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1234 Main St.
Riverview, FL 33579
02/18/2020 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
5
Maintenance
23
Deficiencies

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client agent
Occupancy
Vacant
Temperature (approximate)
62 Fahrenheit (F)
Weather Conditions
Cloudy, Light Rain
Home Inspection Details
Overview

Professional Home Inspectors strive to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the Standards of Practice as set forth by the State of Florida and InterNACHI {web site link}. As such, I inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of the home as designated in these Standards of Practice. When systems or components designated in the Standards of Practice were present but were not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected will be stated. This inspection is neither technically exhaustive or quantitative.

This report contains observations of those systems and components that, in my professional judgment, were not functioning properly, significantly deficient, or unsafe. All items in this report that were designated for repair, replacement, maintenance, or further evaluation should be investigated by qualified tradespeople within the clients contingency period or prior to closing, which is contract applicable, to determine a total cost of said repairs and to learn of any additional problems that may be present during these evaluations that were not visible during a "visual only" Home Inspection. 

This inspection will not reveal every concern or issue that may be present, but only those significant defects that were visible at the time of inspection. This inspection cannot predict future conditions, or determine if latent or concealed defects are present. Once again, the statements made in this report reflect the conditions as existing at the time of Inspection only, and expire at the completion of the inspection. Weather conditions and other changes in conditions may reveal problems that were not present at the time of inspection; including roof leaks, or water infiltration into crawl spaces or basements. This report is only supplemental to the Sellers Disclosure. Refer to the State of Florida Standards of Practice (linked to above), and the Inspection agreement regarding the scope and limitations of this inspection.

This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, REGARDING THE CONDITIONS OF THE PROPERTY, INCLUDING THE ITEMS AND SYSTEMS INSPECTED, AND IT SHOULD NOT BE RELIED ON AS SUCH. This inspection is a tool to assist you in your buying decision, it should be used alongside the sellers disclosure, pest inspection report, and quotes and advice from the tradespeople recommended in this report to gain a better understanding of the condition of the home. Some risk is always involved when purchasing a property and unexpected repairs should be anticipated, as this is unfortunately, a part of home ownership.


Thermal Imaging Information

THERMAL IMAGING: Infrared cameras are used for specific areas or visual problems, and should not be viewed as a full thermal scan of the entire home. Additional services are available at additional costs and would be supplemented by an additional agreement / addendum. Temperature readings displayed on thermal images in this report are included as a courtesy and should not be wholly relied upon as a home inspection is qualitative, not quantitative. These values can vary +/- 4% or more of displayed readings, and these values will display surface temperatures when air temperature readings would actually need to be conducted on some items which is beyond the scope of a home inspection.


These categorizations are in my professional opinion and based on what I observed at the time of inspection, and this categorization should not be construed as to mean that items designated as "Minor defects" or "Recommendations" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendation in the text of the comment is more important than it's categorization. Due to your opinions or personal experience you may feel defects belong in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once again it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining to each defect that is paramount, not it's categorical placement. 

Lead Paint Disclaimer

Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are the most hazardous sources of lead for U.S. children. Lead-based paints were banned for use in housing in 1978. All houses built before 1978 can possibly contain some lead-based paint. However, it is the deterioration of this paint that causes a problem.

Lead paint is a possible danger to small children and pets.  The trim if chewed on may expose the lead content of earlier layers of paint.  While multiple layers of paint entrap the lead paint, chipping of paint can cause problems.

I can test for lead paint, at an additional charge, if requested

Ungrounded Receptacles Disclaimer

The ungrounded outlets are easily distinguishable by their two slot configuration verses the newer grounded type of outlets that have the two slots with a hole (ground socket) centered under the slots.  IMPORTANT:  Many times the homes receptacles have been upgraded to a three prong outlet but the wiring has not upgraded. 

Grounded receptacles provide protection when devices with metal surfaces.  If the metal surface becomes shorted to the electricity the grounded plug with protect a person from electrical shock.  The kitchen areas of the home are particularly important because many of the countertop appliances are metal cased.

Older wiring never contained a ground wire so any ungrounded outlets in your home were originally wired in this manner and are considered acceptable, but they do have their safety issues. Many ungrounded outlets have been installed in the older homes, but as the years went by the electrical standards have changed and are absolutely required in newer homes. While it is not usually required to upgrade ungrounded outlets in your home today, it is still a good idea because a properly wired home is a much safer home for you and your family.

A home inspection is a non-intrusive inspection.  Meaning that we will not be breaking holes in the walls, floors, or ceilings.  While we can disassemble some things in the home, like the electrical panel and HVAC air handler, we can't see through drywall.  We will look at the roof components in the home including the roof, electrical, plumbing, HVAC, floors, walls, ceilings, and cabinets.  This is an example of what we are looking at.  We are looking at over a thousand components in your home.  We pride ourselves on being thorough as possible within the scope of a home inspection.

2 - Roof

IN NI NP D
2.1 Coverings X
2.2 Flashing X
2.3 Vents and Stacks X
2.4 Roof Drainage Systems X
Inspection Method
Drone


We attempted to inspect the roof from various locations and methods, including from the ground and a ladder. 

The inspection was not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes.  It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection.  We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roof and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy.  


Roof Useful Life

Roofs are covered with different types of shingles.  The life expectancy of a roof varies between different roof materials. 

Here are the averages:
1.  Asphalt Shingles, 3-tab - 15 to 20 years
2.  Asphalt Shingles, Architectural - 24 to 30 years
3.  Galvalume (metal) - 30 to 45 years
4.  Concrete Tile - 35 to 50 years
5.  Built-Up or Modified Bitumen - 10 to 16 years
6.  EPDM (rubber) - 10 to 16 years

But average lifespan estimates are based on average conditions. Many factors contribute to a longer or shorter life of the roof; so a particular roof's life can sometimes vary significantly from the average. 

Heres a list of conditions that affect roof longevity:
1.  Color of the roof - A dark roof absorbs more heat, which shortens the lifespan.
2.  The angle of roof slope - Higher pitch roofs tend to last longer.
3.  The orientation of roof surface - A roof slope facing south will get more sunlight, and have a shorter life.
4.  Multiple-layer roof - A roof installed over an existing roof will have a shorter life.
5.  Quality of roof material - Economy roof materials have a shorter life.
6.  Installation - Sloppy or improper installation shortens roof life.
7.  Attic ventilation - An unventilated or poorly ventilated attic reduces roof lifespan.
8.  Trees near roof - Tree branches rubbing on a roof or the acidity from the accumulation of leaf debris on a roof shortens its life.
9.  Harsh climate - Hot summers, along with big temperature swings within a 24-hour period, also shorten lifespan because of the expansion and contraction of roof materials.

Coverings: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job as the homeowner is to monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak. To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters.

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant. Roofs are not designed to be waterproof. Eventually, the roof system will leak. No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 

Every roof should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.


Coverings: Material
Asphalt

The material used to cover the roof will determine the longevity of the roof surface.  Tile roofs last longer than shingle roofs.  Architectural shingles last longer than three tab shingles.

This is a visual-only inspection of the roof-covering materials. It does not include an inspection of the entire system. There are components of the roof that are not visible or accessible at all, including the underlayment, decking, fastening, flashing, age, shingle quality, manufacturer installation recommendations, etc.

We observed the roof-covering material and attempted to identify its type.  

This inspection is not a guarantee that a roof leak in the future will not happen. Roofs leak.  Even a roof that appears to be in good, functional condition will leak under certain circumstances. We will not take responsibility for a roof leak that happens in the future.  This is not a warranty or guarantee of the roof system.

Flashing: Wall Intersections

We looked for flashing where the roof covering meets a wall or siding material.  There should be step and counter flashing installed in these locations.  This is not an exhaustive inspection of all flashing areas.

Flashing: Eaves and Gables

We looked for flashing installed at the eaves (near the gutter edge) and at the gables (the diagonal edge of the roof). There should be metal drip flashing material installed in these locations. The flashing helps the surface water on the roof to discharge into the gutter. Flashing also helps to prevent water intrusion under the roof-covering. 

Vents and Stacks: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job is to monitor the flashing around the plumbing vent pipes that pass through the roof surface.  Sometimes they deteriorate and cause a roof leak.  

Be sure that the plumbing vent pipes do not get covered, either by debris, toys, or other items.

Vents and Stacks: Informational
Ridge, Gable Vents

We looked at DWV (drain, waste, and vent) pipes that pass through the roof covering. There should be watertight flashing (often black rubber material) installed around the plumbing vent pipes.

Roof Drainage Systems: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job is to monitor the gutters and be sure that they function during and after a rainstorm. Look for loose parts, sagging gutter ends, and water leaks. The rain water should be diverted far away from the house foundation. 

The inspector shall inspect: 

A. roofing materials. 

B. roof drainage systems.

C. skylights

D. chimneys

E. roof penetrations.


The inspector is NOT required to inspect

A. antennae. 

B. interiors of vent systems, flues, and chimneys that are not readily accessible

C. other installed accessories.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Flashing

Missing Kickout Flashing

We observed a defect at the flashing area called a "kickout."  A kickout flashing "kicks" the roof water away from the house structure and diverts it into a gutter. This missing flashing could lead to hidden moisture intrusion and water damage issues that we would not be able to observe during a visual-only home inspection. A roofing professional is needed to further evaluate and make necessary corrections. 

Roof Roofing Professional

3 - Exterior

IN NI NP D
3.1 Driveway & Walkway X X
3.2 Wall, Covering, Flashing & Trim X X
3.3 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X X
3.4 Exterior Doors X
3.5 Door Bell X
3.6 Lights Fixtures X
3.7 Receptacles (GFCI) X
3.8 Exterior Vents/Penetrations X
3.9 Decks, Balconies, Porches, Patios & Steps X X
3.10 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls X
Homeowner's Responsibility

The exterior of every home is slowly deteriorating and aging. The sun, wind, rain, and temperatures are constantly affecting it. Your job is to monitor the building's exterior for its condition and weather tightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

During a heavy rainstorm (without lightning), grab an umbrella and go outside. Walk around your house and look around at the roof and property. A rainstorm is a perfect time to see how the roof, downspouts, and grading are performing. Observe the drainage patterns of your entire property, as well as the property of your neighbor. The ground around your house should slope away from all sides. Downspouts, surface gutters, and drains should be directing water away from the foundation. 

Driveway & Walkway: Informational
Walkway Photos

We inspected the walkways and driveways that were adjacent to the house. The walkways, driveways, and parking areas that were far away from the house foundation were not inspected.

Wall, Covering, Flashing & Trim: Wall & Covering Material
Block Wall

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging.  The sun, wind, rain, and temperatures are constantly affecting it.  Your job is to monitor the house's exterior for its condition and weather tightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior wall-covering materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Informational
Photos

We inspected the eaves, soffits, and fascia. We were not able to inspect every detail, since a home inspection is limited in its scope.

Exterior Doors: Material
Aluminum
Lights Fixtures : Informational
Photos

Outdoor lights mounted on the face of a wall are vulnerable to damage from water. Whether you are installing a new light or performing periodic maintenance, caulking ensures the wiring and connections inside the wall are protected from possible electrical shorts. Electricians and maintenance technicians use similar procedures when caulking outdoor lights at wood or masonry walls. The job is not complicated and in most instances, the average do-it-yourself enthusiast can accomplish it in a relatively short time.

Receptacles (GFCI): Receptacles
GFCI Present

Outdoor receptacles must also be protected from moisture and rain. Protection is accomplished by GFCI type outlets and weather protection.

All outdoor receptacles MUST be protected by a GFCI circuit.  The protection may be a GFCI outlet located in the garage which sources all exterior outlets or by individual GFCI outlets.

If the receptacle is in what the NEC calls a damp location, meaning that it is outdoors but under a roof so that it cannot be directly rained on, then it should have a weatherproof cover, which has a flap mechanism that covers the slots when it is not in use. Receptacles in a wet location, that are exposed to direct rain, must have a while-in-use cover that is able to seal out rain while a cord is plugged into it.


Decks, Balconies, Porches, Patios & Steps: Appurtenance
Back Porch

Appurtenance: an accessory or other item associated with a particular activity or style of living.

The inspector shall inspect:

A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; 

B. all exterior doors; 

C. adjacent walkways and driveways; 

D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; 

E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; 

F. railings, guards and handrails; 

G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; 

H. a representative number of windows; and 

I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.

The inspector is not required to:

A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. 

B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. 

C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. 

D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. 

E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. 

F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. 

G. inspect for safety-type glass. 

H. inspect underground utilities. 

I. inspect underground items. 

J. inspect wells or springs. 

K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. 

L. inspect swimming pools or spas. 

M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. 

N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. 

O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. 

P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Driveway & Walkway

Walkway - Minor Cracking

We observed minor cracking and no major damage at the walkway.  

Monitoring is recommended. 

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Driveway & Walkway

Cracking/ loose tiles

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Wall, Covering, Flashing & Trim

Poor Caulking Around Windows

Gaps around window will allow water intrusion and damage. We recommend this be sealed with caulking and painted. 


*only one window,  the one at the porch

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Wall, Covering, Flashing & Trim

paint chips on ground exterior

Based on the age of the home, it is possible that these paint chips left behind could contain lead. Only way to know for sure is by testing.

Recommend testing and cleaning up completely by a qualified professional, if they do contain lead.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Soffits Damaged

One or more sections of the soffits are loose or damaged. Recommend qualified roofer evaluate & repair.

Hardhat General Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.9.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches, Patios & Steps

Stair risers out of Code

The riser height shall be a maximum 8-1/4" high and not more the 3/8" in variance, so it does not create a tripping hazard. 

Bottom riser is 7.5"

Top riser is 4"

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Crawlspace

IN NI NP D
4.1 General X
4.2 Floor Material X
4.3 Vapor Retarders X
4.4 Trailer Tie Downs X
4.5 Plumbing X X
General: Inspection Method
Crawlspace Access
Floor Material: Informational Photos
Dirt

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Plumbing

Pipes need more support

Plumbing pipes need support every 6 to 8' to avoid sagging and weakening

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
4.5.2 - Plumbing

Hvac condensate line needs support

The condensate line is severely sagging,  and below the drain level on the outside.  This means that all that sagging area is always filled with water, and can facilitate clogging/ backing up to the air handler

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
4.5.3 - Plumbing

Copper pipes should be supported with copper straps

Galvanized strap is being used on the copper water lines.  This can cause dissimilar metal corrosion over time and corrode the copper. 

Suggest replacing with copper strap

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
4.5.4 - Plumbing

Unneccesary P-Trap

This line has an extra p-trap installed, downstream of the master bathroom.  This is most likely the cause for the slow drains in the master fixtures.

Recommend qualified professional cut out and repair the drain line.

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Water Supply

IN NI NP D
5.1 Water Meter Box X
5.2 Main Water Shut-off Device X
5.3 Sewer Cleanout
5.4 Water Pressure X
5.5 Hose Bibs X
5.6 Water Pressure Relief Valve X
5.7 Water Heater X
5.8 Water temperature X
Water Source
Public
Water Meter Box: Location
Front
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
Front

It's your job to know where the main water shut off is located. And be sure to keep an eye out for any water and plumbing leaks.

Water Pressure: Water Pressure
Low-range/normal 30 +/-
Hose Bibs: Anti-Siphon Device
None Present

The orbit hose bib anti-siphon valve prevents outside water from siphoning through an outside faucet and contaminating the drinking water used in your home. This valve is easy to install and fits all standard outdoor hose faucets. Its durable construction provides years of reliable use.

Water Pressure Relief Valve: Definition

A water pressure relief valve (PRV) is a type of safety valve used to protect the internal pipes of the home. If the pressure from the public water pressure at the street gets to high, this valve will open.  When the water pressure is to high this valve will open an release the water, normally outside.  Unfortunately these valves are not resettable.  Once open the main water to the home needs to be turned off and a plumber called.

Water Heater: Service Life

Based on the manufacturer's suggested service life, the life expectancy of a water heater is about 8 to 12 years. That varies with the location and design of the unit, quality of installation, maintenance schedule and water quality.

We notate the condition of the water heater and whether hot water is being produced.

Water Heater: Location
Exterior Rear
Water Heater: Manufacturer
Rheem

We recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding.

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help.

Water Heater: Year Manufactured
2014
Water Heater: Power Source/Type
Electric
Water Heater: TPR
Present

The temperature relief valve (TPR) is a protective feature on the water heater to prevent the water heater from exploding if the pressure in the water heater gets too great.

Sewer Cleanout: Unable to Locate

We were unable to locate. There is normally an 'S' marked at curb which locates the sewer cleanup.  We could not find the sewer mark at the street nor the sewer clean out cap.  Many times the clean out cap is covering by mulch in the flower beds.

Your Homes water supply can be supplied by either city (public) water or a well system (private).  These systems are vastly different in nature.  

I. City water comes in your home from the street.  This system may have some components to prevent contamination of the city side of the water source.  These components will be identified if present.

II. The other option is a well system.  A well system has a well drilled into the ground to pull drinkable water for use in the home.  You will have a well and a pump located somewhere on the property.  

We check for proper water pressure at one of the hose bibs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies

6 - Electrical

IN NI NP D
6.1 Service Conductors & Electric Meter X X
6.2 Main Service Panel X
6.3 Subpanel X
Service Conductors & Electric Meter: Service Conductor & Meter Location
Overhead, photos
Main Service Panel: Homeowner's Responsibility

It's your job to know where the main electrical panel is located, including the main service disconnect that turns everything off. 

Be sure to test your GFCIs, AFCIs, and smoke detectors regularly. You can replace light bulbs, but more than that, you ought to hire an electrician. Electrical work is hazardous and mistakes can be fatal. Hire a professional whenever there's an electrical problem in your house. 

Main Service Panel: Location
Exterior Rear
Main Service Panel: Capacity
200 AMP
Main Service Panel: Manufacturer
GE
Main Service Panel: Type
Circuit Breaker

The inspector shall inspect:

A. the service drop; the overhead service conductors and attachment point;

B. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;

C. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;

D. the electric meter and base; service-entrance conductors;

E. the service grounding and bonding.

F. the main service disconnect;

G. the panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);

H. all exterior ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles using a GFCI tester, where possible;

I. all interior receptacles and GFCI outlets for functionality and polarity.


 The inspector is not required to:

A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures.

B. operate electrical systems that are shut down.

C. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices.

E. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems.

F. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled.

G. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices.

H. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized.

I. inspect low-voltage systems

J. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility.

K. inspect spark or lightning arrestors.

L. determine the accuracy of labeling.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Service Conductors & Electric Meter

Service mast rusting

Recommend scraping the rust and painting the mast to extend life, and prevent water intrusion into electric meter.

*caution* this is under live electric wires

Contractor Qualified Professional

7 - HVAC

IN NI NP D
7.1 Condensing Unit X
7.2 Air Handler X X
7.3 Filter X
7.4 Thermostat X
Informational

Your HVAC is made up of two main components. These components can be combined in to one unit or be two separate units. The two components are the Condenser (the component that makes the cold & hot air) and the Air Handler (the component that moves the conditioned air). We are checking on the age, maintenance, and condition of the components. 

The average life expectancy for HVAC units is 15 - 25 years. The most important thing a homeowner can do is change the filter regularly with the correct size filter.

The truth of the matter is the system lasts as long as you want it to. As long as you maintain the system well and have regular tune-ups/servicing, you'll find your system lasts a very long time. Many homeowners decide to replace it after about 10-15 years for a new, more efficient model. In the long-run, replacing the system every 15-20 years (most systems average life expectancy) is more economical in terms of maintenance fees and energy bills.

Equipment Configuration
Split Unit

In a split unit configuration, the condenser and air handler (evaporator) are contained in separate units. The condenser is the unit oustide. The air handler is located inside the home, the garage, or the attic. The air handler normally contains the air filter.

In a single unit configuration, both the condenser and evaporator are contained in the same unit which is outside the home.

Condensing Unit: Definition
The condenser contains all the equipment necessary to reclaim the refrigerant gas and convert it back to a liquid. It consists of a compressor, condenser, hot gas discharge line, condenser fan, electrical panel box, and some accessory components.
Not all units are A/C and Heat. If the unit is only A/C then there is normally a heat strip inside the air handler unit inside the home. 
Condensing Unit: Location
Left, Rear
Condensing Unit: Brand
Goodman
Condensing Unit: Year Manufactured
2014
Condensing Unit: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Condensing Unit: Condensation Drip Line

The condensation drip line allows the water from the HVAC air handler inside to the outside.  When the HVAC is on there should always be water flowing out of this pipe.

Condensing Unit: Local Disconnect

The local disconnect is a safety device that allows an HVAC technician to work on the condensing unit without the risk of the power being turned on.

Air Handler: Definition
The air handler unit contains the evaporator coils. This evaporator device is used to transfer or absorb heat from the air surrounding the evaporator to the refrigerant. In doing so, the liquid refrigerant is evaporated or boiled off as it passes through the evaporator.
Air Handler: Location
Utility Closet/Room
Air Handler: Brand
Goodman
Air Handler: Year Manufactured
2014
Air Handler: Energy Source/Type/Heat
Electric, Heat Pump
Air Handler: Local Disconnect

The local disconnect is a safety device that allows an HVAC technician to work on the air handler without the risk of the power being turned on.

Filter: Location
Air Handler
Filter: Filter Size
20x22x1
Thermostat: Location
Hallway
Thermostat: Measured Temperatures
45 - 49

We measure the temperature coming out of the registers in the ceilings.

The inspector shall inspect:

Cooling:

The inspector shall inspect:
A. the central cooling equipment using normal operating controls.

The inspector is not required to:
A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU or supply adequacy of the cooling system.
B. inspect window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters.
C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65
Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or
may damage the equipment.
D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic
setbacks or clocks.
E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.:

Heating:

The inspector shall inspect:
A. the heating systems using normal operating controls, and describe the energy source and heating method;
B. and report as in need of repair heating systems that do not operate;
C. and report if the heating systems are deemed inaccessible.

The inspector is not required to:
A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems.
B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems.
C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity,
BTU or supply adequacy of the heating system.
D. light or ignite pilot flames.
E. activate heating, heat-pump systems or other heating systems when ambient
temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or
may damage the equipment.
F. over-ride electronic thermostats.
G. evaluate fuel quality.
H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers,
programs or clocks.



  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
7.2.1 - Air Handler

Missing cover plate on disconnect

Contractor Qualified Professional

8 - Pest Control

Types
Termite Treatment Sticker

9 - Laundry Room

IN NI NP D
9.1 Interior Doors X
9.2 Lights & Switches X
9.3 Receptacles (GFCI) X X
9.4 Washer & Dryer X
9.5 Floor Covering X
9.6 Walls X
9.7 Windows X X
9.8 Ceilings X
Informational
Photos
Receptacles (GFCI): General Photos
Non-GFCI Present

Depending on the age of a home, electrical codes require outlets within 4' of sinks to be GFCI protected. While older homes do not require GFCI outlets, upgrading should be strongly considered.  If any of these receptacles were to trip, they can be reset by the pushing in the reset button on the GFCI outlet.

Floor Covering: Informational
Photos
Windows: Informational
Photos
Ceilings: Informational
Photos
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Receptacles (GFCI)

No GFCI Protection Installed

No GFCI protection present in all locations. Recommend licensed electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles at sink and washing machine areas. 

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. 

$
Credit
Comment
9.7.1 - Windows

Out of track

The window has latches to keep it in the track,  and these can be pulled to remove the window for cleaning.  These latches are not inside the track so it can easily come forward

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Crawlspace

IN NI NP D
10.1 General X
10.2 Floor Material X
10.3 Vapor Retarders X X
10.4 Trailer Tie Downs X

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Vapor Retarders

No Vapor Barrier

No soil cover was installed at the time of the inspection. Soil covers help reduce humidity levels in crawlspaces by limiting moisture evaporation into the air from soil. Reducing humidity levels can help reduce the chances for mold growth.


11 - Kitchen

IN NI NP D
11.1 Interior Doors X
11.2 Lights & Switches X
11.3 Receptacles (GFCI) X
11.4 Floor Covering X
11.5 Walls X
11.6 Windows X
11.7 Ceilings X
11.8 Countertops & Cabinets X
11.9 Sink X
11.10 Water Supply and Drains X
11.11 Garbage Disposal X
11.12 Dishwasher X X
11.13 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
11.14 Built-in Microwave X
11.15 Refrigerator X
Informational
Photos
Interior Doors: Informational
Pantry
Lights & Switches: Informational
Photos

We operate all light switches.  We notate any light switch that we can not determine what it controls.

Receptacles (GFCI): Informational Photos
GFCI Present

All receptacles that are accessible are tested. Depending on the age of the home,  electrical codes require outlets within 4' of sinks to be GFCI protected. While older homes do not require GFCI outlets, upgrading should be strongly considered.  If any of these receptacles were to trip, they can be reset by the pushing in the reset button on the GFCI outlet.

Floor Covering: Informational
Photos
Ceilings: Informational
Photos
Sink: Material
Metal
Water Supply and Drains: Water Supply Pipe Material
Copper
Water Supply and Drains: Drain Trap
ABS
Dishwasher: Informational
Photos
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
Samsung
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Electric
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Built-in Microwave: Informational
Photos
Refrigerator: Informational
Photos

We checked to see if the refrigerator was on. It was. That's all we inspected in relation to a refrigerator. Refrigerators are beyond the scope of a home inspection.

The inspector shall inspect: 

I. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 

The inspector is NOT required to inspect: 

I. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in above section.

II. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
11.12.1 - Dishwasher

No high loop

No 'high loop' installed, which means supporting the drain hose up underneath the countertop.  This is recommend as it pulls the hose up higher than the sink basin to prevent dirty water from backflowing back into the dishwasher if the sink is full or backed up.

Wrench DIY

12 - Family Room

IN NI NP D
12.1 Lights & Switches X
12.2 Receptacles X X
12.3 Floor Covering X
12.4 Walls X
12.5 Windows X
12.6 Ceilings X
12.7 Smoke Detectors
Informational
Photos
Lights & Switches: Informational
Photos

We operate all light switches.  We notate any light switch that we can not determine what it controls.

Receptacles: Informational
Photos

All receptacles that are accessible are tested.

Receptacles: Switched Receptacle

One of the receptacles located in this room is what's called a half hot. This means that half of the receptacle is controlled from a switch. This allows you to plug in a table lamp at the receptacle and still control the power from the switch.

Floor Covering: Informational
Photos
Windows: Informational
Photos
Ceilings: Informational
Photos
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
12.2.1 - Receptacles

House has older '2 wire' system

One or more receptacles are ungrounded. To eliminate safety hazards, and possible shock,  all receptacles should be grounded.

These receptacles are wired with original wiring,  that only have a hot and a neutral, with no ground wire included.  

The best way to correct this is to install new wiring. The other alternative that will protect the outlets from a hazard is to install gfci protection on those circuits.  This can be done with either a single gfci receptacle if it is 'upstream' of the others,  or a gfci breaker that controls the whole circuit. 


Although this does not provide an actual ground fault back to the panel, it does provide a protection from shock. 


**The living room and 2 smaller bedrooms have this older system. A gfci receptacle was installed in bedroom to protect both bedrooms,  but it was not functioning correctly.  All other receptacles in the home are newer, grounded type. 

13 - Master Bedroom

IN NI NP D
13.1 Interior Doors X
13.2 Lights & Switches X
13.3 Receptacles X
13.4 Floor Covering X
13.5 Walls X
13.6 Windows X
13.7 Ceilings X
13.8 Smoke Detectors X
Informational
photos
Interior Doors: Informational
Entry, Closet
Receptacles: Informational
Photos

All receptacles that are accessible are tested.

Floor Covering: Informational
Photos
Windows: Informational
Photos
Smoke Detectors: Informational
Photos
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies

14 - Master Bathroom

IN NI NP D
14.1 Interior Doors X
14.2 Lights & Switches X
14.3 Receptacles (GFCI) X
14.4 Floor Covering X
14.5 Walls X
14.6 Windows X
14.7 Ceilings X
14.8 Ventilation X
14.9 Sink X
14.10 Water Supply and Drain Trap X X
14.11 Countertops & Cabinets X
14.12 Toilet X
14.13 Bathtub: Surface and Fixture X
14.14 Shower: Surface & Fixture X X
Informational
Photos
Interior Doors: Informational
Entry
Lights & Switches: Informational
Photos

We operate all light switches.  We notate any light switch that we can not determine what it controls.

Receptacles (GFCI): General Photos
GFCI Present

Depending on the age of a home, electrical codes require outlets within 4' of sinks to be GFCI protected. While older homes do not require GFCI outlets, upgrading should be strongly considered.  If any of these receptacles were to trip, they can be reset by the pushing in the reset button on the GFCI outlet.

Floor Covering: Informational
Photos
Ceilings: Informational
Photos
Ventilation: Ventilation Source
Vent
Sink: Informational
Photos
Water Supply and Drain Trap: Water Supply Material
Copper
Water Supply and Drain Trap: Drain Trap
PVC
Countertops & Cabinets: Informational
Photos
Toilet: Informational
Photos
Shower: Surface & Fixture: Informational
Photos
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
14.10.1 - Water Supply and Drain Trap

Slow Drain

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
14.14.1 - Shower: Surface & Fixture

Needs caulking

Recommend caulking with a matching color. 

These corners are just grouted,  which will crack over time. At least keep an eye on all the 90 degree corners and if you start to see cracking,  recommend caulking to prevent water intrusion and damage

Contractor Qualified Professional

15 - Bedroom 2

IN NI NP D
15.1 Interior Doors X
15.2 Lights & Switches X X
15.3 Receptacles X X
15.4 Floor Covering X
15.5 Walls X
15.6 Windows X
15.7 Ceilings X
15.8 Smoke Detectors X X
Informational
photos
Interior Doors: Informational
Entry, Closet
Lights & Switches: Informational
Photos

We operate all light switches.  We notate any light switch that we can not determine what it controls.

Receptacles: Informational
Photos

All receptacles that are accessible are tested.

Floor Covering: Informational
Photos
Windows: Informational
Photos
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
15.2.1 - Lights & Switches

Lightbulb hazard in closet

The light fixture in the closet has no cover,  and the bulb is a standard incandescent.  


These bulbs get hot and are a fire hazard when in close proximity to shelves or clothing. 

Recommend replacing with LED bulb or installing cover

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
15.3.1 - Receptacles

Reverse Polarity

One or more receptacles have been wired with reverse polarity. (The hot and neutral wires are reversed on the receptacle)  This can create a shock hazard, and could ruin sensitive electronics. 

Recommend licensed electrician evaluate & repair.

$
Credit
Comment
15.3.2 - Receptacles

Ungrounded Receptacle

One or more receptacles are ungrounded. To eliminate safety hazards, all receptacles in kitchen, bathrooms, garage & exterior should be grounded.
$
Credit
Comment
15.8.1 - Smoke Detectors

Missing

The smoke detector located in this room is missing. We recommend that one be installed in every bedroom

16 - Bedroom 3

IN NI NP D
16.1 Interior Doors X
16.2 Lights & Switches X
16.3 Receptacles X X
16.4 Floor Covering X
16.5 Walls X
16.6 Windows X
16.7 Ceilings X
16.8 Smoke Detectors X X
Informational
photos
Interior Doors: Informational
Entry, Closet
Lights & Switches: Informational
Photos

We operate all light switches.  We notate any light switch that we can not determine what it controls.

Receptacles: Informational
Photos

All receptacles that are accessible are tested.

Floor Covering: Informational
Photos
Windows: Informational
Photos
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
16.3.1 - Receptacles

Ungrounded Receptacle

This one has the gfci receptacle installed for protection of the two bedroom outlet circuits, (ungrounded)  but it is not functioning correctly.  Would not reset, and would not trip when tested

$
Credit
Comment
16.8.1 - Smoke Detectors

Missing

The smoke detector located in this room is missing. We recommend that one be installed in every bedroom. 

17 - Bathroom 2

IN NI NP D
17.1 Interior Doors X
17.2 Lights & Switches X
17.3 Receptacles (GFCI) X
17.4 Floor Covering X
17.5 Walls X
17.6 Windows X
17.7 Ceilings X
17.8 Ventilation X
17.9 Sink X X
17.10 Water Supply and Drain Trap X
17.11 Countertops & Cabinets X
17.12 Toilet X
17.13 Bathtub: Surface and Fixture X X
17.14 Shower: Surface & Fixture X
Informational
Photos
Interior Doors: Informational
Entry
Lights & Switches: Informational
Photos

We operate all light switches.  We notate any light switch that we can not determine what it controls.

Receptacles (GFCI): General Photos
GFCI Present

Depending on the age of a home, electrical codes require outlets within 4' of sinks to be GFCI protected. While older homes do not require GFCI outlets, upgrading should be strongly considered.  If any of these receptacles were to trip, they can be reset by the pushing in the reset button on the GFCI outlet.

Floor Covering: Informational
Photos
Ceilings: Informational
Photos
Ventilation: Ventilation Source
Vent
Sink: Informational
Photos
Water Supply and Drain Trap: Water Supply Material
Galvanized
Water Supply and Drain Trap: Drain Trap
PVC
Countertops & Cabinets: Informational
Photos
Toilet: Informational
Photos
Bathtub: Surface and Fixture: Informational
Photos
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies
$
Credit
Comment
17.9.1 - Sink

Slow Drain

The drain for the sink is slow. We recommend the trap be cleaned of hair, sludge etc. and if this does not correct the problem, we recommend the line be 'snaked' by a professional sewer cleaning service.
$
Credit
Comment
17.13.1 - Bathtub: Surface and Fixture

Needs caulking

They only grouted the shower in the corners. 

Recommend caulking with a matching color,  the grout in the 90 degree corners will crack out over time

Contractor Qualified Professional

18 - Attic, Insulation, and Ventilation

IN NI NP D
18.1 Roof Structure & Attic X
18.2 Attic Insulation X
18.3 Ventilation X
18.4 Attic Access X
Informational
Photos
Roof Structure & Attic: Material
Trusses
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Loose-fill, Cellulose

During the home inspection, we inspected for insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces, and foundation areas. 

We attempted to describe the type of insulation observed and the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure.

We reported as in need of correction the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces.

Attic Insulation: Approximate Average Depth of Insulation
6-9 inches

Determining how much insulation should be installed in a house depends upon where a home is located. The amount of insulation that should be installed at a particular area of a house is dependent upon which climate zone the house is located and the local building codes.  

Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Gable Vents, Soffit Vents

The inspector shall inspect:

A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; 

B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; 

C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. 

The inspector shall describe:

A. the type of insulation observed;

B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. 

The inspector is not required to:

A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. 

B. move, touch or disturb insulation. 

C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. 

D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. 

E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. 

F. activate thermostatically operated fans. 

G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. 

H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiencies