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1234 Main St.
Knoxville, Tennessee 37922
08/20/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
18
Minor defect
8
Major defect
2
Material defect

www.ncis-tn.com

1 - Inspection Detail

General Inspection Info: Occupancy
Occupied
General Inspection Info: Weather Conditions
Sunny, Hot
General Inspection Info: Type of Building
Detached, Single Family
General Inspection Info: In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent

I prefer to have my client with me during my inspection so that we can discuss concerns, and I can answer all questions. 

Your Job As a Homeowner: What Really Matters in a Home Inspection

Now that you've bought your home and had your inspection, you may still have some questions about your new house and the items revealed in your report. 

Home maintenance is a primary responsibility for every homeowner, whether you've lived in several homes of your own or have just purchased your first one. Staying on top of a seasonal home maintenance schedule is important, and your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector can help you figure this out so that you never fall behind. Don't let minor maintenance and routine repairs turn into expensive disasters later due to neglect or simply because you aren't sure what needs to be done and when. 

Your home inspection report is a great place to start. In addition to the written report, checklists, photos, and what the inspector said during the inspection not to mention the sellers disclosure and what you noticed yourself it's easy to become overwhelmed. However, it's likely that your inspection report included mostly maintenance recommendations, the life expectancy for the home's various systems and components, and minor imperfections. These are useful to know about. 

But the issues that really matter fall into four categories: 

  1. major defects, such as a structural failure; 
  2. things that can lead to major defects, such as a small leak due to a defective roof flashing; 
  3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home if not rectified immediately; and 
  4. safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel. 

Anything in these categories should be addressed as soon as possible. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4). 

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. It's important to realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in your inspection report. No house is perfect. Keep things in perspective as you move into your new home. 

And remember that homeownership is both a joyful experience and an important responsibility, so be sure to call on your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector to help you devise an annual maintenance plan that will keep your family safe and your home in good condition for years to come.




Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice while reading this inspection report.  I performed the home inspection according to the standards and my clients wishes and expectations.  Please refer to the inspection contract or agreement between the inspector and the inspector's client.  

2 - Roof

Roof Covering: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job as the homeowner is to monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak. To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters.

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant. Roofs are not designed to be waterproof. Eventually, the roof system will leak. No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 

Every roof should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.


Roof Covering: Type of Roof-Covering Described
Asphalt

I observed the roof-covering material and attempted to identify its type.  

This inspection is not a guarantee that a roof leak in the future will not happen. Roofs leak.  Even a roof that appears to be in good, functional condition will leak under certain circumstances. We will not take responsibility for a roof leak that happens in the future.  This is not a warranty or guarantee of the roof system.

Roof Covering: Roof Was Inspected
Roof

We attempted to inspect the roof from various locations and methods, including from the ground and a ladder. 

The inspection was not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes.  It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection.  We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roof, and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy.  

Flashing: Wall Intersections

I looked for flashing where the roof covering meets a wall or siding material.  There should be step and counter flashing installed in these locations.  This is not an exhaustive inspection of all flashing areas.

Flashing: Eaves and Gables

I looked for flashing installed at the eaves (near the gutter edge) and at the gables (the diagonal edge of the roof).  There should be metal drip flashing material installed in these locations.  The flashing helps the surface water on the roof to discharge into the gutter.  Flashing also helps to prevent water intrusion under the roof-covering. 

Plumbing Vent Pipes: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job is to monitor the flashing around the plumbing vent pipes that pass through the roof surface.  Sometimes they deteriorate and cause a roof leak.  

Be sure that the plumbing vent pipes do not get covered, either by debris, a toy, or snow.

Plumbing Vent Pipes: Plumbing Vent Pipes Inspected

I looked at DWV (drain, waste and vent) pipes that pass through the roof covering.  There should be watertight flashing (often black rubber material) installed around the vent pipes.  These plumbing vent pipes should extend far enough above the roof surface.    

Gutters & Downspouts: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job is to monitor the gutters and be sure that they function during and after a rainstorm. Look for loose parts, sagging gutter ends, and water leaks. The rain water should be diverted far away from the house foundation. 

Gutters & Downspouts: Gutters Were Inspected

I inspected the gutters.  I wasn't able to inspect every inch of every gutter.  But I attempted to check the overall general condition of the gutters during the inspection and look for indications of major defects.  

Monitoring the gutters during a heavy rain (without lightening) is recommended.  In general, the gutters should catch rain water and direct the water towards downspouts that discharge the water away from the house foundation. 

Roof Covering: Unable to See Everything

This is a visual-only inspection of the roof-covering materials. It does not include an inspection of the entire system. There are components of the roof that are not visible or accessible at all, including the underlayment, decking, fastening, flashing, age, shingle quality, manufacturer installation recommendations, etc. 

Flashing: Difficult to See Every Flashing

I attempted to inspect the flashing related to the vent pipes, wall intersections, eaves and gables, and the roof-covering materials.  In general, there should be flashing installed in certain areas where the roof covering meets something else, like a vent pipe or siding.  Most flashing is not observable, because the flashing material itself is covered and hidden by the roof covering or other materials.  So, it's impossible to see everything.  A home inspection is a limited visual-only inspection.  

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice related to inspecting the roof of the house.  

Monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak.  To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters. 

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant.  Roofs are not designed to be waterproof.  Eventually, the roof system will leak.  No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 


I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves:

  1. the roof-covering materials;
  2. the gutters;
  3. the downspouts;
  4. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and 
  5. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of roof-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. observed indications of active roof leaks.

Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Flashing

Missing Flashing

I observed areas where flashing was missing.  These areas of missing flashing are prone to water penetration.  Flashing is installed to provide protection against roof leaks and to divert water away from certain areas.  No damage was observed. 

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Gutters & Downspouts

Gutter Guards

Gutter guards were old and brittle.  They were made of vinyl.  Gutter guards are not required but can reduce the frequency of gutter cleaning.

Contractor Qualified Professional

3 - Exterior

Walkways & Driveways: Walkways & Driveways Were Inspected

I inspected the walkways and driveway. 

Windows: Windows Inspected

A representative number of windows from the ground surface was inspected. 

Exterior Doors: Exterior Doors Inspected

I inspected the exterior doors. 

General: Homeowner's Responsibility

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging. The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it. Your job is to monitor the buildings exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

During a heavy rainstorm (without lightning), grab an umbrella and go outside. Walk around your house and look around at the roof and property. A rainstorm is the perfect time to see how the roof, downspouts and grading are performing. Observe the drainage patterns of your entire property, as well as the property of your neighbor. The ground around your house should slope away from all sides. Downspouts, surface gutters and drains should be directing water away from the foundation. 



General: Exterior Was Inspected

I inspected the exterior of the house.  It was observed on the day of the inspection that window and door trim was overdue for maintenance.

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Eaves, Soffits and Fascia Were Inspected

I inspected the eaves, soffits and fascia.  I was not able to inspect every detail, since a home inspection is limited in its scope. 

Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim: Type of Wall-Covering Material Described
Brick, Engineered Wood

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging.  The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it.  Your job is to monitor the house's exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior wall-covering materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading: Vegetation, Drainage, Walls & Grading Were Inspected

I inspected the vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.

GFCIs & Electrical: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible.

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports: Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports Were Inspected

I inspected the porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports at the house that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Railings, Guards & Handrails Were Inspected

I inspected the railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Inspection Was Restricted

I did not inspect all of the eaves, soffit, and facia.  It's impossible to inspect those areas closely during a home inspection.  A home inspection is not an exhaustive evaluation.  My inspection of the exterior was limited.  I did not reach and access closely every part of the eaves, soffit, and fascia.

Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim: Inspection Was Restricted

I did not inspect all of the exterior wall-covering material.  A home inspection is not an exhaustive evaluation.  My inspection of the exterior was limited.  I did not reach and access closely every part of the exterior wall-covering. 

GFCIs & Electrical: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the GFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

Windows: Inspection Restricted

I did not inspect all windows. I did inspect a representative number of them. It's impossible to inspect every window component closely during a home inspection. A home inspection is not an exhaustive evaluation. I did not reach and access closely every window, particularly those above the first floor level. 

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice related to inspecting the exterior of the house. 


I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the exterior wall-covering materials; 
  2. the eaves, soffits and fascia;
  3. a representative number of windows;
  4. all exterior doors;
  5. flashing and trim;
  6. adjacent walkways and driveways;
  7. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
  8. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
  9. railings, guards and handrails; and 
  10. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of exterior wall-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails.

Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim

Damaged Wall-Covering Material

I observed indications of localized rot at the exterior wall-covering material.

Correction and further evaluation is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim

Loose Wall-Covering Material

I observed indications of loose areas of the exterior wall trim.

Correction and further evaluation is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading

Negative Grading

Grading is sloping towards the home or flat in some areas. This could lead to water intrusion and foundation issues.

The ground around a house should slope away from all sides, ideally at least 6 inches for the first 10 feet from the house foundation perimeter. Downspouts, surface gutters and drains should also be directing water away from the foundation. 

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.4.2 - Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading

Fence Defect

I observed that the condition of the fence in many areas is poor.  Routine maintenance and repairs are overdue.

Fence Fence Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.8.1 - Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports

Worn Out Surfaces

I observed indications of worn out surfaces at the deck. Maintenance is due.  

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
3.10.1 - Windows

Wood Rot at Window
Multiple

I observed indications of wood rot at windows over the garage.

Correction and further evaluation is recommended.  All first and second story windows should get overdue maintenance by a qualified contractor.  Most windows could not be inspected because the windows don't open.  There may be more windows that have rotten trim.  

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
3.12.1 - Exhaust Hoods

Clogged Dryer Exhaust Hood

I observed an exhaust hood that seemed to be connected to the clothes dryer, and it was clogged and warped.  Fire hazard.  

Wash Appliance Repair

4 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

Under-Floor Crawlspace: Type of Under-Floor Crawlspace Foundation Described
Masonry Block
Under-Floor Crawlspace: Under-Floor Crawl Access Location
Exterior
Basement: Homeowner's Responsibility

One of the most common problems in a house is a wet basement or foundation. You should monitor the walls and floors for signs of water penetration, such as dampness, water stains, peeling paint, efflorescence, and rust on exposed metal parts. In a finished basement, look for rotted or warped wood paneling and doors, loose floor tiles, and mildew stains. It may come through the walls or cracks in the floor, or from backed-up floor drains, leaky plumbing lines, or a clogged air-conditioner condensate line. 

Basement: Type of Basement Foundation Described
Masonry Block

 The foundation included an unfinished basement. There was a dehumidifier running. There were no visible signs of moisture intrusion or structural problems on the day of the inspection. 

Basement: Foundation Was Inspected

The foundation was inspected according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Basement: Structural Components Were Inspected

Structural components were inspected according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice, including readily observed floor joists. 

Under-Floor Crawlspace: Homeowner's Responsibility

One of the most common problems in a house with a crawlspace is water intrusion, condensation, and excessively high humidity levels. You should monitor the walls and floors for signs of water penetration, such as dampness, water stains, efflorescence, and rust on exposed metal parts. Water may come through the walls or cracks in the floor, or from backed-up floor drains, leaky plumbing lines, or a clogged air-conditioner condensate line. 

Basement: Personal Storage Restriction

Personal items limited my visual inspection. Moving personal items and storage is not required by the Standards of Practice. I could not see everything. Many things were blocking my inspection. 

Under-Floor Crawlspace: Totally Inaccessible

The crawlspace was inaccessible. This is an inspection restriction. I don't know what's going on inside the crawlspace, because I could not enter it. Access needs to be provided in order to inspect and evaluate the crawlspace condition.  Acess is under the rear deck, which has been enclosed with lattice.  The inspector can return to inspect the crawl space (for a small fee) if access to the area is created.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the foundation;
  • the basement;
  • the crawlspace; and
  • structural components.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of foundation; and
  • the location of the access to the under-floor space.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil;
  • observed indications of active water penetration;
  • observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and
  • any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern.

5 - Heating

Heating System Information: Energy Source
Gas
Heating System Information: Heating Method
Warm-Air Heating System
Heating System Information: Homeowner's Responsibility

Most HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. They consist of four components: controls, fuel supply, heating or cooling unit, and distribution system. The adequacy of heating and cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

It's your job to get the HVAC system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system as an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned. 

Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Multiple thermostats

The thermostat for downstairs was in the main hallway and the thermostat for upstairs was in the upstairs hallway.

Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Emergency Shut-Off Switch Inspected

I observed an emergency shut-off switch. I inspected it. It worked when I used it during my inspection.

Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Service Switch Inspected

I observed a service switch. I inspected it. It worked when I used it during my inspection. 

Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Performance

The HVAC system performed well in both heating and cooling modes.  temperature at the registers was well within standards, indicating good duct performance.

Ductwork: Ductwork Installed
Insulated

I observed ductwork in the house.  Warm-air heating systems, including heat pump systems, use ductwork to distribute the warm air throughout the house. I will attempt to determine if the each room has a heat source, but I may not be able to find every duct register.  

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the heating system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the heating system;
  2. the energy source; and
  3. the heating method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any heating system that did not operate; and
  2. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible.

Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Heating System Information

Old System

I observed during my inspection that the systems for both the main floor ( located in basement) and the upstairs rooms ( located in attic)  appeared to be 25 year old and at the end of the expected service life.  They may not be reliable. 


The furnaces were both working well on the day of the Inspection.   Regular maintenance and monitoring of the condition is recommended. Budgeting for repairs and future replacement is recommended. InterNACHI's Standard Estimate Life Expectancy Chart for Homes

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Ductwork

Combustion vent clearance

A combustion vent in the attic did not have proper clearance from combustible material.  Asphalt shingles and tar paper should be trimmed away from the hot metal exhaust pipe per manufacturer instructions and building codes.  1" minimum distance from metal flue to the shingles. (DIY 5 minute fix with utility knife/razor)

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - Ductwork

Ducts Not Sealed

Some ducts were attached with duct tape instead of HVAC tape (foil tape) and they were loose.  Duct tape is a poor tape for attics and crawl spaces because of heat and humidity.  The inspector recommends retaping the loose joints with HVAC tape.

Wrench DIY

6 - Cooling

Cooling System Information: Service Disconnect Inspected

I observed a service disconnect within sight of the cooling system. 

Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Multiple thermostats
Performance: Performance

Cooling System Performance was good.  

Cooling System Information: Homeowner's Responsibility

Most air-conditioning systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. The adequacy of the cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

It's your job to get the air conditioning system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system as an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned. 

Condensate: Condensate Discharge Confirmed

I observed a discharge pipe apparently connected to the condensate pump installed at the cooling system. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the cooling system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and
  2. the cooling method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any cooling system that did not operate; and
  2. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.


Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Cooling System Information

Old System

I observed during my inspection that the system for the main floor appeared to be 25 years old and at the end of its service life. It may not be reliable.  


It was working well on the day of the inspection. 


Regular maintenance and monitoring of its condition is recommended. Budgeting for repairs and future replacement is recommended. InterNACHI's Standard Estimate Life Expectancy Chart for Homes

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Condensate

Condensate Discharge Should Be Extended

The condensate discharge pipes next to the wall should be extended so that the water is diverted far enough away from the house foundation. 

Tools Handyman/DIY

7 - Plumbing

Hot Water Source: Inspected Venting Connections

I inspected the venting connections. 

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Location of Main Shut-Off Valve
Basement
Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Homeowner's Responsibility

It's your job to know where the main water and fuel shutoff valves are located. And be sure to keep an eye out for any water and plumbing leaks. 

Water Supply : Water Supply Is Public

The water supply to the house appeared to be from the public water supply source based upon the observed indications at the time of the inspection.  To confirm and be certain, I recommend asking the homeowner for details. 

Hot Water Source: Type of Hot Water Source
Gas-Fired Hot Water Tank

I inspected for the main source of the distributed hot water to the plumbing fixtures (sinks, tubs, showers).  I recommend asking the homeowner for details about the hot water equipment and past performance. 

Hot Water Source: Inspected Hot Water Source

I inspected the hot water source and equipment according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Inspected Drain, Waste, Vent Pipes

I attempted to inspect the drain, waste, and vent pipes.  Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about water and sewer leaks or blockages in the past.  

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Inspected Water Supply & Distribution Pipes

I attempted to inspect the water supply and distribution pipes (plumbing pipes). Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed. Inspection restriction. Ask the homeowner about water supply, problems with water supply, and water leaks in the past.  

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the drainage pipes were hidden within the walls.  

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the water supply pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the water distribution pipes, valves and connections were hidden within the walls.  

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the main water supply shut-off valve;
  2. the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  3. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  4. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  5. all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  6. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  7. the drain, waste and vent system; and
  8. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  2. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  3. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  4. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
  5. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  2. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  3. active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; and  
  4. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate.


Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Hot Water Source

Old System

I observed during my inspection that the system appeared to be old and at the end of its service life. It may not be reliable. Ask the homeowner or occupant about its recent performance. Regular maintenance and monitoring of its condition is recommended. Budgeting for repairs and future replacement is recommended. InterNACHI's Standard Estimate Life Expectancy Chart for Homes

Mag glass Monitor

8 - Electrical

Electric Meter & Base: Inspected the Electric Meter & Base

I inspected the electrical electric meter and base. 

Electrical Wiring: Type of Wiring, If Visible
NM-B (Romex)
Service-Entrance Conductors: Inspected Service-Entrance Conductors

I inspected the electrical service-entrance conductors. 

Main Service Disconnect: Inspected Main Service Disconnect

I inspected the electrical main service disconnect.

Service Grounding & Bonding: Inspected the Service Grounding & Bonding

I inspected the electrical service grounding and bonding.

Main Service Disconnect: Homeowner's Responsibility

It's your job to know where the main electrical panel is located, including the main service disconnect that turns everything off. 

Be sure to test your GFCIs, AFCIs, and smoke detectors regularly. You can replace light bulbs, but more than that, you ought to hire an electrician. Electrical work is hazardous and mistakes can be fatal. Hire a professional whenever there's an electrical problem in your house. 

Main Service Disconnect: Main Disconnect Rating, If Labeled
200

I observed indications of the main service disconnect's amperage rating. It was labeled. 

Panelboards & Breakers: Inspected Main Panelboard & Breakers

I inspected the electrical  service panel and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses). 

GFCIs: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible.

Electrical Wiring: Unable to Inspect All of the Wiring

I was unable to inspect all of the electrical wiring. Obviously, most of the wiring is hidden from view within walls. Beyond the scope of a visual home inspection. 

Panelboards & Breakers: Inadequate Workspace at Panelboard

I observed inadequate workspace at the panelboard. 

A clear working space for accessing all of the electrical equipment is needed. A clear space that is 3 feet deep, 30 inches wide, and 6' 6" in height should be provided in front of the equipment.

This service panel is located in the corner of the basement with no room on the right side. 

Service Grounding & Bonding: Unable to Confirm Proper Grounding and Bonding

I was unable to confirm proper installation of the system grounding and bonding according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the grounding and bonding as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice. 

GFCIs: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the GFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the service drop;
  2. the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  3. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  4. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  5. the electric meter and base;
  6. service-entrance conductors;
  7. the main service disconnect;
  8. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  9. service grounding and bonding;
  10. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  11. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  12. for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  2. the type of wiring observed.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  2. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  3. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  4. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and
  5. the absence of smoke and/or carbon monoxide detectors. 


Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - Panelboards & Breakers

Labels missing

One breaker was not labeled.  The service panel should contain a clearly marked label identifying each individual circuit so that in an emergency individual circuits can be quickly shut off. The inspector recommends that the top tight breaker be identified by a qualified electrical contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.8.1 - Electrical Defects

Loose outlets

Many electrical receptacles at various areas in the home were improperly secured and moved when plugs were inserted. Receptacles should be securely installed to prevent fire, shock and/or electrocution hazard. Loose outlets should be corrected by a qualified electrical contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor

9 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

Insulation in Attic: Type of Insulation Observed
Fiberglass
Mechanical Exhaust System: Mechanical Exhaust in Kitchen Inspected

I inspected the mechanical exhaust system in the kitchen. 

Mechanical Exhaust System: Mechanical Exhaust in Bathrooms Inspected

I inspected the mechanical exhaust system in the bathrooms. 

Structural Components & Observations in Attic: Structural Components Were Inspected

Structural components were inspected from the attic space according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Insulation in Attic: Insulation Was Inspected

During the home inspection, I inspected for insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas.  I inspected for ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas.  And I inspected mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.

I attempted to describe the type of insulation observed and the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure.

I reported as in need of correction the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces.


Insulation in Attic: Approximate Average Depth of Insulation
6-9 inches

Determining how much insulation should be installed in a house depends upon where a home is located. The amount of insulation that should be installed at a particular area of a house is dependent upon which climate zone the house is located and the local building codes.  

Ventilation in Attic: Ventilation Inspected

During the home inspection, I inspected for ventilation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas. And I inspected for mechanical exhaust systems. 

I report as in need of correction the general absence of ventilation in unfinished spaces.

Structural Components & Observations in Attic: Could Not See Everything in Attic

I could not see and inspect everything in the attic space. The access is restricted and my inspection is limited. 

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; 
  • ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and 
  • mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. 

The inspector shall describe: 

  • the type of insulation observed; and 
  • the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. 

Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Insulation in Attic

Additional Insulation Recommended

I recommend air sealing and adding insulation to the areas that need more insulation. There were several bare areas in the attic floor, and although the amount of insulation is normal for the time that the house was built in the mid 90’s (R-20), the overall thickness is much less than current standards(R-38 or more recommended by DOE).

House construction Insulation Contractor

10 - Bathrooms

Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected

I flushed all of the toilets. 

Hydromassage Bathtub: Tub Filled and Turned On

I filled the tub and turned on the bubbles. 

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers

I ran water and inspected all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: GFCI-Protection Tested

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. 

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing; and 
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.

Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - Bathroom Toilets

Defect at Flushing Mechanism

I observed indications of a defect at the flushing mechanism in the toilet tank. Replacement of the flush valve is recommended ($20)

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

11 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

Doors: Doors Inspected

I inspected all doors according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them, operated door locks , hinges, and checked overall condition. 


Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them, checking window locks and operation features.  

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Railings, Guards & Handrails Were Inspected

I inspected a representative number railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Inspected for Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

I inspected for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. 

There should be a smoke detector in every sleeping room, outside of every sleeping room, and one every level of a house. 

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Unable to Test Every Detector

I was unable to test every detector. We recommend testing all of the detectors.  Ask the seller about the performance of the detectors and of any issues regarding them.  We recommend replacing all of the detectors (smoke and carbon monoxide) with new ones just for peace of mind and for safety concerns.  

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; 
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 
  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. 

The inspector shall describe: 

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; 
  • photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and 
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. 

Credit
Comment
11.1.1 - Doors

Garage Door

Garage door auto-reverse failed on both doors.  Adjustment recommended to fix this safety feature.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
11.2.1 - Windows

Fogged / Broken Seal
Basement entry door

I observed a fogged window and broken seal that caused condensation between the window panes. 

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.2.2 - Windows

Missing Window Screen
Many windows

I observed missing window screens at many windows.  Consider installing screens to keep pests out if you like to open windows during good weather.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.2.3 - Windows

Window Would Not Open

I observed that most of the windows would not open with more-than-reasonable force applied.  All windows should be serviced so that they can be used as designed.  Windows appear to be original to the house. 

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.7.1 - Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

Old Detectors, New Detectors Recommended

I observed indications of old smoke detectors in the house. Detectors should be replaced every 5-10 years. The should be hard-wired with electricity and have a battery backup feature in case the electricity turns off. New smoke detectors are recommended. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Chimney, Fireplace, or Stove

Masonry Chimney: Masonry Chimney Exterior Was Inspected

The chimney exterior was inspected during my home inspection.

Fireplace: Type of Fireplace
Masonry

I tried to describe the type of fireplace. 

Fireplace: Lintel

I observed the lintel above the fireplace opening. 

Masonry Chimney: Masonry Chimney Flashing Was Inspected

I inspected for flashing installed at the chimney. 

Flashing is installed in areas where the chimney stack meets another system or component of the house.  And the flashing is supposed to divert water away from those areas to prevent water intrusion.

Fireplace: Damper Door

I inspected the fireplace damper doors by opening and closing them, if they were readily accessible and manually operable.  It works great.  seems barely used, almost new condition.

Masonry Chimney: Chimney Interior is Beyond the Scope

Inspecting the chimney interior and flue is beyond the scope of a home inspection.  An inspector is not required to inspect the flue or vent system, and is not required to inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.  Out of courtesy only, the inspector may take a look at readily accessible and visible parts of the chimney flue.  

Fireplace: Fireplace and Stack Inspection Limitations

Not everything of the fireplace and chimney stack system and components are inspected because they are not part of the Home Inspection Standards of Practice. I inspected only what  was visible during the home inspection.  I recommend hiring a certified chimney sweep to inspect, sweep, and further evaluate the interior of the fireplace system immediately and every year as part of a homeowner's routine maintenance plan. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;
  2. lintels above the fireplace openings;
  3. damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and
  4. cleanout doors and frames.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of fireplace.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;
  2. manually operated dampers that did not open and close;
  3. the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;
  4. the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and
  5. cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Masonry Chimney

Chimney Flashing Defect

I observed a defect at the chimney flashing. Sealant was old and cracked or loose and is prone to water leaking at this area.  Water stains were found in the wood sheathing around the chimney.  The inspector recommends that flashing around the chimney be further analysed and repaired by a roofing contractor.

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.1.2 - Masonry Chimney

Crowned Cap Was Damaged


I observed indications of damage at the chimney wash or crowned cap. This is the top of the chimney that is shaped or "crowned" to divert water away from the top of the chimney stack. 

If a wash or crown on top of the chimney is not properly sloped or is extensively cracked, defective, spalled, or displays rust stains, it should be repaired or replaced.  This crown has minor cracks which can simply be sealed to keep water out.  This is a routine maintenance task that should be done every 3-6 years as needed.

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor

13 - Laundry

Clothes Washer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. 

Clothes Dryer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. 

The inspector shall inspect:

  • mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.


14 - Kitchen

Countertops & Cabinets: Inspected Cabinets and Countertops

I inspected cabinets and countertop surfaces. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Turned On Stove & Oven

I turned on the kitchen's stove and oven. 

Kitchen Sink: Kitchen Sink

The kitchen sink was inspected, including faucet hardware and supply and drain plumbing. 

GFCI: GFCI Tested

I observed ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection in the kitchen. 

Refrigerator: Refrigerator Was On

I checked to see if the refrigerator was on. It was. That's all I inspected in relation to a refrigerator. Refrigerators are beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Built-in Microwave: Microwave Turned On

I checked the microwave to make sure it was working and that there were no EMF leaks.

Dishwasher: Inspected Dishwasher

I inspected the dishwasher by turning it on and letting it run a short cycle. 

Garbage Disposal: Turned On Garbage Disposal

I turned on the garbage disposal.  It is a standard 1/2 hp builder grade basic unit.

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

The kitchen appliances are not included in the scope of a home inspection according to the Standards of Practice. 

The inspector will out of courtesy only check:

  • the stove, 
  • oven, 
  • microwave, and 
  • garbage disposer. 

Credit
Comment
14.1.1 - Kitchen Sink

Defect at the Kitchen Sink

I observed indications of a defect at the kitchen sink. Water leaks from the Fossett handle base. Adjustment or possibly a new washer is needed.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
14.2.1 - GFCI

GFCI Wouldn't Reset

The GFCI  on the right side of the kitchen sink would not reset easily.  It seems to be mostly worn out or clogged.  The inspector recommends replacement of this GFCI outlet. 

Electric Electrical Contractor