s) had water damage / wood rot present at the bottom of the door jamb/mullion, where it contacted the threshold. Repairs are recommended in this or these areas as needed by a contractor or other qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
2.8.1 - H. Windows

Caulk window edge

We recommend that all window edges be caulked periodically  on the interior and exterior  to seal them off and help keep them more energy efficient.

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Comment
2.8.2 - H. Windows

Windows do not have safety glass markings

Windows do not have safety glass markings on them. This is required when windows are in areas where there is traffic and at any point are less than 18 off the ground.

Fixed or operable windows must include safety glass if they measure larger than 9 feet square, the bottom edge is less than 18 inches above the floor, the top edge is more than 36 inches above the floor, and there is a walking surface within 36 inches of the glass. Tempered glass is not required unless all four of these conditions are met.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
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Comment
2.8.3 - H. Windows

Windows over 44"

The windowsill height in one or more of the bedrooms measured more than 44 from the floor. Under current building standards, these windows are considered to high for a proper emergency egress (escape) exit.  The occupants of these bedrooms should be aware of this hazard and be physically able to use this window as an emergency egress exit.

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2.10.1 - J. Fireplaces and Chimneys

Clean chimney

It is recommended that chimney's be cleaned annually to prevent the risk of fire damage due to creosote build up. We recommend that this chimney be cleaned prior to use by a qualified chimney sweep.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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2.13.1 - M. Cabinets

Granite Counter Top is Cracked

The granite counter top is cracked in the hall bathroom.

Contractor Qualified Professional

3 - II. Electrical Systems

IN NI NP D
3.1 A. Service Entrance and Panels X X
3.2 B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures X X
3.3 C. Door bell X
3.4 D. Smoke, Fire & Carbon Monoxide Detectors X X
Electrical needs repair

We recommend that the Electrical system of this home be further evaluated by a licensed electrician.

Keep in mind that there may not be many repairs that an electrician will make unless there are upgrades made to allow for code compliance.  This could get to be a costly repair depending on the amount of upgrades that are required by the electrical contractor in this area.


A. Service Entrance and Panels: Main Service Panel Amperage
150 Amp
A. Service Entrance and Panels: Main Service Panel Box Location
Bedroom Closet
A. Service Entrance and Panels: Main Service Panel Manufacturer
General Electric
A. Service Entrance and Panels: Service Entrance
Overhead
A. Service Entrance and Panels: Sub-Panel Box Location
Bedroom Closet
A. Service Entrance and Panels: Sub-Panel Manufacturer
General Electric
B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures: Comments

The electrical receptacles, light switches and fixtures were tested and appeared to be operating properly unless listed otherwise below.

B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures: Type of Wiring
Romex
B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures: There are some light switches in the home that are not operating.

There are one or more light switches in the home that do not appear to be operating anything. Some times these switches may be a receptacle that we cannot get to due to furnishings, and some of them may be for additional lights or other things for future use. We recommend asking the seller what these switches go to, they may have knowledge of what these switches are for.

C. Door bell: Comment
D. Smoke, Fire & Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Comments

Appeared to be in all required locations, we do recommend checking the alarms quarterly and replacing the batteries at least annually to make sure they operate properly. 

A. Service Entrance and Panels: Grounding is not visibly proper

The grounding electrode does not have two ground rods visible in the ground next to this home which is now required for proper grounding of the electrical system. When a ground wire is going directly into the slab it appears to be grounding the system however it is difficult to tell if it is doing the job as intended.


 2017 NEC 250.52 (3) States

Concrete installed with insulation, vapor barriers, films or similar items separating the concrete from the earth is not considered to be in "direct contact" with the earth.

We recommend that an electrical contractor further evaluate the grounding of this electrical system or that the current owners or builder(if the property is new construction) provide documentation that the grounding electrode was installed properly.

SERVICE ENTRANCE AND PANELS 22 TAC 535.229 (a) (1) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (A) a drop, weatherhead or mast that is not securely fastened to the building; (B) the absence of or deficiencies in the grounding electrode system; (C) missing or damaged dead fronts or covers plates; (D) conductors not protected from the edges of electrical cabinets, gutters, or cutout boxes; (E) electrical cabinets and panel boards not appropriate for their location; such as a clothes closet, bathrooms or where they are exposed to physical damage; (F) electrical cabinets and panel boards that are not accessible or do not have a minimum of 36-inches of clearance in front of them; (G) deficiencies in: (i) electrical cabinets, gutters, cutout boxes, and panel boards; (ii) the insulation of the service entrance conductors, drip loop, separation of conductors at weatherheads, and clearances; (iii) the compatibility of overcurrent devices and conductors; (iv) the overcurrent device and circuit for labeled and listed 240 volt appliances; (v) bonding and grounding; (vi) conductors; (vii) the operation of installed ground-fault or arc-fault circuit interrupter devices; and (H) the absence of: (i) trip ties on 240 volt overcurrent devices or multi-wire branch circuit; (ii) appropriate connections; (iii) anti-oxidants on aluminum conductor terminations; (iv) a main disconnecting means. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) determine present or future sufficiency of service capacity amperage, voltage, or the capacity of the electrical system; (B) test arc-fault circuit interrupter devices when the property is occupied or damage to personal property may result, in the inspector's reasonable judgment; (C) conduct voltage drop calculations; (D) determine the accuracy of overcurrent device labeling; (E) remove covers where hazardous as judged by the inspector; (F) verify the effectiveness of overcurrent devices; or (G) operate overcurrent devices.


BRANCH CIRCUITS, CONNECTED DEVICES, AND FIXTURES 22 TAC 535.229 (b) (1) The inspector shall: (A) manually test the installed and accessible smoke and carbon monoxide alarms; (B) report the type of branch circuit conductors; (C) report as Deficient: (i) the absence of ground-fault circuit interrupter protection in all: (I) bathroom receptacles; (II) garage receptacles; (III) outdoor receptacles; (IV) crawl space receptacles; (V) unfinished basement receptacles; (VI) kitchen countertop receptacles; and (VII)receptacles that are located within six feet of the outside edge of a sink; (ii) the failure of operation of ground-fault circuit interrupter protection devices; (iii) missing or damaged receptacle, switch or junction box covers; (iv) the absence of: (I) equipment disconnects; (II) appropriate connections, such as copper/aluminum approved devices, if branch circuit aluminum conductors are discovered in the main or sub-panel based on a random sampling of accessible receptacles and switches; (v) appliances and metal pipes that are not bonded or grounded; (vi) deficiencies in: (I) receptacles; (II) switches; (III) wiring, wiring terminations, junction boxes, devices, and fixtures, including improper location; (IV) doorbell and chime components; (V) smoke and carbon monoxide alarms; (vii) improper use of extension cords; (viii) deficiencies in or absences of conduit, where applicable; and \ (ix) the absence of smoke alarms: (I) in each sleeping room; (II) outside each separate sleeping area

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficient
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - A. Service Entrance and Panels

Bedroom closet

The electrical panel is located in a clothes closet.  Under current electrical standards, this is no longer an accepted practice.  This is an as-built condition but Per TREC standards of practice we are required to report this condition as a deficiency.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
3.1.2 - A. Service Entrance and Panels

Neutral wires should terminate under individual terminals

Each neutral conductor should terminate under individual terminations and not share a termination with other neutral or ground wires. When neutral wires share a termination point with another wire it is likely that the connection will become loose due to expansion and contraction of wires.

NEC. 2017  408.41 Grounded Conductor Terminations. Each grounded conductor shall terminate within the panelboard in an individual terminal that is not also used for another conductor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
3.1.3 - A. Service Entrance and Panels

Service wires are not high enough

The service entrance wires for the electrical are not the proper height above the driveway and home we recommend that you contact a licensed electrical contractor to raise wires to proper height above the ground.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
3.1.4 - A. Service Entrance and Panels

Missing ground and neutral wires missing in the sub panel

The ground and neutral wires were missing from the sub panel. This us a potential shock or electrocution hazard.  Recommend having a licensed & qualified electrician repair as necessary. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
3.2.1 - B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures

Cover Plates Missing

One or more receptacles/light switches are missing a cover plate. This is a potential short and shock risk. Recommend installation of plates.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
3.2.2 - B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures

Damaged receptacle

There are one or more receptacles in this home that are damaged and in need of repair.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
3.2.3 - B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures

Extension cord wiring

Extension cord are being used to control various fixtures.  This is an improper use of an extension cord.  Extension cords are not designed for permanent use.  It is recommended to have a licensed/certified electrician evaluate and repair/replace as necessary. 


Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.4 - B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures

Exterior receptacles need weather resistant covers

All exterior receptacles should have weather resistant covers installed on them.

There are one or more receptacle covers that are in need of repair or replacement or reorientation on the exterior of the structure.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.2.5 - B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures

Grommets or bushings needed

Grommets or bushings needed in junction box knockouts to protect wiring entering the junction box

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.6 - B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures

Light flickering

One or more light fixtures that are flickering in this home. This is likely due to the bulb going out however there is a chance that this is an electrical wiring issue and Could need repair by licensed electrician.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.2.7 - B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures

Open ground receptacles

One or more receptacles throughout the house have an open ground.  These receptacles should be repaired or replaced.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - D. Smoke, Fire & Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Co Detectors

CO Detectors: CO Alarm Required - Garage and gas appliances present.
Due to the home having an attached garage and/or the installation of Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors are required outside of each sleeping area. More information about CO detectors and their requirements can be found here:  Info about CO

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.2 - D. Smoke, Fire & Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Code for Smoke/CO/Fire Alarms

R314.3 Location.
Smoke alarms are required to be in each sleeping room, and immediately outside of each sleeping room.
R314.5 Interconnection.
Where more than one smoke alarm is required, to be installed within an individual dwelling unit in accordance with section R314.3, the alarm devices shall be interconnected in such a manner that the actuation of one alarm will activate all of the alarms in the individual unit.  
R315.1 Carbon monoxide alarms.
An approved carbon monoxide alarm shall be installed outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms in dwelling units within which fuel-fired appliances are installed and in dwelling units that have attached garages.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - III. Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning Systems

IN NI NP D
4.1 A. Heating Equipment X X
4.2 B. Cooling Equipment X X
4.3 C. Duct System, Chases, and Vents X X
Temperature Differental

The air conditioning system operation was tested and responded to the on/off command at the inside thermostat controllers. The unit functioned as expected and discharged conditioned air at measured ducts.

 

The differential temperature between the supply and return vents appeared to be acceptable (14F - 23F) at the time of inspection. The differential temperature is an indication that the air conditioning system is functioning satisfactorily. The differential temperature is a basic test. This does not validate the size of the unit or the homes ability to be cooled due to insulation, air leaks, or other inefficient conditions.

A. Heating Equipment: Brand
Carrier, Trane
A. Heating Equipment: Energy Source Unit
Gas
A. Heating Equipment: Approximate Year Built
1999, 2008
A. Heating Equipment: Older unit

Additional Notice from the Inspector: It is the opinion of this Inspector, these units may be functioning as intended or in need of minor repairs, you should be aware that these are older units, and the future life expectancy cannot be determined.  You can continue to use and service these components until replacement is necessary.

A. Heating Equipment: Type of System
Gas-Fired Heat
B. Cooling Equipment: Approximate Year Built Unit #1
2013
B. Cooling Equipment: Approximate Year Built Unit #2
1999
B. Cooling Equipment: AproximateTonage Unit #1
3.5 Ton
B. Cooling Equipment: AproximateTonage Unit #2
3 Ton
B. Cooling Equipment: Average Temperature at Supply Registers
53°, 62°
B. Cooling Equipment: Average Temperature at Return Register(s)
71°, 76°
B. Cooling Equipment: Temperature Differential
18°, 14°, we recommend that the HVAC System be serviced prior to closing
B. Cooling Equipment: Unit Brand
Comfort Maker, Carrier
B. Cooling Equipment: Type of System
Electric
B. Cooling Equipment: Older Unit

Additional Notice from the Inspector: It is the opinion of this Inspector, this component may be functioning as intended or in need of minor repairs, you should be aware that this is an older component and the future life expectancy cannot be determined.  You can continue to use and service this component until replacement is necessary.
Any HVAC Units that are more than ten years old are considered older equipment. We recommend that you have the HVAC system serviced regularly which is usually in the spring for the summer months and then again in the fall for the winter months. There are some companies that offer a service plan where you can pay a monthly fee and they will service the unit at recommended times and will put you at the top of the list if there is a problem throughout the year and perform repairs at a discounted rate.

C. Duct System, Chases, and Vents: Comments
C. Duct System, Chases, and Vents: Duct disclaimer

In Texas' hot, humid climate, ductwork in the attic can cause moisture problems. HVAC contractors in Texas often use flexible duct for their attic duct runs. Careless installation practices often result in ducts being intertwined and tangled around each other. If the ducts touch each other, or touch insulation, that contact surface becomes cool enough for moisture in the attic air to condense on the duct. From June through October many people say that it's raining in their house. Their ductwork is reaching the dew point. You stick your hand in between two flex ducts, or between rigid duct and blown insulation, and it comes out sopping wet. Water is dripping over the insulation and through the gypsum board ceiling, because the air conditioner is running all day and night and it is constantly condensing and dripping." Proper separation of the flex ductwork can prevent the condensation and resulting moisture problems.

C. Duct System, Chases, and Vents: Filter location
Ceiling Mounted
C. Duct System, Chases, and Vents: Filter Size
18 x 24, 10 x 10, 20 x 20

HEATING EQUIPMENT 22 TAC 535.230(a) (1) General requirements. (A) The inspector shall report: (i) the type of heating systems; (ii) the energy sources; (B) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (i) inoperative units; (ii) deficiencies in the thermostats; (iii) inappropriate location; (iv) the lack of protection from physical damage; (v) burners, burner ignition devices or heating elements, switches, and thermostats that are not a minimum of 18 inches above the lowest garage floor elevation, unless the unit is listed for garage floor installation; (vi) the absence of an opening that would allow access to equipment for inspection, service, repair or replacement without removing permanent construction or building finish; (vii) when applicable; a floored passageway and service platform that would allow access for equipment inspection, service, repair or replacement; (viii) deficiencies in mounting and performance of window and wall units; (2) Requirements for electric heating units, the inspector shall report deficiencies in: (A) performance of heat pumps; (B) performance of heating elements; and (C) condition of conductors; and (3) Requirements for gas heating units, the inspector shall report as Deficient: (A) gas leaks; (B) flame impingement, uplifting flame, improper flame color, or excessive scale buildup; (C) the absence of a gas shut-off valve within six feet of the appliance; (D) the absence of a gas appliance connector or one that exceeds six feet in length; (E) gas appliance connectors that are concealed within or extended through walls, floors, partitions, ceilings or appliance housings; and (F) deficiencies in: (i) combustion, and dilution air; (ii) gas shut-off valves; (iii) access to a gas shutoff valves that prohibits full operation; (iv) gas appliance connector materials; and (v) the vent pipe, draft hood, draft, proximity to combustibles, and vent termination point and clearances; and COOLING EQUIPMENT 22 TAC 535.230(b) (1) Requirements for cooling units other than evaporative cooler. (A) The inspector shall report the type of systems; (B) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (i) inoperative units; (ii) inadequate cooling as demonstrated by its performance; (iii) the absence of an opening that would allow access to equipment for inspection, service, repair or replacement without removing permanent construction or building finish; (iv) when applicable; a floored passageway and service platform that would allow access for equipment inspection, service, repair or replacement; (v) noticeable vibration of blowers or fans; (vi) water in the auxiliary/secondary drain pan; (vii) a primary drain pipe that discharges in a sewer vent; (viii)missing or deficient refrigerant pipe insulation; (ix) dirty coils, where accessible; (x) condensing units lacking adequate clearances or air circulation or that has deficiencies in the fins, location, levelness, or elevation above grade surfaces; (xi) deficiencies in: (I) the condensate drain and auxiliary/ secondary pan and drain system; (II) mounting and performance of window or wall units; and (III) thermostats. (2) Requirements for evaporative coolers. (A) The inspector shall report: (i) type of systems; (ii) the type of water supply line; (B) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (i) inoperative units; (ii) inadequate access and clearances; (iii) deficiencies in performance or mounting; (iv) missing or damaged components; (v) the presence of active water leaks; and (vi) the absence of backflow prevention. DUCT SYSTEMS, CHASES, AND VENTS 22 TAC 535.230(c) (1) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (A) damaged duct systems or improper material; (B) damaged or missing duct insulation; (C) the absence of air flow at accessible supply registers; (D) the presence of gas piping and sewer vents concealed in ducts, plenums and chases; (E) ducts or plenums in contact with earth; and (2) The inspector shall report as Deficient deficiencies in: (A) filters; (B) grills or registers; and (C) the location of return air openings. GENERAL LIMITATIONS 22 TAC 535.230(d) For heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems inspected under this section, the inspector is not required to perform the following actions: (1) program digital thermostats or controls; (2) inspect: (A) for pressure of the system refrigerant, type of refrigerant, or refrigerant leaks; (B) winterized or decommissioned equipment; or (C) duct fans, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, air purifiers, motorized dampers, electronic air filters, multi-stage controllers, sequencers, heat reclaimers, wood burning stoves, boilers, oil-fired units, supplemental heating appliances, de-icing provisions, or reversing valves; (3) operate: (A) setback features on thermostats or controls; (B) cooling equipment when the outdoor temperature is less than 60 degrees Fahrenheit; (C) radiant heaters, steam heat systems, or unvented gas-fired heating appliances; or (D) heat pumps, in the heat pump mode, when the outdoor temperature is above 70 degrees; (4) verify: (A) compatibility of components; (B) tonnage match of indoor coils and outside coils or condensing units; (C) the accuracy of thermostats; or (D) the integrity of the heat exchanger; or (5) determine: (A) sizing, efficiency, or adequacy of the system; (B) balanced air flow of the conditioned air to the various parts of the building; or (C) types of materials contained in insulation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficient
Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - A. Heating Equipment

Rust/Debris in condensate pan

Rust/debris in the auxiliary condensate drain pan under the evaporator coils. This needs to be replaced. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.1.2 - A. Heating Equipment

Float switch not installed

There is not a float switch installed in the auxiliary drain pan. A float switch will tell the furnace to shut down if there is an accumulation of moisture in the condensate pan to help keep the pan from overflowing and causing damage to the attic and ceiling materials.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.1.3 - A. Heating Equipment

Float switch not operating

The float switch does not appear to be operating properly in the secondary condensate drain pan. We recommend that this be repaired or replaced so that the unit will shut down if condensation accumulates in the pan to prevent damage to the ceiling and attic of the home.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
4.1.4 - A. Heating Equipment

Missing Sediment Trap

The heater gas supply line is not equipped with a sediment trap just before the gas appliance connector. This condition does not meet current installation requirements and should be corrected. 


Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - B. Cooling Equipment

Fins damaged

There are one or more areas on the condensing unit where the fins are damaged and the coils are exposed. We recommend that this unit be serviced and further evaluated by a licensed HVAC Technician prior to closing.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - B. Cooling Equipment

Rust at A-Coils

There is rust visible on the A-Coils we recommend that the unit be serviced prior to closing.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.3 - B. Cooling Equipment

Missing P-Trap

The primary condensate drain line is not equipped with a p-trap. Under current mechanical installation standards, the manufacturer requires a p-trap be installed in the primary condensate drain line within 6-inches of the coil housing.

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.2.4 - B. Cooling Equipment

Code for Locking Caps

2015 International Mechanical Code

1101.10 Locking Access Port Caps

Refrigerant service access ports located outdoors, shall be fitted with locking-type, tamper-resistant caps, or shall otherwise be secured to prevent unauthorized access.


Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
4.3.1 - C. Duct System, Chases, and Vents

DIRTY FILTER


The air filter(s) was dirty. I recommend replacement ASAP. This puts additional strain on the air handler, can shorten the life of the unit, and affects the efficiency of the unit.

Wrench DIY

5 - IV. Plumbing Systems

IN NI NP D
5.1 A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures X
5.2 B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents X X
5.3 C. Water Heating Equipment X X
5.4 D. Hydro-Massage Therapy Equipment X X X
5.5 E. Gas Supply System X X
Location of Main Water Supply Valve
Left side of the home
Location of Water Meter
Within 5' of curb
Static Water Pressure Reading
65 to 70 psi
A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures: Comments
A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures: Material - Distribution
Galvanized, Pex
A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures: Water flow

The water flow was tested by running water in more than one faucet simultaneously to check for a pressure drop and to see if the valves operated correctly. At the time of inspection there were no deficiencies in the water flow unless otherwise noted in this report.

B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents: Comments
B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents: Functional Flow

Water was ran through all drains in the home for an extended period of time to determine if functional drainage was occurring. No hindered drainage was present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. Lived-in conditions can not be adequately replicated during an inspection. There is no way to tell the outcome of future drainage conditions due to heavy or frequent use. Also we can only report on the drain pipe material that is visible we have no knowledge of the material that is underground. We recommend that you consider  having the drain line scoped by a licensed plumber to see what the material is under ground and if there are any deficiencies such as breaks or blockages in the drain lines that were not made evident when running water in the home at the time of inspection.

B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents: Location of the cleanout
Not visible
B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents: Material
PVC, Galvanized
C. Water Heating Equipment: Comments
C. Water Heating Equipment: Location
Laundry Room, Garage Closet
C. Water Heating Equipment: Aproximate build date
2006
C. Water Heating Equipment: Power Source
Gas
C. Water Heating Equipment: # Capacity
50 Gallon
C. Water Heating Equipment: Manufacturer
Bradford & White
C. Water Heating Equipment: Water heaters can be dangerous if temperature is set too high!

Please test the temperature of the water before placing a child in the bath or shower.  Do not leave a child or an infirm person in the bath unsupervised

DANGER: Hot water can be dangerous, especially for infants, children, the elderly, or infirm.  Hot water scald potential if the thermostat is set too high.  Water temperatures over 125 F (52 C) can cause severe burns or scalding resulting in death.  Hot water can cause first degree burns with exposure for as little as:


.

C. Water Heating Equipment: Bonding & Grounding

At the time of the inspection, the water heater appeared to be improperly bonded & grounded.

D. Hydro-Massage Therapy Equipment: Comments
E. Gas Supply System: Comments
A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures: Plumbing Limitations

During this inspection the inspector will check the supply piping and drain lines for leaks and corrosion of the piping where readily visible. (we can not speculate on plumbing between walls drain pan is in showers or other areas or components that are covered or concealed) There are issues that may not be present at the time of inspection and could manifest themselves over time and even soon after the inspection is over. Seals and valves will fail especially in older home and leaks will likely occur in the future.  Seals and packing on valve stems/handles will eventually give way and need replacement.  We would like to help you understand that these potential issues are all part of living in a home and it is not a matter of if these issues will come up, it is when they will come up. If you remodel your bathrooms, spend a little extra money on fixtures with a lifetime warranty so that when these issues occur you can have the manufacturer send the parts to you for replacement. Another wise decision to make would be to have a licensed plumber scope the drain lines of this home. To check for blockages and breaks in the line that may not have shown themselves at the time of inspection.

C. Water Heating Equipment: Annual Maintenance Flush Needed

It is recommended to have the water heating unit cleaned and serviced by a licensed & qualified plumber. The observations made to support the rendering of this opinion are listed but may not be limited to the following:

C. Water Heating Equipment: Note: Older/Aged Equipment

Additional Notice from the Inspector: This component may be functioning as intended or in need of minor repairs, you should be aware that this is an older component and the future life expectancy cannot be determined.  You can continue to use and service this component until replacement is necessary.

PLUMBING SYSTEMS 22 TAC 535.231(a) (1)The inspector shall: (A) report: (i) location of water meter; (ii) location of homeowners main water supply shutoff valve; and (iii) static water pressure; (B) report as Deficient: (i) the presence of active leaks; (ii) water pressure in excess of 80 PSI; (iii) the lack of a pressure reducing valve when the water pressure exceeds 80 PSI; (iv) the lack of an expansion tank at the water heater(s) when a pressure reducing valve is in place at the water supply line/system, unless the pressure reducing valve automatically allows for thermal expansion; (v) the absence of: (I) fixture shut-off valves; (II) dielectric unions, when applicable; (III) back-flow devices, anti-siphon devices, or air gaps at the flow end of fixtures; and (vi) deficiencies in: (I) water supply pipes and waste pipes; (II) the installation and termination of the vent system; (III) the performance of fixtures and faucets not connected to an appliance; (IV) water supply, as determined by viewing functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; (V) fixture drain performance; (VI) orientation of hot and cold faucets; (VII) installed mechanical drain stops; (VIII) commodes, fixtures, showers, tubs, and enclosures; and (IX) the condition of the gas distribution system. (2) The inspector is not required to: (A) operate any main, branch, or shut-off valves; (B) operate or inspect sump pumps or waste ejector pumps; (C) verify the performance of: (i) the bathtub overflow; (ii) clothes washing machine drains or hose bibbs; or (iii) floor drains; (D) inspect: (i) any system that has been winterized, shut down or otherwise secured; (ii) circulating pumps, free-standing appliances, solar water heating systems, waterconditioning equipment, filter systems, water mains, private water supply systems, water wells, pressure tanks, sprinkler systems, swimming pools, or fire sprinkler systems; (iii) inaccessible gas supply system components for leaks; (iv) for sewer clean-outs; or (v) for the presence or performance of private sewage disposal systems; or (E) determine: (i) quality, potability, or volume of the water supply; or (ii) effectiveness of backflow or antisiphon devices. WATER HEATERS 22 TAC 535.231(b) (1) General requirements. (A) The inspector shall: (i) report: (I) the energy source; (II) the capacity of the units; (ii) report as Deficient: (I) inoperative units; (II) leaking or corroded fittings or tanks; (III) damaged or missing components; (IV) the absence of a cold water shutoff valve; (V) if applicable, the absence of a pan or a pan drain system that does not terminate over a waste receptor or to the exterior of the building above the ground surface; (VI) inappropriate locations; (VII) the lack of protection from physical damage; (VIII) burners, burner ignition devices or heating elements, switches, or thermostats that are not a minimum of 18 inches above the lowest garage floor elevation, unless the unit is listed for garage floor installation; (IX) the absence of an opening that would allow access to equipment for inspection, service, repair or replacement without removing permanent construction or building finish; (X) when applicable; a floored passageway and service platform that would allow access for equipment inspection, service, repair or replacement; (XI) the absence of or deficiencies in the temperature and pressure relief valve and discharge piping; (XII) a temperature and pressure relief valve that failed to operate, when tested manually; (B) The inspector is not required to: (i) verify the effectiveness of the temperature and pressure relief valve, discharge piping, or pan drain pipes; (ii) operate the temperature and pressure relief valve if the operation of the valve may, in the inspector's reasonable judgment, cause damage to persons or property; or (iii) determine the efficiency or adequacy of the unit. (2) Requirements for electric units, the inspector shall report deficiencies in: (A) performance of heating elements; and (B) condition of conductors; and (3) Requirements for gas units, the inspector shall report as Deficient: (A) gas leaks; (B) flame impingement, uplifting flame, improper flame color, or excessive scale build-up; (C) the absence of a gas shut-off valve within six feet of the appliance; (D) the absence of a gas appliance connector or one that exceeds six feet in length; (E) gas appliance connectors that are concealed within or extended through walls, floors, partitions, ceilings or appliance housings; (F) deficiencies in: (i) combustion and dilution air; (ii) gas shut-off valves; (iii) access to a gas shutoff valves that prohibit full operation; (iv) gas appliance connector materials; and (v) vent pipe, draft hood, draft, proximity to combustibles, and vent termination point and clearances. HYDRO-MASSAGE THERAPY EQUIPMENT 22 TAC 535.231(c) (1) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (A) inoperative units; (B) the presence of active leaks; (C) deficiencies in components and performance; (D) missing and damaged components; (E) the absence of an opening that would allow access to equipment for inspection, service, repair or replacement without removing permanent construction or building finish; and (F) the absence or failure of operation of ground-fault circuit interrupter protection devices; and (2) The inspector is not required to determine the adequacy of self-draining features of circulation systems.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficient
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures

Pressure is low at one or more faucets

The water pressure is low at one or more faucets throughout the home we recommend that this be further evaluated by a licensed plumber,  this is likely due to the faucet itself and may need to be repaired or replaced. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.1.2 - A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures

One Inch Air Gap @ Ballcock

The commode tank overflow tube should be adjusted so to be at least 1-inch lower than the ballcock assembly (tank valve) head seal. The lack of this air-gap could cause a cross connection and should be corrected as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents

Acordion drain lines

Although, Accordion Drain line material is easy to use, it is not recommended for use in sinks because it is thin, easily torn, and the ridges on these piping materials are known to catch trash and clog easily.


Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.2.2 - B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents

Drain stops not working properly

One or more drain stops are not working properly or are missing in the sinks/bathtubs of this home.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - C. Water Heating Equipment

Code for Water Heater Pan

International Residential Code for One & Two-Family Dwellings
P2801.5 Required pan.

Where water heaters or hot water storage tanks are installed in locations where leakage of the tanks or connections will cause damage, the tank or water heater shall be installed in a galvanized steel pan having a minimum thickness of 24 gauge (0.016 inches) (0.4 mm) or other pans for such use. Listed pans shall comply with CSA LC3.
P2801.5.1 Pan size and drain.
The pan shall be not less than 11/2 inches (38 mm) deep and shall be of sufficient size and shape to receive all dripping or condensate from the tank or water heater. The pan shall be drained by an indirect waste pipe having a minimum diameter of 3/4 inch (19 mm). Piping for safety pan drains shall be of those materials listed in Table P2904.5.
P2801.5.2 Pan drain termination.
The pan drain shall extend full-size and terminate over a suitably located indirect waste receptor or shall extend to the exterior of the building and terminate not less than 6 inches (152 mm) and not more than 24 inches (610 mm) above the adjacent ground surface.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - C. Water Heating Equipment

Galvanized piping is used at water heater.

There is galvanized piping used at the water heater connections.  Due to the nature of galvanized piping, it can react with natural gas and cause flaking.  This can potentially cause premature failure of the water heater. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.5.1 - E. Gas Supply System

No visible bonding or grounding wires on gas system

There are no visible wires on the gas meter that indicate that this gas supply is properly bonded or grounded to the electrical system. We recommend that this system be checked for proper bonding and grounding by a licensed electrician and repaired as recommended.


G2411.1 (310.1) Pipe and tubing other than CSST. Each above-ground portion of a gas piping system other than corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) that is likely to become energized shall be electrically continuous and bonded to an effective ground-fault current path. Gas piping other than
CSST shall be considered to be bonded where it is connected to appliances that are connected to the equipment grounding conductor of the circuit supplying that appliance.

Electric Electrical Contractor

6 - V. Appliances

IN NI NP D
6.1 A. Dishwashers X X
6.2 B. Food Waste Disposers X
6.3 C. Range Hood and Exhaust Systems X X
6.4 D. Ranges, Cooktops, and Ovens X
6.5 E. Microwave Ovens X
6.6 F. Mechanical Exhaust Vents and Bathroom Heaters X
6.7 G. Garage Door Operators X
6.8 H. Dryer Exhaust Systems X
6.9 I. Other/Warming Drawer X
Mechanical Systems Notice

Mechanical components like dishwashers, ovens, stoves, water heaters, HVAC units, ect. can and will break down. A home inspection tells you the condition of the component at the time of the home inspection. The inspector is not required to determine life expectancy of any system or component. [Rule 535.227(b)(3)(C)(i)]
There is not any "fool proof" way to determine the future performance of any mechanical systems.
All areas of the home are inspected in a time frame of a few hours of one day and are not representative of regular full load of every day use by occupants. We strive to find the obvious visible deficiencies in our home inspections and report on such deficiencies. We cannot see items that are behind walls, under floors, or otherwise concealed from view.

A. Dishwashers: Comments

The dishwasher was operated by running a wash cycle, and was functional at the time of inspection. No leaks or water was present at the base of the unit at the completion of the cycle. The unit's efficiency of cleaning dishes is not tested for. No deficiencies were observed with the unit unless otherwise noted in this report.

A. Dishwashers: Manufacturer
General Electric
B. Food Waste Disposers: Comments

The food waste disposal was inspected to determine it was functional while also looking for leaks from the unit, an exposed power cord, heavy rust, or other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

B. Food Waste Disposers: Manufacturer
Badger
C. Range Hood and Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Hood Type
Vented
C. Range Hood and Exhaust Systems: Manufacturer
Dacor
D. Ranges, Cooktops, and Ovens: Comments
D. Ranges, Cooktops, and Ovens: Cook Top Manufacturer
Unknown
D. Ranges, Cooktops, and Ovens: Oven Manufacturer
Wolf
D. Ranges, Cooktops, and Ovens: Range/Oven Energy Source
Gas, Electric
E. Microwave Ovens: Comments

The microwave was tested by running on "Cook" mode and was functional at the time of inspection. The efficiency of the unit or other functions are not tested for. No reportable conditions were present unless otherwise noted in this report.

E. Microwave Ovens: Manufacturer
Dacor
F. Mechanical Exhaust Vents and Bathroom Heaters: Comments

The exhaust fan was operated. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

G. Garage Door Operators: Garage Door Opener Brands:
LiftMaster
H. Dryer Exhaust Systems: Comments
I. Other/Warming Drawer: Comments

GENERAL PROVISIONS 22 TAC 535.232(a) The inspector is not required to: (1) operate or determine the condition of other auxiliary components of inspected items; (2) test for microwave oven radiation leaks; (3) inspect self-cleaning functions; (4) disassemble appliances; (5) determine the adequacy of venting systems; or (6) determine proper routing and lengths of duct systems. DISHWASHERS 22 TAC 535.232(b) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (1) inoperative units; (2) deficiencies in performance or mounting; (3) rusted, missing or damaged components; (4) the presence of active water leaks; and (5) the absence of backflow prevention. FOOD WASTE DISPOSERS 22 TAC 535.232(c) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (1) inoperative units; (2) deficiencies in performance or mounting; (3) missing or damaged components; and (4) the presence of active water leaks. RANGE HOODS AND EXHAUST SYSTEMS 22 TAC 535.232(d) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (1) inoperative units; (2) deficiencies in performance or mounting; (3) missing or damaged components; (4) ducts that do not terminate outside the building, if the unit is not of a re-circulating type or configuration; and (5) improper duct material.  ELECTRIC OR GAS RANGES, COOKTOPS, AND OVENS 22 TAC 535.232(e) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (1) inoperative units; (2) missing or damaged components; (3) combustible material within thirty inches above the cook top burners; (4) absence of an anti-tip device, if applicable; (5) gas leaks; (6) the absence of a gas shutoff valve within six feet of the appliance; (7) the absence of a gas appliance connector or one that exceeds six feet in length; (8) gas appliance connectors that are concealed within or extended through walls, floors, partitions, ceilings or appliance housings; (9) deficiencies in: (A) thermostat accuracy (within 25 degrees at a setting of 350 F); (B) mounting and performance; (C) gas shut-off valves; (D) access to a gas shutoff valves that prohibits full operation; and (E) gas appliance connector materials. MICROWAVE OVENS 22 TAC 535.232(f) The inspector shall inspect built-in units and report as Deficient: (1) inoperative units; (2) deficiencies in performance or mounting; and (3) missing or damaged components. MECHANICAL EXHAUST SYSTEMS AND BATHROOM HEATERS 22 TAC 535.232(g) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (1) inoperative units; (2) deficiencies in performance or mounting; (3) missing or damaged components; (4) ducts that do not terminate outside the building; and (5) a gas heater that is not vented to the exterior of the building unless the unit is listed as an unvented type.  GARAGE DOOR OPERATORS 22 TAC 535.232(h) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (1) inoperative units; (2) deficiencies in performance or mounting; (3) missing or damaged components; (4) installed photoelectric sensors located more than six inches above the garage floor; and (5) door locks or side ropes that have not been removed or disabled.  DRYER EXHAUST SYSTEMS 22 TAC 535.232(i) The inspector shall report as Deficient: (1) missing or damaged components; (2) the absence of a dryer exhaust system when provisions are present for a dryer; (3) ducts that do not terminate to the outside of the building; (4) screened terminations; and (5) ducts that are not made of metal with a smooth interior finish.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficient
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - A. Dishwashers

Hight loop missing

DISHWASHER HIGH LOOP MISSING
A "high loop" or "air gap" was not present for the dishwasher drain line at visible portions. A high loop or air gap prevents wastewater from siphoning back into the dishwasher during operation. The proper installation of the dishwasher drain line is recommended by a licensed plumber or other qualified person.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - C. Range Hood and Exhaust Systems

Exhaust Fan Inoperable

Exhaust fan was inoperable. Recommend a qualified contractor repair. 

Contractor Qualified Professional