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1234 Main St.
Nashville, Tn 37214
07/18/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
69
Items Inspected
23
Recommendation
Inspection Key

Here is an explanation of what the different phrases used to report on the condition and function of systems means.


ACCEPTABLE CONDITION/FUNCTION: This means the system was inspected (i.e. opperated, tested) as much as was available to the inspector at the time of the inspection and it was found to be functioning properly.


MOSTLY ACCEPTABLE w/ AREAS of CONCERN: This implies the system was inspected (i.e. opperated, tested) as much as was available to the inspector at the time of the inspection and it was found to be overall functional, there happened to be issues found that did not hinder the main function of the system.


NEEDS ATTENTION: This means the system was inspected (i.e. opperated, tested) as much as was available to the inspector at the time of the inspection and the main function was damaged or not working as designed.



Setting Reasonable Expectations

Setting Reasonable Expectations When Things Go Wrong. 

There may come a time that you discover something wrong with the house, and you may be upset or disappointed with your home inspection.

Intermittent Or Concealed Problems
Some problems can only be discovered by living in a house. They cannot be discovered during the few hours of a home inspection. For example, some shower stalls leak when people are in the shower, but do not leak when you simply turn on the tap. Some roofs and basements only leak when specific conditions exist. Some problems will only be discovered when carpets were lifted, furniture is moved or finishes are removed.

No Clues

These problems may have existed at the time of the inspection but there were no clues as to their existence. Our inspections are based on the past performance of the house. If there are no clues of a past problem, it is unfair to assume we should foresee a future problem.

We Always Miss Some Minor Things
Some say we are inconsistent because our reports identify some minor problems but not others. The minor problems that are identified were discovered while looking for more significant problems. We note them simply as a courtesy. The intent of the inspection is not to find the $200 problems; it is to find the $2,000 problems. These are the things that affect peoples decisions to purchase.

Contractors Advice
The main source of dissatisfaction with home inspectors comes from comments made by contractors. Contractors opinions often differ from ours. Dont be surprised when three roofers all say the roof needs replacement when we said that, with some minor repairs, the roof will last a few more years.

Last Man In Theory
While our advice represents the most prudent thing to do, many contractors are reluctant to undertake these repairs. This is because of the Last Man In Theory. The contractor fears that if he is the last person to work on the roof, he will get blamed if the roof leaks, regardless of whether the roof leak is his fault or not. Consequently, he wont want to do a minor repair with high liability when he could re-roof the entire house for more money and reduce the likelihood of a callback. This is understandable.

Most Recent Advice Is Best
There is more to the Last Man In Theory. It suggests that it is human nature for homeowners to believe the last bit of expert advice they receive, even if it is contrary to previous advice. As home inspectors, we unfortunately find ourselves in the position of First Man In and consequently it is our advice that is often disbelieved.

Why Didnt We See It
Contractors may say I cant believe you had this house inspected, and they didnt find this problem. There are several reasons for these apparent oversights:

  • Conditions During Inspection - It is difficult for homeowners to remember the circumstances in the house, at the time of the inspection. Homeowners seldom remember that it was snowing, there was storage everywhere in the basement or that the furnace could not be turned on because the air conditioning was operating, et cetera. Its impossible for contractors to know what the circumstances were when the inspection was performed.
  • The Wisdom Of Hindsight - When the problem manifests itself, it is very easy to have 20/20 hindsight. Anybody can say that the basement is wet when there is 2 inches of water on the floor. Predicting the problem is a different story.
  • A Long Look - If we spent 1/2 an hour under the kitchen sink or 45 minutes disassembling the furnace, wed find more problems too. Unfortunately, the inspection would take several days and would cost considerably more.
  • We're Generalists - We are generalists; we are not specialists. The heating contractor may indeed have more heating expertise than we do.
  • An Invasive Look - Problems often become apparent when carpets or plaster are removed, when fixtures or cabinets are pulled out, and so on. A home inspection is a visual examination. We don't perform any invasive or destructive tests.

Not Insurance
In conclusion, a home inspection is designed to better your odds. It is not designed to eliminate all risk. For that reason, a home inspection should not be considered an insurance policy. The premium that an insurance company would have to charge for a policy with no deductible, no limit and an indefinite policy period would be considerably more than the fee we charge. It would also not include the value added by the inspection.

We hope this is food for thought and helps to give a better understanding as to what to expect when reading your report.


1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client
Occupancy
Vacant
Type and Style of Building
Single Family/ Multi Level
Temperature (approximate)
24 Fahrenheit (F)
Weather Conditions
Clear

The weather can play a key role in how the inspection is performed and what is actually inspected and reported.



2 - Roof

General Information and Components: Roof Type/Style
Gable
General Information and Components: Flashings
Acceptable Condition
General Information and Components: Drip Edge
Acceptable Condition
General Information and Components: Penetrations
Acceptable Condition
Asphalt Roofing: Covering Type
Architectural
Gutter Systems: Gutter Condition
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern
Gutter Systems: Downspout Condition
Acceptable Condition
Structure and Attic: Structure Type
Conventional Framing

The roof/attic structure was evaluated and inspector will report on type.

Structure and Attic: Attic Access
Acceptable Condition
Structure and Attic: Plumbing Pipe Vents
PVC, Acceptable Condition
Structure and Attic: Electrical
Acceptable Condition
Chimney: Material
Metal
Chimney: Condition
Acceptable Condition
Structure and Attic: Insulation Depth
14 inches
Structure and Attic: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Chimney: Chimney Photos
General Information and Components: Inspection Method
Roof, Ladder


Inspector will observe from the roof unless type of materials, structural integrity, lack of access or personal safety prohibit. In the event that the roof can not be safely walked a visual inspection will be made from either a ladder or other means i.e. binoculars.

Asphalt Roofing: Covering Condition
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern


Unless otherwise stated, coverings were in acceptable condition at the time of the inspection.

Asphalt Roofing: Estimated Roof Age (Years)
1-5

This is an informational only estimation that is made based on the age of home, the  inspectors experience and personal judgement and is in no way a guarantee.

Asphalt Roofing: Estimated Remaining Life (Years)
25-30

This is an informational only estimation of remaining life expectancy that is made based on the inspectors experience and personal judgement and is in no way a guarantee.

Asphalt Roofing: Number Of Layers
1

The maximum amount of layers a roof is allowed to have is 2 (two) for site built homes and 1 (one) for manufactured which is to stay within weight limits and to prevent excessive thermal retention which can deteriorate roofing materials prematurely.

Asphalt Roofing: Roof Photos
Gutter Systems: Gutter Photos
Structure and Attic: Structure Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the condition of observable  structure materials and construction.

Structure and Attic: Insulation Type
Loose Fill

The attic insulation was inspected as much as possible, some compression and shifting is normal. The inspector will comment on anything outside of the ordinary.

Structure and Attic: Ventilation Type
Ridge Vent, Soffit Vent

The inspector will observe and report any damage or leaking, as well as effectiveness of thermal energy transfer.

Structure and Attic: Attic Photos

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Asphalt Roofing

Minor Blemishes

Concern: Roof coverings showed minor blemishes from contractors working on the roof. 

Recommendation: Have builder/contractor determine integrity of roof covering.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.2.2 - Asphalt Roofing

Capping Nails Not Sealed

Concern: The nails on the capping ends were not sealed. 

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.2.3 - Asphalt Roofing

Improper Repair

Concern: Improper practices used to repair roof. 


Roof Roofing Professional

3 - Exterior

Siding Systems: Siding Material
Fiber Cement
Siding Systems: Siding Condition
Acceptable Conditions
Siding Systems: Paint/Sealant
Acceptable Condition
Siding Systems: Trim Condition
Acceptable Condition
Siding Systems: Fascia/Soffits
Acceptable Condition
Hard Surfaces: Pillar/Post Material & Condition
Wood, Acceptable Condition
Decks & Balconies: Decks
Acceptable Condition
Decks & Balconies: Deck Guard Railing
Acceptable Condition
Decks & Balconies: Stairs
Acceptable Condition
Electrical : Doorbell
Did Not Function
Hard Surfaces: Walkways
Acceptable Condition
Hard Surfaces: Steps/Stoops
Acceptable Condition
Exterior Doors: Main Entry Door
Wood, Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern
Exterior Doors: Exterior Doors
Acceptable Condition
Electrical : Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Electrical : Exterior Receptacles
GFCI Protected

The exterior outlets were tested and the functionality was reported.

Siding Systems: Siding Photos
Siding Systems: Fascia/Soffit Photos
Hard Surfaces: Driveway
Acceptable Condition
Hard Surfaces: Porch/Patios
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the observable condition. Normal cracking will be reported as acceptable.

Hard Surfaces: Coverings
Acceptable Condition

The porch coverings including posts and beams, soffits and fascia were inspected.

Decks & Balconies: Photos
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage : Grading & Drainage
Acceptable Function

Grade should slope away from house at about 6 inches per every 10 feet to maintain proper drainage away from the foundation. See link for additional info.

Vegetation, Grading, Drainage : Vegatation
Acceptable Condition

Vegetation growing against the exterior walls may introduce pests and/or accelerate deterioration of the exterior wall covering by retaining moisture. Watering this vegetation will introduce moisture to the soil which may eventually reach the foundation. Moisture in soil supporting the foundation can affect the ability of the foundation to support the weight of the structure above and can cause damage from soil heaving or settling, depending on soil composition and other conditions. Although the vegetation may be attractive caution should be observed to prevent damage to the structure.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding Systems

Splices Not Sealed

Concern: There was one splice that didn't have a flashing backer in the siding.

Recommendation: Have builder/contractor determine that all siding spices have proper flashing.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Siding Systems

Uncapped Vents

Concern: There were some vents penetrating the siding that did not have the proper rain caps. 

Recommendation: Have builder/contractor install proper vent caps.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Exterior Doors

Door Does Not Seal Properly
Main Entrance

Concern: Door does not seal properly unless dead bolt is locked. 

Recommendation: Qualified handyman adjust strike plate and/or lock.

Here is a DIY troubleshooting article on fixing door issues. 

Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage

Trim Back Tree Branches

Concern: Leaves and tree debris in gutters on back left side of house. 

Recommendation: Trim back any tree branches that are with in 15-20 feet from house roof, and remove any dead trees that are leaning toward the house that could potentially cause damage.

Yard scissors Tree Service
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Electrical

Loose Wiring Above Deck

Concern: There was some loose wiring coming out of the ceiling above the deck. 

Recommendation: Have builder/contractor determine purpose of wire.

Electric Electrical Contractor

4 - Electrical

Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Manufacturer
Square
Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Meter Panel/Stand: Main Breaker Amperage
200 Amp
Meter Panel/Stand: System Grounding Method
Earth Ground Rod
Sub Panel: Panel Manufacturer
Square D
Sub Panel: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Sub Panel: System Grounding Method
Grounded to Main Panel
Sub Panel: Branch Wiring Style
Romex

The inspector will report on the visual portion of the wiring system.

Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Location
Right Side
Meter Panel/Stand: Main Service Conductor Type
Below Ground
Sub Panel: Panel Location
Garage
Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Capacity
200 Amp

Panel amperage capacity is determined by the manufacturer. Due to the ability for the breakers to be changed by anyone the manufacturers label must be followed. If the labels are missing then the capacity will be marked "unknown".

Meter Panel/Stand: Exterior Photos
Meter Panel/Stand: Interior Photos
Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the main service panel.

Meter Panel/Stand: Breakers/Fuses Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the circuit breakers or fuses.

Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Bonding
Acceptable Method

This is the connection of the panel to the grounding system. The inspector will report on the physically observable method and the adequacy of the bond to the panel.

Meter Panel/Stand: Branch Conductor Material
Aluminum & Copper

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the branch wiring.

Info: Aluminum wiring can be used if sized adequately and proper installation methods are followed.

Meter Panel/Stand: Branch Wiring Style
Romex

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the wiring system.

Sub Panel: Exterior Photos
Sub Panel: Interior Photos
Sub Panel: Panel Capacity
Unknown

Panel amperage capacity is determined by the manufacturer. Due to the ability for the breakers to be changed by anyone the manufacturers label must be followed. If the labels are missing then the capacity will be marked "unknown".

Sub Panel: Panel Condition
Acceptable Condition

The Inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the sub panel.

Sub Panel: Breakers/Fuses Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the circuit breakers or fuses.

Sub Panel: Branch Conductor Material
Copper

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the branch wiring.

Info: Aluminum wiring can be used if sized adequately and proper installation methods are followed.

Smoke/Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Smoke Detectors
Not Tested

We recommend installation in the following areas for smoke detectors: on every level of the house, on the wall or ceiling outside bedrooms, in each bedroom, in the garage, in the living room (if there is a fireplace), and basements if present. If there are no fire extinguishers in the house it is recommend that a fire extinguisher be accessible in the kitchen, garage, and second floor if present. Click this link for more information. We also recommend replacement every 7 years.

Smoke/Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Cabon Monoxide Detectors
Not Found

Although Carbon Monoxide Detectors may not have been required at the time of construction, we recommend installing in any house with a fossil fuel burning heater or appliance, a fireplace, and attached garage, or other feature, fixture or element that emits carbon monoxide as a byproduct of combustion. They are an important addition to the safety of the home. It is recommended that they are replaced every 7 years with the smoke detectors.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Smoke/Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Cabon Monoxide Detector

Concern: Could not determine installation of carbon monoxide detector. Some newer versions have a smoke alarm/carbon monoxide detector in one. Recommendation: Confirm with seller of installation of a Carbon Monoxide Detector before closing. 

Tools Handyman/DIY

5 - Plumbing

Water System: Water Source
Public
Water System: Meter Location
In Street
Waste System: Sewage Clean Out Material & Size
4", PVC
Waste System: Type of Disposel System
Public Sewer
Gas Fuel System: Fuel Source & Type
Public-Natural Gas
Hot Water Systems: Approximate Age
1.5 years
Hot Water Systems: Capacity
73 gallons
Water System: Main Shut Off Location
Crawspace
Waste System: Clean Out Location
Front
Gas Fuel System: Meter/Tank Location
Right Side
Gas Fuel System: Gas Shut-off Location
At Meter
Hot Water Systems: Location
Garage
Hot Water Systems: Power Source/Type
Gas
Water System: Distribution Material
Pex

The inspector will attempt to observe a representative amount of plumbing system to report on the type of materials present.

Water System: Distribution System Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the water distribution system.

Water System: System Pressure
50 PSI

The water pressure will be tested with normal operating parameters. The maximum recommended pressure for a residence is 80 psi. Anything over this can cause premature wear on the seals in your plumbing fixtures.

Water System: Pressure Regulator
Present/Acceptable Condition

The pressure regulator is not tested or adjusted and its presence is noted for information only.

Water System: Hose Bibs
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the condition and the function of the accessible hose bibs.

Waste System: Visual Condition
Acceptable Condition

Based on industry recommended water tests, the system drainage was tested and function will be reported on. 

However, only a video-scan of the main drainpipe can confirm its actual condition which is beyond the scope of a general home inspection.

Hot Water Systems: Manufacturer
State

We recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding. 

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help. 

Hot Water Systems: Drip Pan
Acceptable Condition

Drip pans are helpful if properly installed to prevent undetected leaks from doing damage to the surrounding areas.

Hot Water Systems: TPR Valve
Acceptable Condition

A TPR valve should be constructed of Copper, CPVC, Galvanized Steel, Polyethylene, Polypropylene, or Stainless Steel. PVC and other non-approved plastics should not be used since they can easily melt. It should also discharge at 6" off of the floor and to a floor drain, to an indirect waste receptor, or to the outdoors. See link for more info.

Hot Water Systems: Equipment Photos

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

6 - Cooling

Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Cooling Equipment: Manufactured Date
8/2017
Cooling Equipment 2: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Cooling Equipment 2: Location
Right Side
Cooling Equipment 2: Manufactured Date
8/2017
Distribution System: Configuration
Central
Cooling Equipment: Brand
American Standard
Cooling Equipment: Location
Right Side
Cooling Equipment 2: Brand
American Standard
Thermostat: Location
Hallway
Thermostat 2: Location
Second Floor Hallway
Recommended Maintenance

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems require proper and regular maintenance in order to work efficiently, but even in the best case scenarios most components of such systems only last 15 to 25 years. Furnaces on average last 15-20 years, heat pumps 16 years, and air conditioning units 10-15 years. If any of these components are in any of these age ranges we recommend budgeting for a new one.

 We also Highly recommend a biannual tune up on the HVAC and changing the filters every 6 months to enhance the efficiency of the unit and possibly prolong it's life span.  

Cooling Equipment: Equipment Photos
Cooling Equipment: SEER Rating
14 SEER

Modern standards call for at least 13 SEER rating for new install. 

Read more on energy efficient air conditioning at Energy.gov.

Cooling Equipment 2: Equipment Photos
Cooling Equipment 2: SEER Rating
14

Modern standards call for at least 13 SEER rating for new install. 

Read more on energy efficient air conditioning at Energy.gov.

Normal Operating Controls: Operation
Not Operated-Outside Air Temperature to Low

The air conditioner will be run using regular procedures weather permitting or otherwise stated.

We do not operate the Air Conditioner if the outside air temperature is below 65 degrees Fahrenheit as it could damage the compressor. Click the link for additional information.

Cooling Equipment: Temperature To Low

Air conditioners use a cycle that involves changing a refrigerant between a liquid and a gas to decrease the temperature of a room. The design of virtually all air conditions assumes that the system is not going to be run when the exterior temperature is below 60 degrees Fahrenheit, since it is below the comfort area of most people. In most cases, it is not safe to run an air conditioner below this temperature. Click on this link for more information.

Cooling Equipment 2: Temperature To Low

Air conditioners use a cycle that involves changing a refrigerant between a liquid and a gas to decrease the temperature of a room. The design of virtually all air conditions assumes that the system is not going to be run when the exterior temperature is below 60 degrees Fahrenheit, since it is below the comfort area of most people. In most cases, it is not safe to run an air conditioner below this temperature. Click on this link for more information.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.


7 - Heating

Equipment: Heat Type
Furnace
Normal Operating Controls: Operation
Acceptable Condition
Distribution Systems: Condition
Acceptable Condition
Equipment: Brand
American Standard
Equipment: Energy Source
Natural Gas
Equipment: Location
Craw Space
Distribution Systems: Ductwork
Insulated
AFUE Rating
92.1-92.3

AFUE (Annual fuel utilization efficiency) is a metric used to measure furnace efficiency in converting fuel to energy. A higher AFUE rating means greater energy efficiency. 90% or higher meets the Department of Energy's Energy Star program standard.

Equipment: Equipment Photos

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

8 - Heating 2

Equipment: Heat Type
Furnace
Normal Operating Controls: Operation
Acceptable Condition
Distribution Systems: Condition
Acceptable Condition
Equipment: Brand
American Standard
Equipment: Energy Source
Gas
Equipment: Location
Attic
Distribution Systems: Ductwork
Insulated
AFUE Rating
80

AFUE (Annual fuel utilization efficiency) is a metric used to measure furnace efficiency in converting fuel to energy. A higher AFUE rating means greater energy efficiency. 90% or higher meets the Department of Energy's Energy Star program standard.

Equipment: Equipment Photos

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

9 - Bedrooms & Bathrooms

Bedroom: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Ceiling Fans
None
Bedroom: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bedroom 2: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 2: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 2: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 2: Windows
Double Pane, Vinyl, Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern
Bedroom 2: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bedroom 3: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bonus Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bonus Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bonus Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bonus Room: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bonus Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bonus Room: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Ceiling Fans
None
Guest Bedroom: Window Screens
Missing
Guest Bedroom: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Master: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Master: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Master: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Master: Ceiling Fans
None
Master: Window Screens
Missing
Master: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bathroom: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bathroom 2: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 2: Windows
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern, Double Pane, Vinyl
Bathroom 2: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 2: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 2: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Guest Bathroom: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Closets
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Master Bathroom: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bedroom: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 2: Doors
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern
Bedroom 2: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 2: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 2: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 2: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bonus Room: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bonus Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Bonus Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bonus Room: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Master: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Master: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Master: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Master: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Room Photos
Bathroom: Doors
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern
Bathroom: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Cabinets/Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Toilet
Acceptable Function
Bathroom: Closets
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 2: Room Photos
Guest Bathroom: Room Photos
Guest Bathroom: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Cabinets/Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Toilet
Acceptable Function
Guest Bathroom: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Toilet
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern
Master Bathroom: Windows
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Room Photos
Bedroom: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane, Vinyl
Bedroom 2: Room Photos
Bedroom 3: Room Photos
Bedroom 3: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane, Vinyl
Bedroom 3: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Bonus Room: Room Photos
Bonus Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane, Vinyl
Guest Bedroom: Room Photos
Guest Bedroom: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Windows
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Master: Room Photos
Master: Windows
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern
Bathroom: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Bathroom: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Tub/Shower
Acceptable Condition

Attention: We do not operate jetted tubs or whirpool tubs during our inspection due to possible leaks or busted pipes. Confirm operation with seller prior to closing.

Bathroom: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane, Vinyl
Bathroom 2: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 2: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Bathroom 2: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 2: Cabinets/Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 2: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 2: Toilet
Acceptable Function
Bathroom 2: Tub/Shower
Acceptable Condition

Attention: We do not operate jetted tubs or whirpool tubs during our inspection due to possible leaks or busted pipes. Confirm operation with seller prior to closing.

Bathroom 2: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 2: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Guest Bathroom: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Tub/Shower
Acceptable Condition

Attention: We do not operate jetted tubs or whirpool tubs during our inspection due to possible leaks or busted pipes. Confirm operation with seller prior to closing.

Master Bathroom: Room Photos
Master Bathroom: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Master Bathroom: Cabinets/Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Master Bathroom: Tub/Shower
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern

Attention: We do not operate jetted tubs or whirpool tubs during our inspection due to possible leaks or busted pipes. Confirm operation with seller prior to closing.

Master Bathroom: Closets
Acceptable Condition
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Bedroom

Window Does Not Latch
Bedroom

Concern: The one window in the bedroom did not latch when closed.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.1.2 - Bedroom

Paint Scrathed/Pealed on Window Trim

There was some paint scrtached/pealed off on the window trim. Recommend checking whole house for paint scratches. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.1.3 - Bedroom

Screens Missing

Concern: Screens missing in all windows throughout whole house. 

Recommendation: Have Builder/Contractor install screens before closing.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Bedroom 2

Closet Door Does Not Latch
Bedroom 2

Concern: The closet door does not latch when closed.

Recommendation: Adjust strike plate or door so the door functions properly.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.2.2 - Bedroom 2

Window Did Not Latch

Concern: The window in the bedroom did not latch when closed.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - Master

Window Did Not Open
Master

Concern: One of the windows in the bedroom did not open. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.7.1 - Bathroom

Door Is Tight When Closing

Concern: The bathroom door is tight when opening and closing.

Recommendation: Adjusting door to function smoothly.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
9.8.1 - Bathroom 2

Window Does Not Latch

Concern: The window in the bathroom does not latch when closed.


Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.10.1 - Master Bathroom

Toilet Loose
Master Bathroom

Concern: The toilet was wobbly and loose.

Recommendation: Qualified contractor evaluate floor structure and plumbing and repair as needed.

Hammer Carpentry Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.10.2 - Master Bathroom

Floor Vent Missing
Master Bathroom

Concern: There was a floor vent missing for the HVAC system. 

Recommendation: Builder/contractor install proper vent.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.10.3 - Master Bathroom

Tub Stopper Leaks

Concern: The stopper in the tub didn't seal completely when closed. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

10 - Interior

Hallway: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Closets
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Heating/Cooling Source
Yes
Stairway: Treads & Risers
Acceptable Condition
Stairway: Handrail
Acceptable Condition
Stairway: Landing Areas
Acceptable Condition
Stairway: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Foyer: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Foyer: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Foyer: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Stairway: Photos
Stairway: Gaurdrail
Acceptable Condition
Foyer: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Foyer: Floors
Acceptable Condition
Foyer: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Foyer: Room Photos
Foyer: Closet
Accetable Condition
Hallway: Room Photos
Hallway: Switches
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will operate and report on the function and condition of all accessible switches.

Hallway: Flooring
Acceptable Condition

The flooring was found to be in acceptable condition with only normal wear unless otherwise stated.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

11 - Fireplace

Cleanout Doors & Frames: Condition
Acceptable Condition
Fireplace Photos
Function
Not Set Up

The inspector will light the gas fire place if he/she deems it to be safe and functional. 

Type
Gas

I. The inspector shall inspect:

readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;

lintels above the fireplace openings;

damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and

cleanout doors and frames.

II. The inspector shall describe:

the type of fireplace.

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;

manually operated dampers that did not open and close;

the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;

the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and

cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

inspect the flue or vent system.

inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.

determine the need for a chimney sweep.

operate gas fireplace inserts.

light pilot flames.

determine the appropriateness of any installation.

inspect automatic fuel-fed devices.

inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices.

inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted.

ignite or extinguish fires.

determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics.

move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents.

perform a smoke test.

dismantle or remove any component.

perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection.

perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

12 - Living Areas

Dining Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Dining Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Dining Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Living Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Living Room: Ceiling Fans
Needs Attention
Living Room: Walls
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern
Living Room: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Living Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Den: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Den: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Den: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Den: Window Screens
Missing
Den: Heating/Cooling Source
Yes
Dining Room: Room Photos
Dining Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Dining Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Dining Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Dining Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane, Vinyl
Dining Room: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Living Room: Room Photos
Living Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Living Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Living Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Den: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Den: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Den: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Den: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Den: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane, Vinyl
Den: Room Photos
Living Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition
Credit
Comment
12.2.1 - Living Room

Ceiling Fan Not On

Concern: The ceiling fan did not turn on using the wall switch and the pull chain on the fan. 

Recommendation: Qualified contractor diagnose issue and repair.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.2.2 - Living Room

Spackle Spots On Wall

Concern: There were some drywall mudding spots on the wall and some paint/sealant bubbles on the top side of the crown mold. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Laundry Room

Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Room: Receptacles
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern, Not GFCI Protected
Room: Water Hookups
Acceptable Condition
Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Washer & Dryer: Dryer Power Source
220 Electric
Washer & Dryer: Dryer Vent
Metal (Solid)
Room: Room Photos
Room: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Room: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Washer & Dryer: Dryer
Not Present

The inspector ran the dryer and checked to make sure it came to temperature and reported on the function and completion.

14 - Kitchen

Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Room: Cabinet Doors & Drawers
Acceptable Condition
Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Dishwasher: Brand
Jen-Air
Dishwasher: Drain Line (High Loop)
Acceptable Function
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Brand
Jenn-Air
Countertop/Built-in Microwave: Brand
Jenn-Air
Room: Room Photos
Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Room: Pantry
Acceptable Condition
Dishwasher: Equipment Photos
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type/Function
Vented, Acceptable Function
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Energy Source
Gas
Garbage Disposal: Equipment Photos
Garbage Disposal: Equipment Function
Mostly Acceptable w/Areas of Concern, Acceptable Function
Countertop/Built-in Microwave: Equipment Photos
Room: Receptacles
GFCI Protected, Acceptable Condition

All receptacles above counter space and within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Room: Cabinets & Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Room: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition
Dishwasher: Function
Acceptable Function

The inspector will run the dishwasher for a full cycle and report on the operation and condition of equipment.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Equipment Photos
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Equipment Function
Acceptable Function

The inspector will operate the appliances under normal controls and report on the findings.

Countertop/Built-in Microwave: Equipment Function
Acceptable Function

The inspector will test and observe function. If orange light is visible it functions properly

15 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

Foundation: Inspection Method
Visual-Via Crawspace
Crawlspace: Crawlspace Floor-Material & Condition
Gravel
Crawlspace: Vapor Barrier
Acceptable Condition
Sub Floor: Insulation
Acceptable Condition
Crawlspace: Crawspace Access Location
Access Door From Exterior
Foundation: Material/Type
Masonry Block Stem Wall

The foundation will be inspected and any unusual or excessive movement, and/or major cracking outside of normal settling will be reported.

Foundation: Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will observe and report on the visible parts of the foundation walls.

Crawlspace: Crawspace Photos
Crawlspace: Inspection Method
Visual Inside Crawspace

The inspector will enter and inspect all attic and crawspaces that have no physical or safety limitations, and is not limited to the comfort of the inspector.

Sub Floor: Floor Joists & Sub Floor
TJI Joists

The inspector will report on the physically observable portion of the sub floor. As some may be obscured by insulation, drywall, vapor barriers, etc. it may be possible that other methods were used and not reported on.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

16 - Garage, Shop, Sheds

Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Room: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Garage Door: Garage Door
Metal, Non-insulated
Garage Door: Type
Automatic
Garage Door: Track System
Acceptable Condition
Garage Door: Cabling/Tension System
Acceptable Condition
Garage Door: Opener Controls
Acceptable Condition
Garage Door: Auto Reverse Sensors
Acceptable Condition
Garage Door: Pressure Safety Sensor
Acceptable Condition
Garage Door: Electric Opener
Acceptable Condition
Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Fire Seperation
Fire Rated

The inspector will observe and report on the fire rating of the door.

Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition, GFCI Protected

All the receptacles in the garage should be GFCI protected.

Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Room: Photos
Room: Walls and Firewalls
Acceptable Condition

Ceiling and walls adjoining living quarters should be rated as a Firewall and should be built with materials to prevent the spreading of a fire into the home living space.

Floor: Type and Condition
Acceptable Condition, Concrete

Concrete floors tend to settle and crack over time and it is completely normal to have small cracks in the floor.

Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Door
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will observe and report on the condition and function of the door.

Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Self Closing And Latching
Acceptable Condition-Self Closing


The inspector will observe and report on whether the door closes and latches completely from a reasonable distance.

Credit
Comment
16.1.1 - Room

Uncovered Electrical Boxes

Concern: The boxes that were used to run the wiring for the door sensors did not have covers. 

Recommendation: Have builder/contractor install proper covers.

Tools Handyman/DIY

17 - Radon Mitigation System

Mitigation Type: Information
Passive sub-slab depressurization, Sub-membrane depressurization, Acceptable Condition

This inspection was performed in substantial compliance with InterNACHIs International Standards of Practice for Inspecting Radon Mitigation Systems. It is designed to provide an indication as to whether or not the radon mitigation system was installed improperly, is not performing as designed, or is in need of repair.  It is not a substitute for a radon level measurement. 

 

Radon is a radioactive gas that has been found in homes, schools and buildings around the world.  Radon comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil and rock, and moves up into the indoor air that people breathe.  Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.  Radon-mitigation systems reduce radon levels in homes and buildings. 

The inspector shall describe the radon mitigation system as one of the following types:

  • active sub-slab depressurization;
  • passive sub-slab depressurization;
  • sump (pit) depressurization;
  • drain-tile depressurization;
  • sub-membrane depressurization;
  • hollow-block wall depressurization;
  • crawlspace depressurization; or
  • heat-recovery ventilation.