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1234 Main St.
Chicago, Illinois 60618
10/13/2019 9:00AM

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1 - Inspection Details

General Inspection Info: In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent, Listing Agent
General Inspection Info: Occupancy
Vacant
General Inspection Info: Weather Conditions
Sunny, Hot
General Inspection Info: Type of Building
Condominium
About Your Inspection Report:

Thank you for choosing Home Inspection Geeks for your inspection!  We are honored that you have entrusted us with your current or future home.  Before you start reading this report there are a couple of key items to note:


1) Remember that a home inspection is a visual inspection, we are not able to remove any component or structure to further evaluate a potential issue.  We report on defects that could be signs of more major issues.  That is why there are some recommendations in the report to seek further evaluation from a licensed professional as they can complete a thorough diagnostic analysis of a particular issue and give you a price estimate for what the repair might cost.


2) During the inspection, there may have been several items that were not accessible due to personal items being in the way or obstruction blocking our ability to visually see an item or space.  Some examples of this are snow on a roof, a painted electrical panel disallowing screws to be removed, or a cluttered garage space.  Unfortunately, we cannot inspect what we cannot see.  If there was something that couldn't be inspected, it is listed in the report.  We are more than happy to come back on a later date when the obstruction has been removed.


3) We are thorough when it comes to inspecting the components of your house and there may be a lot of items listed as "action recommended".  It is important to note that not all defects are created equal.  Some items may cost only a few dollars to fix or replace, while others may require a few thousand dollars to repair.  It is important to get quotes from licensed contractors for any repairs that are suggested.  You may contact us to get a range of what something might cost to repair, but we are not a licensed contractor and are not liable if a contractor's quote is different than our estimate.


4) Please excuse any typos found in the report.  While our goal is to provide you with a comprehensive report and to check our verbiage as we are writing, we are not perfect and some errors do get glanced over!


5) Our service to you does not stop here.  Please feel free to call us at 773-242-9358 with any questions on the report or even after you have moved into your new home!  A phone call is always free!

About Your Inspection Report: Condo Disclaimer

The scope of work for this condo inspection only covers what is considered the home owner's responsibly and not common elements that are the responsibility of the building or Home Owner's Association (HOA).   Normally if the component is located within the unit, it is the responsibility for the unit owner, but there may be certain circumstances this is not the case and you should check with your realtor or attorney to verify what you will be responsible for.  Typical systems/components that are not included within our scope if they are not within the unit: hot water source, main supply/drain plumbing lines, and HVAC equipment and lines.  Additionally, the roof and exterior components are common elements and are not included within this inspection.  If you wish to have any of these common elements inspected, feel free to contact us to obtain pricing information for inspecting these additional components.

How to Read This Report: Information, Limitations, Standards, and Observations

This report is broken up into Sections organized by Systems/Areas of the home for your convenience.  The sections are constructed as follows:

1) Informational - This subsection includes information about the section's specific system (such as the type of siding material or the manufacturer of your HVAC equipment if applicable).  This subsection also includes information about what was inspected and how we inspected each component for that system.  Lastly, some Sections have tips for homeowners to let you know what you will need to do in the future to make sure that that your home is properly maintained.

2) Limitations - If you click on the 2nd tab next to the Information Subsection, you will be directed to the Limitations subsection for that system or area.  While we are as thorough as we possibly can be during our inspection, a home inspection is not an exhaustive test of all of the home's systems and hence we record any limitations we encounter.  This subsection tells you what limitations we encountered at the time of inspection and if follow up action is recommended on your part.

3) Standards of Practice (SOP) - If you click on the 3rd tab next to Limitations, you will be directed to the SOP subsection for that system or area. We use the International Association of Certifed Home Inspectors' (InterNACHI) SOP as our guide for what to inspect.  While we try to exceed the inspection scope set by this standard, this SOP defines what at a minimum we are required to cover under our scope of work.  We have included a system breakdown of the SOP in the report for your convenience and for you to reference.

4) Observations - Underneath the Information/Limitations/SOP tabs is the observations section in which you will note each observation has its own envelope.  This is the part of the section that we document any material defects, safety hazards, deferred maintenance, or issues to monitor that were observed during the inspection.  Please note that not all defects are created equal and that there is no such thing as a perfect home.  Just because items are listed in this section doesn't mean that immediate action needs to be taken.  For your convenience, we have categorized observations into three color-coded bins.  They are as follows:

Upgrade/Consideration - These are items where we believe it is not appropriate to ask for compensation or repair from the seller as they are more modern safety upgrades or are cosmetic damage only.  These items are reported for your consideration and are improvements that may be made in the future for your benefit.

Maintain/Monitor - These are items where deferred maintenance was observed.  Also, some items with low-cost repairs such as missing sealant or a door misaligned are also included in this category.  Lastly, items that are not in themselves a material defect, but show potential signs of a larger future issue are listed in this category and are also labeled as monitor under recommendations.

Action Recommended - These are the items that we recommend be repaired as soon as possible.  Material defects and safety issues make up most of what is reported in this category.  Note, just because we list a defect in this category does not mean that it will cost a lot to repair. It is your responsibility to get quotes from a licensed contractor.

Two final items to also quickly note.  First, within any observation, there is a recommended follow up action to be taken whether it is to consult a contractor, DIY, or monitor an issue.  Second, if you are just interested in seeing the summary of issues only (This includes the orange and red categories) then you may click on the summary tab at the top of the report page to view this summary.

We'll Buy Your Home Back

If our home inspectors misses anything, InterNACHI will buy your home back.  

And now for the fine print:

  • It's valid for home inspections performed for home buyers or sellers by participating InterNACHI members.
  • The home must be listed for sale with a licensed real estate agent.
  • The Guarantee excludes homes with material defects not present at the time of the inspection, or not required to be inspected, per InterNACHI's Residential Standards of Practice.
  • The Guarantee will be honored for 90 days after closing.
  • We'll pay you whatever price you paid for the home.

For more information, please visit www.nachi.org/buy.


Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice while reading this inspection report.  I performed the home inspection according to the standards and my clients wishes and expectations.  Please refer to the inspection contract or agreement between the inspector and the inspector's client.  

2 - Kitchen Components and Appliances

Counters and Cabinets: Cabinetry Material
Metal
Counters and Cabinets: Countertop Material
Composite, Laminate
Food Waste Disposer: FT - Disposer
Functionally tested by turning on disposer.
Kitchen Exhaust: Exhaust Type
Continuous
Ceiling, Walls, and Floor: Visually Inspected

I visually inspected the Kitchen's Ceilings, Walls, and Floors for signs of staining and deterioration.

Counters and Cabinets: Visually Inspected Counters

I visually inspected the kitchen counters to ensure they were secure and that proper sealant has been applied to joints.  

Counters and Cabinets: Functionally Tested Cabinets

I functionally tested a representative number of cabinets by opening and closing them.

Plumbing Drain and Vent Systems: Visually inspected

Visually inspected the physical condition of the drain lines underneath the kitchen sink and check for proper p-trap(s).

Plumbing Water Supply Faucets and Fixtures: Functionally Tested

Functionally tested faucet(s) for hot water and adequate water flow.  Also, checked supply connections for leaks.

Electrical Outlets, Switches and Fixtures: Functionally Tested Outlets

I functionally tested outlets for GFCI protection (near the sink) utilizing my external GFCI circuit tester.

Ranges/Ovens/Cooktops: Functionally Tested

Functionally Tested by turning on burners and verifying oven heats up utilizing infrared camera or thermometer.

Microwave: Functionally Tested

I functionally tested microwave by running for 30-60 seconds and heating a cup of water or some other element.

Refridgerator: Visually inspected

Verified cooling capability of the refrigerator and freezer using my IR thermometer or camera.

Smoke Detectors: Functionally Tested.
Functionally tested smoke detectors by pressing test button on detector. 

Required placement of smoke detectors near the kitchen is inconsistent between municipalities, but it is a good practice to have a smoke detector located near or on the ceiling within 15 feet of the stove.  Please contact your municipality if you would like to know the exact local requirements. 

Plumbing Drain and Vent Systems: Could Not See Main Drain/Vent Line

The main drain/vent line was not visible as the sink drain connection to the line was covered.  I could not verify if connections made to this line were acceptable and could not confirm proper venting of the line.

Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Counters and Cabinets

Cabinets Misaligned

Some Cabinets are mis-aligned and do not properly close.  Recommend repair as desired.
Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
2.2.2 - Counters and Cabinets

Deteriorating Sealant at Countertops

I noted deteriorated watertight sealant noted between countertops and wall.  This can lead to water seeping behind the cabinets which could lead to microbial growth.  Recommend old sealant be removed and new silicone-based caulk be added to ensure a watertight seal at any joint between wall and countertop.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
2.6.1 - Electrical Outlets, Switches and Fixtures

Non-GFCI Outlet Present

Non-GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) outlet(s) were present. This is a shock hazard.  Recommend repair.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.11.1 - Smoke Detectors

Non functional detector

Detector did not function recommend repair or replacement with a dual purpose smoke and carbon monoxide detector

Contractor Qualified Professional

3 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Materials
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Covering(s)
Hardwood T&G, Tile
Doors: Construction
Wood, Solid
Windows: Window Types
Double-hung, Thermal/Insulated, Tilt feature
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Visually Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls, and ceilings for the kitchen and surrounding area.  Looked for deterioration of surfaces and any staining that could be related to microbial growth.

Doors: Functionally Tested

I inspected a representative number of doors according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate door locks and door stops, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 


Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate window locks and operation features, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Inspected for Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

I inspected for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. 

There should be a smoke detector in every sleeping room, outside of every sleeping room, and one every level of a house. 

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component for proper installation of the system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; 
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 
  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. 

The inspector shall describe: 

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; 
  • photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and 
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. 

Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Floors, Walls, Ceilings

Paint Cracking

Wall paint was cracking in one or more areas. Recommend a qualified painter evaluate and apply a new coat.

Here is a DIY article on treating cracking paint

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Floors, Walls, Ceilings

Built in drawer not functioning properly

I observed a built in storage system in a closet where the drawers did not slide in and out properly. Recommend repair as desired.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Windows

Missing Window Screen

I observed a missing window screen. 

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Windows

Window Would Not close

I observed a window that would not close. 

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.3.3 - Windows

windows were hard to open

In general the windows were hard to open this is a maintenance issue. Recommend further evaluation and repair as needed.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

Cover Not In Place

I observed a receptacle with a cover (plate) that was not in place. This is a shock hazard. Recommend repair. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.4.2 - Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

Cover Plates Missing or Damaged

I observed one or more wall receptacles with a missing or damaged cover plate. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.4.3 - Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

Closet Light Fixture Missing Cover

Noted a light fixture in a clothing closet without a cover.  This is a fire hazard as a hot light bulb may be near combustibles.  Recommend cover be installed.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

Non functioning detector

Detector did not function recommend repair or replacement with a dual purpose smoke and carbon monoxide detector

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Bathrooms

Cabinetry, Ceiling, Walls & Floor: Visually Inspected

I visually inspected the bathroom floors, walls, and ceilings.  Also, I inspected the vanity and other cabinets.

Door: Functionally Tested

I functionally tested the bathroom door by opening and closing the door and ensuring it latched properly.

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water

I ran water at all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

Plumbing Water Supply and Distribution Systems and Fixtures: Functionally Tested Water Supply
Functionally tested all faucets and verified hot water.  Tested water flow by turning on sink and tub at same time. 
Plumbing Drain, Waste and Vent Systems: Visually inspected.

Visually inspected all drain piping to ensure no deterioration and to ensure proper P-Traps are installed to prevent backflow of sewer gases.

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: GFCI-Protection Tested

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. 

Bathroom Toilets: Functionally Tested

I flushed all bathroom toilets and checks for proper anchor connection to the floor.

Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing; and 
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.

Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Cabinetry, Ceiling, Walls & Floor

Wall Damage

I observed damage at the tile on the bathroom wall. This is a cosmetic issue. Recommend repair as desired.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
4.1.2 - Cabinetry, Ceiling, Walls & Floor

Deteriorating tile geout

Tile grout is deteriorating

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
4.1.3 - Cabinetry, Ceiling, Walls & Floor

Deteriorating caulking

Noted deteriorating caulking between the tile and the wall. This could allow moisture penetration between the tile and the wall. This could potentially create moisture damage and microbial growth. Recommend the old caulking be stripped and replaced.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.3.1 - Sinks, Tubs & Showers

Deteriorating caulking.

Noted deteriorating caulking between the tub and the wall. This could allow moisture penetration between the tub and the wall. This could potentially create moisture damage and microbial growth. Recommend the old caulking be stripped and replaced.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
4.3.2 - Sinks, Tubs & Showers

Deteriorating tile grout

The grouting between the tiles has begun to deteriorate. This could allow moisture penetration behind the tiles. Moisture trapped behind the tile could allow potential moisture damage and microbial growth. Recommend repair via a Qualified professional. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.3.3 - Sinks, Tubs & Showers

Tub spout leak

I observed that the tub spout had a slight leak when the water was turned off at the handle. Recommend further evaluation and repair as necessary. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Plumbing Water Supply and Distribution Systems and Fixtures

Dirty faucet aerator

I observed that the faucet aerator was dirty and restricting the water flow at the sink faucet. Recommend maintenance or repair as necessary.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
4.6.1 - GFCI & Electric in Bathroom

Light Within Shower/Tub Defect

I observed a lighting fixture within close proximity of a shower/tub fixture. It does not appear to be an approved lighting fixture that is permitted in this zone. 

This zone is 3 feet horizontal by 8 feet vertical above the threshold of a shower or the rim of a bathtub. This is a hazardous condition. 

A recessed or surface mounted light fixture is allowed in this zone, but it must be designed for use in a damp location. I will not be able to confirm or deny this type of fixture. It's beyond the scope of a home inspection. Further evaluation is recommended in order to be safe. 

Electric Electrical Contractor

5 - Plumbing

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Location of Main Shut-Off Valve
Unable to Determine
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Main DWV Lines Not Inspected (Common Element)

The Main Drain, Waste, and Vent line piping is a common element of the building and is the Homeowner's Association's responsibility. The piping was not visible within the unit.  Therefore, this is outside the scope of this inspection.

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Main Supply Lines Not Inspected (Common Element)

The main supply piping is a common element of the building and is the Homeowner's Association's responsibility. The piping was not visible within the unit.  Therefore, this is outside the scope of this inspection.

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: No Main Shutoff within Unit

There was no main shutoff valve within the unit.  It is recommended that you consult with building management on the exact location of the main shutoff for the unit to ensure you are able to isolate plumbing lines for future remodel or maintenance work.

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the drain pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the drainage pipes were hidden within the walls.  

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Inside of Drain Lines Not Inspected

Inspection of the inside of any DWV lines via a camera is not included within the scope of this inspection. It is recommended to have this done by a licensed plumber prior to close to ensure there is no clog in underground sewer piping (which may lead to future flooding) and that the line is still intact.   

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the water supply pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the water distribution pipes, valves and connections were hidden within the walls.  

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the main water supply shut-off valve;
  2. the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  3. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  4. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  5. all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  6. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  7. the drain, waste and vent system; and
  8. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  2. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  3. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  4. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
  5. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  2. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  3. active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; and  
  4. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate.


6 - Electrical

Electrical Wiring: Type of Wiring, If Visible
Conduit, Metal flex
Panelboards & Breakers: Panel Manufacturer
Not labeled
Service Grounding & Bonding: Inspected the Service Grounding & Bonding

I inspected the electrical service grounding and bonding.

Main Service Disconnect: Homeowner's Responsibility

It's your job to know where the main electrical panel is located, including the main service disconnect that turns everything off. 

Be sure to test your GFCIs, AFCIs, and smoke detectors regularly. You can replace light bulbs, but more than that, you ought to hire an electrician. Electrical work is hazardous and mistakes can be fatal. Hire a professional whenever there's an electrical problem in your house. 

Main Service Disconnect: Main Disconnect Rating, If Labeled
Not Labeled

I observed indications of the main service disconnect's amperage rating. It was labeled. 

Panelboards & Breakers: Inspected Main Panelboard & Breakers

I inspected the electrical panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses). 

Electrical Wiring: Unable to Inspect All of the Wiring

I was unable to inspect all of the electrical wiring. Obviously, most of the wiring is hidden from view within walls. Beyond the scope of a visual home inspection. 

Service Grounding & Bonding: Unable to Confirm Proper Grounding and Bonding

I was unable to confirm proper installation of the system grounding and bonding according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the grounding and bonding as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the service drop;
  2. the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  3. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  4. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  5. the electric meter and base;
  6. service-entrance conductors;
  7. the main service disconnect;
  8. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  9. service grounding and bonding;
  10. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  11. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  12. for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  2. the type of wiring observed.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  2. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  3. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  4. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and
  5. the absence of smoke and/or carbon monoxide detectors. 


Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Main Service Disconnect

Main Disconnect Missing

I was unable to find a main electrical disconnect. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Panelboards & Breakers

Missing Identification of Disconnects at Panel

I observed missing/inadequate identification of each circuit. 

Each circuit must be clearly identified as to its purpose. No two circuits should be labeled the same. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
6.3.2 - Panelboards & Breakers

Missing Deadfront Screws

Noted missing dead front panel screws.  Recommend installing new screws.

Wrenches Handyman

7 - Heating

Heating System Information: Heating Method
Hot-Water Heating System
Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Multiple locations
Heating System Information: Homeowner's Responsibility

Most HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. They consist of four components: controls, fuel supply, heating or cooling unit, and distribution system. The adequacy of heating and cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

It's your job to get the HVAC system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system as an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned. 

Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Radiant heat control valves

There are control valves located on every radiant heat source throughout the unit. These valves are operated to use that specific heating element. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the heating system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the heating system;
  2. the energy source; and
  3. the heating method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any heating system that did not operate; and
  2. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible.

8 - Cooling

Cooling System Information: Cooling Equipment Manufacturer
Sharp
Cooling System Information: Homeowner's Responsibility

Most air-conditioning systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. The adequacy of the cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

It's your job to get the air conditioning system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system as an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned. 

Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Multiple locations

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the cooling system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and
  2. the cooling method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any cooling system that did not operate; and
  2. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.