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1234 Main St.
Erie, CO 80516
09/21/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
4
Maintenance item
10
Recommendations

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client
Building Type
Single Family, Attached
Occupancy
Occupied, Furnished
Utilities
Water On, Gas On, Electric On
Weather Conditions
Cloudy, Precipitation within last 48 Hours, Ice, Snow
Temperature
18 Fahrenheit (F)
Area View Photos
Overview

 

Purpose and Scope of the Home Inspection

The inspection is supplemental to the Property Disclosure. It is the responsibility of the Client to obtain any and all disclosure forms relative to this real estate transaction.

This document was prepared as a report of all visual defects noted at the time and date of the inspection. It is not necessarily an all-inclusive summary, as additional testing or inspection information/processes and analysis may be pending. It is subject to all terms and conditions specified in the Inspection Agreement.

It should be noted that a standard pre-purchase inspection is a visual assessment of the condition of the property at the time of inspection. The inspection and inspection report are offered as an opinion only, of items observed on the day of the inspection. Although every reasonable effort is made to discover and correctly interpret indications of previous or ongoing defects that may be present, it must be understood that no guarantee is expressed nor implied nor responsibility assumed by the inspector or inspection company, for the actual condition of the building or property being examined.

Inspector Badget LLC., endeavors to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the inspection standards of practice of the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI). The scope of the inspection is outlined in the Inspection Agreement, agreed to and signed by the Client. This report contains observations of those systems and components that are, in the professional opinion of the inspector authoring this report, significantly deficient or are near the end of their expected service life. If the cause for the deficiency is not readily apparent, the suspected cause or reason why the system or component is at or near the end of expected service life is reported, and recommendations for correction or monitoring may be made as appropriate. When systems or components designated for inspection in the NACHI Standards are present but are not inspected, the reason the item was not inspected may be reported as well.

  

Exclusions and Limitations 

The client should understand that this is the assessment of an inspector, not a professional engineer, and that, despite all efforts, there is no way we can provide any guaranty that the foundation, structure, and structural elements of the unit, are sound. We suggest that if the client is at all uncomfortable with this condition or our assessment, a professional engineer be consulted to independently evaluate the condition, prior to making a final purchase decision.

This inspection is limited to the structure, exterior, landscape, roof, plumbing, electrical, heating, foundation, bathrooms, kitchen, bedrooms, hallway, and attic sections of the house as requested, where sections are clearly accessible, and where components are clearly visible. Inspection of these components is limited, and is also affected by the conditions apparent at the time of the inspection, and which may, in the sole opinion of the inspector, be hazardous to examine for reasons of personal safety.

This inspection will exclude insulation, hazardous materials, retaining walls, hidden defects, buried tanks of any type, areas not accessible or viewable. As all buildings contain some level of mold, inspecting for the presence of mold on surfaces, hidden locations, and in the air is not the responsibility of the inspector. Should the Client feel the need to perform testing and evaluation for the presence or absence of molds, the Inspector recommends contacting a certified industrial hygienist or qualified laboratory testing service for these activities.

The following items are also excluded from the scope of the inspection, and deviations to the NACHI and ASTM (American Society for Testing Materials) standards are hereby noted:

Inspecting for the presence of wood destroying insects (WDI), testing for the presence of radon gas, building code violations of any type, document reviews, survey, American Disability Act (ADA) or accessibility reviews of any type whatsoever, cost estimates of any type, remaining useful life, estimated useful life, insulation, life/safety equipment and issues.

The NACHI Standards of Practice, are applicable to all residential properties. They are the bare minimum standard for a residential inspection, are not technically exhaustive and do not identify concealed conditions or latent defects. Inspectors are NOT required to determine the condition of any system or component that is not readily accessible; the remaining service life of any system or component; determination of correct sizing of any system or component; the strength, adequacy, effectiveness or efficiency of any system or component; causes of any condition or deficiency; methods materials or cost of corrections; future conditions including but not limited to failure of systems and components; the suitability of the property for any specialized use; compliance with regulatory codes, regulations, laws or ordinances; the market value of the property or its marketability; the advisability of the purchase of the property; the presence of potentially hazardous plants or animals including but not limited to wood destroying organisms or diseases harmful to humans; mold; mildew; the presence of any environmental hazards including, but not limited to toxins, carcinogens, noise, and contaminants in soil, water or air; the effectiveness of any system installed or methods utilized to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; the operating costs of any systems or components and the acoustical properties of any systems or components.

The inspector is NOT required to operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; any system or component which does not respond to normal operating controls or any shut off valves.

The inspector is NOT required to offer or perform any act or service contrary to law; offer or perform engineering services or work in any trade or professional service.

This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a guarantee or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding the conditions of the property, including the items and systems inspected, and it should not be relied on as such. This inspection is a tool to assist you in your buying decision, it should be used alongside the seller disclosure, and quotes and advice from the tradespeople recommended in this report to gain a better understanding of the condition of the home. Some risk is always involved when purchasing a property and unexpected repairs should be anticipated, as this is unfortunately, a part of home ownership.

The inspector is NOT required to enter into or onto any area or surface, or perform any procedure or operation which will, in the sole opinion of the inspector, likely be dangerous to the inspector or others or damage the property, its systems or components; nor are they required to move suspended ceiling tiles, personal property, furniture, equipment, plants, soil, snow, ice or debris or dismantle any system or component, or venture into confined spaces.

The inspector is NOT required to enter crawlspaces or attics that are not readily accessible nor any area which will, in the sole opinion of the inspector, likely to be dangerous, inaccessible, or partially inaccessible to the inspector or other persons, or where entry could possibly cause damage to the property or its systems or components.

There are items that are not inspected in a home inspection such as, but not limited to; fences and gates, pools and spas, outbuildings or any other detached structure, refrigerators, washers / dryers, storm doors and storm windows, screens, window AC units, central vacuum systems, water softeners, alarm and intercom systems, and any item that is not a permanent attached component of the home. Also drop ceiling tiles are not removed, as they are easily damaged, and this is a non-invasive inspection. Subterranean systems are also excluded, such as but not limited to: sewer lines, septic tanks, water delivery systems, and underground fuel storage tanks.

Water and gas shut off valves are not operated under any circumstances. As well, any component or appliance that is unplugged or "shut off" is not turned on or connected for the sake of evaluation. I don't have knowledge of why a component may be shut down, and can't be liable for damages that may result from activating said components / appliances.

Also not reported on are the causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; Any component or system that was not observed; Calculate the strength, adequacy, design or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility.

Lastly a home inspection does not address environmental concerns such as, but not limited to: Asbestos, lead, lead based paint, radon, mold, wood destroying organisms (termites, etc), cockroaches, rodents, pesticides, treated lumber, Chinese drywall, mercury, or carbon monoxide.

The inspector is not a licensed professional engineer or architect, and does not engage in the unlicensed practice of either discipline. Opinions contained herein are just that.

 

Contractors, Repairs and 20/20 Hindsight

A common source of dissatisfaction with inspectors sometimes comes as a result of off-the cuff comments made by contractors (made after-the-fact), which often differ from ours. Don't be surprised when someone says that something needed to be replaced when we said it needed to be repaired, replaced, upgraded, or monitored. Having something replaced may make more money for the contractor than just doing a repair. Contractors sometimes say, "I can't believe you had this building inspected and they did not find this problem." There may be several reasons for these apparent over sights:

Conditions during inspection. It is difficult for clients to remember the circumstances in the subject property at the time of the inspection. Clients seldom remember that there was storage everywhere, making things inaccessible, or that the air conditioning could not be turned on because it was less than 65 outside. Contractors do not know what the circumstances were when the inspection was performed.

The wisdom of hindsight. When a problem occurs, it is very easy to have 20/20 hindsight. Anybody can say that the roof is leaking when it is raining outside and the roof is leaking. In the midst of a hot, dry, or windy condition, it is virtually impossible to determine if the roof will leak the next time it rains. Predicting problems is not an exact science and is not part of the inspection process. We are only documenting the condition of the property at the time of the inspection.

A destructive or invasive examination. The inspection process is non-destructive, and is generally non-invasive. It is performed in this manner because, at the time we inspected the subject property, the Client did not own, rent, or lease it. A Client cannot authorize the disassembly or destruction of what does not belong to them. Now, if we spent half an hour under a sink, twisting problems. Of course, we could possibly CAUSE some problems in the process. Therein lies the quandary. We want to set your expectations as to what an inspection is, and what it not. We are generalists. We are not acting as specialists in any specific trade. The heating and cooling contractor may indeed have more heating expertise than we do. This is because heating and cooling is all he's expected to know. Inspectors are expected to know heating and cooling, plumbing, electricity, foundations, carpentry, roofing, appliances, etc. That's why we're generalists.

It is recommended that licensed professionals be used for repair issues as it relates to the comments in this report, and copies of receipts are kept for warranty purposes. The use of the term "Qualified Person" in this report relates to an individual or company whom is either licensed or certified in the field of concern. If I recommend evaluation or repairs by contractors or other licensed professionals, it is possible that they will discover additional problems since they will be invasive with their evaluation and repairs. Any listed items in this report concerning areas reserved for such experts should not be construed as a detailed, comprehensive, and / or exhaustive list of problems, or areas of concern.

Any suggested causes of damage or defects, and methods of repair mentioned in this report are considered a professional courtesy to assist you in better understanding the condition of the home, and in my opinion only from the standpoint of a visual inspection. The causes of damage/defects and repair methods should not be wholly relied upon. Contractors or other licensed professionals will have the final determination on causes of damage/deficiencies, and the best methods of repairs, due to being invasive with their evaluation. Their evaluation will supersede the information found in this report.    

 

HVAC System Recommendations

Regardless of comments and/or deficiencies listed in this report, the Inspector recommends the HVAC system be serviced by a qualified HVAC technician. The Inspector, while attempting to conduct as thorough as possible inspection and testing of the HVAC system, will be unable to inspect all of the interior components of the HVAC system due to the HVAC systems enclosure and specialty tools required. While the Inspector will check to confirm operating temperatures, thermostat operation, ignition, burners, etc., the Inspector will be unable to check the charge of the cooling lines, the condition of the burn chambers, or components sealed within.

  

Thermal Imaging

Infrared cameras may be used for specific areas or visual problems, and should not be viewed as a full thermal scan of the entire home. Additional services are available at additional costs and would be supplemented by an additional agreement / addendum. Temperature readings displayed on thermal images in this report are included as a courtesy and should not be wholly relied upon as a home inspection is qualitative, not quantitative. These values can vary +/- 4% or more of displayed readings, and these values will display surface temperatures when air temperature readings would actually need to be conducted on some items which is beyond the scope of a home inspection

  

Other Notes

Note: In the report, there may be specific references to areas and items that were inaccessible. I can make no representations regarding conditions that may be present but were concealed or inaccessible for review. With access and an opportunity for inspection, reportable conditions may be found in these areas.

Note: Components may be listed as having no deficiencies at the time of inspection, but may fail at any time due to their age or lack of maintenance, that couldn't be determined by the inspector. A life expectancy chart provided by NACHI can be viewed by clicking HERE.

Note: Several photographs and/or videos are included in your inspection report. These photos/videos are for informational purposes only and do not attempt to show every instance or occurrence of a defect.

Note: This report is proofread before sending it out, but typographical errors may be present. If any errors are noticed, please feel free to contact me for clarification.  

Note: Read the Standards of Standards of Practice set forth by the Inter National Association of Certified Home Inspectors for an insight into the scope of the inspection.

Note: For the purpose of this report, all directional references (left, right, rear, front) are based on when facing the front of the structure as depicted in the cover image above.

Notice to Third Parties: This report is the exclusive property of Inspector Badget LLC., and the Client(s) listed above and is not transferable to any third parties or subsequent buyers. Our Inspection and this report have been performed with a written contract agreement that limits its scope and usefulness. Unauthorized recipients are therefore advised not to rely upon this report, but rather to retain the services of an appropriately qualified property inspector of their choice to provide them with their own inspection and report.

Comment Key and Definitions

Comment Key - Definitions

This report divides deficiencies into three categories; Significant Defects (in red), Recommendations (in orange), and Maintenance Items/FYI/Minor Defects (in blue). Safety Hazards or concerns will be listed in the Red or Orange categories depending on their perceived danger, but should always be  addressed ASAP. 

  • Significant DefectsItems or components that were not functional and/or may require a major  expense to correct. Items categorized in this manner require further  evaluation and repairs or replacement as needed by a Qualified Contractor. These components and/or systems flagged in red also include items that are considered a safety concern.
  • Recommendations - Items or components that were found to include a deficiency but were still  functional at the time of inspection, although this functionality may be impaired or not ideal. Repairs are recommended to items categorized in  this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or  adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect. Items categorized  in this manner typically require repairs from a Handyman or Qualified Contractor and are not considered routing maintenance or DIY repairs. 
  • Maintenance Items/FYI/Minor Defects - Items or components that were found to be in need of recurring or basic general maintenance and/or may need minor repairs which may improve  their functionality. Typically these items are considered to represent a less significant immediate cost than those listed in the previous two categories and can be  addressed by a Homeowner or Handyman.  Also included in this section are items that were at the end of their typical service life or beginning to show signs of wear, but were in the opinion of the inspector, still functional at the time of inspection.  Items that are at, or past their typical service life will require subsequent observation to monitor performance with the understanding  that replacement or major repairs should be anticipated. 

These categorizations are in the professional opinion of the Inspector and based on what was observed at the time of inspection, and this categorization should not  be construed as to mean that items designated as "Minor defects" or "Recommendations" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendation in the text of the comment is more important than it's categorization.  Due to your opinions or personal experience you may feel defects belong  in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the  importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once  again it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining  to each defect that is paramount, not it's categorical placement. 

2 - Miscellaneous Concerns / Comments

New Construction Warning

The client should be aware that a break-in period occurs during the first year or two after a building is constructed. Some amount of  settlement and shrinkage is inevitable as temperature and humidity varies during the seasons. Systems may need adjustment or repair after experiencing constant, prolonged and/or heavy usage. Overall performance of the building exterior has not yet been tested by a wide variety of weather conditions.

Also, it is beyond the scope of  this inspection to determine if all permits have been approved or signed off. Consult with the builder and/or municipality to determine if all necessary permits have been approved.

Occupied and/or Furnished Advisement

Many areas and items at this property were  obscured by furniture stored items. This often includes but is not  limited to walls, floors, windows, inside and under cabinets, under  sinks, on counter tops, in closets, behind window coverings, under rugs  or carpets, and under or behind furniture. Areas around the exterior,  under the structure, in the garage and in the attic may also be obscured by stored items. The inspector in general does not move personal  belongings, furnishings, carpets or appliances. When furnishings, stored items or debris are present, all areas or items that are obscured, concealed or not readily accessible are excluded from the inspection.  The client should be aware that when furnishings, stored items or debris are eventually moved, damage or problems that were not noted during the inspection may be found.

Cable/Satellite/Telephone/Intercomm/Alarm System Advisement

If present, cable, satellite, telephone, inter communication and alarm systems are not inspected. Evaluating these  systems are beyond the scope of a property inspection. Their condition  is unknown, and they are excluded from this inspection. Recommend that a qualified specialist review these systems and make repairs if necessary.

3 - Grounds

Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Concrete
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Site Profile
Positive (Away from the Home)

Grading / Lot Drainage: Grading / Drainage Information

Grading is inspected to determine that it allows rainwater to adequately drain away from the structure. The soil is recommended to slope away from the home, with a 6 inch drop in  elevation, in the first 10 feet away from the structure (5% grade). Any flat or low areas around the home should be backfilled and sloped away from the foundation, to prevent potential moisture infiltration into areas below grade. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

 

Grading / Lot Drainage: Grading Limitations

The performance of lot drainage and the grading are limited to the conditions existing at the time of the  inspection only. The Inspector cannot guarantee this performance as conditions  constantly change. Heavy rain or other weather conditions may reveal issues that were not visible or foreseen at the time of inspection. Furthermore, items such as leakage in downspouts and gutter systems are  impossible to detect during dry weather. The inspection of the grading  and drainage performance in relation to moisture infiltration through  foundation walls, therefore, is limited to the visible conditions at the time of inspection, and evidence of past problems. The Inspector recommends consulting with the sellers as to any previous moisture intrusion into  the home, and / or ensuring that the Sellers disclosure has no mention of moisture infiltrating the structure.

 

Vegetation Observations: Vegetation Information

Vegetation was inspected around the home to ensure that it had adequate clearance from the structure, and was not impacting the structure. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Walkways, Steps, Patios & Driveways: Driveway Material
Concrete

Driveway Information

Driveways are inspected to determine their effect on the structure of the home. The Inspector will also report  on any visual deficiencies that may be present such as cracking, displacement, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of  inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Walkways, Steps, Patios & Driveways: Walkway Material
Concrete

Walkway Information

Walkways are inspected to determine their effect on the structure of the home. The Inspector will also report on any visual deficiencies that may be present such as cracking, displacement, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Walkways, Steps, Patios & Driveways: Steps Material
Concrete

Steps Information

Steps are inspected to determine their effect on the structure of the home. The Inspector will also report on any visual deficiencies that may be present such as cracking, displacement, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Walkways, Steps, Patios & Driveways: Patio
Concrete

Patio Information

Patio's are inspected to determine their effect on the structure of the home. The Inspector will also report on any visual deficiencies that may be present such as cracking, displacement, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Front Porch, Covered Porch

Deck Information

Decks are inspected looking for water related damage, construction related deficiencies, and safety hazards. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless  otherwise noted in this report.


Stairs Information

The stairs were inspected by looking at  their construction, attachment, risers and treads, applicable railings, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.


Porch/Deck Roof Information

Visible portions of porch/deck roofs are  inspected looking for any significant defects, leaks, etc. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Fences/Gates: Fence Type
Wood

Fence and Gate Information

Fence and gates are inspected to determine their overall structure. The Inspector will also report on any visual deficiencies that may be present such as cracking, leaning, rot, damage, displacement, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

The Inspector shall observe: vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the  property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture  intrusion.

Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Walkways, Steps, Patios & Driveways

Driveway Cracking - Minor Cosmetic

Minor cosmetic cracks observed, which may indicate movement in the soil. Recommend monitor and/or have concrete contractor patch/seal.

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Walkways, Steps, Patios & Driveways

Walkway Cracking - Minor

Minor cosmetic cracks observed. Recommend monitor and/or patch/seal.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Concrete / Dirt Erroding

At the time of the inspection, one or more areas of concrete/dirt erosion was observed. This can lead to structural weakness in the observed area. Recommend backfilling to prevent further damage. 

Wrench DIY

4 - Roof

Inspection Method
Fully Traversed
Roof Type/Style
Hip
Coverings: Material
Asphalt
Roof Pitch
4 - 12
Coverings: Layers Visible
One Layer
Roof Area Views
Roof Information 

The Inspector will inspect the roof to the best of their ability, but confirming proper fastening, use and adequacy of underlayment, and adequacy of flashing is impossible as these items are not visible. Damaging and invasive means would have to be carried out to confirm proper installation. Therefore, the inspection of the  roof is limited to visual portions only.


Roof Limitations

The inspection of the roof and it's  covering material is limited to the conditions on the day of the  inspection only. The roof covering material, visible portions of the roof structure (from within the attic), and interior ceilings are  inspected looking for indications of current or past leaks, but future conditions and inclement weather may reveal leaks that were not present  at the time of inspection. Any deficiencies noted in this report with  the roof covering or indications of past or present leaks should be  evaluated and repaired by qualified professionals. 

Roof Structure (Exterior): Roof Structure Examination

The roof was inspected at visible portions for obvious signs of structural damage to include deflection, roof sag, etc. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Coverings: Architectural Shingles

The roof covering was comprised of  architectural composition shingles. Architectural shingles, also called  dimensional shingles, are thicker and heavier (often 50% more) than  traditional 3-tab shingles. These 'premium' shingles are manufactured by starting with a fiberglass reinforcement mat, multiple layer of asphalt are added over the mat, and lastly ceramic granules are added over the  upper layer of asphalt for protection against the elements (wind, rain, UV rays from the sun). Architectural shingles typically have higher wind resistance numbers than their 3-tab counterparts, and resist leaks better. 30 - 50 year warranties are common with these shingles, but the warranty is highly prorated after 25 - 30 years. Typical replacement is  usually needed 23 - 28 years after the initial installation.


Due to the many variables which affect the lifespan of roof covering  materials, the Inspector does not estimate the remaining service life of any roof  coverings. This is in accordance with all industry inspection Standards  of Practice. The following factors affect the lifespan of roof covering  materials:

  • Roofing material quality: Higher quality materials, will of course, last longer.
  • Number of layers: Shingles installed over existing shingles will have a shorter lifespan.
  •  Structure orientation: Southern facing roofs will have shorter lifespans.
  •  Pitch of the roof: Shingles will age faster on a lower pitched roof in comparison with higher pitches.
  •  Climate: Wind, rain, hail, and snow will impact the lifespan of the roof.
  •  Color: Shingles that are darker in color will have a shorter lifespan, than lighter colored shingles.
  •  Attic Ventilation: Poorly vented attic spaces will decrease shingle life due to heat.
  •  Vegetation conditions: Overhanging trees, branches, contacting the roof, or leaf cover drastically shorten lifespan.

Asphalt shingles must be installed to manufacturers' recommendations, for the warranty coverage to be upheld. These installation requirements vary widely from manufacturer to manufacturer, and across the multitude of different shingle styles manufactured.


Shingles Information

The shingles were inspected at visible portions for excessive granule loss, signs of curling or delamination, loss of adhesion between the shingles, and any other signs of damage or  excessive age. The shingles appeared to be in satisfactory condition, allowing for normal wear and tear, at the time of inspection. No  deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Flashings: Material
Aluminum
Flashing Information

Visible portions of the flashing were  inspected looking for installation related deficiencies or damage (drip edge, sidewall, headwall, counter, etc - if applicable). Typically most  areas of flashing are not visible as they are covered by the roof covering material, and therefore functionality has to be determined by  looking for moisture intrusion on the sheathing in the attic or ceilings where the flashing was presumed to be in place. No deficiencies were  observed at visible portions, at the time of inspection, unless  otherwise noted in this report.

Roof Drainage Systems: Roof Drainage System Material
Aluminum
Gutter Information

The gutters were inspected for proper securement, debris in the channel, standing water, damage, etc.  Leaking gutters cannot be diagnosed if an active rain was not occurring at the time of inspection. If leaks are noticed after taking ownership of the home sealing may be needed at seams or endcaps. No deficiencies  were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

 

Downspouts Information

The downspouts were inspected to ensure  they were diverting rainwater away from the foundation walls.Testing for blockages in downspouts or drainpipes is beyond the scope of a home  inspection, as is locating their termination point. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Chimneys: Material
Absent

The Chimney was inspected for material makeup as well as signs of damage, deterioration, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Plumbing Vents: Plumbing Vents

The plumbing stack vents, their related rain boots, and other roof penetrations were inspected by looking at their clearance, the integrity of their boots, for proper installation, or any significant defects. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless  otherwise noted in this report.

Roof Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Turtle

The exterior roof ventilation is reported on by a visual inspection of said  ventilation sources, and looking for indications of improper ventilation. Measurements of ventilation sources are beyond the scope of a home inspection. No indications of inadequate ventilation was observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Roof Information

It is impossible to determine the integrity of a roof, absent of performing an invasive inspection, and absent of obvious defects noted, especially if the inspection had not taken place during or immediately after a sustained rainfall. The inspector makes no warranty as to the remaining life of this roof or related components. Any verbal estimates as to the remaining life of this roof is only opinion of the inspector. Be advised that there are many different roof types, which we evaluate wherever and whenever possible. Every roof covering material will wear differently relative to the following lifespan factors:

 

- Roofing material quality

- Installation method

- Number of layers

- Structure orientation: south-facing roofs will have shorter lifespans.

- Degree of roof slope: flatter roofs will have shorter lifespans.

- Climate (snow & rain): harsh climates shorten roof lifespans.

- Temperature swings: climates with large daily temperature differentials will shorten roof lifespans.

- Building site conditions (overhanging tree branches, wind, etc.)

- Roof color: darker roofs absorb more heat which shortens roof lifespan.

- Elevation: homes at higher elevations are exposed to more ultra violet (UV) light, which shortens roof lifespan.

- Orientation: roofs which receive more sun deteriorate more quickly than roofs which receive less sun.

- Roof structure ventilation: poor ventilation shortens roof lifespans.

- Quality of maintenance

Regardless of its design-life, every roof is only as good as the waterproof membrane beneath it, which is concealed and cannot be examined without removing the roof material, and this is equally true of almost all roofs. In fact, the material on the majority of pitched roofs is not designed to be waterproof, only water-resistant. This membrane can be split by movement, or deteriorated through time. Although there is leeway in installation specifications, the type and quality of membranes that are installed can vary from one installer to another, and leaks do occur. The majority of leaks result when a roof has not been well maintained or kept clean, and we recommend servicing them annually. However, what remains true of all roofs is that, whereas their condition can be evaluated, it is virtually impossible for anyone to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our service.

Even water stains on ceilings, or on the framing within attics, could be old and will not necessarily confirm an active leak without some corroborative evidence, and such evidence can be deliberately concealed. Consequently, only the installers can credibly guarantee that a roof will not leak, and they do. We evaluate every roof conscientiously, but we will not predict its remaining life expectancy, or guarantee that it will not leak. Naturally, the sellers or the occupants of a residence will generally have the most intimate knowledge of the roof and of its history. Therefore, we recommend that you ask the sellers about it, and that you either include comprehensive roof coverage in your insurance policy, or that you obtain a roof certification from an established local roofing company.

 

Additionally, the condition of a roof can change dramatically after a hard winter, so monitoring is always necessary.

 

The home inspector shall observe: roof covering; roof drainage systems (gutters and downspouts); vents; flashings; skylights, chimneys, and other roof penetrations; and signs of' leaks or abnormal condensation on building components.

 

The home inspector shall: describe the type of roof covering materials; and report the methods used to observe the roofing.

 

The home inspector is not required to: walk on any roof surface; predict the service life expectancy; inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes; remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces; observe attached accessories including but not limited to solar systems, antennae, lightning arrestors, or similar attachments.

Roofing Material Estimated Life Expectancy 
Aluminum Coating3 to 7
Asphalt (architectural) 30
Asphalt Shingles (3-tab)20
BUR (built-up roofing)30
Clay/Concrete100+
Coal and Tar30
Copper70+
EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) Rubber15 to 25
Fiber Cement25
Green (vegetation-covered)5 to 40
Metal40 to 80
Modified Bitumen20
Simulated Slate10 to 35
Slate60 to 150
TPO7 to 20
Wood25



Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Gutters Drain Onto Roof

One or more areas observed at the time of the inspection showed gutters that drained directly onto the roof. This can cause cosmetic wear and shortened lifespan at affected area.

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Exterior

Exterior Doors & Windows: Secondary Exterior Entry Door
Glass
Exterior Area Views

The Standards of Practice states that a representative sample of exterior components shall be inspected on each side of the home when multiple pieces make up an item or component (i.e. cladding, windows, overhangs, etc.). The Inspector tries to ensure that all portions are inspected but height from the ground, vegetation, or other factors  may prevent full accessibility or visibility of all items. No deficiencies were observed at the time of the inspection unless noted in this report. 

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Engineered Wood, Masonry, Stone

The wall cladding was inspected looking for damage, potential water  entry points, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of  inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Exterior Doors & Windows: Main Exterior Entry Door
Wood

All exterior doors were inspected by looking for damage, lack of proper  flashing, deficiencies with their operation, etc. No deficiencies were  observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Exterior Doors & Windows: Windows
Vinyl

The exterior components of the windows were inspected looking for  damage, lack of proper flashing, clearance, etc. No deficiencies were  observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Eaves, Soffits & Fascia Area Views

The soffit and fascia was inspected at visible portions looking for any  water damage or other significant defects. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Exterior Electrical Fixtures Area Views

The exterior electrical fixtures were inspected at visible portions checking to determine if inoperable, damaged, or significant defects. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

The home inspector shall observe: wall cladding, flashings, and trim; entryway doors and a representative number of windows; decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches and applicable railings; eaves, soffits, and fascias; and vegetation, grading, drainage, driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls with respect to their effect on the condition of the building. 

 

The home inspector shall: describe wall cladding materials; operate all entryway doors and a representative number of windows; and probe exterior wood components where deterioration is suspected. 

 

The home inspector is NOT required to observe: storm windows, storm doors, screening, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories; fences; presence of safety glazing in doors and windows; garage door operator remote control transmitters; geological conditions; soil conditions; recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); detached buildings or structures; or presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks.  

 

The home inspector is not required to: move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice or debris that obstructs access or visibility.

Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Cracking - Minor

Siding showed cracking in one or more places. This is a result of temperature changes, and typical as homes with stucco age. Recommend filling cracks less than a 1/4 of an inch thick with caulk. Cracks larger than 1/4 of an inch need to be repaired. Recommend consulting a qualified contractor to evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Exterior Doors & Windows

Window Sealing Missing

Areas around one or more windows was observed to be missing sealant or had gaps. Recommend filling gaps to prevent moisture intrusion.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Light Inoperable

One or more lights are not operating. New light bulb possibly needed.

Tools Handyman/DIY

6 - Garage

Garage Location
Attached
Vehicle Door: Material
Non-insulated, Aluminum
Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Door Label
Present
Garage Area Views
Ceiling: Type
Finished

The ceiling area was inspected looking for indications of leaks or other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

The framing in the garage is required to be covered with a 5/8" type X  drywall if the home was constructed after 2006, and if living areas are  overhead. Confirmation of the proper drywall is not possible in a  "visual only home inspection", but the presence of drywall will be  reported on. Homes built prior to 2006 were not required to meet these  requirements but upgrading is recommended as desired.

Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Type
Solid

The interior door located between the garage and living areas was a  steel or solid wood door measuring at least 1 3/8 inches thick. This  appears to satisfy the current standards for separation of garage and  living space relating to the door.

The door between the garage and living areas was in satisfactory  condition at the time of inspection. Current standards require for these doors to be comprised of steel or solid wood measuring at least 1 3/8"  thick for proper garage to living space separation. These doors built on homes prior to 2006 may not meet these standards and should be upgraded as desired for safety. No reportable conditions were present at the  time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Walls & Firewalls: Type
Finished

The walls appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of  inspection. No deficiencies were observed at visible portions unless  otherwise noted in this report.

Current standards require that walls adjacent to living areas in a  garage are covered with 1/2" drywall for proper separation of garage to  living space. Homes built prior to 2006 may not have this protection,  but upgrades are recommended as desired for safety.

Floor: Garage Floor Material
Concrete

The concrete slab floor appeared to be in satisfactory condition. No  deficiencies were observed at visible portions unless otherwise noted in this report

Vehicle Door: Type
Sectional Garage Doors

The garage door was tested by operating the wall mounted transmitter and checking for proper operation. The door was examined for damage or  installation related deficiencies. 

The rollers, brackets, door panels, springs, and tracks were inspected  looking for damage or loose components. 

The garage door opener(s) were inspected by depressing the wall mounted  transmitter and observing the openers functionality (remote transmitters are not tested). 

The safety eye beam(s) were inspected by closing the garage door and  "breaking" the path of the eye beam(s) to ensure the door auto-reversed  properly. The system was functional unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Vehicle Door Opener/Mechanism: Brand
LiftMaster
Vehicle Door Opener/Mechanism: Safety Devices
Photoelectric Sensor

The inspector shall: inspect garage doors and garage door openers by operating first by remote (if available) and then by the installed automatic door control; report as in need of repair any installed electronic sensors that are not operable or not installed at proper heights above the garage door; report as in need of repair any door locks or side ropes that have not been removed or disabled when garage door opener is in use.


The inspector is not required to: inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage except as otherwise noted; verify or certify safe operation of any auto reverse or related safety function of a garage door.


GARAGELIFE EXPECTANCY - YEARS
Garage Doors20 to 25
Garage Door Openers   10 to 15

 


7 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

General: Attic Access Hatch Location
2nd Floor Hallway
Roof Structure Condition: Ceiling Structure
2X4
Attic Insulation: R-value
40
General: Attic Access Hatch
Ceiling Hatch
Roof Structure Condition: Sheathing Type
Plywood
General: Attic Limitations

Attics are navigated as best as the Inspector can; levels of high insulation, HVAC ductwork, framing, and other factors can prevent physical and visual  accessibility of some areas and items. Insulation is not moved or  disturbed for visual accessibility of items. The inspection of this area is limited to visual portions only. Any areas not visible are excluded  from this inspection.

General: Attic Area Views

Attics are navigated as best as the Inspector can; levels of high insulation, HVAC duct-work, framing, and other factors can prevent physical and visual  accessibility of some areas and items. Insulation is not moved or disturbed for visual accessibility of items. The inspection of this area is limited to visual portions only. Any areas not visible are excluded  from this inspection.

The attic area was walked where possible, but not all areas were able to be safely traversed due to insulation obscuring the bottom chord of the truss / ceiling joists. Traversing an attic with insulation that obscures the framing is dangerous, as footing can be lost. The attic inspection is limited to visually accessible portions only.

Roof Structure Condition: Structure Type
Engineered Wood Trusses

The roof structure was inspected at visible portions looking for any  signs of moisture infiltration, damage, or other deficiencies. No  reportable conditions or indications of past or present leaks were  observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report

Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Blown

The insulation was inspected to determine the approximate depth and  type. Current energy star standards recommend approximately 13 inches of insulation to achieve an R-38 rating. Depending on when the home was constructed anywhere from 8-13 inches may be present. No reportable deficiencies were observed with the insulation unless otherwise noted in this report.

Attic Insulation: Insulation Thinkness
18 Inches
R-Value is a measure of insulation’s ability to resist heat traveling through it. The higher the R-Value the better the thermal performance of the insulation. Current standards for existing wood-framed buildings for this climate and location are R38-R60.
Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Soffit Vents, Turtle Vents

The attic ventilation is reported on by a visual inspection of said  ventilation sources, and looking for indications of improper  ventilation. Measurements of ventilation sources are beyond the scope of a home inspection. No indications of inadequate ventilation was observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Ducting, Vents & Exhaust Pipes: Venting Ducts
Bathroom Vents, Plumbing Vents

Visible portions of exhaust vents / plumbing stack vent(s) were inspected looking  for any disconnected portions and looking at the condition of the sheathing or decking surrounding them for indications of past or present leaks. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection  unless otherwise noted in this report.




Moisture Intrusion: Moisture Instrusion

The Inspector checked the attic area/roof structure for obvious signs of moisture intrusion. It is important to note, that weather conditions can limit the chances of finding an issues as well as exacerbating a problem. During the inspection, no deficiencies were found unless otherwise noted in this report. 

The inspector shall observe: insulation in unfinished spaces, ventilation of attic spaces, mechanical ventilation systems, signs of' leaks or abnormal condensation on building components.

 

The inspector shall: report on the general absence or lack of insulation.

 

The inspector is not required to: enter the attic or unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible or where entry could cause damage or pose a safety hazard to the inspector in his or her opinion; move, touch, or disturb insulation; move, touch or disturb vapor retarders; break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels and covers; identify the composition of or the exact R-value of insulation material; activate thermostatically operated fans; determine the types of materials used in insulation of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers, and wiring; determine adequacy of ventilation.

8 - Plumbing

Drain, Waste & Vent System: Vent Material
ABS
Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacture Year
2017
Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Hot Water Heater - Capacity
48 gallons
Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Basement
Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Hot Water Heater - # of Units
2 Units
Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacture Year
2016
Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Hot Water Heater - Capacity
48
Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Hot Water Temperature
155 - 160
Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Basement
Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Hot Water Heater - # of Units
2
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Main Gas Supply Line Material
Black Malleable Iron
General: Water Source
Public
Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Power Source/Type
Gas, High-Efficiency
Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Hot Water Temperature
155 - 160 Degrees Fahrenheit
Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Gas Shut-Off
Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Hot Water Heater #1 Data Sheet
Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Power Source/Type
Gas, High -Efficiency
Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Gas Shut-Off
Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Hot Water #2 Data Sheet
Sprinkler System : Water Supply Material
Copper
Sprinkler System : Sprinkler System Anti-Siphon Valve
Installed
Water Pressure & Functional Flow : Water Pressure / Functional Flow
65 PSI

Property water supply pressure was within the acceptable limits of 40 pounds per square inch (PSI) and 80 PSI at the time of the inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Water was ran from multiple faucets simultaneously to gauge that there was not a significant reduction in flow as a result of doing so. No significant reduction occurred unless otherwise noted in this report.

Main Water Shut-off Device: Water Shut-Off Valve Color Location
Basement
Lever, Red

The shut off valve appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time  of inspection. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in  this report. The valve is not operated to test it's functionality.

Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Supply Material
Copper

Visible portions of the water distribution pipes were inspected looking for leaks or other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were visually present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Distribution Material
Pex

Secondary house shut-off.

Drain, Waste & Vent System: Drain Pipe Material
ABS Plastic Waste

Visible portions of the (DWV) drain, waste, and vent pipes were  inspected looking for leaks or indications of other deficiencies. No reportable conditions (significant defects) were visibly observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Drain, Waste & Vent System: Sewer Clean Out

A sewer clean-out was present. Sewer clean-outs are reported on with regards to their presence only and are not attempted to open or verify any other information.

Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
Bradford & White

The Inspector recommends flushing & servicing the water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees Fahrenheit to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees Fahrenheit to prevent scalding.

To learn more about hot water heater maintenance CLICK HERE.

Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: TPR Valve

A TPR valve was in place, and appeared functional. These are not tested due to the fact that once they are tested, they tend to form a drip  leak. These valves allow the water heater to expel water and pressure of the tank reaches over 150psi, or the water temperature exceeds 210 degrees. No deficiencies were observed with the valve unless otherwise noted in this report.

Hot Water System #1, Controls, Flues & Vents: Operational Photos
Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
Bradford & White

The Inspector recommends flushing & servicing the water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees Fahrenheit to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees Fahrenheit to prevent scalding.

To learn more about hot water heater maintenance CLICK HERE.

Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: TPR Valve

A TPR valve was in place, and appeared functional. These are not tested due to the fact that once they are tested, they tend to form a drip  leak. These valves allow the water heater to expel water and pressure of the tank reaches over 150psi, or the water temperature exceeds 210 degrees. No deficiencies were observed with the valve unless otherwise noted in this report.

Hot Water System #2, Controls, Flues & Vents: Operational Pictures
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Main Gas Shut-Off
Front Right
Gas Meter

The shut off valve appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time  of inspection. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in  this report. The valve is not operated to test it's functionality.

Exhaust Fans: Exhaust Fan Information

The exhaust fan was operated. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Sprinkler System : Sprinkler System Installed
Yes
The inspection of the lawn sprinkler system is beyond the cope of the home inspection. The inspector only noted components as to the presence and not its operation, design, or configuration. The sprinkler system was not activated or operated during the inspection.
Sump Pump: Sump Pump Type
Sealed
A sump pump system protects the property from water intrusion by discharging rising groundwater or by routing surface drainage via the property perimeter drain to the pit, from where it is discharged by the pump to the exterior of the property or to a waste pipe or storm drain. Sump pumps require periodic maintenance to ensure that they work when they're needed and should be tested on an annual basis to ensure they are in working order. The pumps can be tested by lifting the float, but to avoid potential shock/electrocution hazard testing should be performed using a tool which will not conduct electricity. Pumps have a filter that should be cleaned during routine maintenance.

The home inspector shall observe: Interior water supply and distribution system, including: piping materials, supports, and insulation; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections; interior drain, waste, and vent system, including: traps; drain, waste, and vent piping; piping supports and pipe insulation; leaks; and functional drainage; hot water systems including: water heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; and chimneys, flues, and vents; fuel storage and distribution systems including: interior fuel storage equipment, supply piping, venting, and supports; leaks; and sump pumps.


The home inspector shall describe: water supply and distribution piping materials; drain, waste, and vent piping materials; water heating equipment; and location of main water supply shutoff device.

 

The home inspector shall operate: all plumbing fixtures, including their faucets and all exterior faucets attached to the house, except where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance.

 

The home inspector is not required to: state the effectiveness of anti-siphon devices; determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; operate automatic safety controls; operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets; observe: water conditioning systems; fire and lawn sprinkler systems; on-site water supply quantity and quality; on-site waste disposal systems; foundation irrigation systems; spas, except as to functional flow and functional drainage; swimming pools; solar water heating equipment; or observe the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.

 

PLUMBINGLIFE EXPECTANCY - YEARS
ABS and PVC Waste Pipe50 to 80
Accessible/ADA Handles100+
Acrylic Kitchen Sink50
Cast-Iron Bathtub100
Cast-Iron Waste Pipe (above ground)60
Cast-Iron Waste Pipe (below ground)50 to 60
Concrete Waste Pipe100+
Copper Water Lines70
Enameled Steel Kitchen Sink5 to 10+
Faucets and Spray Hose15 to 20
Fiberglass Bathtub and Shower20
Gas Lines (black steel)75
Gas Lines (flex)30
Hose Bibs20 to 30
Instant (on-demand) Water Heater10
PEX40
Plastic Water Lines75
Saunas/Steam Room15 to 20
Sewer Grinder Pump10
Shower Enclosure/Module50
Shower Doors20
Showerheads100+ (if not clogged by mineral/other deposits)
Soapstone Kitchen Sink100+
Sump Pump7
Toilet Tank Components5
Toilets, Bidets and Urinals100+
Vent Fan (ceiling)5 to 10
Vessel Sink (stone, glass, porcelain, copper)5 to 20+
Water Heater (conventional)6 to 12
Water Line (copper)50
Water Line (plastic)50
Water Softener20
Well Pump15
Whirlpool Tub20 to 50

 


9 - Heating & Cooling

Heating Equipment #1: Brand
Bryant
Heating Equipment #1: Energy Source
Gas
Heating Equipment #2: Energy Source
Gas
Cooling Equipment: Manufacturer
Carrier
Thermostat(s) : Number of Thermostats
2
Distribution System: Configuration
Central
Heating Equipment #1: Heating System Data Plate - Year
2016 Year
Heating Equipment #1: HVAC Electrical Shut-Off
Heating Equipment #2: Brand
Bryant
Heating Equipment #2: Heating System Data Plate - Year
2016
Heating Equipment #2: HVAC Electrical Shut-Off
Cooling Equipment: Estimated Year Manufactured AC Cond Unit
2016 Years Old
Cooling Equipment: AC Data Label(s) #2
2nd Floor
General: HVAC Testing

The inspection of the HVAC system is limited to the response of the system at the thermostat in both heating and cooling modes; a visual observation of the equipment, and the removal of any access panels made for removal by a homeowner (not requiring ANY tools). If a more thorough inspection is desired, an HVAC contractor should be consulted.

General: Auxiliary Drain Pan(s)

Interior HVAC units are inspected for the presence of an auxiliary drain pan if they are located in or adjacent to finished areas. These pans  may contain a float switch to sense when the pan fills with water, shutting the unit off; or may contain a drain pipe that will allow any  accumulated water to drain to the exterior. The functionality of either  the float switches or drain pipes are not tested for. No deficiencies were present at visible portions unless otherwise noted in this report.

Heating Equipment #1: Heat Type
Forced Air

Heating source units are inspected visually and tested by ensuring they respond to normal operating controls (the thermostat), and that warm air is produced. The unit responded to normal operating controls, at the  time of inspection. No indications of deficiencies were observed unless  otherwise noted in this report.

Heating Equipment #1: Operational Pictures
Case Interior, Burners, Ignitors, Data Plate, Blower, Heat Exchangers, Combustion Air Supply Duct(s), HVAC Shut-Off, Fuel Supply Shut-Off, Exhaust Venting, Plenum/Supply/Return Ducts, Thermostat Controls, Condensate/Drain Components

The typical temperature differential between return and supply air is 16 - 25 degrees in heating mode. Several factors can affect these numbers, such as, but not limited to: indoor ambient air temperature, exterior ambient air temperature,  humidity, cleanliness of the air filter and evaporator, etc. Furthermore HVAC thermometers (wet bulb) are required for accurate readings, and measurement points would be carried out at a different location by an HVAC contractor. These readings are shown to show the system responded  to normal operating controls at the time of inspection, and not to show  the exact temperature differential produced by the system, the  efficiency, or performance of the system; which lies beyond the scope of a home inspection.

Heating Equipment #2: Heat Type
Forced Air

Heating source units are inspected visually and tested by ensuring they  respond to normal operating controls (the thermostat), and that warm air is produced. The unit responded to normal operating controls, at the  time of inspection. No indications of deficiencies were observed unless  otherwise noted in this report.

Heating Equipment #2: Operational Pictures
Case Interior, Burners, Ignitors, Data Plate, Blower, Heat Exchangers, Combustion Air Supply Duct(s), HVAC Shut-Off, Fuel Supply Shut-Off, Exhaust Venting, Plenum/Supply/Return Ducts, Thermostat Controls, Condensate/Drain Components

The typical temperature differential between return and supply air is 16 - 25 degrees in heating mode. Several factors can affect these numbers, such as, but not limited to: indoor ambient air temperature, exterior ambient air temperature,  humidity, cleanliness of the air filter and evaporator, etc. Furthermore HVAC thermometers (wet bulb) are required for accurate readings, and measurement points would be carried out at a different location by an HVAC contractor. These readings are shown to show the system responded  to normal operating controls at the time of inspection, and not to show  the exact temperature differential produced by the system, the  efficiency, or performance of the system; which lies beyond the scope of a home inspection.

Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Central Air Conditioner

Cooling source units are inspected visually and tested by ensuring they  respond to normal operating controls (the thermostat), and that cool air is produced. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time  of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Cooling Equipment: Insulation of Refrigerant Lines

Pipe insulation was continuous on the refrigerant lines at visible  portions. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Cooling Equipment: AC Data Label(s) #1
Cooling Equipment: Cold Weather Limitation <65 Degrees

The air conditioning system was not tested because the outside temperature was below 65 degrees Fahrenheit at the time of the inspection. Testing the air conditioning in these conditions risks significant damaging the compressor. In addition, the temperature differentials will not be accurate in these conditions. The system should be serviced at the beginning of every cooling season.

Thermostat(s) : Thermostat Type
Programmable

The thermostat was operated and it initiated the HVAC system, at the  time of inspection. No indications of deficiencies were observed unless  otherwise noted in this report.

Thermostat(s) : Thermostat Location(s)
Distribution System: Duct-work

The duct-work appeared to be sealed and supported well at visible  portions. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Air-Filter & Plenum: Air-Filter & Return Plenum

There were no visible deficiencies observed with the air filter(s) and / or visible portions of the return plenum. The Inspector recommends changing the filter every 30 days - 3 months depending on the style of filter used. This is one of the most important "maintenance" items you can perform. A dirty filter puts additional strain on the air handler and may cause damage to the unit.

Air-Filter & Plenum: Air-Filter Size & Location #1
Bottom Of Unit
16-25-1
Air-Filter & Plenum: Air-Filter Size & Location #2
Bottom Of Unit
14-25-1
Presence of Installed Heating/Cooling Source in Each Room: Presence of Installed Heating/Cooling Source in Each Required Room
Cooling Equipment: Low Temperature <65
The air conditioning system was not tested because the outside temperature was below 65 degrees Fahrenheit at the time of the inspection. Testing the air conditioning in these conditions risks significant damaging the compressor. In addition, the temperature differentials will not be accurate in these conditions. The system should be serviced at the beginning of every cooling season.

A Word About the Inspection of Heating and Cooling Systems

As prescribed in the Inspection Agreement and according to the NACHI Standards of Practice, this inspection of the heating and cooling systems is a visual inspection only using the normal operating controls for the system. This also includes the inspection of small heating units (thru-wall, heat pumps, and thru-wall air conditioning units. The inspection of the heating and cooling system is general and not technically exhaustive, and represents the operation of these systems at the date and time of the inspection only. Where ambient temperatures are below 65 degrees Fahrenheit, air conditioning systems cannot be activated or operated, as a real risk of compressor damage can occur. An examination and evaluation of the interior components of the heating system and cooling system is also beyond the scope of an inspection. Due to the design of these systems, only a very small view can be gained of any interior components, and any inspection of the interior components of the heating and cooling system can only be gained by dismantling the unit.

 

The home inspector shall observe permanently installed heating and cooling systems, including: heating equipment; cooling equipment that is central to home; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible; solid fuel heating devices; heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and the presence of an installed heat source in each room.

 

The home inspector shall describe: energy source; and heating equipment and distribution type.

 

The home inspector shall: operate the systems using normal operating controls. The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance.

 

The home inspector is not required to: operate heating systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; operate automatic safety controls; ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or observe: the interior of flues; fireplace insert flue connections; humidifiers; electronic air filters; or the uniformity or adequacy of heat supply to the various rooms.

 

HVAC - HEATINGLIFE EXPECTANCY - YEARS
Boiler40
Burner10+
Chimney Cap (concrete)                   100+
Chimney Cap (metal)10 to 20
Chimney Cap (mortar)15
Chimney Flue Tile40 to 120
Dampers20+
Dehumidifier8
Diffusers, Grilles and Registers25
Ducting60 to 100
Electric Radiant Heater40
Furnace15 to 25
Gas Fireplace15 to 25
Heat Exchanger10 to 15
Heat Pump10 to 15
Heat-Recovery Ventilator20
Hot-Water and Steam-Radiant Boiler40
Humidifier12
Induction and Fan-Coil Units10 to 15
Thermostats35
Ventilator7



Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Cooling Equipment

Home Entry Point Gap

At the time of the inspection one or more areas which served as entry points into the home for the refrigeration line had large holes or gaps. Recommend ceiling to prevent moisture, rodent, or insect intrusion.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.4.2 - Cooling Equipment

Sliding Off Pad

At the time of the inspection one or more air conditioning condensation units had slid or was almost off the pad. Recommend moving the unit back onto the pad.

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Electrical

Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors Material
Copper
Main Disconnect: Main Disconnect Location
Left Side, Front
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Front, Left Side
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Location
Front, Left Side
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Over Protection Devices
Circuit Breaker
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wiring Material
Copper
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: 120 Volt Branch Circuit Material
Copper
Conductor material for the 120-volt circuits rated for below 30 amps.
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: 240 Volt Branch Circuit Material
Copper
Conductor material for the 240-volt circuits rated 30amps and above.
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Electrical Service Capacity
Adequate


 
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors Location
Below Ground
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductor Size/Amp Rating
4/0 AL – 200
Main Disconnect: Main Disconnect Rating
200 AMP
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Manufacturer
General Electric
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Capacity
125 AMP
Electric Meter: Electrical Meter Installed

The meter and conduit appeared to be n satisfactory condition. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Electric Meter: Low Voltage Systems/Wiring Not Inspected

Any low voltage systems in the home were not inspected and are excluded  from this inspection. Including but not limited to: phone/telecom  systems, cable coaxial systems, alarm systems, low voltage lighting and  applicable wiring, etc.

Service Entrance Conductors: Service Amperage

The service amperage is determined by inspecting the service entrance  conductors size as well as the service disconnects size. In some  situations the sizing of the service entrance conductors will not be legible or marked and the stated amperage will be followed by "presumed" as it could not be verified.

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Manufacturer
General Electric

Electrical panels are inspected looking for any wiring deficiencies or  damage that may be present in the panel. No indications of reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Grounding Observed
Hidden / Buried

The grounding electrode conductor (GEC) was present and connected in the service equipment panel. Typically the attachment point to a grounding  rod, etc. is not visible. No deficiencies were observed at visible  portions.

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Electrical Panel / Service Equipment: No Hot Spots Observed with IR Camera

No hot spots or anomalies were observed in the electrical panel, under current loading conditions, during the inspection.

Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Romex (Non-Metallic Sheathed

The branch wiring (branch feeders) were inspected at visible portions looking for any significant deficiencies or defects that could be a fire and/or safety hazard; including but not limited to: connections made  outside of a junction box, wiring terminations, open junction boxes,  damage, the type of wiring, improper support, etc. The majority of branch feeders are not visible due to them being covered by wall and ceiling coverings, insulation, etc. No significant deficiencies were  present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: 220V/240V Receptacle(s) Not Tested

220V/240V receptacles are not tested for functionality or polarity, as  they can not be tested with a standard receptacle polarity tester. Only  visual deficiencies will be reported on with relation to these  receptacle(s).

Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Circuit Breakers - Thermal

The breakers were inspected looking for any visible signs of damage due  to arcing, heat, etc. Corresponding conductors were inspected looking  for multiple lugging, sizing, damage, etc. No deficiencies were present  at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Breaker Label(s)
GFCI & AFCI: AFCI Protection Present

The AFCI (Arc fault circuit interrupter) breakers in the panel tripped  when the test button was depressed. No indications of deficiencies were  observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

GFCI & AFCI: GFCI Protection Present

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) is a protection feature that  allows a circuit or receptacle to "trip" or "shut off" if as little as a 5 milliamp differential is noticed between the "hot" and "neutral"  conductors. This protection is required at locations near a water source or where something plugged into the receptacle could come into contact  with water, including: bathrooms, kitchens, on the exterior, in garages, and basements. Although GFCI protection may not have been required in  some or all of these areas when the home was built, there installation  is highly recommended and is typically inexpensive. This protection, if present, was tested and was in satisfactory condition at the time of  inspection.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Receptacle Information

A representative number of receptacles were tested with a polarity  tester to confirm proper wiring. No deficiencies were observed unless  otherwise noted in this report.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Switches & Light Information

A representative number of switches and lights were tested throughout  the home and were found to be in good working order. No deficiencies  were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Lights Not Tested

Exterior dusk to dawn lights, motion lights, landscape lighting, or any  light not attached to the structure are not included in a home  inspection, and were not tested for functionality. These items are  excluded from this inspection.

The home inspector shall observe: service entrance conductors; service equipment, grounding equipment, main over current device, and main and distribution panels; amperage and voltage ratings of the service; branch circuit conductors, their over current devices, and the compatibility of their ampacities and voltages; the operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling's exterior walls; the polarity and grounding of all receptacles within six feet of interior plumbing fixtures, and all receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected structures; the operation of ground fault circuit interrupters; and smoke detectors.


The home inspector shall describe: service amperage and voltage; service entry conductor materials; service type as being overhead or underground; and location of main and distribution panels.

 

The home inspector shall report: any observed aluminum branch circuit wiring.

 

The home inspector shall report on: presence or absence of smoke detectors, and operate their test function, if accessible, except when detectors are part of a central system.

 

The home inspector is not required to: insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels; test or operate any over current device except ground fault circuit interrupters; dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels; or observe: low voltage systems; security system devices, heat detectors, or carbon monoxide detectors; telephone, security, cable TV, intercoms, or other ancillary wiring that is not a part of the primary electrical distribution system; or built-in vacuum equipment.  

 

ELECTRICALLIFE EXPECTANCY - YEARS
Accessories10+
Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs)30
Bare Copper100+
Bulbs (compact fluorescent)8,000 to 10,000+ hours
Bulbs (halogen)4,000 to 8,000+ hours
Bulbs (incandescent)1,000 to 2,000+ hours
Bulbs (LED)30,000 to 50,000+ hours
Copper-Clad Aluminum100+
Copper-Plated100+
Fixtures40
Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs)up to 30
Lighting Controls30+
Residential Propane Backup Generators12
Service Panel60
Solar Panels20 to 30
Solar System Batteries3 to 12
Wind Turbine Generators20



Credit
Comment
10.6.1 - GFCI & AFCI

No GFCI Protection Installed

No GFCI protection present in all locations. GFCI protection is recommended in areas like kitchens and bathrooms or where water is present. Recommend qualified electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles in all locations.

CLICK HERE to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe.  

Electric Electrical Contractor

11 - Bathroom(s)

Bathroom Views
Shower Pan Limitations

Shower pans are not tested for leaks as this would be a technically  exhaustive test. The only way to test shower pans for leaks is to block  off the drain and fill the shower pan with 1-2" of water, looking for  leaks on drywall or framing below, which would cause damage to the home. Therefore the shower is operated as normal and the areas under the  bathroom are examined for indications of leaks. These pans are known to  leak and can potentially be a major expense to correct.  A licensed  plumber should be consulted if more invasive testing is desired.

Tub and Sink Overflow Limitations

Tub and sink overflows are not  tested for functionality due to the very high likelihood the gaskets  will leak. Care should be exercised in filling tubs to not allow water into the overflow. While they will likely drain away the bulk of water,  some amount of leaking should be anticipated. As an improvement, a  plumber could check the gaskets and make repairs deemed  necessary. Again, it should be assumed these overflows will not be water tight.

Countertops & Cabinets: Counter-top Material
Granite, Laminate

The counter-tops appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed if not followed  by additional comments in this report.

Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood

The cabinets appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed if not followed  by additional comments in this report.

Mirror(s): Mirror(s) - Present

The bathroom mirror(s) were inspected looking at their attachment to the wall and for any damage. No reportable conditions were present at the  time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Exhaust Fan(s): Exhaust Fan(s)

The bath ventilation fan(s) were tested by operating the switch and  listening for proper air flow. Ventilation fans are recommended for all  bathrooms containing a shower or tub. A window in a bathroom can  substitute for a fan, but a fan is still recommended due to not  utilizing fans in colder winter months. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Bathtub(s): Bathtub(s)

The bathtub(s) were inspected by operating the faucet valves checking for proper flow and drainage, looking for leaks and/or any cracks or  damage to the tub itself. No deficiencies were observed at the time of  inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.


Shower(s): Shower(s)

The shower(s) were inspected by operating the water valve(s) and  ensuring proper flow and drainage was present, looking for leaks, and/or any significant defects. No reportable conditions were present at the  time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Sink(s): Sink(s)

The sink(s) were inspected by operating the faucet valves and checking for proper flow and drainage, looking for leaks, operating pop-ups, etc. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Toilet(s): Toilet(s)

The toilets were inspected by flushing them to ensure they were flushing adequately and to determine no leaks were present at the water supply  line or tank location. Toilets will also be checked for an adequate connection at the floor. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Visible Plumbing: Drain Pipe Material
ABS Plastic Waste

Visible portions of sink plumbing is inspected by running water through  the drain pipe for over one minute and looking for leaks from the drain  pipe / trap assembly, water supply lines, and areas underneath of the  sink area (ceiling below/basement/crawl space). Other significant  defects are also looked for with the plumbing. No reportable conditions  were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

The home inspector is not required to: Operate any  valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose  faucets; or Inspect the system for proper sizing, design, or use of  proper materials.

Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Bathtub(s)

Bathtub Faucet & Spout Loose

At the time of the inspection, the inspector noted above the hot, cold, and waterspout were loose. Recommend qualified plumber tighten as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
11.6.1 - Sink(s)

Sink Drain Stopper Damaged/Broken

At the time of the inspection, the sink drain stopped was found to be damaged, inoperable, and/or broken. Stopper would not maintain seal and water leaked into drain. It was impossible to fill sink. Recommend a qualified plumber repair or replace as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Kitchen Appliances

Range, Oven & Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
GE
Range, Oven & Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Gas
Range, Oven & Cooktop: Self Cleaning
Yes
Refrigerator: Water Supply Connection
Yes
Microwave: Type
Cabinet Mounted
Dishwasher: Brand
GE
Refrigerator: Brand
Samsung
Microwave: Microwave Brand
GE
Microwave: Microwave Test
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop/Cabinets Information

The cabinets and countertops were inspected looking for damage and by  testing a representative number of doors and drawers evaluating their  operation. No reportable conditions were present at the time of  inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Granite
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Sink(s): Sink(s)

The sink(s) were inspected by operating the faucet valves and checking for proper flow and drainage, looking for leaks, operating pop-ups, etc. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Sink(s): Spray Wand Information

The spray wand, whether standalone or attached to the faucet, was  operated looking for proper flow and to ensure no leaks were present. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise  noted in this report.

Visible Plumbing: Drain Pipe Material
ABS Plastic Waste

Visible portions of sink plumbing is inspected by running water through  the drain pipe for over one minute and looking for leaks from the drain  pipe / trap assembly, water supply lines, and areas underneath of the  sink area (ceiling below/basement/crawl space). Other significant  defects are also looked for with the plumbing. No reportable conditions  were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Exhaust Fans: Exhaust Fan Information

The exhaust fan was operated. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Dishwasher: Dishwasher Information

The dishwasher was operated by running a wash cycle, and was functional  at the time of inspection. No leaks or water was present at the base of  the unit at the completion of the cycle. The unit's efficiency of  cleaning dishes is not tested for. No deficiencies were observed with  the unit unless otherwise noted in this report.

Dishwasher: Operational Pictures
Range, Oven & Cooktop: Range/Oven/Cooktop Information

The Range, Oven and/or Cooktop was operated by running each component, and was functional  at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed with  the unit unless otherwise noted in this report.

Range, Oven & Cooktop: Operational Pictures
Refrigerator: Refrigerator Information

The refrigerator was checked by measuring both the refrigerator and freezer with a digital thermometer. Typical freezer temperatures are set at 0 degrees Fahrenheit.Typical refrigerator temperatures are set at 35 degrees Fahrenheit. Although the above temperatures are typical, temperatures can be found outside those boundaries. No deficiencies were observed with the unit unless otherwise noted in this report.

Refrigerator: Operational Pictures
Microwave: Microwave Information

The microwave was tested by running on "Cook" mode and testing with an LED microwave tester. The microwave was functional at the time of inspection. The red LED lights in the testing unit show the microwave is functional. The efficiency of the unit or other functions are not tested for. No reportable conditions were  present unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garbage Disposal: Garbage Disposal Information

The garbage disposal was operated. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garbage Disposal: Brand
Badger

The home inspector shall observe and operate the basic functions of the following kitchen appliances: permanently-installed dishwasher, through its normal cycle; range, cook top, and permanently-installed oven; trash compactor; garbage disposal; ventilation equipment or range hood; and permanently-installed microwave oven.


The home inspector is not required to observe: clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven function, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation; non built-in appliances; or refrigeration units.


The home inspector is not required to operate: appliances in use; or any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.


APPLIANCES       YEARS
Compactor (trash)6
Dishwasher9
Disposal (food waste)12
Exhaust Fans10
Freezer   10 to 20
Gas Oven10 to 18
Microwave Oven9
Range/Oven Hood14
Electric Range13 to 15
Gas Range   15 to 17
Refrigerator9 to 13

 


13 - Laundry Room

Dryer Components: Dryer Receptacles
Electric
Washing Machine Components: Washing Machine Power Source
120 Volt
Washing Machine Components: Washing Machine Water/Drain Sourse
Hot Water, Cold Water, Drain
Dryer Components: Dryer Vent
Metal (Flex)
Countertops & Cabinets: Counter-top Material
Laminate

The counter-tops appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed if not followed  by additional comments in this report.

Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood

The cabinets appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed if not followed  by additional comments in this report.

Exhaust Fan(s): Exhaust Fan(s)

The laundry room ventilation fan(s) were tested by operating the switch and  listening for proper air flow. Ventilation fans are recommended for all  bathrooms containing a shower or tub. A window in a laundry room can substitute for a fan, but a fan is still recommended due to not utilizing fans in colder winter months. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Visible Plumbing: Drain Pipe Material
Not Determined

Visible portions of sink plumbing is inspected by running water through  the drain pipe for over one minute and looking for leaks from the drain  pipe / trap assembly, water supply lines, and areas underneath of the  sink area (ceiling below/basement/crawl space). Other significant  defects are also looked for with the plumbing. No reportable conditions  were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Washing Machine Components: Brand
LG

Laundry appliances are not tested or inspected as part of a standard home inspection.

Dryer Components: Brand
LG

Laundry appliances are not tested or inspected as part of a standard home inspection.

The home inspector is not required to operate: washing machines or dryers; appliances in use; or any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.


LAUNDRYLIFE EXPECTANCY - YEARS
Dryer Vent  (plastic)5
Dryer Vent  (steel)20
Dryer (clothes)13
Washing Machine5 to 15



Credit
Comment
13.2.1 - Exhaust Fan(s)

Exhaust Fan Inoperable

One or more exhaust fans were inoperable. Recommend repair or replace as necessary. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

14 - Fire Place

Gas/LP Firelogs & Gas Fireplaces: Type
Gas

The fireplace was evaluated by a visual examination of the firebox,  hearth extension, mantle, and by operating the flue damper (if  applicable). An NFPA level 2 fireplace examination by a chimney sweep is recommended by the NFPA during the transfer of ownership of a home, as  they are invasive with their examination and can uncover issues not seen during a home inspection. No deficiencies were observed at visual  portions unless otherwise noted in this report.

The inspector shall inspect: readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys; lintels above the fireplace openings; damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and cleanout doors and frames.

 

The inspector shall describe: the type of fireplace.

 

The inspector shall report as in need of repair: evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers; manually operated dampers that did not open and close; the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace; the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

 

The inspector is not required to: inspect the flue or vent system; inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels; determine the need for a chimney sweep; operate gas fireplace inserts; light pilot flames; determine the appropriateness of any installation; inspect automatic fuel-fed devices; inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices; inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted; ignite or extinguish fires; determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics; move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents; perform a smoke test; dismantle or remove any component; perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection; perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.  

 

15 - Interior Home Components (Doors, Walls, Etc.)

Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall

The ceilings throughout the home were inspected looking for moisture  intrusion due to roof leaks or leaking plumbing pipes, settlement  cracks, or significant defects. No reportable conditions were observed  at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Ceiling Fan(s): Ceiling Fan(s)

A representative number of ceiling fans were inspected by ensuring they  powered on and did not wobble excessively, as well as looking for other  deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at the time of  inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Windows & Skylights: Window Types
Sliders, Double-hung

The windows were inspected by operating a representative number (I will  try and operate every window in the home, but personal belongings may block accessibility to some). They are inspected by testing their  operation, looking for damage, broken glass, failed seals, etc. No reportable deficiencies were present unless otherwise noted in this report.

Walls: Wall Material
Drywall

The walls throughout the home were inspected looking for moisture  intrusion due to roof leaks or leaking plumbing pipes, settlement  cracks, or significant defects. No reportable conditions were observed  at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Doors: Doors

A representative number of interior doors were inspected by operating  them ensuring that they opened and closed properly, as well as latched  properly without binding on jambs or the floor. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this  report.

Floors: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Hardwood, Tile

The floors throughout the home were inspected looking for moisture  intrusion due to roof leaks or leaking plumbing pipes, settlement  cracks, or significant defects. No reportable conditions were observed  at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Granite

The countertops appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed if not followed  by additional comments in this report.

Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood

The cabinets appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed if not followed  by additional comments in this report.

Steps, Stairways & Railings: Steps, Stairways, & Railings

The stairs were inspected by evaluating the risers and treads, applicable railings, etc. No deficiencies were present at the time of  inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Closets: Closets

No reportable deficiencies were present at visible portions in the  closets at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Smoke Detectors: Smoke Detectors Present

Smoke alarms are recommended for each sleeping room and (1) outside of each sleeping room(s), and one per level including habitable attics and basements. The Inspector recommends testing the smoke alarms before spending your first night in the home, and monthly thereafter. Several other recommendations relating to smoke alarms and fire safety are recommended by the NFPA, and can be found by clicking HERE.

Smoke Detectors: Smoke Detectors Tested

The smoke alarm(s) that were present were  tested by depressing the "test" button and an audible alarm sounded. Any exceptions will be listed below. A true test of the alarm(s) would  require the use of a smoke can and is beyond the scope of a Home Inspection. It is recommend to test the alarms as soon as you move in, and monthly thereafter, replace the batteries every six months, and replace the alarms themselves every five to ten years (manufacturer specific). If the home is older than 5 years old the Inspector recommends removing  the smoke alarms to check the manufacturing date on the back. Dual sensor alarms incorporating both an ionization sensing chamber and  photoelectric eyes are recommended. Click HERE for examples.

Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Carbon Monoxide Detectors Present

Due to the home having an attached garage and/or gas appliance, the installation of Carbon  Monoxide (CO) detectors is highly recommended outside of each sleeping area. More information about CO detectors and their requirements can be found HERE.

Odors: Odors

The inspector did not note any unusual or unpleasant odors during the inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Interior Room Views: Area Pictures

A Word About Interior Rooms and Contents During the Inspection:
 Be aware that if the subject property is furnished, there are limitations pertaining what we may able to inspect during the engagement. In accordance with industry standards, we only inspect those surfaces that are exposed and readily accessible. We do not move furniture, lift carpets, move or remove stored items, clear clutter, nor do we remove or rearrange items within closets and cabinets.
 
Our inspection of living space includes the visually accessible areas of walls, floors, cabinets and closets, and includes the testing of a representative number of windows and doors, switches and outlets. Nationally recognized home inspection standards require testing a minimum of one window, door, switch and outlet in every room, where accessible. However, we do not evaluate window treatments, or move furniture, lift carpets or rugs, empty closets or cabinets, and we do not comment on cosmetic deficiencies.
 
We may not comment on the cracks that appear around windows and doors, or which follow the lines of framing members and the seams of drywall and plasterboard. These cracks may be a consequence of movement, such as wood shrinkage, common settling, or seismic activity, and will often reappear if they are not correctly repaired. Such cracks can become the subject of disputes, and are therefore best evaluated by a specialist. Similarly, there may be a number of environmental pollutants, which could include molds or other contaminants, the specific identification of which is beyond the scope of our service but which can become equally contentious.
 
In addition, there are a host of lesser contaminants, such as that from moisture penetrating carpet covered cracks in floor slabs, as well as odors from household pets and cigarette smoke that can permeate walls, carpets, heating and air conditioning ducts, and other porous surfaces, and which can be difficult to eradicate. However, inasmuch as the sense of smell adjusts rapidly, and the sensitivity to such odors is certainly not uniform, we recommend that you make this determination for yourself, and particularly if you or any member of your family suffers from allergies or asthma, and then schedule whatever remedial services may be deemed necessary before the close of escrow.
 
Additional information about "broken" window seals: Calling window seals “damaged” or “failed” is a little bit misleading. The thinking that there is an airtight seal between thermal window panes is incorrect. Although double-paned windows appear to be stable, they actually experience a daily cycle of expansion and contraction caused by “solar pumping". When sunshine hits a double pane window, the air or gas inside heats up significantly, causing the sealed window unit to expand and pushing air out through the semi-permeable seals. In the evening, the window cools and contracts, drawing air—and humidity—with it. Day after day, year after year, this cyclical expansion and contraction occurs, stressing the window seals and filling the air space with moisture. Windows on the sunny side of a home will experience larger temperature swings, resulting in greater amounts of thermal pumping, seal stress and failure rates. Manufacturers expect and plan for solar pumping. Built into every thermal pane window frame is silica desiccant to absorb the small amounts of moisture inevitably drawn into the window. The desiccant, however, has a limited capacity and lifespan. Windows are manufactured with a specific moisture absorption life span (i.e., 5 years, 20 years etc.) that is based on solar pumping activity. The cause of condensation or cloudy appearance in thermal pane windows is not so much due to a loss of seal, as it is to a failure of desiccant placed within the units to absorb moisture.
 
NOTE: During the course of a home inspection, we attempt to be as thorough as possible related to the identification of window seal issues. However, the buyer should NOT solely rely on this report (related to window issues), as a compromised barrier/seal may not manifest itself by cloudiness or condensation in or on the glazing’s of glass at the time of inspection. Condensation may be present in the morning but not in the evenings, and vice versa. Additionally, condensation on or in window glazing’s may not be evident if the outside temperature is within 10-15 degrees of the temperature inside the home. Identification of a compromised thermal seal can be made impossible when dealing with windows that are dirty or not fully cleaned immediately prior to our inspection.
 
The inspector shall: open and close a representative number of doors and windows; inspect the walls, ceilings, steps, stairways, and railings; report as in need of repair any windows that are obviously fogged or display other evidence of broken seals.
 
The inspector is not required to: inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments; inspect central vacuum systems; inspect safety glazing; inspect security systems or components; evaluate the fastening of countertops, cabinets, sink tops and fixtures, or firewall compromises; move furniture, stored items, or any coverings like carpets or rugs in order to inspect the concealed floor structure; move drop ceiling tiles; operate or evaluate security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including compliance with local, state, or federal standards; operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations, or devices; operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches or signal lights; inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens; operate or examine any sauna, steam-jenny, kiln, toaster, ice-maker, coffee-maker, can-opener, bread-warmer, blender, instant hot water dispenser, or other small, ancillary devices; inspect elevators; inspect remote controls; inspect appliances; inspect items not permanently installed; examine or operate any above-ground, movable, freestanding, or otherwise non- permanently installed pool/spa, recreational equipment or self-contained equipment; come into contact with any pool or spa water in order to determine the system structure or components; determine the adequacy of spa jet water force or bubble effect; determine the structural integrity or leakage of a pool or spa.  
 

Credit
Comment
15.6.1 - Floors

Squeeking and Spongy
1st Floor Outside Bedroom Door

During the home inspection, one or more areas of the floor were found to have squeaking sounds or spongy feeling. This could be attributed to poor installation, moisture intrusion/damage, or the floor coming to the end of its life expectancy. Recommend a qualified contractor repair or replace as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional

16 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

Foundation: Material
Slab on Grade, Concrete
Vapor Retarders & Ventilation: Vapor/Moisture Barrier
Present
Vapor Retarders & Ventilation: Ventilation
Absent
Basements & Crawlspaces: Inspection Method
Walked Unfinished

The referenced visual obstructions may block or hinder visual  accessibility of the floor structure and other areas. The inspection of  the basement area and floor structure is limited to visual portions  only. Any items or areas not visible are excluded from this inspection.  Insulation or any other item is not moved or disturbed for visual accessibility.

Basements & Crawlspaces: Limitations

The referenced visual obstructions may block or hinder visual  accessibility of the floor structure and other areas. The inspection of  the basement area and floor structure is limited to visual portions  only. Any items or areas not visible are excluded from this inspection.  Insulation or any other item is not moved or disturbed for visual  accessibility.

Support Material: Support Material
Metal Beams

Support structures were present that supported the overhead floor structure. The column(s) appeared to be in satisfactory condition at visible portions, at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed unless  otherwise noted in this report.

Floor Structure: Material
Concrete, Slab

A floor was present in the basement. No deficiencies were  observed at visible portions at the time of inspection unless otherwise  noted in this report.

Wall Structure: Foundation Walls Information

Visible portions of the foundation walls were inspected looking for cracking, moisture intrusion, or any other indications of damage or deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Wall Structure: Foundation Walls Covered Disclaimer

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector noted that all of the foundation walls were covered with insulation which prohibited examination.

Ceiling Structure: Ceiling Structure
Unfinished, Engineered Wood Joists

Visible portions of the framing and floor structure was inspected  looking for damage or other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were  observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Insulation Basement: Insulation Present

Insulation was in place between the framing. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Moisture Intrusion : Moisture Intrusion Information

The basement area was inspected looking for signs of past or present  water intrusion by inspecting visible portions of the walls and floors  looking for moisture stains and/or other signs of prior water intrusion. No signs of water / moisture intrusion was present at visible portions  at the time of inspection in the basement area unless otherwise noted in this report. The Inspector can only report on the conditions as they existed at the time of inspection, and can not guarantee that water will not infiltrate this area at a future time due to a heavy rain or changes in  conditions. The Inspector highly recommend consulting with the sellers as to prior  moisture infiltration into this area, and reading the sellers disclosure which would list such a condition.

Assessment of the Basement
The client should understand that this is the assessment of an inspector, not a professional engineer, and that, despite all efforts, there is no way we can provide any guaranty that this foundation, and the overall structure and structural elements of the property, is sound. We suggest that if the client is at all uncomfortable with this condition or our assessment, a professional engineer be consulted to independently evaluate the condition, prior to making a final purchase decision. The inspection is supplemental to the Property Disclosure.
 
At least once a year, the client should carefully inspect the foundation (interior elements and exterior elements) for signs of cracking, insect intrusion, moisture intrusion, or changes of any type (such as the appearance of cracks, or the widening or lengthening of existing cracks).
 
All structures are dependent on the soil beneath them for support, but soils are not uniform. Some that might appear to be firm and solid can liquify and become unstable during seismic activity. Others can become unstable through the freeze-thaw cycle, or from site drainage issues. Also, there are soils that can expand to twice their volume with the influx of water and move structures with relative ease, raising and lowering them and fracturing slabs and other hard surfaces. In fact, expansive soils have accounted for more structural damage than most natural disasters. Regardless, foundations are not uniform, and conform to the structural standard of the year in which they were built. In accordance with the NACHI Standards of Practice, we identify foundation types and look for any evidence of structural deficiencies, within the scope of our profession, but not within the scope of the practice of architecture of professional engineering. However, cracks or deteriorated surfaces in foundations are quite common. In fact, it would be rare to find a raised foundation wall that was not cracked or deteriorated in some way, or a slab foundation that did not include some cracks concealed beneath the carpeting and padding. Fortunately, most of these cracks are related to the curing process or to common settling, including some wide ones called cold-joint separations that typically contour the footings, but others can be more structurally significant and reveal the presence of expansive soils that can predicate more or less continual movement. We will certainly alert you to any suspicious cracks if they are clearly visible. However, we are not specialists, and in the absence of any major defects we may not recommend that you consult with a foundation contractor, a structural engineer, or a geologist, but this should not deter you from seeking the opinion of any such expert.
 
Modern foundations vary considerably from older ones. Newer foundations may have a moisture barrier under them and reinforcing steel within them, as compared to older ones that may have neither. Our inspection of foundations conforms to industry standards, which is that of a generalist and not a specialist. We check the visible portion of the walls on the outside for any evidence of significant cracks or structural deformation, but we do not move furniture or lift carpeting and padding to look for cracks or moisture penetration, and we do not use any of the specialized devices that are used to establish relative elevations and confirm differential movement.

Significantly, many foundations are built or move out of level, but the average person may not become aware of this until there is a difference of more than one inch in twenty feet, which most authorities regard as being tolerable.
 
Many slab floors are found to contain cracks when the carpet and padding are removed, including some that contour the edge and can be quite wide. They typically result from shrinkage and usually have little structural significance. However, there is no absolute standard for evaluating cracks, and those that are less than 1/4" and which exhibit no significant vertical or horizontal displacement are generally not regarded as being significant. Although they typically do result from common shrinkage, they can also be caused by a deficient mixture of concrete, deterioration through time, seismic activity, adverse soil conditions, and poor drainage, and if they are not sealed they can allow moisture to enter a residence, and particularly if the residence is surcharged by a hill or even a slope, or if downspouts discharge adjacent to the slab. However, in the absence of any major defects, we may not recommend that you consult with a foundation contractor, a structural engineer, or a geologist, but (again) this should not deter you from seeking the opinion of any such expert.
 
There is no way for the inspector to know if hydrostatic pressure exists, or if moisture intrusion is, or was ever a problem with regard to the foundation or any foundation element. Where finished walls are installed, the possibility always exists that moisture intrusion occurred, and that mold may exist in hidden areas. Foundational components were generally dry on the day of the inspection. Monitor as necessary.

Foundation:
The home inspector shall observe: structural components including foundations, floors, walls, columns or piers, ceilings and roof.
 
The home inspector shall describe: the type of foundation, floor structure, wall structure, columns or piers, ceiling structure, roof structure.
 
The home inspector shall: probe structural components where deterioration is suspected; and report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.
 
The home inspector is not required to: enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely effect the health of the home inspector or other persons.

Structural Crawl Space:
The inspector shall describe: the type of foundation; and the location of the access to the under-floor space.

The inspector shall report as in need of repair: observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; observed indications of active water penetration; observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern.

The inspector is not required to: enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to the inspector; move stored items or debris; operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats; identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems; provide any engineering or architectural service; report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.