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1234 Main St.
Overland Park, KANSAS 66207
12/15/2019 9:00AM

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Thank you for choosing KC Property Experts. Please take the time to read through your report. It is ultimately up to you to interpret its findings and to act accordingly.

Orientation

For the sake of this inspection the front of the home will be considered as the portion of the home with the front door. Anything stated "left" or "right" will be as if you were facing the front door.

KC Property Experts makes every effort to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the Standards of Practice of the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI). NACHI.ORG/SOP. As such, we inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of a home. While every effort is made to identify and report all current or potential issues with a home, please understand that there are simply areas that cannot be seen- such as within the wall structure, nor can we predict future conditions, or determine if latent or concealed defects are present.  An inspector is considered to be a "Generalist" in that the job is to identify and report potential issues rather than diagnose the specific cause or repair items.  For this reason, you will find that it is often recommended to seek further evaluation by a qualified professional such as an Electrical, Plumbing, or Roofing contractor. The statements made in this report reflect the conditions as existing at the time of Inspection only and expire at the completion of the inspection. Weather conditions and other changes in conditions may reveal problems that were not present at the time of inspection.

This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, REGARDING THE CONDITIONS OF THE PROPERTY, INCLUDING THE ITEMS AND SYSTEMS INSPECTED, AND IT SHOULD NOT BE RELIED ON AS SUCH. 

Notice to Third Parties: This report is the property of KC Property Experts and the Client named herein and is non-transferable to any and all third-parties or subsequent buyers. THE INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT SHALL NOT BE RELIED UPON BY ANY ONE OTHER THAN THE CLIENT NAMED HEREIN. This report is governed by an Inspection agreement that contained the scope of the inspection, including limitations and exclusions.

The report includes Informational data on various components of the home, Limitations that affected the ability to inspect certain items/areas, and Recommendations for items that require immediate or future attention.

Observations and Recommendations are organized into three categories. 

1) Minor/Maintenance Issues - : Primarily comprised of small cosmetic items and includes items or components that were found to be in need of routine or basic general maintenance to protect the life/functionality of the item or component. Also included in this section are items that were beginning to show signs of wear, but were still functional at the time of inspection.    

2) Recommendations Include items or components that were found to have a deficiency but were still functional at the time of inspection, although this functionality may be impaired or not ideal, repairs are recommended for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a Qualified Licensed Professional and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs.

3) Significant DefectsInclude items or components that were found to have significant defects.. These should be addressed immediately by a Qualified Licensed Professional  

This is meant to be an Honest, Impartial, Third-Party assessment.  Oftentimes, in the mind of a buyer, minor items are given too much weight and significant items are under-appreciated.  That being said, I would be more than happy to discuss anything in more detail.  Please reach out if you have any questions or need further explanation on anything identified in this report.

1 - Inspection Details

General: In Attendance
Inspector(s), Client, Buyers Agent
General: Occupancy
Vacant
General: Type of Building
Condominium / Townhouse
General: Weather Conditions
Partly Cloudy
General: Utilities
All Utilities On


General: Temperature (approximate)
40 Fahrenheit (F)

The outside temperature will impact various portions of the inspection. If its too cool, we will be unable to fully test the A/C. If too warm, same goes for the furnace. 

General: What Really Matters In An Inspection

Now that you've bought your property and had your inspection, you may still have some questions about your new house and the items revealed in your report. 

Property maintenance is a primary responsibility for every owner, whether you've lived in several properties of your own or have just purchased your first one. Staying on top of a seasonal property maintenance schedule is important, and your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector can help you figure this out so that you never fall behind. Don't let minor maintenance and routine repairs turn into expensive disasters later due to neglect or simply because you aren't sure what needs to be done and when. 

Your home inspection report is a great place to start. In addition to the written report, checklists, photos, and what the inspector said during the inspection not to mention the sellers disclosure and what you noticed yourself it's easy to become overwhelmed. However, it's likely that your inspection report included mostly maintenance recommendations, the life expectancy for the home's various systems and components, and minor imperfections. These are useful to know about. 

But the issues that really matter fall into four categories: 

  1. major defects, such as a structural failure; 
  2. things that can lead to major defects, such as a small leak due to a defective roof flashing; 
  3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home if not rectified immediately; and 
  4. safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel. 

Anything in these categories should be addressed as soon as possible. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4). 

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. It's important to realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in your inspection report. No house is perfect. Keep things in perspective as you move into your new home. 

And remember that homeownership is both a joyful experience and an important responsibility, so be sure to call on your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector to help you devise an annual maintenance plan that will keep your family safe and your home in good condition for years to come.

General: REASONABLE EXPECTATIONS REGARDING A PROFESSIONAL PROPERTY INSPECTION:

There may come a time when you discover something wrong with the property, and you may be upset or disappointed with your property inspection. There are some things we'd like you to keep in mind. 

Intermittent or concealed problems: Some problems can only be discovered by occupying in a property. They cannot be discovered during the few hours of a property inspection. For example, some shower stalls leak when people are in the shower, but do not leak when you simply turn on the tap. Some roofs and basements only leak when specific conditions exist. Some problems will only be discovered when carpets are lifted, furniture is moved or finishes are removed. 

No clues: These problems may have existed at the time of the inspection, but there were no clues as to their existence. Our inspections are based on the past performance of the property. If there are no clues of a past problem, it is unfair to assume we should foresee a future problem. 

We always miss some minor things: Some say we are inconsistent because our reports identify some minor problems but not others. The minor problems that are identified were discovered while looking for more significant problems. We note them simply as a courtesy. The intent of the inspection is not to find the $200 problems; it is to find the $1000 problems. These are the things that affect people's decisions to purchase. 

Contractor's advice: A common source of dissatisfaction with property inspectors comes from comments made by contractors. Contractors' opinions often differ from ours. Don't be surprised when three roofers all say the roof needs replacement, when we said that the roof would last a few more years with some minor repairs. 

"Last man in" theory: While our advice represents the most prudent thing to do, many contractors are reluctant to undertake these repairs. This is because of the "last man in" theory. The contractor fears that if he is the last person to work on the roof, he will get blamed if the roof leaks, regardless of whether or not the roof leak is his fault. Consequently, he won't want to do a minor repair with high liability, when he could re-roof the entire property for more money and reduce the likelihood of a callback. This is understandable. 

Most recent advice is best: There is more to the "last man in" theory. It suggests that it is human nature for owners to believe the last bit of expert advice they receive, even if it is contrary to previous advice. As property inspectors, we unfortunately find ourselves in the position of "first man in" and consequently it is our advice that is often disbelieved. Why didn't we see it?: Contractors may say, "I can't believe you had this property inspected, and they didn't find this problem." There are several reasons for these apparent oversights: Conditions during inspection: It is difficult for owners to remember the circumstances in the house at the time of the inspection. Owners seldom remember that it was snowing, there was storage everywhere or that the furnace could not be turned on because the air conditioning was operating, etc. It's impossible for contractors to know what the circumstances were when the inspection was performed. 

This wisdom of hindsight: When the problem manifests itself, it is very easy to have 20/20 hindsight. Anybody can say that the basement is wet when there is 2" of water on the floor. Predicting the problem is a different story. 

A long look; If we spent half an hour under the kitchen sink or 45 minutes disassembling the furnace, we'd find more problems, too. Unfortunately, the inspection would take several days and would cost considerably more. 

We're generalists: We are generalists; we are not specialists. The heating contractor may indeed have more heating expertise than we do. This is because we are expected to have heating expertise and plumbing expertise, structural expertise, electrical expertise, etc. 

An invasive look: Problems often become apparent when carpets or plaster are removed, when fixtures or cabinets are pulled out, and so on. A property inspection is a visual examination. We don't perform invasive or destructive tests. 

Not insurance: In conclusion, a property inspection is designed to better your odds. It is not designed to eliminate all risk. For that reason, a property inspection should not be considered an insurance policy. The premium that an insurance company would have to charge for a policy with no deductible, no limit and an indefinite policy period would be considerably more than the fee we charge. It would also not include the value added by the inspection.

Reprinted from ASHI Reporter, By Permission of Alan Carson, Carson Dunlop & Assoc.

General: Report

Inspector reserves the right to modify the Property Inspection Report for a period of time that shall not exceed forty eight (48) hours after the Property Inspection Report has first been delivered to Client. 

General: Idealistic Vs Realistic

Inspectors are looking for issues or situations where potential issues may arise in a property. Over time the building industry has developed new techniques and technologies to make properties better, safer and to last longer. As inspectors we want to provide you with the best information possible based on the most current understanding and knowledge available. 

Issues we call out in this inspection may reflect some of this knowledge. For example...

GFCI outlets did not exist in the 1950s, but we will document their absence during an inspection. GFCI outlets are a safety feature and it is recommended for them to be installed in the proper locations. 

Inspections are inherently idealistic and that sometimes causes confusion because there is what is realistic. What we mean by realistic is that not every home is constantly being updated at all times to keep current.  

As inspectors it is our goal to provide you with the latest information. We do not distinguish between todays standards versus what was acceptable at the time the home was built . We are happy to discuss issues noted in the report to help shed light on these types of issues or refer you to someone who can. 

We highly recommend reviewing the entire report before making any decisions and to do further due diligence (for example... contacting an electrician to discuss cost of installing GFCI outlets) and discussing with your real estate agent and/or trusted person(s).

General: Possible Asbestos and/or Lead Base Paint

Any home built prior to 1978 may contain lead base paint and any home may contain material that could contain asbestos. It is recommended that a qualified specialist be contacted to inspect and test for these items. Asbestos and lead base paint inspection services were not included as part of this home inspection. 

General: Inspection Report Is Not An Exhaustive List Of All Repairs

This is a visual only (non destructive) inspection. Issues noted in the report are a sampling of what was observed at the time of inspection. To obtain an exhaustive list of all issues, qualified professionals for each trade in regards to property construction, repair, etc will need to be contacted. 

General: Condo - Interior Only Inspection

This inspection does not include inspecting the roof, structure, common areas, common utilities or equipment. 

2 - Electrical

Service Entrance : Service Box (Meter Can) Capacity
Unknown
Service Entrance : Service/Main Disconnect Type
Pushmatic
Service Entrance : Service/Main Disconnect Location
Inside
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Basement
Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Romex
Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper, Aluminum
Service Entrance : Electrical Service Conductors
Below Ground
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Distribution Panel Capacity
125 Amp
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Type
Pushmatic
General: OWNERS RESPONSIBILITY

It's your job to know where the main electrical panel is located, including the main service disconnect that turns everything off. Be sure to test your GFCIs, AFCIs, and smoke detectors regularly. You can replace light bulbs, but more than that, you ought to hire an electrician. Electrical work is hazardous and mistakes can be fatal. Hire a professional whenever there's an electrical problem in your house.

Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Circuit Limitation

Home branch circuit wiring consists of wiring distributing electricity to devices such as switches, receptacles, and appliances. Most conductors are hidden behind floor, wall and ceiling coverings and cannot be evaluated by the inspector. The Inspector does not remove cover plates and inspection of branch wiring is limited to proper response to testing of switches and a representative number of electrical receptacles.

$
Credit
Comment
2.3.1 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Missing strain relief clamp or proper bushing

Electric shock / fire hazard 

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.2 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Double taps/lugging

Double-Tapping/Lugging is when there are two or more conductors terminating under one screw/lug that was only meant for one conductor. This can lead to arcing and overheating of the conductors. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.3 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Corrosion

Possible electric shock / fire hazard. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.4 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Pushmatic Panel

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Aluminum Branch Circuits

Aluminum wire appears to be installed on branch electrical circuits in the subject premises. These single strand, branch circuit aluminum wires were used widely in houses during the mid 1960s and 1970s. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, problems due to expansion can cause overheating at connections between the wire and devices (switches and outlets) or at splices, which has resulted in fires. For further information on aluminum wiring contact the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission via the Internet at http://www.cpsc.gov/ . It is recommended that the electrical system be evaluated by a licensed electrician.

Electric Electrical Contractor

3 - HVAC

Cooling Equipment: AC unit operated?
No
Cooling Equipment: Approximate age
9
Cooling Equipment: Size (Tons) Approximate
2
Cooling Equipment: Type of free-on
R-410A
Cooling Equipment: Configuration
Central
Cooling Equipment: Thermostat Location
Wall Mounted
Cooling Equipment: Average life expectancy is 12-15 years
Heating Equipment: Humidifier Present?
No
Heating Equipment: Location
Basement
Heating Equipment: Energy Source
Natural Gas
Heating Equipment: Approximate age
14
Heating Equipment: Effeciency
Conventional
Heating Equipment: Heating Method
Forced Air
Heating Equipment: Average life expectancy for high efficiency units is 15-20 years and conventional units is 18-25 years.
Heating Equipment: Thermostat Location
Wall Mounted
Cooling Equipment: Brand
Lennox
Cooling Equipment: Data Plate Photo(s)
Heating Equipment: Furnace operated?
Yes
Heating Equipment: Data Plate Photo(s)
General: OWNERS RESPONSIBILITY

Most HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. They consist of four components: controls, fuel supply, heating or cooling unit, and distribution system. The adequacy of heating and cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. It's your job to get the HVAC system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system as an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned.

Most air-conditioning systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. The adequacy of the cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. It's your job to get the air conditioning system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system as an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned.

General: Disclaimer

Inspection of home cooling systems typically includes visual examination of readily observable components for adequate condition, and system testing for proper operation using normal controls. Cooling system inspection will not be as comprehensive as that performed by a qualified heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system contractor. Report comments are limited to identification of common requirements and deficiencies. Observed indications that further evaluation is needed will result in referral to a qualified HVAC contractor.

Inspection of heating systems is limited to basic evaluation based on visual examination and operation using normal controls. Report comments are limited to identification of common requirements and deficiencies. Observed indications that further evaluation is needed will result in referral to a qualified heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) contractor.

Heating Equipment: Brand
Rheem
Ductwork: Disclaimer

A representative sample of the visible distribution components (duct work) were inspected. Full inspection of all  duct work is not possible in areas/rooms where there are finished walls, ceilings and floors. Video inspection of duct work is not part of a general home inspection and should be completed if desired by a qualified HVAC contractor who provides such inspections.

General: No carbon monoxide test perfromed

This is a visual only inspection of the furnace and other combustible gas components in the home. For further evaluation on carbon monoxide levels it is recommended to consult a qualified professional for further testing and evaluation. 

Cooling Equipment: No package units or window units are inspected (if present)
Cooling Equipment: Low Temperature

Operating the AC unit when then the temperature has been below 65 degrees Fahrenheit for the previous 24 hours may cause damage the unit and the unit will not be tested (unless the AC unit was already being used upon arrival of the inspection). If the previously mentioned stated conditions existed during the inspection, it is recommended that you consult your real estate about getting a cold weather addendum if they have not already done so. 

Heating Equipment: Humidifier not tested
Heating Equipment: Space heaters and non centralized heating units are not inspected (if present)
Heating Equipment: Heat exchanger and/or elements not visible or limited visibility
Ductwork: Duct Cleaning

I did not inspect the interior of the ducts. It is recommended to have the ducts cleaned on a regular basis. 

$
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Cooling Equipment

Clean and Service Unit(s)

Fire HVAC Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Cooling Equipment

Too cold to test

The A/C unit was not tested due to low outdoor temperature. Operating the unit when then the temperature has been below 65 degrees Fahrenheit for the previous 24 hours  may cause damage the unit. It is recommended that you consult your real estate about getting a cold weather addendum if they have not already done so.

$
Credit
Comment
3.2.3 - Cooling Equipment

Insulation Missing or Damaged

Missing or damaged insulation on refrigerant line can cause energy loss and condensation.
Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Heating Equipment

Possible Rust and/or cracks in the heat exchanger

Potential for carbon monoxide to enter home. Possible health/safety hazard. 

Fire HVAC Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Heating Equipment

Clean and service unit(s)

Fire HVAC Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Vents, Flues & Chimneys

Condensation - Flue Issue

Condensation stains can be evidence of a poorly functioning unit. 

Fire HVAC Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Ductwork

Corrosion/Rust

One or more areas of the duct work was at the time of inspection. Recommend a HVAC contractor evaluate and repair.

Fire HVAC Professional

4 - Interior Living Space

Air Quality: Odor
Normal
Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: CO Detector Present?
Yes
Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Smoke Detector Present?
Yes
HVAC Supply: HVAC Supply Vent Located In Each Room?
Yes
Thermal Images: Heating
Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Detectors Not Tested

We recommend testing all of the detectors.  Ask the seller about the performance of the detectors and of any issues regarding them.  We recommend replacing all of the detectors (smoke and carbon monoxide) with new ones just for peace of mind and for safety concerns.  

$
Credit
Comment
4.3.1 - Doors & Windows

Lock Damaged/Inoperable

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
4.6.1 - Ceilings

Water stain(s)

Recommend further evaluation by a qualified professional. Possible water damage to contents, finishes and or structure. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Bathrooms

Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected

I flushed all of the toilets. 

Heat Source in Bathroom: Heat Source in Bathroom Was Inspected

I inspected the heat source in the bathroom (register/baseboard). 

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers

I ran water at all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: GFCI-Protection Tested

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. 

$
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Sinks, Tubs & Showers

Active Water Leak

I observed indications of an active water leak. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.2 - Sinks, Tubs & Showers

Improper trap material

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.3 - Sinks, Tubs & Showers

Drain Stopper Inoperative

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.4 - Sinks, Tubs & Showers

Sealant Needed

Potential for water damage 

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.2.5 - Sinks, Tubs & Showers

Diverter Not Working As Intended

Nuisance 

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window

Window Only Exhaust

Window must be open to exhaust bathroom of humidity from shower. 

6 - Kitchen

General: General Appliance Operation

Note: Appliances are operated at the discretion of the Inspector

Sink: Water ran at sink?
Yes
Garbage Disposal: Garbage Disposal Operated?
Yes
Refrigerator: Refrigerator Present?
Yes
Dishwasher: Dishwasher Operated?
Yes
Range/Cooktop/Oven: Range/Cooktop/Oven Operated?
Yes
Built-in Microwave: Microwave Operated
Yes
Exhaust Fan: Exhaust System Operated?
Yes
GFCI: GFCI Tested

I observed ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection in the kitchen. 

Refrigerator: Refrigerator Was On

I checked to see if the refrigerator was on. It was. That's all I inspected in relation to a refrigerator. Refrigerators are beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate window locks and operation features, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

$
Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - Range/Cooktop/Oven

Range not fastened

No anti-tip bracket installed.  Safety hazard.

Tools Handyman/DIY

7 - Laundry

Clothes Washer: Washer Hookups Present?
Yes
Clothes Dryer: Dryer Hookups Present?
Yes
Clothes Washer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. 

Clothes Dryer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires.