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1234 Main St.
Loveland, Ohio 45140
11/21/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
2
Maintenance item
13
Prioritized observations
5
Immediate concern

1 - Inspection Details

Client Name
Happy Client
Inspection Date
08/21/2019
In Attendance
Client
Occupancy
Occupied
Type of Building
Single Family
Building Age
1-5 yrs
Temperature (approximate)
77 Fahrenheit (F)
Weather Conditions
Clear
About Your Report

Thank you for allowing Horizon Point Inspections to conduct your whole house inspection. We have prepared this confidential report for your personal use only. We suggest you read the ENTIRE report, if there is anything you don't understand within this report, please feel free to call your inspector for further clarification. 

Your home inspection report is based on the VISIBLE condition of the major systems and components accessible at the time of the inspection. This inspection is not a warranty, insurance policy or guarantee for your new home. Horizon Point Inspections follows the ASHI Standards of Practice than an exhaustive evaluation of a system or component. The ASHI SOPs are within this report and were sent as an attachment with your confirmation email after you scheduled your inspection. 

This inspection is not intended to list or point out cosmetic issues. For example, drywall nail pops, loose baseboard, squeaky floors, or loose door handles. We are looking for the proper function and safe operation of the systems and components of the house. These systems include the roof and chimney system, exterior cladding and drainage system, interior components including the walls/ceilings, garage door, windows, electrical outlets and fireplace, attic system, electrical system, structural, plumbing, and HVAC systems.
During your inspection, a representative number of building components were viewed in areas that were accessible. We cannot inspect items concealed within the walls, under concrete slabs or in other areas not visible without removing permanently assembled components or moving personal property.

Your inspection was conducted according to the Standards of Practice of the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) and is intended to provide you (client) with information about the condition of inspected systems and components at the time of the inspection. Horizon Point Inspections does provide additional services above and beyond the ASHI Standards of Practice. All of our ancillary services are provided through our 3rd party vendors.

Your inspector shall inspect readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components listed in the ASHI Standards of Practice. Horizon Point will provide you with a written report stating any systems or components inspected that, in the professional judgment of the inspector, need repairs or replacement, are not functioning as intended, unsafe, or near the end of their intended service life.  Your inspector is not required to determine methods, materials, or document cost for corrections. The inspector shall list any systems or components that were not present or could not be inspected and why the component was not inspected.

Please review our the link below for the typical life expectancy of items in your home.

Life Expectancy Chart

Building requirements change, this is NOT a code inspection. While this inspection company makes every effort to point out safety issues, we cannot point out all safety issues that may be covered or concealed at the time of the inspection. It is common that homes of any age will have had repairs performed by the owner and some repairs may not be in a workmanlike manner. Some areas may appear less than standard. This inspection company looks for items that are defective, unsafe or not functioning as intended.  Sometimes homes have signs of damaged wood from wood destroying insects. We suggest having a wood destroying insect inspection by a licensed pest control company prior to closing to investigate for wood destroying insect activity.

We suggest having a qualified contractor in the respected trade repair or replace any of the noted observations items documented in this report prior to closing. Horizon Point Inspections does not perform re-inspections of any of the listed items in this inspection report. It is the client's responsibility to collect the proper receipts and documentation for any requested repairs from the sellers or sellers agent prior to closing.

If this is a vacant or foreclosed property, there is an increasing potential that some adverse conditions affecting the systems and components of the house will not be visible during the inspection and may become evident only after completion of the inspection. We suggest having an air quality and/or mold test conducted for homes that have been vacant for an extended amount of time.

If the plumbing, heating, cooling or electrical systems are not on at the time of the inspection we will not be able to complete the inspection. A follow-up inspection will need to be scheduled and additional fees may apply.

Horizon Point Inspections will not restore service to or make arrangements to have service restored to any system or component which is not on at the time of the inspection. This inspection company will not remove any system or component from service or make arrangements to have any system or component removed from service subsequent to the inspection.

We would like to thank you for selecting Horizon Point Inspections, please feel free to call if you have any questions concerning your inspection report.


Thank You, 

The Horizon Point Team

Report Categories

The following information explains how to read your inspection report. If you do not understand your report or have a question please call your inspector or our office at 513-831-1200. 


Each system or component will have 4 tabs associated with it.

  • Overview Tab: This tab lists the items inspected and if they are Inspected, Not InspectedNot Present,  and Observations.
  • Informational Tab: This tab list information about the system or component and may include pictures or videos. 
  • Limitations Tab: This tab includes any limitations we encountered during the inspection. 
  • Standards Tab: This tab includes the ASHI Standards of Practice and what we inspect and don't inspect during the property inspection. 


Explanation of Ratings (How to Read Report)

IN-Inspected. This means the system or component was inspected and found to be functioning properly, or in acceptable condition at the time of the inspection. No further comment is necessary, additional information about materials used in the construction and how to care for or maintain the home may be included.

L = Limitations. This indicates that at least part of a system or component could not be inspected or inspected thoroughly.

NP = Not Present. This indicates that a system or component was not present at the time of inspection. If the system or component should have been present, a comment will follow.

NI = Not Inspected. This indicates that a system or component was not inspected. An explanation of why it was not inspected will be listed in the limitations tab. 

O= Observations. This indicates that an action is recommended. Observations are color-coded to indicate the importance of the observation.


Please see the explanations of our color-coded observations below

MAINTENANCE ITEMS

  • Maintenance/Service items, DIY items, or recommended upgrades will fall into this category. These concerns will ultimately lead to Prioritized Observations or Immediate Concerns if left neglected for extended periods of time. These items are generally more straightforward to remedy and should be repaired by a qualified contractor.

PRIORITIZED OBSERVATIONS

  • A functional component that is not operating as intended or defective. Items that inevitably lead to, or directly cause (if not addressed in a timely manner) adverse impact on the value of the home, or unreasonable risk (unsafe) to people or property. These concerns typically require further evaluation or may be more complicated to remedy.

IMMEDIATE CONCERN

  • A specific issue with a system or component that may have a significant, adverse impact on the condition of the property, or that poses an immediate risk to people or property. These immediate items are often imminent or may be very difficult or expensive to remedy.
What Really Matters in a Home Inspection

Now that you've bought your home and had your inspection, you may still have some questions about your new house and the items revealed in your report. 

Home maintenance is a primary responsibility for every homeowner, whether you've lived in several homes of your own or have just purchased your first one. Staying on top of a seasonal home maintenance schedule is important, and your inspector can help you figure this out so that you never fall behind. Don't let minor maintenance and routine repairs turn into expensive disasters later due to neglect or simply because you aren't sure what needs to be done and when. 

Your home inspection report is a great place to start. In addition to the written report, checklists, photos, and what the inspector said during the inspection not to mention the sellers disclosure and what you noticed yourself it's easy to become overwhelmed. However, it's likely that your inspection report included mostly maintenance recommendations, the life expectancy for the home's various systems and components, and minor imperfections. These are useful to know about. 

But the issues that really matter fall into four categories: 

  1. major defects, such as a structural failure; 
  2. things that can lead to major defects, such as a small leak due to a defective roof flashing; 
  3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home if not rectified immediately; and 
  4. safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel. 

Anything in these categories should be addressed as soon as possible. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4). 

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. It's important to realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in your inspection report. No house is perfect. Keep things in perspective as you move into your new home. 

And remember that homeownership is both a joyful experience and an important responsibility, so be sure to call on your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector to help you devise an annual maintenance plan that will keep your family safe and your home in good condition for years to come.

Schedule Your Home Maintenance Inspection

Even the most vigilant homeowner can, from time to time, miss small problems or forget about performing some routine home repairs and seasonal maintenance. That's why an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection will help you keep your home in good condition and prevent it from suffering serious, long-term and expensive damage from minor issues that should be addressed now. 

The most important thing to understand as a new homeowner is that your house requires care and regular maintenance. As time goes on, parts of your house will wear out, break down, deteriorate, leak, or simply stop working. But none of these issues means that you will have a costly disaster on your hands if you're on top of home maintenance, and that includes hiring an expert once a year. 

Just as you regularly maintain your vehicle, consider getting an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection as part of the cost of upkeep for your most valuable investment your home. 

Your inspector can show you what you should look for so that you can be an informed homeowner. Protect your family's health and safety, and enjoy your home for years to come by having an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection performed every year. 

Call to schedule next year's maintenance inspection with your home inspector today!


Every house should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.

2 - Chimney

IN NI NP O
2.1 Exterior Chimney X X
2.2 Chimney Flue X X
Exterior Chimney : Home Owners Responsibility

It is the homeowner's responsibility to have the chimney and flue inspected once a year by a qualified chimney contractor.  Chimneys are exposed to extreme weather conditions as well as the freeze-thaw cycle in the winter. Over time, this can cause deterioration and damage to the chimney brick and concrete cap. Having the chimney evaluated once a year is proactive and can prevent further damage and cost of repairs. 

Exterior Chimney : Exterior Chimney
Stacked Brick

The inspection of the exterior chimney includes the chimney chase, chimney cap, visible flue, chimney flashing, and the visible chimney cap. We suggest having your chimney system inspected once a year by a qualified chimney contractor.  

Chimney Flue: Chimney Flue
Clay Flue Tile

The inspection of the chimney flue will only include the visible portions of the flue. 

Chimney Flue: Chimney Flue - Not Inspected

The chimney flue and/or venting system was not inspected. The interior portions of the installed flue were not accessible at the time of the inspection. We suggest having the interior flue and/or venting system inspected by a qualified chimney contractor prior to using the fireplace. 

5.1 The inspector shall: A. inspect: 1. roofing materials. 2. roof drainage systems. 3. flashing. 4. skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations. B. describe: 1. roofing materials. 2. methods used to inspect the roofing. 5.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: A. antennas. B. interiors of vent systems, uses, and chimneys that are not readily accessible. C. other installed accessories

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Exterior Chimney

Damaged Chimney System
Roof

The exterior chimney chase, flashing and concrete cap were damaged at the time of the inspection. A damaged chimney system will leak water into the interior chimney and fireplace. Suggest having the chimney system repaired by a qualified chimney contractor.

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Chimney Flue

Gaps in Flue Tiles
Family Room

We did observe gaps in one or more flue tiles with evidence of shifting. This can cause hazardous gases to enter the home. Recommend a qualified chimney contractor evaluate and repair. 

3 - Roofing

IN NI NP O
3.1 Roof Materials X
3.2 Flashings X X
3.3 Roof Vents X
3.4 Plumbing Vents X
3.5 Skylight/s X
3.6 Roof Drainage Systems X X
Roof Materials: Inspection Method
Roof
Roof Materials: Roof Type/Style/Layers
Gable, Hip
Roof Vents: Roof Vents
Ridge Vents
Plumbing Vents: Plumbing Vents
PVC Vent
Home Owners Responsibility

Your job as the homeowner is to monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak. To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters.

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant. Roofs are not designed to be waterproof. Eventually, the roof system will leak. No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 

Every roof should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.

Roof Inspection Information

The inspector will attempt to walk the roof to visually inspect the roofing material and its current condition. However, due to circumstances such as weather and/or a steep roof pitch it may not be possible to safely walk on the roof. The inspection of the roof may have to be performed from the eves with a ladder or using binoculars from the ground. We will document if a complete inspection of the roof, flashing could not be performed. If the roof system was not inspected due to snow, weather and/or an unsafe pitch of the roof, we suggest having a qualified roofing contractor complete the inspection prior to closing. 

Roof Materials: Roof Material
Asphalt

Depend on the roofing materials, the typical life expectancy for an asphalt roofing material is between 20-30 years. Please see the attached link for the life expectancy of other roofing materials. 

Life Expectancy Chart

Roof Materials: Approximate Age
1-5 yrs

The age of the roof is an approximation only based off the age of the home, the number of layers, the type of shingle, and the visible condition of the shingles. 

Flashings: Roof Flashing Material
Galvanized, Rubber

We inspected all the visible flashing on the roof at the time of the inspection. 


Flashings: Wall Intersections

We looked for flashing where the roof covering meets a wall or siding material.  There should be step and counter flashing installed in these locations.  This is not an exhaustive inspection of all flashing areas.


Skylight/s: Skylight
Not Present

Skylights are notoriously problematic and a common point of leaks.  It is important to keep the area around the skylight free of debris and to monitor it for evidence of water leaks during heavy rains and/or winter snow melts.

From outside, watch the glazing for cracks or breaks, loosening of the flashing, and rusting or decaying frames.  Skylights should be checked from the interior, too.  Don't be surprised if your skylight develops a leak in the future.

Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Galvanized

We inspected the gutters.  We were not able to inspect every inch of every gutter.  But we attempted to check the overall general condition of the gutters during the inspection and look for indications of major defects.  

Monitoring the gutters during heavy rain (without lightning) and keeping them clear of debris is recommended.  In general, the gutters should catch rainwater and direct the water towards downspouts that discharge the water away from the house foundation. 

Flashings: Difficult to See Every Flashing

We attempted to inspect the flashing related to the vent pipes, wall intersections, eaves and gables, and the roof-covering materials.  In general, there should be flashing installed in certain areas where the roof covering meets something else, like a vent pipe or siding.  Most flashing is not observable, because the flashing material itself is covered and hidden by the roof covering or other materials.  So, it's impossible to see everything.  A home inspection is a limited visual-only inspection.  

Roof Drainage Systems: Buried Downspout Extensions

If your gutter downspout extensions are installed underground, we will not be able to complete a visible inspection of the extensions. We suggest having buried downspouts extensions scoped to determine their condition and if they properly terminate away from the house.

5.1 The inspector shall: A. inspect: 1. roofing materials. 2. roof drainage systems. 3. flashing. 4. skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations. B. describe: 1. roofing materials. 2. methods used to inspect the roofing. 5.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: A. antennas. B. interiors of vent systems, uses, and chimneys that are not readily accessible. C. other installed accessories.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Flashings

Exposed Nails Not Sealed
Rear Roof Plumbing Stacks

We observed exposed nails in the roof flashing at the time of the inspection. There should be no exposed nails in any of the roof flashings, including any roof air and plumbing vents. Suggest having the the exposed nails sealed or removed and sealed by a qualified roofing contractor.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Debris

The downspouts was full of debris at the time of the inspection.  Gutters that are not able to properly drain water away from the foundation will cause water and structural issues in the home. Suggest having all the debris removed from the gutters by a qualified contractor. Installing gutter guards will help reduce the build-up of leaves and debris in the gutters.

Here is a DIY resource for cleaning your gutters. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.6.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Gutter Leaking
Rear Middle Gutter

We observed the gutters leaking at the time of the inspection. This can result in excessive moisture in the soil at the foundation, which can lead to foundation/structural movement and future water intrusion. Suggest having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair the gutters.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.6.3 - Roof Drainage Systems

Extension Leaking
Rear Left

We observed leaking or damaged downspout extension pipe/s. Suggest having the extension/s replaced by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Exterior

IN NI NP O
4.1 Exterior Siding X
4.2 Exterior Trim & Soffits X
4.3 Exterior Caulking X
4.4 Exterior Flashing X
4.5 Exterior Doors X
4.6 Hose Bibs X
4.7 Gas Meter X
4.8 Exterior Stairwell X X
Gas Meter: Main Gas Meter
Present Exterior
Exterior Siding : Exterior Siding
Vinyl
Exterior Siding : Home Owner's Responsibility

The exterior of every home is slowly deteriorating and aging. The sun, wind, rain, and temperatures are constantly affecting it. Your job is to monitor the exterior of the building for its condition and weather tightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

During a heavy rainstorm (without lightning), grab an umbrella and go outside. Walk around your house and look around at the roof and property. A rainstorm is a perfect time to see how the roof, downspouts, and grading are performing. Observe the drainage patterns of your entire property, as well as the property of your neighbor. The ground around your house should slope away from all sides. Downspouts, surface gutters, and drains should be directing water away from the foundation. 

Exterior Trim & Soffits: Exterior Trim & Soffits
Vinyl
Exterior Caulking: Caulking
Present

Any areas of the home that have been caulked (windows, doors, siding) should be evaluated at least once a year to make sure the caulking is not deteriorated. Cracked or deteriorated caulking is vulnerable to water intrusion. Suggest having any areas of your home that have been caulked inspected annually and repair as needed.

Exterior Flashing : Exterior Flashing
Aluminum, Vinyl

Exterior flashing is typically installed over windows and doors. Depending on the siding material, some flashing will be covered by the siding material and not visible for inspection. 

Exterior Doors: Exterior Entry Door
Wood/Steel

Exterior doors are prone to water leaks and damage if they are not maintained and sealed. Maintaining the wood trim and threshold around the bottom of the door will prevent water damage and wood rot in this area. Over time, a leaking door will cause water damage to the interior sub-floor for the door and flooring. We suggest monitoring the threshold around all the exterior doors for wood rot and/or deteriorated caulking. 


Hose Bibs: Hose Bib Type
Frost Proof/Anti-Siphon

Frost Proof/Anti-Siphon hose bibs have an interior valve were the water is shut off from the exterior handle. Suggest removing any hoses attached to the hose bib in the winter to prevent freezing.

A Non-Frost Proof hose bib is the older type of hose bib, suggest upgrading to an anti-frost/siphon hose bib in the near future. Until then, we suggest turning off the installed hose bib/s in the winter (interior shut off if present) and detaching any hoses to prevent the line from freezing.

Exterior Stairwell: Exterior Stairwell
Exterior Stairway

We suggest keeping the stairwell drain (if present) free of any debris. This will help prevent the drain from clogging and flooding the interior of the home. The interior of the drain can not be inspected, this is an inspection restriction due to limited access.

Exterior Flashing : Limited Flashing Inspection

We are limited to a visible inspection of the flashing on the exterior wall cladding. We can not determine the condition of any part of the flashing behind the wall coverings. 

4.1 The inspector shall: A. inspect: 1. wall coverings, flashing, and trim. 2. exterior doors. 3. attached and adjacent decks, balconies, stoops, steps, porches, and their associated railings. 4. eaves, soffits, and fascias where accessible from the ground level. 5. vegetation, grading, surface drainage, and retaining walls that are likely to adversely affect the building. 6. adjacent and entryway walkways, patios, and driveways. B. describe wall coverings. 4.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: A. screening, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories. B. fences, boundary walls, and similar structures. C. geological and soil conditions. D. recreational facilities. E. outbuildings other than garages and carports. F. seawalls, break-walls, and docks. G. erosion control and earth stabilization measures.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation
Credit
Comment
4.8.1 - Exterior Stairwell

Damaged Wood Door Trim
Rear Stairwell

We observed water damage around the door trim in the stairwell. This is typically due to the drain clogging and/or not properly draining. We suggest having the door trim repaired and the drain evaluated for clogging or improper sizing. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Grounds

IN NI NP O
5.1 Driveway & Walkways X X
5.2 Patios/Porches X X
5.3 Railings, Guards, Handrails X
5.4 Decks and Balcony X X
5.5 Steps/Stoops X
5.6 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage X X
5.7 Retaining Walls X
Driveway & Walkways: Material
Asphalt
Patios/Porches : Material
Concrete
Railings, Guards, Handrails: Railing Type/Material
Wood, Vinyl
Decks and Balcony: Deck/Balcony
Deck
Retaining Walls: Wall Material
Stacked Stone
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage : Vegetation, Grading, Drainage
Wood/Soil Contact

Over time, if the grading around your house is not maintained it will settle, causing low areas to develop. In order to prevent water and structural issues, you must maintain the grading, gutters, downspouts, and surface drainage around the house to help direct water away from the foundation. Grading towards the foundation will drain water towards the house and down along the footers. Over time, this will cause water and structural issues with the foundation and inside the house.



4.1 The inspector shall: A. inspect:  5. vegetation, grading, surface drainage, and retaining walls that are likely to adversely affect the building. 6. adjacent and entryway walkways, patios, and driveways. B. describe wall coverings. 4.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: A. screening, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories. B. fences, boundary walls, and similar structures. C. geological and soil conditions. D. recreational facilities. E. outbuildings other than garages and carports. F. seawalls, break-walls, and docks. G. erosion control and earth stabilization measures.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Driveway & Walkways

Driveway Asphalt-Sunken

The asphalt driveway is sunken in places and has excessive wear. The driveway surface is in poor condition and will need to be considered for replacement.

House front Driveway Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Patios/Porches

Patio Cracking - Major
Rear Patio

Significant settling & cracking was observed on the patio. Further deterioration could result if repairs or replacement is not completed. Suggest having a qualified contractor evaluate the patio for repairs or replacement.

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Decks and Balcony

No Visible Flashing
Front Deck

We observed no visible flashing on the deck. Flashing is installed to prevent water intrusion and damage to the interior walls and floor. Suggest having the deck properly flashed. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage

Tree Overhang

We observed trees overhanging the roof. This can cause damage to the roof and prevent proper drainage. Suggest having a qualified tree service trim to allow for proper drainage and prevent shingle damage.  

Yard scissors Tree Service
Credit
Comment
5.6.2 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage

Wood Soil Contact
Rear of House

The wood/soil contact should be eliminated around the noted areas of the foundation.  Architects will normally provide for a minimum of 4-6 inches of exposed foundation above the finished grade.  The amount of appropriate above-ground clearance will include the potential for standing snow in colder areas.  When the soil is graded above the foundation wall, it presents a potential for moisture entry or insect infestation into the building. Suggest having the soil contacting the siding lowered with 4-6 inches of clearance from the ground by a qualified contractor.

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor

6 - Interiors

IN NI NP O
6.1 Walls/Ceiling X
6.2 Garage Door & Opener X
6.3 Garage Floor/Slab X X
6.4 Floors X
6.5 Doors X
6.6 Windows X
6.7 Countertops & Cabinets X
6.8 Ceiling Fans X
6.9 Steps, Stairways & Railings X
6.10 House Wiring, Lighting, Outlets/Switches X
6.11 Polarity and Grounding of Receptacles X
6.12 Presence of Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors X
Garage Door & Opener: Garage Door Type
Insulated
Garage Door & Opener: Door Opener
Automatic

Floors: Floor Coverings
Laminate, Carpet
Doors: Interior Doors
Hollow Core
Ceiling Fans: Ceiling Fan Type
Fan/Light
Steps, Stairways & Railings: Stairway Material
Wood Stairs/Handrail
House Wiring, Lighting, Outlets/Switches: Wiring Method
120/240 Volt
Walls/Ceiling : Wall/Ceiling Material
Drywall/Plaster
Garage Floor/Slab: Slab Material
Concrete

The slab, sub-floor, and floor supports include the garage floor (if present), basement floor & floor joist and sub-flooring material (if visible) under the carpet and/or tile. 

Windows: Window Type
Vinyl/Aluminum

Evidence of a broken thermal seal may appear and disappear as the interior/exterior temperature and humidity change with the seasons. A fogged window pane may not be detectable during a 3-4 hour one-time inspection. Life expectancy varies with usage, weather, installation, maintenance and quality of materials. 

Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinets & Countertops
Formica, Solid Surface

A representative number of cabinets will be inspected for damage and functional use. All accessible countertops will be inspected for proper attachment to the cabinets.  

Steps, Stairways & Railings: Stair/Step Inspection and Safety

Today's building standards require stair balusters to have no more than 4" of spacing between each baluster. This is to help prevent a small child from slipping or fitting through the balusters. Depending on the age of your home, this spacing may not have been required when your home was built. If the baluster spacing for any of the stairs or landings in your home are wider then 4 inches, we suggest having them updated to the proper spacing. 

Polarity and Grounding of Receptacles: Installed Outlets
3 Prong Ground Outlets

Outlets installed in homes prior to 1960 were typically wired with a two-wire cable into a two-prong outlet. These outlets did not have a 3rd bare copper wire to bond/ground the outlet back to the panel.  Must outlets installed after 1960 were a three-prong outlet with a three wire cable.

The electrical system in homes built before 1960 were grounded, however, the outlets and items plugged into the outlets were not bonded back to the panel. In older homes, it is a common practice for today's homeowners to switch out the two-prong outlets with three prong outlets, the only problem is the circuit is still not bonded but is identified as a bonded outlet with the three prong plug. These are solutions for this and we will note these outlets in your report. 

Presence of Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Smoke Detector & Carbon Monoxide Detectors
Present

Per the ASHI Standards of Practice, we are required to check for the presence of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. This is noted in the report, however, we suggest replacing all the smoke and carbon monoxide detectors as soon as you take occupancy. Typically, these detectors are replaced every 5-7 years, it is not known what these detectors have been subject to prior to the home inspection. 

Suggest installing photoelectrical smoke detectors and NOT ionization or a combination of ionization/photoelectric. Both ionization and the combination type smoke detectors have proved unreliable. While not all smoke detectors will alarm as intended, your chances are greatly improved with photoelectric type smoke detectors. Suggest testing the smoke detectors every six months or as suggested by the manufacturer. Battery operated smoke detectors should have their batteries replaced every six months.

Steps, Stairways & Railings: Interior Steps/Stairway

If the interior steps or stairs material was covered at the time of the inspection we will not be able to complete a visible inspection of the flooring material under the carpet. 

House Wiring, Lighting, Outlets/Switches: Covered Non-Visible Wiring

Wiring covered by drywall, insulation, and floors is restricted and not visible for inspected. All visible wiring within the home will be inspected and noted within the report. 

Presence of Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Unable to Test Every Detector

We were unable to test every detector. We recommend testing all of the detectors.  Ask the seller about the performance of the detectors and of any issues regarding them.  We recommend replacing all of the detectors (smoke and carbon monoxide) with new ones just for peace of mind and for safety concerns.  

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: A. walls, ceilings, and floors. B. steps, stairways, and railings. C. countertops and a representative number of installed cabinets. D. a representative number of doors and windows. E. garage vehicle doors and garage vehicle door operators. F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: A. paint, wallpaper, and other finish treatments. B. floor coverings. C. window treatments. D. coatings on and the hermetic seals between panes of window glass. E. central vacuum systems. F. recreational facilities. G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or confirm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation
Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Garage Floor/Slab

Concrete Slab Floor Settled
Garage

We observed settlement of the concrete floor. Suggest having a qualified contractor evaluate the floor to determine the best course of action to repair the floor and prevent further settlement. 

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor

7 - Built-in Appliances

IN NI NP O
7.1 Dishwasher X
7.2 Refrigerator X
7.3 Microwave X
7.4 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
7.5 Garbage Disposal X
7.6 Washer & Dryer X
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Type
Electric
Garbage Disposal: Garbage Disposal
Present

If present, the garbage disposal was operated and inspected for leaks. 

Appliance Inspection

The installed appliances will be operated and inspected using normal operating functions. The refrigerator is inspected for power and water leaks, not for cooling capacity or efficiency. The clothes washer and dryer are visually inspected only, these items may be taken by the sellers. All portable stoves that are not physically mounted to a wall should have an anti-tip bracket installed. The anti-tip bracket secures the rear leg of the stove to the floor and prevents the stove from tipping over on a small child. 


Dishwasher: Dishwasher Type
Built In Dishwasher

If present, we ran the dishwasher using normal operating controls to activate the primary function on the quick/rinse cycle to inspect for leaks and operation.

Refrigerator: Refrigerator
Present

If present, we inspect the refrigerator for power, water leaks and damage to the unit.

Microwave: Microwave
Built In/Wall Mount

The microwave was inspected for operation and proper mounting to the wall and/or cabinet. A small glass of water was placed in the microwave to test the heating of the unit.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Anti-Tip Bracket
Kitchen
Not Present

ANTI-TIP BRACKET: The anti-tip bracket is supplied by the manufacturer of the stove and should be installed as directed. Per the manufacturer's directions, an anti-tip safety bracket is installed to prevent the range from tipping forward if a small child stands on the oven door or the weight of the door pulls the stove down. If the anti-tip bracket was not installed, we suggest having a qualified contractor install one per the manufacturer's directions. An anti-tip bracket can be purchased by an appliance service contractor.

Washer & Dryer: Washer/Dryer
120 Volt Washer, 240 Volt Dryer

The clothes washer and dryer are visually inspected only, these items may be taken by the sellers. We will inspect the units for proper installation.

Washer & Dryer: Not Inspected

We do not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. We did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires.

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dish washing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation

8 - Fireplaces, and Fuel-Burning Appliances

IN NI NP O
8.1 Fireplaces, Stoves & Inserts X
8.2 Gas Burning Appliances (Fireplace Inserts) X
Fireplaces, Stoves & Inserts: Fireplace Type
Not Present

Due to the limited visibility of the fireplace smoke chamber and flue, this inspection company suggests having the entire flue and smoke chamber inspected by a qualified chimney contractor. This inspection company will visually inspect the visible components of the wood burning fireplace/s and accessories, stoves, fireplace inserts, and chimney system. The inspector is not required to inspect the interior of any flues vent systems or chimneys that are not readily accessible.

Gas Burning Appliances (Fireplace Inserts): Gas Burning Appliance Type
Vented

Suggest having the fireplace cleaned and serviced annually by a qualified gas fireplace contractor. A non-vented gas fireplace has an oxygen depletion sensor installed to monitor for proper oxygen levels. Suggest having a working carbon monoxide detector installed near the gas fireplace to monitor for carbon monoxide if the sensor were to fail. The vent-free gas fireplace should be inspected and serviced once a year by a qualified fireplace contractor.

12.1 The inspector shall: A. inspect: 1. fuel-burning replaces, stoves, and replace inserts. 2. fuel-burning accessories installed in replaces. 3. chimneys and vent systems. B. describe systems and components listed in 12.1.A.1 and .2. 12.2 The inspector is NOT required to: A. inspect: 1. interiors of vent systems, uses, and chimneys that are not readily accessible. 2. fire screens and doors. 3. seals and gaskets. 4. automatic fuel feed devices. 5. mantles and replace surrounds. 6. combustion air components and to determine their adequacy. 7. heat distribution assists (gravity fed and fan assisted). 8. fuel-burning replaces and appliances located outside the inspected structures. B. determine draft characteristics. C. move fireplace inserts and stoves or firebox contents.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation

9 - Insulation and Ventilation

IN NI NP O
9.1 Insulation X
9.2 Attic Ventilation X
9.3 Exhaust Systems X
Exhaust Systems: Mechanical Exhaust Fans
Bathroom Fan
Insulation: Insulation Type
Blown

It was not uncommon for homes built over 50 years ago to have little or no insulation in the attic area of the home. By today's standards, a minimum rating of R38 to R60 (12-18 inches) insulation depth is suggested for this area of the country.

Attic Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Ridge Vents

Suggest maintaining airflow through the attic and do not block the soffit vents with new insulation. 

Exhaust Systems: Not Visible

If the ductwork for install exhaust fans buried under the attic insulation it cannot be inspected. This is an inspection restriction. 

11.1 The inspector shall: A. inspect: 1. insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces. 2. ventilation of attics and foundation areas. 3. kitchen, bathroom, laundry, and similar exhaust systems. 4. clothes dryer exhaust systems. B. describe: 1. insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces. 2. absence of insulation in unfinished spaces at conditioned surfaces. 11.2 The inspector is NOT required to disturb insulation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation

10 - Electrical

IN NI NP O
10.1 Electrical Service Entrance, Meter & Service Conductors X
10.2 Electrical Panels, Main Breaker & Circuit Breakers/Fuses X
10.3 Panel Circuit Wiring X X
10.4 GFCI & AFCI Breakers & Outlets X
10.5 Grounding Equipment X
Electrical Service Entrance, Meter & Service Conductors: Electrical Service
Below Ground, 120/240 Volts
Electrical Service Entrance, Meter & Service Conductors: Meter Location
Exterior
Electrical Panels, Main Breaker & Circuit Breakers/Fuses: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Panel Circuit Wiring : Electrical Panel Wiring
Non-Metallic Sheathed Cable
Electrical Panels, Main Breaker & Circuit Breakers/Fuses: Panel Manufacturer
Cutler Hammer
Electrical Panels, Main Breaker & Circuit Breakers/Fuses: Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Grounding Equipment : Grounding System
Waterline/Ground Rod
Electrical Panels, Main Breaker & Circuit Breakers/Fuses: Main Electrical Shut Off Location
Basement

As a homeowner, it is important to know where the main electrical panel is located, including the main service disconnect that turns everything off. The location has been noted in your report. 

Be sure to test your GFCIs, AFCIs, and smoke detectors regularly. You can replace light bulbs, but more than that, you should hire an electrician. Electrical work is hazardous and mistakes can be fatal. Hire a professional whenever there's an electrical problem in your house

GFCI & AFCI Breakers & Outlets: GFCI & AFCI Outlets/Breakers
GFCI Outlets, AFCI Breakers

Depending on the year the home was built, GFCI and/or AFCI outlets may not have been required at the time the home was built. If they are not present, we suggest adding them for additional safety around areas with a water source present. A qualified electrical contractor will be able to determine how to properly install these outlets in an older home. 


7.1 The inspector shall: A. inspect: 1. service drop. 2. service entrance conductors, cables, and raceways. 3. service equipment and main disconnects. 4. service grounding. 5. interior components of service panels and subpanels. 6. conductors. 7. overcurrent protection devices. 8. a representative number of installed lighting fixtures, switches, and receptacles. 9. ground fault circuit interrupters and arc fault circuit interrupters. B. describe: 1. amperage rating of the service. 2. location of main disconnect(s) and subpanels. 3. presence or absence of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms. 4. the predominant branch circuit wiring method. 7.2 The inspector is NOT required to: A. inspect: 1. remote control devices. 2. or test smoke and carbon monoxide alarms, security systems, and other signaling and warning devices. 3. low voltage wiring systems and components. 4. ancillary wiring systems and components not a part of the primary electrical power distribution system. 5. solar, geothermal, wind, and other renewable energy systems. B. measure amperage, voltage, and impedance. C. determine the age and type of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation
Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Panel Circuit Wiring

Ground & Neutral Wires Double Lugged
Electrical Panel

The ground (bare wire) and the neutral wire (white wire) have been installed under the same lug. The ground wire (bare wire) is a non-load carrying wire and should not be in direct contact with the neutral wire (white) wire which is a load (electrical) carrying wire. We suggest having the wires removed and properly installed by a qualified electrical contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor

11 - Structural Components

IN NI NP O
11.1 Attic Structure X
11.2 Wall/Structure Type X
11.3 Foundation Walls X X
11.4 Joist, Beams, Support Columns X
11.5 Sub Floor X
11.6 Slab X
11.7 Moisture Issues X X
Attic Structure: Attic Inspection Method
Attic, Attic Access
Wall/Structure Type: Construction Type
Platform Wood Framed
Wall/Structure Type: Building Material
Wood Framed, Not Visible
Foundation Walls: Foundation Material
Masonry Block
Joist, Beams, Support Columns : Joist, Beam, Column Material
Wood Joist, Steel Column, Steel I-Beam
Sub Floor: Sub Floor Material
OSB
Attic Structure: Attic Structural Framing/Sheathing
Wood Truss, OSB
Foundation Walls: Maintaining Your Foundation

Maintaining and cleaning your gutters so they drain water away from the foundation is one of the most economical ways to prevent water and structural issues with your home. Also, the grade around your home should slope away from the foundation to help move surface water away from your home. Doing these simple maintenance items will help keep water away from your foundation and prevent future water or structural issues. If you fail to maintain your gutters and the slope around your home you will have future water intrusion and structural problems.

Slab: Slab Material
Concrete

The slab, sub-floor, and floor supports include the garage floor (if present), basement floor & floor joist and sub-flooring material (if visible) under the carpet and/or tile. 

Moisture Issues: Water/Moisture Issues
Present

The buyer should understand it is impossible to predict future water or moisture penetration through the foundation during a 3-4 hr home inspection, especially if the walls were covered at the time of the inspection. We will conduct a visible inspection of the exterior grading and gutter system as well as checking on the inside of the house for water leaks and damage. The majority of basement water leakage problems are the result of insufficient control of surface stormwater along the exterior of the house. We suggest monitoring the drainage of the gutter system and grading around the exterior foundation.  Maintaining a properly working gutter system and grading that directs water away from the foundation with a minimum 6" drop in the first 10' from the house. Gutters and downspouts should shed roof water at least five feet from the foundation. In the event that basement water problems are experienced, lot and roof drainage improvements should be undertaken first. Damp proofing, foundation waterproofing systems, and/or the installation of drainage tiles should be considered as a last resort. In some cases, however, it may be necessary. Horizon Point makes NO guarantee or warranty there will never be any water issues with your home. Please view the following illustrations about water issues and how to prevent them.

Wall/Structure Type: Wall Framing Not Visible

WALL/CEILING FRAMING NOT OBSERVED: The wall & ceiling framing was not observed at the time of the inspection due to the finished interior and/or exterior walls.

Foundation Walls: Foundation Not Visible

Portions or all of the foundation walls were covered with drywall and/or a blanketed insulation at the time of the inspection. This is an inspection restriction. No representation could be made as to the condition of the foundation walls. 

Joist, Beams, Support Columns : Flooring/Structural Components Not Visible
Not Visible

NOT VISIBLE: All or some of the flooring structure was not visible at the time of the inspection. Any covered floor joist, vertical supports, beams, floor slab, and sheathing covered is an inspection restriction.  There was no visible sagging or bouncing in the flooring system or drywall at the time of the inspection.

Sub Floor: Flooring/Structural Components Not Visible
Not Visible

NOT VISIBLE: All or some of the flooring structure was not visible at the time of the inspection. Any covered floor joist, vertical supports, beams, floor slab, and sheathing covered is an inspection restriction.  There was no visible sagging or bouncing in the flooring system or drywall at the time of the inspection.

Slab: Flooring/Structural Components Not Visible
Not Visible

NOT VISIBLE: All or some of the flooring structure/slab was not visible and could not be inspected at the time of the inspection. Any covered floor joist, vertical supports, beams, floor slab, sub floor and sheathing covered is an inspection restriction.  There was no visible sagging or bouncing in the flooring system or drywall at the time of the inspection.

Moisture Issues: Not Visible

Any areas of the basement that have been finished or have unfinished areas that are covered or blocked with a vapor barrier, insulation, or personal items are an inspection restriction. These areas cannot be inspected for water/moisture or water stains. We suggest you check these areas on your final walk-through before closing. Horizon Point Inspections makes no guarantee or warranty as to the condition of these hidden materials or surfaces.

3. STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS 3.1 The inspector shall: A. inspect structural components including the foundation and framing. B. describe: 1. the methods used to inspect under floor crawlspaces and attics. 2. the foundation. 3. the floor structure. 4. the wall structure. 5. the ceiling structure. 6. the roof structure. 3.2 The inspector is NOT required to: A. provide engineering or architectural services or analysis. B. offer an opinion about the adequacy of structural systems and components. C. enter under floor crawlspace areas that have less than 24 inches of vertical clearance between components and the ground or that have an access opening smaller than 16 inches by 24 inches. D. traverse attic load-bearing components that are concealed by insulation or by other materials.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation
Credit
Comment
11.3.1 - Foundation Walls

Shrinkage Cracks - Minor
Closet with electrical panel

 

We observed shrinkage cracks in the noted areas on the foundation wall.  Shrinkage cracks typically are not a structural concern, however, these cracks can still allow water penetration from the exterior. The cracks can be sealed inexpensively by using a polyurethane injection or hydraulic cement at the inside face of the wall. We suggest maintaining the slope/grade away from the house to help drain water away from the foundation. A working gutter system with downspouts extended a minimum of six feet from the foundation will decrease the chances of water in the basement.

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.7.1 - Moisture Issues

Water Intrusion

We did observe water leaking into the noted area/s at the time of the inspection. Suggest having the water leak or leaks repaired by a qualified contractor or waterproofing company.

Water Waterproofing Contractor

12 - Plumbing

IN NI NP O
12.1 Water Supply Lines X
12.2 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
12.3 Tubs/Whirlpools/Showers X
12.4 Fixtures / Faucets / Toilets X X
12.5 Sump Pumps / Sewage Ejectors X X
12.6 Water Heater X X
12.7 Water Heater Vents, Flues X
12.8 Gas Lines/Fuel Storage X
Material - Main Water Supply
Copper, Pex
Main Fuel Shut-Off (Location)
Exterior
Water Supply Lines: Material - House Supply Lines
Copper
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Drain Line Material
PVC
Sump Pumps / Sewage Ejectors: Type
Submersible Sump Pump
Water Heater: Location
Basement
Water Heater: Capacity/Size
50 Gallons
Water Heater: Power Source
Gas
Gas Lines/Fuel Storage : Material
Black Iron
Gas Lines/Fuel Storage : Main Gas Shut Off Location
Exterior
Gas Lines/Fuel Storage : Oil Tank Location
Not Present
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Main Plumbing Clean Out -Location
Basement
Fixtures / Faucets / Toilets : Toilets
Porcelain
Water Heater: Manufacturer
AO Smith
Water Heater Vents, Flues: Vent Type
Double Walled Galvanized
Main Water Shut Off Location
Basement
Tubs/Whirlpools/Showers: Tub/Shower Material
Fiberglass
Fixtures / Faucets / Toilets : Sinks
Stainless Steel, Porcelain
Fixtures / Faucets / Toilets : Faucets
Sink Faucets, Bathtub Faucets, Shower Faucets
Water Heater: Water Heater Age
1-5 yrs

The typical life span of a water heater is 15-20 years. Some water heaters last longer, however, we can not predict when the water heater will fail. If your water heater is older than 15yrs, we suggest budgeting for replacement within the next 5 years.

Water Conditioner Not Inspected

If present, whole house water conditioner testing is beyond the scope of a general home inspection.  Recommend having a specific equipment manufacturer technician fully service system to ensure proper function.

Cistern Not Inspected

Per our written agreement and the ASHI Standards of Practice, any private water systems (wells, cisterns) are excluded from this inspection report. If the property has a private water system we suggest asking the seller to disclose any issues related to the particular system and any completed inspections of the systems.  If you can not obtain any previous inspection reports, we suggest having the systems inspected by a qualified contractor.

Main Water Source & Sewage Disposal-Not Inspected

Per the ASHI Standards of Practice we are not required to inspect or determine if the water supply or sewage disposal system to the home is a public or private system. The water supply lines, well system and septic system is typically buried underground and can not be visibly inspected for performance, damage, or leaks. These types of systems are typically in the sellers disclosure or listed with the AHJ.

Water Supply Lines: Water Lines Not Visible

Water lines buried or covered are excluded from the visible home inspection. 

6.1 The inspector shall: A. inspect: 1. interior water supply and distribution systems including fixtures and faucets. 2. interior drain, waste, and vent systems including fixtures. 3. water heating equipment and hot water supply systems. 4. vent systems, flues, and chimneys. 5. fuel storage and fuel distribution systems. 6. sewage ejectors, sump pumps, and related piping. B. describe: 1. interior water supply, drain, waste, and vent piping materials. 2. water heating equipment including energy source(s). 3. location of main water and fuel shut-off valves. 6.2 The inspector is NOT required to: A. inspect: 1. clothes washing machine connections. 2. interiors of vent systems, flues, and chimneys that are not readily accessible. 3. wells, well pumps, and water storage related equipment. 4. water conditioning systems. 5. solar, geothermal, and other renewable energy water heating systems. 6. manual and automatic re-extinguishing and sprinkler systems and landscape irrigation systems. 7. septic and other sewage disposal systems. B. determine: 1. whether water supply and sewage disposal are public or private. 2. water quality. 3. the adequacy of combustion air components. C. measure water supply low and pressure, and well water quantity. D. fill shower pans and fixtures to test for leaks.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation
Credit
Comment
12.4.1 - Fixtures / Faucets / Toilets

Toilet Leaking
Basement Bathroom

We observed leaking from the noted toilet. Suggest having a qualified plumbing contractor repair the leak on the toilet. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.5.1 - Sump Pumps / Sewage Ejectors

Missing Sump Pit Cover
Basement

We observed the cover missing for the top of the sump pump pit. This is a safety issue; an unsupervised child or infant could fall into the pit and drown. Suggest having a cover installed and secured to the top of the pit by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.6.1 - Water Heater

Drip Pan Missing

Suggest having a drip pan with a discharge line installed to a surface drain or approved exterior location. Drip pans with a discharge pipe are installed under water heaters where water leaks could cause damage. These locations include attics or where leakage could cause damage to finished areas of the home. Suggest having a drip pan installed by a qualified plumber.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

13 - HVAC System

IN NI NP O
13.1 Cooling System/Equipment X X
13.2 Evaporator Coil X
13.3 Heating System/Equipment X
13.4 Vents & Flues X
13.5 Distribution Systems X
13.6 Thermostat & Normal Operating Controls X
Cooling System/Equipment: Inspection Method
Normal Operating Controls
Cooling System/Equipment: Cooling Method
Central Air Conditioner
Cooling System/Equipment: Energy Source
Electric
Cooling System/Equipment: Area Served
Entire House
Cooling System/Equipment: Approximate Age
1-5 yrs
Evaporator Coil: Evaporator Coil
Not Inspected-Sealed

The evaporator coil is typically located above the furnace. 

Heating System/Equipment: Inspection Method
Normal Operating Controls
Heating System/Equipment: Heating Method
Forced Air
Heating System/Equipment: Energy Source
Natural Gas
Heating System/Equipment: Area Served
Entire House
Heating System/Equipment: Approximate Age
1-5 yrs
Distribution Systems: Duct Work Material
Galvanized
Thermostat & Normal Operating Controls : Thermostat Location
1st Floor
Cooling System/Equipment: Manufacturer
Comfortmaker
Vents & Flues: Flue/Vent Type
PVC Power Vent
Homeowners Responsibility

Most air-conditioning systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. The adequacy of the cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

As a home owner, it's your job to get the air conditioning system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system has an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned or replaced each month. 




Heating System/Equipment: Manufacturer
Comfortmaker
Evaporator Coil: Not Accessible

The evaporator unit is not accessible and sealed inside the plenum above the furance heat exchange. This is an inspection restriction. We suggest having the cooling system serviced annually to help extend the life of the system and ensure a more efficient cooling system.

Heating System/Equipment: Heat Exchange

The inspection of the heat exchange in many cases is very difficult to view without dismantling the furnace or boiler unit, therefore a complete evaluation of the heat exchanger is beyond the scope of this inspection and the ASHI Standards of Practice. No guarantees can be made on a heat exchangers life expectancy. This inspection company does not lite pilot lights or activate systems which are shut down and safety devices are not tested by the inspector. Thermostats are not checked for calibration or time functions. The efficiency of the system and distribution of air cleaners, humidifiers, and dehumidifiers are beyond the scope of this inspection. Determining the interior condition of oil tanks, exposed or buried is beyond the scope of this inspection, leaking oil tanks represent an environmental hazard which can be costly to remedy. These types of systems should be evaluated by a qualified HVAC contractor or an environmental engineer.

Vents & Flues: Flue Vent Interior-Not Inspected

The interior of the flue vent is not accessible. If present, we inspect the visible exterior condition of the flue vent.  

Distribution Systems: Asbestos Wrap

Some older homes contain an asbestos wrap used to insulate the HVAC ducts. Any duct work located in or concealed by walls & drywall/plaster is an inspection restriction and will limit our inspection in those areas.

9.1 The inspector shall: A. open readily openable access panels. B. inspect 1. central and permanently installed cooling equipment. 2. distribution systems. C. describe: 1. energy source(s). 2. cooling systems. 9.2 The inspector is NOT required to: A. inspect electric air cleaning and sanitizing devices. B. determine cooling supply adequacy and distribution balance. C. inspect cooling units that are not permanently installed or that are installed in windows. D. inspect cooling systems using a ground source, water source, solar, and renewable energy technologies.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observation
Credit
Comment
13.1.1 - Cooling System/Equipment

Oversized Breaker
Electrical Panel

The installed breaker/fuse was oversized for the outside AC/Compressor unit. Typically, newer exterior AC units don't require larger breakers/fuses because they are more efficient then units installed in the past. Suggest having the correct sized breaker/fuse installed for the air conditioning disconnect by a qualified HVAC contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor