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1234 Main St.
Olympia, Washington 98501
04/08/2020 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
63
Items Inspected
6
Minor defect
14
Major defect
2
Material defect

Visit us online at https://spsinspections.com

1 - Inspection Detail

General Inspection Info: Occupancy
Vacant
General Inspection Info: Weather Conditions
Cloudy, Light Rain
General Inspection Info: Type of Building
Detached, Single Family
General Inspection Info: In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent, Listing Agent

I prefer to have my client with me during my inspection so that we can discuss concerns, and I can answer all questions. 

Your Job As a Homeowner: What Really Matters in a Home Inspection

Now that you've bought your home and had your inspection, you may still have some questions about your new house and the items revealed in your report. 

Home maintenance is a primary responsibility for every homeowner, whether you've lived in several homes of your own or have just purchased your first one. Staying on top of a seasonal home maintenance schedule is important, and your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector can help you figure this out so that you never fall behind. Don't let minor maintenance and routine repairs turn into expensive disasters later due to neglect or simply because you aren't sure what needs to be done and when. 

Your home inspection report is a great place to start. In addition to the written report, checklists, photos, and what the inspector said during the inspection not to mention the sellers disclosure and what you noticed yourself it's easy to become overwhelmed. However, it's likely that your inspection report included mostly maintenance recommendations, the life expectancy for the home's various systems and components, and minor imperfections. These are useful to know about. 

But the issues that really matter fall into four categories: 

  1. major defects, such as a structural failure; 
  2. things that can lead to major defects, such as a small leak due to a defective roof flashing; 
  3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home if not rectified immediately; and 
  4. safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel. 

Anything in these categories should be addressed as soon as possible. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4). 

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. It's important to realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in your inspection report. No house is perfect. Keep things in perspective as you move into your new home. 

And remember that homeownership is both a joyful experience and an important responsibility, so be sure to call on your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector to help you devise an annual maintenance plan that will keep your family safe and your home in good condition for years to come.




Your Job As a Homeowner: Read Your Book

I have provided you a home maintenance book.  It includes information on how your home works, how to maintain it, and how to save energy.  Please write my contact information within the book's inside cover, so that you can always contact me. 

We're neighbors! So, feel free to reach out whenever you have a house question or issue.  


Your Job As a Homeowner: Schedule a Home Maintenance Inspection

Even the most vigilant homeowner can, from time to time, miss small problems or forget about performing some routine home repairs and seasonal maintenance. That's why an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection will help you keep your home in good condition and prevent it from suffering serious, long-term and expensive damage from minor issues that should be addressed now. 

The most important thing to understand as a new homeowner is that your house requires care and regular maintenance. As time goes on, parts of your house will wear out, break down, deteriorate, leak, or simply stop working. But none of these issues means that you will have a costly disaster on your hands if you're on top of home maintenance, and that includes hiring an expert once a year. 

Just as you regularly maintain your vehicle, consider getting an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection as part of the cost of upkeep for your most valuable investment your home. 

Your InterNACHI-Certified Professional Inspector can show you what you should look for so that you can be an informed homeowner. Protect your family's health and safety, and enjoy your home for years to come by having an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection performed every year. 

Schedule next year's maintenance inspection with your home inspector today!


Every house should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.




We'll Buy Your Home Back

If your home inspector misses anything, InterNACHI will buy your home back.  

And now for the fine print:

  • It's valid for home inspections performed for home buyers or sellers by participating InterNACHI members.
  • The home must be listed for sale with a licensed real estate agent.
  • The Guarantee excludes homes with material defects not present at the time of the inspection, or not required to be inspected, per InterNACHI's Residential Standards of Practice.
  • The Guarantee will be honored for 90 days after closing.
  • We'll pay you whatever price you paid for the home.



For more information, please visit www.nachi.org/buy.


Details

InterNACHI is so certain of the integrity of our members that we back them up with our $10,000 Honor Guarantee. 

InterNACHI will pay up to $10,000 USD for the cost of replacement of personal property lost during an inspection and stolen by an InterNACHI-certified member who was convicted of or pleaded guilty to any criminal charge resulting from the member's taking of the client's personal property.  

For details, please visit www.nachi.org/honor


Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice while reading this inspection report.  I performed the home inspection according to the standards and my clients wishes and expectations.  Please refer to the inspection contract or agreement between the inspector and the inspector's client.  

2 - Roof

Roof Covering: Tile Profile
S-tiles
Roof Covering: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job as the homeowner is to monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak. To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters.

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant. Roofs are not designed to be waterproof. Eventually, the roof system will leak. No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 

Every roof should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.


Roof Covering: Type of Roof-Covering Described
Tile

I observed the roof-covering material and attempted to identify its type.  

This inspection is not a guarantee that a roof leak in the future will not happen. Roofs leak.  Even a roof that appears to be in good, functional condition will leak under certain circumstances. We will not take responsibility for a roof leak that happens in the future.  This is not a warranty or guarantee of the roof system.

Roof Covering: Roof Was Inspected
Ground

We attempted to inspect the roof from various locations and methods, including from the ground and a ladder. 

The inspection was not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes.  It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection.  We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roof, and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy.  

Roof Covering: Aging description
As concrete tiles age, erosion of the cement and exposure of the mix aggregate cause them to become more absorbent. The result is that they absorb moisture increasingly easily as they get older. As concrete tiles near the end of their useful lives, they reach a condition in which they can become completely saturated. Clues that concrete tile are nearing the end of their long-term service lives are: - efflorescence forming on the tile; - moisture dripping from the underside of the tile; - thinning of the glaze; - displaced or missing tiles; - cracking; and - pitting.
Roof Covering: Roof Looked Great at Time of Inspection

No deficiencies were noted by the inspector on the roof. The performance of the roof should last well into the future as long as manufacturers' recommendations for maintenance etc. are followed.

Roof Covering: Profile: S-tiles
The roof was covered with concrete "S" tiles that interlocked edges with tiles in the same course and overlap tiles in the course below.
Flashing: Wall Intersections

I looked for flashing where the roof covering meets a wall or siding material.  There should be step and counter flashing installed in these locations.  This is not an exhaustive inspection of all flashing areas.

Flashing: Eaves and Gables

I looked for flashing installed at the eaves (near the gutter edge) and at the gables (the diagonal edge of the roof).  There should be metal drip flashing material installed in these locations.  The flashing helps the surface water on the roof to discharge into the gutter.  Flashing also helps to prevent water intrusion under the roof-covering. 

Flashing: Drip Cap Present

A drip cap was present along the corner of the eaves where the shingles meet the decking. This helps with shedding water over the shingle and off of the roof via the path over a drip cap. Without this flashing here, water would be able to siphon back up into the decking of your roof, causing moisture intrusion damage over time. It is always good to see a proper drip cap installed on a roof, great job.

Plumbing Vent Pipes: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job is to monitor the flashing around the plumbing vent pipes that pass through the roof surface.  Sometimes they deteriorate and cause a roof leak.  

Be sure that the plumbing vent pipes do not get covered, either by debris, a toy, or snow.

Plumbing Vent Pipes: Plumbing Vent Pipes Inspected

I looked at DWV (drain, waste and vent) pipes that pass through the roof covering.  There should be watertight flashing (often black rubber material) installed around the vent pipes.  These plumbing vent pipes should extend far enough above the roof surface.    

Plumbing Vent Pipes: General description

Flashing is a general term used to describe (typically) sheet metal fabricated into shapes and used to protect areas of the roof from moisture intrusion. Inspection typically includes inspection for condition and proper installation of flashing in the following locations: 

  • Roof penetrations such as vents;
  • Electrical masts;
  • Chimneys;
  • Mechanical equipment;
  • Patio cover attachment points; 
  • Around skylights; 
  • Junctions at which roofs meet walls; 
  • Roof edges; 
  • Areas at which roofs change slope; 
  • Areas at which roof-covering materials change; and 
  • Areas at which different roof planes meet (such as valleys).
Gutters & Downspouts: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job is to monitor the gutters and be sure that they function during and after a rainstorm. Look for loose parts, sagging gutter ends, and water leaks. The rain water should be diverted far away from the house foundation. 

Gutters & Downspouts: Gutters Were Inspected

I inspected the gutters.  I wasn't able to inspect every inch of every gutter.  But I attempted to check the overall general condition of the gutters during the inspection and look for indications of major defects.  

Monitoring the gutters during a heavy rain (without lightening) is recommended.  In general, the gutters should catch rain water and direct the water towards downspouts that discharge the water away from the house foundation. 

Roof Covering: Unable to See Everything

This is a visual-only inspection of the roof-covering materials. It does not include an inspection of the entire system. There are components of the roof that are not visible or accessible at all, including the underlayment, decking, fastening, flashing, age, shingle quality, manufacturer installation recommendations, etc. 

Roof Covering: Installation: disclaimer

Many different types, brands and models of concrete tiles have been installed on homes over the years, each with specific manufacturer's installation requirements that may or may not apply to similar-looking tiles. In addition, most tiles have underlayment requirements that cannot be visually confirmed once the tiles have been installed. For this reason, the Inspector disclaims responsibility for accurate confirmation of proper roof tile installation. The Inspector's comments will be based on- and limited to- installation requirements common to many tile types, brands and models. Accurate confirmation of compliance with manufacturer's installation recommendations, or identification of any violations of applicable building codes, exceeds the scope of the General Home Inspection, and will require the services of a qualified roofing contractor.

Roof Covering: Unable to Walk Upon Roof Surface

According to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice, a home inspector is not required to walk upon any roof surface.  However, as courtesy only, I attempted to walk upon the roof surface, but was unable.  It was not safe.  It was not accessible.  This was a restriction to my inspection of the roof system.  You may want to consider hiring a professional roofer with a lift to check your roof system.   

Flashing: Difficult to See Every Flashing

I attempted to inspect the flashing related to the vent pipes, wall intersections, eaves and gables, and the roof-covering materials.  In general, there should be flashing installed in certain areas where the roof covering meets something else, like a vent pipe or siding.  Most flashing is not observable, because the flashing material itself is covered and hidden by the roof covering or other materials.  So, it's impossible to see everything.  A home inspection is a limited visual-only inspection.  

Plumbing Vent Pipes: Unable to Reach All the Pipes

I was unable to closely reach and observe all of the vent pipes that pass through the roof-covering materials.  This was an inspection restriction. 

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice related to inspecting the roof of the house.  

Monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak.  To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters. 

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant.  Roofs are not designed to be waterproof.  Eventually, the roof system will leak.  No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 


I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves:

  1. the roof-covering materials;
  2. the gutters;
  3. the downspouts;
  4. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and 
  5. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of roof-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. observed indications of active roof leaks.

3 - Exterior

General: Exterior Was Inspected

I inspected the exterior of the house.

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stair Structure Materials
Wood
Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Treads: wood
The treads of this stairway were made of wood.
Exterior Doors: Exterior Doors Inspected

I inspected the exterior doors. 

General: Homeowner's Responsibility

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging. The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it. Your job is to monitor the buildings exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

During a heavy rainstorm (without lightning), grab an umbrella and go outside. Walk around your house and look around at the roof and property. A rainstorm is the perfect time to see how the roof, downspouts and grading are performing. Observe the drainage patterns of your entire property, as well as the property of your neighbor. The ground around your house should slope away from all sides. Downspouts, surface gutters and drains should be directing water away from the foundation. 

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Eaves, Soffits and Fascia Were Inspected

I inspected the eaves, soffits and fascia.  I was not able to inspect every detail, since a home inspection is limited in its scope. 

Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim: Type of Wall-Covering Material Described
Wood

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging.  The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it.  Your job is to monitor the house's exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior wall-covering materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading: Vegetation, Drainage, Walls & Grading Were Inspected

I inspected the vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.

GFCIs & Electrical: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible.

Walkways & Driveways: Walkways & Driveways Were Inspected

I inspected the walkways and driveways that were adjacent to the house.  The walkways, driveways, and parking areas that were far away from the house foundation were not inspected. 


Other than a good pressure washing to remove the biological grime, the driveway and walkways were found to be in good shape during the inspection.

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stair: photo

These photos show the two sets of exterior stairs.

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports: Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports Were Inspected

I inspected the porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports at the house that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Railings, Guards & Handrails Were Inspected

I inspected the railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Windows: Windows Inspected

A representative number of windows from the ground surface was inspected. 

Exhaust Hoods: Unidentified Hoods

I observed some exterior exhaust hoods, but I was unable to identify all of them as to what their purpose was. 

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice related to inspecting the exterior of the house. 


I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the exterior wall-covering materials; 
  2. the eaves, soffits and fascia;
  3. a representative number of windows;
  4. all exterior doors;
  5. flashing and trim;
  6. adjacent walkways and driveways;
  7. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
  8. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
  9. railings, guards and handrails; and 
  10. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of exterior wall-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails.

$
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim

Inadequate Ground Clearance

I checked the distance between the bottom of wood components and the ground surface (or grade). In locations that have little or no snow, the distance should be no less than 8 inches. In locations with significant lasting snow, the bottom of wood elements should be no less than 8 inches above the average snow depth. 

Correction and further evaluation is recommended.

Siding Siding Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading

Dense Vegetation

I observed dense vegetation around the house in areas.  This condition limited and restricted my visual inspection.  Dense vegetation and landscaping up against or near the house foundation and exterior walls may be prone to water penetration and insect infestation.  

Trimming, pruning and some landscaping is recommended.  

Wrench DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.4.2 - Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading

Negative Grading
Rear Home Entryway

Grading is sloping towards the home in some areas. This could lead to water intrusion and foundation issues.

The ground around a house should slope away from all sides, ideally 6 inches for the first 10 feet from the house foundation perimeter. Downspouts, surface gutters, and drains should also be directing water away from the foundation. 


Though 90% of the grading around the home properly sloped away from the foundation, there was one dip located at the rear of the home where the rear entryway door was located, creating a bit of a negative grade essentially along the entire rear of the home which looked to direct water to pool at the base of the door where the grade meets the foundation. Having this door located here seems to me to make things more complicated as this is now an access point for excess water pooled up to enter the home underneath the doorway (Whether this has happened or not, I do not know, but the way things are, the possibility of this occurring increases).

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps

Treads: height difference excessive

At the exterior staircase, the greatest riser height exceeded the lowest riser height by more than the 3/8-inch limit recommended by widely-accepted modern safety standards. This condition is a potential trip hazard. All corrections should be made by a qualified contractor
Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.9.1 - Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports

Deteriorated Condition at Deck

I observed indications of deteriorated conditions at the deck components. 


There were one or two boards with deterioration like this under the right side deck around the house. This doesn't seem to be having an adverse effect on the structure of the deck at present, but if rot is actually present in any of these pieces, further deterioration is inevitable. Consider replacing affected boards and members of the deck.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.9.2 - Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports

Ledger Board Defect

I observed indications of a defect at the ledger board of the deck. 

The ledger board is not properly attached to the building. This can cause the deck to pull away from the building and possibly collapse. Material defect. 

Correction and further evaluation is recommended. 

The IRC gives us a prescriptive bolting and lag screwing schedule to follow when mounting a deck ledger to a house.  Table R502.2.2.1 has three options: ½ in. bolt, ½ in. lag screw and ½ in. bolt with the ledger spaced off the wall sheathing by ½ in. for those who like the flow-through design. 

House front 1 Deck Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.9.3 - Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports

Deck - Wood Rot

I observed wood rot at the deck.  This condition is a structural defect.  

Correction and further evaluation of the deck is recommended.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.9.4 - Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports

Deck - Cracked Boards

I observed a cracked post at the deck.  This condition is a structural defect and potential safety hazard. 

Now with this structural defect on another post of the same deck, something ios saying there is too much stress and force being applied downwards, with not adequate supporting members. Consider having a structural engineer or competent and qualified decking contractor take a look at it and give you his opinion as to what should be done if anything. 

Correction and further evaluation of the deck is recommended.

House construction Structural Engineer
$
Credit
Comment
3.10.1 - Railings, Guards & Handrails

Handrail Not Graspable

I observed a handrail that is not grippable or graspable.  This condition is a safety hazard.

Correction and further evaluation is recommended. 

Wrenches Handyman

4 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

Basement: Type of Basement Foundation Described
Concrete
Basement: Homeowner's Responsibility

One of the most common problems in a house is a wet basement or foundation. You should monitor the walls and floors for signs of water penetration, such as dampness, water stains, peeling paint, efflorescence, and rust on exposed metal parts. In a finished basement, look for rotted or warped wood paneling and doors, loose floor tiles, and mildew stains. It may come through the walls or cracks in the floor, or from backed-up floor drains, leaky plumbing lines, or a clogged air-conditioner condensate line. 

Basement: Basement Was Inspected

The basement was inspected according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

The basement can be a revealing area in the house and often provides a general picture of how the entire structure works. In most basements, the structure is exposed overhead, as are the HVAC distribution system, plumbing supply and DWV lines, and the electrical branch-circuit wiring. I inspected those systems and components.

Basement: Foundation Was Inspected

The foundation was inspected according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Basement: Structural Components Were Inspected

Structural components were inspected according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice, including readily observed floor joists. 

Basement: Basement Unfinished

Foundation construction included a basement that was in the process of being converted to living space. Work was incomplete at the time of the inspection. You should ask the seller for documentation showing that work has been done with the proper permits and appropriate building inspections. Work performed without inspections may contain potentially hazardous defects or conditions.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the foundation;
  • the basement;
  • the crawlspace; and
  • structural components.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of foundation; and
  • the location of the access to the under-floor space.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil;
  • observed indications of active water penetration;
  • observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and
  • any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern.

5 - Heating

Heating System Information: Energy Source
Electric, Propane
Heating System Information: Heating Method
Electric Baseboard System, Propane Stove
Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Multiple locations
Heating System Information: Homeowner's Responsibility

Most HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. They consist of four components: controls, fuel supply, heating or cooling unit, and distribution system. The adequacy of heating and cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

It's your job to get the HVAC system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system as an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the heating system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the heating system;
  2. the energy source; and
  3. the heating method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any heating system that did not operate; and
  2. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible.

$
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Heating System Information

Old System

I observed during my inspection that the system appeared to be old and at the end of its service life. It may not be reliable. Ask the homeowner or occupant about its recent performance. Regular maintenance and monitoring of its condition is recommended. Budgeting for repairs and future replacement is recommended. InterNACHI's Standard Estimate Life Expectancy Chart for Homes

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls

Old Thermostat

I observed that the thermostat is very old and should be upgraded to a modern energy-efficient thermostat. 

Wrench DIY

6 - Cooling

Cooling System Information: Homeowner's Responsibility

Most air-conditioning systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. The adequacy of the cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

It's your job to get the air conditioning system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system as an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned. 

Cooling System Information: Cool Temperature Restriction

Because the outside temperature was too cool to operate the air conditioner without the possibility of damaging the system, I did not operate the cooling system.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about the system, including past performance. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the cooling system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and
  2. the cooling method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any cooling system that did not operate; and
  2. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.


7 - Plumbing

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Location of Main Shut-Off Valve
Unable to Determine
Hot Water Source: Inspected TPR Valve

I inspected the temperature and pressure relief valve.  

Hot Water Source: Inspected Venting Connections

I inspected the venting connections. 

Hot Water Source: Inspected Seismic Bracing

I inspected the seismic bracing for the hot water tank. 

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Homeowner's Responsibility

It's your job to know where the main water and fuel shutoff valves are located. And be sure to keep an eye out for any water and plumbing leaks. 

I was unable to determine the location of the main water shutoff, but it was not located at the water heater in the basement, which leads me to believe it to be outside of the home at the water main.

Water Supply : Water Supply Is Public

The water supply to the house appeared to be from the public water supply source based upon the observed indications at the time of the inspection.  To confirm and be certain, I recommend asking the homeowner for details. 

Hot Water Source: Type of Hot Water Source
Gas-Fired Hot Water Tank

I inspected for the main source of the distributed hot water to the plumbing fixtures (sinks, tubs, showers).  I recommend asking the homeowner for details about the hot water equipment and past performance. 

Hot Water Source: Inspected Hot Water Source

I inspected the hot water source and equipment according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Inspected Drain, Waste, Vent Pipes

I attempted to inspect the drain, waste, and vent pipes.  Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about water and sewer leaks or blockages in the past.  

The Large round black tubing in the photographs represent the visible portions of the drain waste vent system.

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Unable to Locate

I was unable to determine the location of the main water shut-off valve.  Ask the homeowner. 

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the drainage pipes were hidden within the walls.  

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Most DWV not visible

Most drain, waste and vent pipes were not visible due to wall, ceiling and floor coverings.

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the water supply pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the water distribution pipes, valves and connections were hidden within the walls.  

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the main water supply shut-off valve;
  2. the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  3. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  4. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  5. all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  6. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  7. the drain, waste and vent system; and
  8. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  2. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  3. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  4. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
  5. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  2. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  3. active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; and  
  4. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate.


$
Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Hot Water Source

Tank Should Be Raised

I observed that the hot water tank should be raised at least 18 inches from the floor. Electric water heaters are allowed to sit on the floor with a catch pan underneath, but all gas water heaters need to be raised 18 inches off of the floor to conform with safety regulations.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

8 - Electrical

Electrical Wiring: Type of Wiring, If Visible
NM-B (Romex)
Service-Entrance Conductors: Inspected Service-Entrance Conductors

I inspected the electrical service-entrance conductors. 

Electric Meter & Base: Inspected the Electric Meter & Base

I inspected the electrical electric meter and base. 

Main Service Disconnect: Homeowner's Responsibility

It's your job to know where the main electrical panel is located, including the main service disconnect that turns everything off. 

Be sure to test your GFCIs, AFCIs, and smoke detectors regularly. You can replace light bulbs, but more than that, you ought to hire an electrician. Electrical work is hazardous and mistakes can be fatal. Hire a professional whenever there's an electrical problem in your house. 

Main Service Disconnect: Inspected Main Service Disconnect

I inspected the electrical main service disconnect.

Main Service Disconnect: Main Disconnect Rating, If Labeled
200

I observed indications of the main service disconnect's amperage rating. It was labeled. 

Panelboards & Breakers: Inspected Main Panelboard & Breakers

I inspected the electrical panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses). 

Panelboards & Breakers: Inspected Subpanel & Breakers

I inspected the electrical subpanel and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses). 

Service Grounding & Bonding: Inspected the Service Grounding & Bonding

I inspected the electrical service grounding and bonding.

GFCIs: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible.

Electrical Wiring: Unable to Inspect All of the Wiring

I was unable to inspect all of the electrical wiring. Obviously, most of the wiring is hidden from view within walls. Beyond the scope of a visual home inspection. 

Panelboards & Breakers: Breaker(s) in Off Position

I observed more than one breaker in the "off" position prior to inspecting the electrical panel. Recommend asking the homeowner what this breaker is connected to, and why it is off. 

One breaker that was in the off position was the one labeled "hot water heater"

Service Grounding & Bonding: Unable to Confirm Proper Grounding and Bonding

I was unable to confirm the proper installation of the system grounding and bonding according to modern IRC Electrical code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the grounding and bonding as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice, and noted any observations or findings I had within this report.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the service drop;
  2. the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  3. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  4. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  5. the electric meter and base;
  6. service-entrance conductors;
  7. the main service disconnect;
  8. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  9. service grounding and bonding;
  10. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  11. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  12. for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  2. the type of wiring observed.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  2. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  3. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  4. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and
  5. the absence of smoke and/or carbon monoxide detectors. 


$
Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Electrical Wiring

Material Defect

I observed indications of a material defect during the inspection. Major defect. Hazard. Correction and further evaluation is recommended. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
8.7.1 - GFCIs

Missing GFCI

I observed indications that a GFCI is missing in an area that is required to keep people safe. 

This was found in the first floor bathroom next to the tub and next to the sink, both should be GFCI protected as they are within 3 feet of a water source.

Electric Electrical Contractor

9 - Bathrooms

Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected

I flushed all of the toilets. 

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers

I ran water at all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Heat Source in Bathroom: Heat Source in Bathroom Was Inspected

I inspected the heat source in the bathroom (register/baseboard). 

Cabinetry, Ceiling, Walls & Floor: Bathrooms Were Inspected

The bathrooms were inspected according to our Standards of Practice.

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Plumbing Panel Not Installed

I observed that there was not a plumbing access panel installed for the bathroom fixtures. I recommend one to be installed. 

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing; and 
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.

$
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Bathroom Toilets

Toilet Did Not Flush

I observed that the upstairs toilet did not flush as expected. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
9.1.2 - Bathroom Toilets

Loose toilet fitting/connection

A properly installed toilet should not budge at all when pushed on with a good amount of weight.


All three toilets in the home had some level of movement when pushed on with the force of my leg. It would be good to think about either trying to tighten them down, or replacing the wax ring seal as toilets should not budge at all when pushed like this.

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Chimney, Fireplace, or Stove

Fireplace: Type of Fireplace
Factory-Built, Gas Stove

I tried to describe the type of fireplace. 

Fireplace: Factory Built Fireplace Info

What is a factory-built fireplace and how does it differ from a masonry fireplace?

The traditional masonry fireplace is based largely on the innovations of Count Rumford, an18th-century inventor.  His applied theories on thermodynamics led to the design of a restricted chimney opening to increase updraft, which allowed fire to burn in an enclosure without smoke filling the room.  Rumfords design quickly achieved wide popularity in London households, and he became something of a celebrity as news of his innovation spread. 

Factory-built fireplaces now make up approximately 75% of all types of fireplaces. Unlike traditional masonry fireplaces, which are built on site, factory-built fireplaces are designed to allow for installation at a later date, although they are just as often used for new construction. 

 

A factory-built fireplace is made up of a firebox enclosed within a steel cabinet, and a steel chimney or flue.  It is lightweight, inexpensive, safe and efficient, and can be installed fairly easily on any floor of a home.  Pre-manufactured masonry fireplaces are also available, and they incorporate engineering techniques not often used in field-constructed fireplaces, such as a listed venting system.

 

Zero Clearance

Factory-built fireplaces are also often called zero-clearance fireplaces because of their minuscule safe-clearance requirements.  An insulating air blanket is incorporated in the design to keep the outer wall of the fireplace cool, which allows safe installation in very close proximity to wood framing.  In general, -inch of clearance to combustibles is required around the outside of the firebox enclosure, and 2 inches of clearance are required around the chimney, except where the firestop is installed if a chimney passes through two levels of a house.  Different manufacturers may have different suggested clearances, and it is important for installers to note this for proper and safe installation. 

Safety and Maintenance

Factory-built fireplaces pass rigorous testing standards established by the  Underwriters Laboratories and the American Gas Association.  Properly installed, factory-built fireplaces have an excellent safety record.  However, as in any situation where an open flame is involved, there are some things to keep in mind in order to avoid any risk of fire hazard. 

If the fireplace is installed on top of any combustible material, such as carpet or wood, it must rest on a metal or tile panel that extends the length and width of the appliance.

Any combustible flooring near the fuel opening must be insulated with non-combustible floor protection.

Room air-inlet and outlet grilles must be unobstructed.

The same fire-safety precautions that are used for a traditional fireplace should be observed when a factory-built fireplace is in use.

In order to ensure safe and optimal operation, normal maintenance and cleaning are required, similar to those used for a traditional fireplace.  The chimney should be inspected monthly during the heating season to determine if creosote (the black, oily accretion that builds up as a result of incomplete burning of wood) has accumulated.  A professional chimney sweep should be hired to clean out the unit at least once a year. 

Fireplace: Gas Fireplace No Hearth Requirement

Most modern gas-only fireplaces with fixed glass do not require a hearth extension. The manufacturers usually require a 36" clear space in front (no furniture, etc.). Now if this was a wood-burning fireplace that had a gas insert, the hearth extension would still be required. Once wood burning, always wood burning.

Fireplace: Vent-less Fireplace Info

Ventless fireplaces, more accurately known as duct-free fireplaces and room-venting fireplaces, are a type of residential gas-heating device.Ventless fireplace vent into hte living space  Ventless fireplaces are preferred because they burn at nearly 100% efficiency, release far less harmful gasses than most other portable heating alternatives, and their installation is restricted little by architectural constraints.

 

They are controversial, however.  Despite their name, they vent unburned combustion byproducts directly into the living space. Traditional fireplaces, by contrast, are equipped with a flue that vents to the outdoors, saving humans and their pets from exposure to the bulk of the carbon monoxide (CO) and airborne particulates created by the fire. As a less serious yet still important side note, ventless fireplaces create high levels of water vapor, which can lead to mold growth and a variety of other moisture-related building problems. Mold can be a serious health hazard for at-risk individuals, and it can damage fabric, photographs, books and building materials.

 

To mitigate CO dangers, manufacturers instruct customers to keep a window open while ventless fireplaces are in operation - advice that is easy to ignore, as an open window allows the entry of cold air, defeating the efforts of the fireplace to warm the living space. Many manufacturers also install an oxygen-detection sensor (ODS) in their ventless fireplaces that will automatically shut down the appliance if oxygen levels in the home become dangerously low. Critics point out that this sensor is typically located at the lower part of the unit near the floor, where it detects cool, fresh, oxygen-filled air and misses hot combustion gasses as they rise and pool toward the ceiling. And if the sensor fails, any CO-producing abnormality experienced by the fireplace will continue unnoticed and potentially harm building occupants.

Massachusetts, California, and a number of other states in the U.S., as well as Canada and other countries, have outlawed ventless gas fireplaces due to the aforementioned safety concerns. Many individual municipalities, too, have outlawed these appliances in states where they are otherwise legal. Advisements against the use of these appliances have been issued by various watchdog groups, such as the American Lung Association, the Centers for Disease Control, the Environmental Protection Agency, and even the Mayo Clinic. In particular, these organizations warn against exposure of individuals who are particularly vulnerable to CO, namely, the elderly, pregnant women, small children, those with pre-existing cardiovascular difficulties, and small pets. To be fair, though, there have been no documented cases of fatalities caused by ODS-equipped ventless fireplaces, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

 

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has banned the installation or use of ventless fireplaces in HUD housing.  The HUD Handbook (7485.2) states the following:

      (1)  Individual Gas or Oil Heaters.  Individual gas and

            oil heaters shall be connected to an approved vent,

            flue or chimney, and shall have adequate air supply

            for complete fuel combustion.  Heaters shall be

            protected to prevent unsafe human contact or fires

            and have clearances around them.  Floors beneath

            equipment shall be protected against fire and

            deterioration. Screening shall not minimize required

            ventilation to the space heater.  When provided new

            or replaced, individual controls or units shall not

            be positioned near the floor, especially in elderly

            projects or in units for the handicapped.

       (2)  Open Flame Heaters.  Open flame radiant space

            heaters shall not be used.

 

Ventless fireplaces can be inspected for the following safety defects:

  • a gas leak. During production, installation or servicing, a leak can be created;
  • plugged burner ports. The contractor may accidentally plug the burner ports while spreading ceramic tile over the burners, or they may be painted over at the factory. The resulting unbalanced burn will create excessive carbon monoxide;
  • a clogged burner. Dust, carpet lint and pet hair can gradually choke off the fireplaces air supply, leading to incomplete combustion and high amounts of CO that are vented into the living space;
  • high gas-input rate. Excessive CO ventilation or overheating of the unit will result from firing the gas higher than the input rate set by the manufacturers specifications. This can be caused by high gas-supply pressure, an incorrect orifice drill size done at the factory, or if the installer gives the customer's unit a larger flame for aesthetic reasons;
  • the fireplace is oversized for the square footage of the area to be heated.
  • a cracked burner. The gas burner may develop a crack over time and function erratically, producing high levels of CO;
  • the fireplace contains items other than the artificial logs designed for the unit. Problems caused by the incineration of firewood or other flammable items will be immediate and extreme. A more likely and less obvious hazard is created by adding pebbles, lava rocks, and other non-combustible aesthetic touches to the fireplace, as their exposure to flames will cause an unsafe rise in levels of CO; and
  • a missing or defective ODS. As these components may fail, it is advisable to install a CO detector near a ventless fireplace and, ideally, in other rooms, as well.

In summary, ventless fireplaces, while attractive and portable, suffer from a design flaw that may allow dangerous gases to enter the living space.

Fireplace: Fireplace and Stack Inspection Limitations

Not everything of the fireplace and chimney stack system and components are inspected because they are not part of the Home Inspection Standards of Practice. I inspected only what I am required to inspect and only what was visible during the home inspection. I recommend hiring a certified chimney sweep to inspect, sweep, and further evaluate the interior of the fireplace system immediately and every year as part of a homeowner's routine maintenance plan. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;
  2. lintels above the fireplace openings;
  3. damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and
  4. cleanout doors and frames.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of fireplace.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;
  2. manually operated dampers that did not open and close;
  3. the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;
  4. the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and
  5. cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

11 - Detached Garage

Garage Vehicle Door: Type of Door Operation
Opener
Gutters & Downspouts: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job is to monitor the gutters and be sure that they function during and after a rainstorm. Look for loose parts, sagging gutter ends, and water leaks. The rain water should be diverted far away from the house foundation. 

Gutters & Downspouts: Gutters Were Inspected

I inspected the gutters.  I wasn't able to inspect every inch of every gutter.  But I attempted to check the overall general condition of the gutters during the inspection and look for indications of major defects.  

Monitoring the gutters during a heavy rain (without lightening) is recommended.  In general, the gutters should catch rain water and direct the water towards downspouts that discharge the water away from the house foundation. 

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Eaves, Soffits and Fascia Were Inspected

I inspected the eaves, soffits and fascia.  I was not able to inspect every detail, since a home inspection is limited in its scope. 

Electric/GFCI Outside Garage: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible.

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Garage Floor: Garage Floor Inspected

I inspected the floor of the attached garage. 

Electric in the Garage: Garage Electrical Inspected

The garage electrical breaker, receptacles, and lighting were checked during the inspection.

Gutters & Downspouts: Difficult to Reach the Gutters

I was unable to closely reach and closely inspect the installation of all of the gutter components and systems.  

The inspector shall inspect:

  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls.


The inspector shall describe:

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener.


$
Credit
Comment
11.3.1 - Electric/GFCI Outside Garage

Electrical Defect

I observed indications of an electrical defect at the exterior. 

No power was found at the exterior GFCI Receptacle at the time of the inspection

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps

Stair Balusters Not Present

Taking into account the fact that this building is still in an unfinished state, the stairway up to the upper unit is lacking any balusters on the left side. This is a safety concern and should be remedied asap.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
11.7.1 - Garage Vehicle Door

Weather Stripping at Garage Door in Poor Condition

I observed indications that the weather stripping at the garage door is in poor condition. 

Garage Garage Door Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
11.7.2 - Garage Vehicle Door

Damage to Garage Door

I observed indications of damage to the garage door itself. 

Garage Garage Door Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
11.8.1 - Electric in the Garage

Loose Receptacles

Loose receptacles were found during the inspection. I recommend tightening them up flush with the wall before use.

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Doors: Doors Inspected

I inspected a representative number of doors according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate door locks and door stops, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 


Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate window locks and operation features, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Railings, Guards & Handrails Were Inspected

I inspected a representative number railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Carbon Monoxide Detectors

CO is slightly lighter than air. However, some studies have suggested there is no significant difference in measurements of carbon monoxide based on what height CO detectors are mounted. It is common for different manufacturers to recommend different mounting locations and heights, which makes it important for you to always follow the manufacturers recommendation.

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Inspected for Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

I inspected for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. 

There should be a smoke detector in every sleeping room, outside of every sleeping room, and one every level of a house. 

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Unable to Test Every Detector

I was unable to test every detector. We recommend testing all of the detectors.  Ask the seller about the performance of the detectors and of any issues regarding them.  We recommend replacing all of the detectors (smoke and carbon monoxide) with new ones just for peace of mind and for safety concerns.  

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; 
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 
  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. 

The inspector shall describe: 

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; 
  • photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and 
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. 

$
Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Doors

Door Sticks

The front door to the home sticks a bit and fits very tightly in the frame.

Wrenches Handyman

13 - Kitchen

Kitchen Sink: Ran Water at Kitchen Sink

I ran water at the kitchen sink. 

GFCI: GFCI Tested

I observed ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection in the kitchen. 

Countertops & Cabinets: Inspected Cabinets & Countertops

I inspected a representative number of cabinets and countertop surfaces. 

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

The kitchen appliances are not included in the scope of a home inspection according to the Standards of Practice. 

The inspector will out of courtesy only check:

  • the stove, 
  • oven, 
  • microwave, and 
  • garbage disposer.