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1234 Main St.
Fall Branch Tennessee 37656
12/14/2018 9:00AM

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1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Inspector, Client(s)
Occupancy
Vacant
Type of Building
Single Family, Detached
Construction Year (From Online Sources)
1974
Weather Conditions
Clear
Temperature at the Time of Inspection
80-90 Degrees
Precipitation in the Last 48 hrs?
No
Ground Condition
Dry
Orientation

For the sake of this inspection the front of the home will be considered as the portion pictured in the cover photo. References to the left of right of the home should be construed as standing in the front yard, viewing the front of the home. 

Overview

Professional Home Inspections strives to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the Standards of Practice as set forth by the State of Tennessee (http://www.prohitn.com/documents/). As such, I inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of the home as designated in these Standards of Practice. When systems or components designated in the Standards of Practice were present but were not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected will be stated. This inspection is neither technically exhaustive or quantitative.

This report contains observations of those systems and components that, in my professional judgement, were not functioning properly, significantly deficient, or unsafe. All items in this report that were designated for repair, replacement, maintenance, or further evaluation should be investigated by qualified tradespeople within the clients contingency period or prior to closing, which is contract applicable, to determine a total cost of said repairs and to learn of any additional problems that may be present during these evaluations that were not visible during a "visual only" Home Inspection. 

This inspection will not reveal every concern or issue that may be present, but only those significant defects that were visible at the time of inspection. This inspection can not predict future conditions, or determine if latent or concealed defects are present. The statements made in this report reflect the conditions as existing at the time of Inspection only, and expire at the completion of the inspection. Weather conditions and other changes in conditions may reveal problems that were not present at the time of inspection; including roof leaks, or water infiltration into crawl spaces or basements. This report is only supplemental to the Sellers Disclosure and Pest (WDI) Inspection Report. Refer to the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice (linked to above), and the Inspection agreement regarding the scope and limitations of this inspection.

This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, REGARDING THE CONDITIONS OF THE PROPERTY, INCLUDING THE ITEMS AND SYSTEMS INSPECTED, AND IT SHOULD NOT BE RELIED ON AS SUCH. This inspection report should be used alongside the sellers disclosure, pest inspection (WDI) report, and quotes and advice from the tradespeople recommended in this report to gain a better understanding of the condition of the home. Some risk is always involved when purchasing a property and unexpected repairs should be anticipated, as this is unfortunately, a part of home ownership. One Year Home Warranties are sometimes provided by the sellers, and are highly recommended as they will cover future repairs on major items and components of the home. If a warranty is not being provided by the seller(s), your Realtor can advise you of companies who offer them. 

Notice to Third Parties

Notice to Third Parties: This report is the property of Professional Home Inspections and is Copyrighted as of 2018. The Client(s) and their Direct Real Estate Representative named herein have been named as licensee(s) of this document. This document is non-transferrable, in whole or in part, to any and all third-parties, including; subsequent buyers, sellers, and listing agents. Copying and pasting deficiencies to prepare the repair request is permitted. THE INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT SHALL NOT BE RELIED UPON BY ANY ONE OTHER THAN THE CLIENT NAMED HEREIN. This report is governed by an Inspection agreement that contained the scope of the inspection, including limitations, exclusions, and conditions of the copyright. Unauthorized recipients are advised to contact a qualified Home Inspector of their choosing to provide them with their own Inspection and Report.  

Items Not Inspected and Other Limitations

ITEMS NOT INSPECTED - There are items that are not inspected in a home inspection such as, but not limited to; fences and gates, pools and spas, outbuildings or any other detached structure, refrigerators, washers / dryers, storm doors and storm windows, screens, window AC units, central vacuum systems, water softeners, alarm and intercom systems, and any item that is not a permanent attached component of the home. Also drop ceiling tiles are not removed, as they are easily damaged, and this is a non-invasive inspection. Subterranean systems are also excluded, such as but not limited to: sewer lines, septic tanks, water delivery systems, and underground fuel storage tanks. 

Water and gas shut off valves are not operated under any circumstances. As well, any component or appliance that is unplugged or "shut off" is not turned on or connected for the sake of evaluation. I don't have knowledge of why a component may be shut down, and can't be liable for damages that may result from activating said components / appliances. 

Also not reported on are the causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; Any component or system that was not observed; Calculate the strength, adequacy, design or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility. 

Lastly a home inspection does not address environmental concerns such as, but not limited to: Asbestos, lead, lead based paint, radon, mold, wood destroying organisms (termites, etc), cockroaches, rodents, pesticides, fungus, treated lumber, Chinese drywall, mercury, or carbon monoxide.

Recommended Contractors Information

CONTRACTORS / FURTHER EVALUATION: It is recommended that licensed professionals be used for repair issues as it relates to the comments in this report, and copies of receipts are kept for warranty purposes. The use of the term "Qualified Person" in this report relates to an individual, company, or contractor whom is either licensed or certified in the field of concern. If I recommend evaluation or repairs by contractors or other licensed professionals, it is possible that they will discover additional problems since they will be invasive with their evaluation and repairs. Any listed items in this report concerning areas reserved for such experts should not be construed as a detailed, comprehensive, and / or exhaustive list of problems, or areas of concern. A listing of Recommended Contractors can be found here: http://www.prohitn.com/recommended-pros/


CAUSES of DAMAGE / METHODS OF REPAIR: Any suggested causes of damage or defects, and methods of repair mentioned in this report are considered a professional courtesy to assist you in better understanding the condition of the home, and in my opinion only from the standpoint of a visual inspection, and should not be wholly relied upon. Contractors or other licensed professionals will have the final determination on the causes of damage/deficiencies, and the best methods of repairs, due to being invasive with their evaluation. Their evaluation will supersede the information found in this report.

Thermal Imaging Information

THERMAL IMAGING: An infrared camera may be used for specific areas or visual problems, and should not be viewed as a full thermal scan of the entire home. Additional services are available at additional costs and would be supplemented by an additional agreement/addendum. Temperature readings displayed on thermal images in this report are included as a courtesy and should not be wholly relied upon as a home inspection is qualitative, not quantitative. These values can vary +/- 4% or more of displayed readings, and these values will display surface temperatures when air temperature readings would actually need to be conducted on some items which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. If a full thermal scan of the home is desired, please reach out to me schedule this service. 

Other Notes - Important Info

INACCESSIBLE AREAS: In the report, there may be specific references to areas and items that were inaccessible or only partly accessible. I can make no representations regarding conditions that may be present in these areas but were concealed or inaccessible for review. With access and an opportunity for inspection, reportable conditions or hidden damage may be found in these areas.


COMPONENT LIFE EXPECTANCY - Components may be listed as having no deficiencies at the time of inspection, but may fail at any time due to their age or lack of maintenance, that couldn't be determined by the inspector. A life expectancy chart can be viewed by visiting http://prohitn.com/component-life-expectancies/


PHOTOGRAPHS: Several photos are included in your inspection report. These photos are for informational purposes only and do not attempt to show every instance or occurrence of a defect.


TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS: This report is proofread before sending it out, but typographical errors may be present. If any errors are noticed, please feel free to contact me for clarification.


Please acknowledge to me once you have completed reading the report. At that time I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, or provide clarification.


Detached Item(s) Present

Only items and components directly and permanently attached to the structure are inspected according to the TN Standards of Practice. And most of these items are only required to be reported on with their respected affect on the structure. This home may contain detached patios, stairs, retaining walls, outbuildings, decks, pools, fireplaces, etc. If comments are made with regard to these items, any comments should be viewed as a courtesy only, and not be construed as an all-inclusive listing of deficiencies. If any detached items or structures are of concern, evaluation of these items should be conducted by qualified individuals prior to the end of your inspection period.

Comment Key - Definitions

This report divides deficiencies into three categories; Major Defects (in red), Marginal Defects (in orange), and Minor Defects/Maintenance Items/FYI (colored in blue). Safety Hazards or concerns will be listed in the Red or Orange categories depending on their perceived danger, but should always be addressed ASAP. 

  • Major Defects - Items or components that may require a major expense to correct. Items categorized in this manner require further evaluation and repairs or replacement as needed by a Qualified Contractor prior to then end of your contingency period. 
  • Marginal Defects - Items or components that were found to include a deficiency. These items may have been functional at the time of inspection, but this functionality may be impaired, not ideal, or the defect may lead to further problems. Repairs or replacement is recommended to items categorized in this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect, prior to the end of your contingency period. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a Handyman or Qualified Contractor and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs. 
  • Minor Defects/Maintenance Items/FYI - Items or components that were found to be in need of recurring or basic general maintenance and/or may need minor repairs which may improve their functionality. Also included in this section are items that were at the end of their typical service life or beginning to show signs of wear, but were in the opinion of the inspector, still functional at the time of inspection. Major repairs or replacement should be anticipated, and planned for, on any items that are designated as being past, or at the end of their typical life. These repairs or replacement costs can sometimes represent a major expense; i.e. HVAC systems, Water Heaters, etc. 

These categorizations are in my professional judgement and based on what I observed at the time of inspection. This categorization should not be construed as to mean that items designated as "Minor defects" or "Marginal Defects" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendations in each comment is more important than its categorization. Due to your perception, opinions, or personal experience you may feel defects belong in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once again it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining to each defect that is paramount, not its categorical placement. 


 

2 - Grounds

Driveway and Walkway Condition: Driveway Material
Asphalt, Concrete
Driveway and Walkway Condition: Walkway Material
Concrete
Grading / Lot Drainage: Grading Types (All Present)
Flat Grading, Positive Grading (slopes away from structure)
Retaining Wall: Retaining Wall Material (Visible Portions)
AMSV
Driveway and Walkway Condition: Driveway/Walkway Information

The driveways and walkways (if applicable) were inspected to determine their affect on the structure of the home only. I will also report on any visible deficiencies that may be present such as; cracking, displacement, or other damage. Any comments relating to damage to the concrete, asphalt, and/or masonry surfaces should be viewed as a courtesy and may not be an all-inclusive listing, as the State of TN only requires that driveway(s) and walkway(s) be reported on with their respected affect on the structure. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Driveway and Walkway Condition: Typical Settlement / Shrinkage Cracks
Rear of Home Driveway
Settlement / shrinkage cracks were present on the concrete surface (<1/4 inch wide). These are typically from standard settlement, or from admixtures used in the composition of the concrete. I recommend sealing these cracks at a minimum, to prevent further damage from freezing water in winter months.
Grading / Lot Drainage: Grading / Drainage Overview

The grading around the home was inspected to determine that it was designed to allow rainwater to adequately drain away from the structure. The soil is recommended to slope away from the home, with a 6 inch drop in elevation, in the first 10 feet away from the structure (5% grade). When the 5% grade can not be achieved, swales or drains should be used as needed to properly divert rainwater runoff. Any flat or low areas around the home should be backfilled and sloped away from the foundation, to prevent potential moisture infiltration into areas below grade. No reportable deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Grading / Lot Drainage: Grading Limitations

The performance of lot drainage and the grading are limited to the conditions existing at the time of the inspection only. I cannot guarantee this performance as conditions constantly change. Heavy rain or other weather conditions may reveal issues that were not visible or foreseen at the time of inspection. Furthermore, items such as leakage in downspouts and gutter systems are impossible to detect during dry weather and can add moisture to the soil in the area around the foundation. The inspection of the grading and drainage performance in relation to moisture infiltration through foundation walls, therefore, is limited to the visible conditions at the time of inspection, and evidence of past problems. I recommend consulting with the sellers as to any previous moisture intrusion into the home, and / or ensuring that the Sellers disclosure has no mention of moisture infiltrating the structure.

Vegetation Observations: Vegetation Information

Vegetation was inspected around the home to ensure that it had adequate clearance from the structure, and was not impacting the structure. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Porches / Decks: Deck Information

The deck(s) were inspected looking for water related damage, construction related deficiencies, and safety hazards. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Stairs: Stairs Information

The stairs were inspected by looking at their construction, attachment, risers and treads, applicable railings, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Porch / Deck Roof Condition: Porch/Deck Roof Information

Visible portions of porch/deck roofs were inspected looking for any significant defects, leaks, etc. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Exterior Spigots: Spigot(s) Information

The spigots were inspected by testing their operation (if weather permitted), looking for leaks, their attachment to the home, presence of anti-siphon, etc. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Retaining Wall: Retaining Wall Information

Retaining walls are inspected in respect to their effect on the structure of the home. The structural integrity or load bearing capacities of retaining walls are beyond the scope of a home inspection. No deficiencies were observed in the walls relation to the home unless otherwise noted in this report.

In accordance with the Tennessee Standards of Practice the home inspector shall observe: Exterior electrical receptacles and the presence of GFCI protection (GFCI protection was not required prior to 1975, but upgrading is recommended for safety). Decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches and applicable railings that are directly attached to the structure. Vegetation, grading and drainage of grounds, driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls will be inspected with respect to their effect on the condition of the structure.
The home inspector is not required to observe: Fences and gates, Geological conditions, Soil conditions, Recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities), Detached buildings or structures, or the Presence or condition of buried fuel or waste storage tanks. The home inspector is not required to: Move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice or debris that obstructs access or visibility.
 

Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Driveway and Walkway Condition

Concrete Spalling Damage
Rear of Home

Spalling damage of the concrete surface was present. This is typically related to the use of "Ice Melt" like products, but can also be associated with the composition of the concrete when poured, or even the weather when poured. If a concern, have a concrete contractor to repair as needed.

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Driveway and Walkway Condition

Cracking Asphalt
Front of Home

Cracking was present on the driveway asphalt surface. If a concern, have an asphalt paving company or other qualified person to evaluate for repair.

House front Driveway Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Grading / Lot Drainage

Grading Not Designed to Manage Rainwater
Front of Home, Left Side of Home

The current configuration of the grading will not allow rainwater to run away from the home properly in the referenced area(s). Grading is either wrong or right, with no gray areas in between. The grading either slopes away from the structure (Right-Positive Grading), is flat (Wrong), or slopes towards the structure (Wrong-Negative Grade). Even though no repercussions may be present at the time of inspection due to improper grading, the possibility of moisture infiltration through foundation walls is always possible during heavy rainfall events. 

Flat grading and negative grading allows the soil in these areas to become saturated, once saturated the porous, permeable masonry foundation walls will wick this water out of the soil via capillary action. This can allow the masonry itself to become saturated and either evaporate this moisture into the crawl space or basement area in the form of water vapor, creating high humidity, 

As mentioned in the "Grading / Drainage Information" comment above, the soil is recommended to slope away from the structure, with a 6 inch drop in elevation, in the first 10 feet away (5% grade). When the proper grade can not be achieved a swale should be used or drains installed as needed to manage rainwater runoff. Repairs are recommended to the grading as needed to allow for the proper runoff of rainwater by a qualified person.

A video about proper grading can be seen here: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5hYIda7tWqA

Triangle Grading Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Porches / Decks

Ledger Flashing Missing
Rear of Home

"Z" flashing / ledger flashing was not present where the ledger board was attached to the structure. Current standards require a "Z" flashing to be installed above the ledger board, to prevent water infiltration from occurring behind the ledger board, creating damage. The installation of ledger flashing is recommended by a qualified person.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.4.2 - Porches / Decks

Guardrail Spacing Exceeded
Rear of Home

There was spacing present between or under the guardrail balusters that was greater than 4 inches. Current safety standards require that guardrails be designed as to not allow the passage of a 4 inch sphere through them. Safety upgrades or modifications are recommended to be conducted here by a qualified person.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - Stairs

Stair Railing Spacing Exceeded
Rear of Home

The railing for the stairs had spacing that would allow the passage of a 4 3/8 inch sphere through the balusters, and/or the passage of a 6 inch sphere below them. Current safety standards require that spheres of the referenced sizes should not pass through the referenced areas. Safety upgrades should be considered here.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.5.2 - Stairs

Hand Rails / Stair Railing Not Present on Each Side
Rear of Home

The stairs were over four risers high and 30 inches off of the ground and only had stair railing present on one side. These stairs are recommended to have stair railing and handrails installed continuously, on each side, designed in a way to prevent the passage of a 4 3/8" sphere through the balusters. Safety upgrades are recommended here by a qualified person. 

House front 1 Deck Contractor

3 - Roof

Inspection Method
Walked the Roof
Roof Covering Material
Architectural Composite Shingles
"Guesstimate" of Covering Age
8-12 Years
Vents / Protrusions: Vent Type(s)
Plumbing Stack Vent(s)
Roof Views
Roof Limitations

The inspection of the roof and its covering material is limited to the conditions on the day of the inspection only. The roof covering material, visible portions of the roof structure from within the attic (if applicable), and interior ceilings, were inspected looking for indications of current or past leaks. Future conditions and inclement weather may reveal leaks that were not present at the time of inspection. Any deficiencies noted in this report with the roof covering or indications of past or present leaks should be evaluated and repaired as needed by a licensed roofing contractor.

Architectural Shingles
The roof covering was comprised of architectural composition shingles. Architectural shingles, also called dimensional shingles, are thicker and heavier (often 50% more) than traditional 3-tab shingles. These 'premium' shingles are manufactured by starting with a fiberglass reinforcement mat, multiple layer of asphalt are added over the mat, and lastly ceramic granules are added over the upper layer of asphalt for protection against the elements (wind, rain, UV rays from the sun). Architectural shingles typically have higher wind resistance numbers than their 3-tab counterparts, and resist leaks better. 30 - 50 year warranties are common with these shingles, but the warranty is highly prorated after 25 - 30 years. Typical replacement is usually needed 23 - 28 years after the initial installation.

Due to the many variables which affect the lifespan of roof covering materials, I do not estimate the remaining service life of any roof coverings. This is in accordance with all industry inspection Standards of Practice.The following factors affect the lifespan of roof covering materials:
  • Roofing material quality: Higher quality materials, will of course, last longer.
  • Number of layers: Shingles installed over existing shingles will have a shorter lifespan.
  • Structure orientation: Southern facing roofs will have shorter lifespans.
  • Pitch of the roof: Shingles will age faster on a lower pitched roof in comparison with higher pitches.
  • Climate: Wind, rain, and snow will impact the lifespan of the roof.
  • Color: Shingles that are darker in color will have a shorter lifespan, than lighter colored shingles.
  • Attic Ventilation: Poorly vented attic spaces will decrease shingle life due to heat.
  • Vegetation conditions: Overhanging trees, branches, contacting the roof, or leaf cover drastically shorten lifespan.
Asphalt shingles must be installed to manufacturers' recommendations, for the warranty coverage to be upheld. These installation requirements vary widely from manufacturer to manufacturer, and across the multitude of different shingle styles manufactured. I will inspect the roof to the best of my ability, but confirming proper fastening, use and adequacy of underlayment, and adequacy of flashing is impossible as these items are not visible, Damaging and invasive means would have to be carried out to confirm proper installation. Therefore, the inspection of the roof is limited to visual portions only.
Roof Surface Condition: Shingles Information

The shingles were inspected at visible portions for excessive granule loss, signs of curling or delamination, loss of adhesion between the shingles, and any other signs of damage or excessive age. The shingles appeared to be in satisfactory condition, allowing for normal wear and tear, at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Vents / Protrusions: Vents Information

The plumbing stack vents, their related rain boots, and other roof penetrations were inspected by looking at their clearance, the integrity of their boots, for proper installation, or any significant defects. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Flashings: Flashing Information

Visible portions of the flashings were inspected looking for installation related deficiencies or damage (drip edge, sidewall, headwall, counter, etc - if applicable). Typically most areas of flashings are not visible as they are covered by the roof covering material, and therefore functionality has to be determined by looking for moisture intrusion on the sheathing in the attic, or ceilings where the flashing was presumed to be in place. No deficiencies were observed at visible portions, at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Gutters / Downspouts: Gutters Information

The gutters were inspected looking for proper securement, debris in the channel, standing water, damage, etc. Leaking gutters can not be diagnosed if an active rain was not occurring at the time of inspection, and if leaks are noticed after taking ownership of the home, sealing may be needed at seams or endcaps. No deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Gutters / Downspouts: Downspouts Information

The downspouts were inspected to ensure they were diverting rainwater away from the foundation walls. Testing for blockages in downspouts or drainpipes is beyond the scope of a home inspection, as is locating their termination point. No deficiencies were present at visible portions at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Gutters / Downspouts: Recommend Maintaining Gutters

It is recommended to periodically clean debris from the guttering channels to prevent downspouts from clogging. Clogs in downspouts can allow the gutters to overflow; damaging roof sheathing, fascia boards, and saturating grounds at the foundation.

Gutters / Downspouts: Downspouts Terminated Below Grade
Some downspouts terminated below grade. Their connection to a drain tube could not be confirmed.

In accordance with the Tennessee Standards of Practice the home inspector shall observe: The roof covering, roof drainage systems, visible flashings, skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and report on signs of leaks or abnormal condensation on building components. The home inspector shall: Describe the type of roof covering materials, and Report on the method used to observe the roofing.
The home inspector is not required to: Walk on the roofing (although every safe attempt to do so, will be taken), report on the age or remaining life of the roof covering, move leaves, snow, or other items on the surface that may block visual accessibility, or observe attached accessories including but not limited to solar systems, antennae, satellite dishes and lightning arrestors. No claims will be made as to remaining roof material life expectancy, and no guarantee or warranty should be expected from comments or observations. The sellers or the occupants of a residence will generally have the most relevant knowledge of the roof and of its history. Therefore, I recommend that you consult with the sellers about the age of the roof covering, and that you either include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy, or that you obtain a roof certification from an established local roofing company.
 

Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Roof Surface Condition

Exposed Nail Heads - Ridge Vent

Exposed nail heads were present on the ridge vent. I recommend for a qualified person to seal any exposed nail heads, to prevent the possibility of leaking.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Roof Surface Condition

Unconventional Woven Valley Installations

The shingles were installed in an interlaced manner on the valleys of the roof surface, called a woven valley. The shingles were woven in an unconventional manner here, that could allow for leaks to occur. Evaluation of these valleys with repairs made as needed is recommended by a qualified roofing contractor. 

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Roof Surface Condition

Roof Surface Had "Give" in Areas

The roof surface (decking) had "give" or lateral movement present in areas when walked on. No deficiencies were observed at visible portions of the attic that may have contributed to this. Typically this is associated with the spacing of the roof framing components, thickness of the decking, lack of "H" clips, etc. If a concern, evaluation is recommended by a roofing contractor to determine the cause. 

Roof Roofing Professional

4 - Exterior

Walls / Cladding: Siding Material
AMSV (Adhered Manufactured Stone Veneer), Fiber Cement Board Siding
Walls / Cladding: Wall Construction Type
2X Wood Lumber, CMU Block
Window Exteriors: Window Material
Vinyl
Overhangs / Soffit / Fascia: Soffit & Fascia Material
Vinyl Soffit, Vinyl-Clad Fascia
Exterior Doors: Door Material(s)
Steel
Exterior Views
Representative Number Inspected

The State of Tennessee Standards of Practice states that a representative sample of exterior components shall be inspected on each side of the home when multiple pieces make up an item or component (i.e. cladding, windows, overhangs, etc.). I try to ensure that all portions are inspected but height from the ground, vegetation, or other factors may prevent full accessibility or visibility of some items. 

Probing of Wood

The TN Standards of Practice requires any areas of wooden trim, siding, or other wood components to be probed if water damage (wood rot) was suspected. Any photos of a screwdriver stuck into wood represents water damage/wood rot to some extent. Hidden damage is always a possibility at these areas. These areas of damage will require further evaluation to determine the extent of the damage, along with repairs made as deemed necessary by a qualified contractor. 

Walls / Cladding: Wall and Cladding Information

The walls and wall cladding were inspected looking for significant damage, presence of proper flashings, and potential water entry points, etc. No reportable deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Walls / Cladding: AMSV Cladding Information

Portions of the home were clad with AMSV (adhered manufactured stone veneer). I have personally never seen AMSV cladding installed properly. Although I have yet to see any repercussions due to improperly installed AMSV, I can not guarantee that deficiencies may not become evident at some point in the future. Any listing of deficiencies mentioned with the AMSV siding should not be viewed as an all-inclusive listing as a cladding expert or specialist may find additional deficiencies. Any and all deficiencies referenced in this report were based on the MVMA 6th edition. This document can be viewed in its entirety here: 

http://www.prohitn.com/documents/

Walls / Cladding: Fiber Cement Board Information

Fiber Cement board siding was present on this home. There are a few manufacturers of this product nationally, and while the installation requirements may vary slightly from manufacturer to manufacturer, it's typically small variations of fractions of an inch in relation to particular clearances. Clearance is required between this product and grade/soil, roof surface, hardscapes, decks, etc. The installation requirements for James Hardie's product can be found at the link provided, but a siding contractor would need to determine the exact manufacturer. 

http://www.prohitn.com/documents/

Window Exteriors: Windows Information

The exterior components of the windows (trim, flashing, etc.) were inspected looking for damage, lack of proper flashing, clearance from grade, etc. No reportable deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Overhangs / Soffit / Fascia: Soffit / Fascia Information

The soffit and fascia was inspected at visible portions looking for any water damage or other significant defects. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Exterior Doors: Doors Information

All exterior doors were inspected by looking for damage, lack of proper flashing, deficiencies with their operation, etc. No reportable deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Exterior Doors: Handleset Information

Handlesets (deadbolts & door handles) are not inspected for their functionality with keys, as replacement or re-keying of any deadbolts and handles is recommended due to not knowing who may possess keys to the home. Therefore deadbolts and handles will be reported on with respect to the misalignment of the door only, preventing them from latching or locking properly. 

In accordance with the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice the home inspector shall observe from ground level: - Wall cladding, flashings, and trim; entryway doors and a representative number of windows; eaves, soffits, and fascias. The home inspector shall: Describe wall cladding materials; Operate all entryway doors and a representative number of windows; and probe exterior wood components where deterioration or damage is suspected.
The home inspector is not required to observe: Storm windows, storm doors, screening / screens, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories; Presence of safety glazing in doors and windows; Detached buildings or structures; or the Presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks, water tanks, or septic tanks. The home inspector is not required to: Move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice or debris that obstructs access or visibility.
 

Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Walls / Cladding

AMSV Clearance From Grade

The AMSV lacked proper clearance from grade which also prevents the proper functionality of any weep screed. Two - four inches of clearance is recommended from grade depending on the application. Evaluation and repairs as needed is recommended by a contractor specializing in AMSV installation.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.1.2 - Walls / Cladding

AMSV Clearance From Hardscape

The AMSV lacked proper clearance from hardscapes, which also prevents the proper functionality of any weep screed. One - two inches of clearance is recommended in these areas. Evaluation and repairs as needed is recommended by a contractor specializing in AMSV installation.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.1.3 - Walls / Cladding

AMSV Transition to Dissimilar Siding

Proper flashing was not present where the AMSV transitioned to a dissimilar wall cladding. Evaluation and repairs as needed is recommended by an exterior contractor familiar with AMSV installation.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.1.4 - Walls / Cladding

AMSV -Weep Screed Not Present

Weep screed was not present at the base of the AMSV. This more than likely signifies that a drainage plane is not present behind the AMSV (achieved by using two papers/building wraps). Evaluation of the entirety of the AMSV installation, and any repairs are recommended by a contractor specializing in AMSV installation. 

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.1.5 - Walls / Cladding

Fiber Cement Siding Loose in Areas

There were pieces of the fiber cement siding that were not firmly supported to the wall. This is typically associated with the "blind nails" being placed too high. This can allow the siding to rattle during high wind and create a nuisance from noise. Evaluation of the siding with repairs made as needed is recommended by an exterior contractor specializing in fiber cement installations. 

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.1.6 - Walls / Cladding

Fiber Cement to Grade Clearance

The fiber cement siding lacked adequate clearance from grade. Most fiber cement manufacturers recommend at least 6" of clearance from grade, to prevent moisture damage to the product. Evaluation and repairs as needed to achieve proper clearance is recommended by a qualified siding contractor. 

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.1.7 - Walls / Cladding

Full Cladding Evaluation Recommended

Due to multiple improper installations and damage being present to areas of the fiber cement siding, a full evaluation of the home's cladding with repairs made as deemed necessary is recommended by a qualified siding contractor. 

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.1.8 - Walls / Cladding

Fiber Cement to Deck Clearance

The fiber cement siding lacked adequate clearance from the deck(s). Most fiber cement manufacturers recommend at least 1-2" of clearance from deck surfaces. Evaluation and repairs as needed to achieve proper clearance is recommended by a qualified siding contractor.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Exterior Doors

Weatherstripping Pads

Light was visible where the side jamb weatherstripping meets the threshold. Weatherstripping pads should address this. Found at Home Improvement stores.

http://www.amazon.com/Door-Corner-Vinyl-Covered-Foam-Weatherstrip/dp/B0195UGAT0
Wrench DIY

5 - Kitchen

Oven/Range: Energy Source
Electric
Oven/Range: Range Anti-tip Bracket Present
No
Exhaust Fan: Fan Type
Microwave Recirculating
Kitchen View
Cabinets, Countertops: Countertop/Cabinets Information

The cabinets and countertops were inspected looking for significant damage and by testing a representative number of doors and drawers evaluating their operation. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Sink(s): Kitchen Sink Information

The kitchen sink was inspected by operating the faucet valves and faucet looking for any leaks or signs of significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Spray Wand: Spray Wand Information

The spray wand, whether standalone or attached to the faucet, was operated looking for proper flow and to ensure no leaks were present. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Visible Plumbing: Plumbing Information

The supply and drain pipes were inspected looking for leaks, improper installation, and other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Dishwasher : Dishwasher Information

The dishwasher was operated by running a wash cycle, and was functional at the time of inspection. No leaks or water was present at the base of the unit at the completion of the cycle. The unit's efficiency of cleaning dishes is not tested for. No deficiencies were observed with the unit unless otherwise noted in this report.

Oven/Range: Heating Elements Information

All of the heating elements on the range were turned to "High", and were functional at the time of inspection. No indications of deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Oven/Range: Oven Information

The oven was operated by placing into "Bake" mode, and heat was produced from the element(s). Temperature calibration, "clean" options, and other functions are not tested for. You are recommended to seek further evaluation of additional functions if desired/needed. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Exhaust Fan: Satisfactory Condition

The exhaust fan was operated. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Microwave: Microwave Information

The microwave was tested by running on "Cook" mode for 30 seconds, and was functional at the time of inspection. The efficiency of the unit or other functions are not tested for. No reportable conditions were present unless otherwise noted in this report.

In accordance with the Tennessee Standards of Practice the inspector will examine and report on the condition and operation of the dishwasher by initiating a cycle, the range by testing heating elements and the oven, the mounted microwave by starting a warm-up cycle, test the hot/cold water supply at the fixture, look for leaks in the plumbing and fixtures/faucet, examine counters, walls, ceilings, floors, a representative number of cabinets, windows, doors, and the presence of GFCI receptacles and their operation, if applicable. Homes built prior to 1987 were not required to have GFCI receptacles in the kitchen, but upgrading is recommended for safety.
The home inspector is not required to report on: Clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven functions, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation; Non built-in appliances; or Refrigeration units. The home inspector is not required to operate: Appliances in use; or Any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.

Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Visible Plumbing

Dishwasher High Loop Missing

A "high loop" or "air gap" was not present for the dishwasher drain line at visible portions. A high loop or air gap prevents wastewater from siphoning back into the dishwasher during operation. The proper installation of the dishwasher drain line is recommended by a licensed plumber or other qualified person.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.4.2 - Visible Plumbing

Flex Drain Pipe Present

A flex drain pipe was present under the kitchen sink. Flex drain pipes are not recommended as they may clog more often and affect water drain flow. Current standards call for smooth walled drain pipes only.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.4.3 - Visible Plumbing

Improper Drain Pipe Pitch

The kitchen drain pipe was pitched improperly, drain lines should pitch downhill at 1/8" per foot to allow for proper draining. This is typically an easy modification to achieve the proper pitch. Repairs are recommended as needed by a licensed plumber.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Oven/Range

Anti-Tip Bracket Missing

An anti-tip bracket was not present for the the range. An anti-tip bracket prevents the range from tipping over, if weight is applied to an open oven door, such as a child stepping or sitting on the door. Ranges contain a warning label on the inside of the oven door with more information. This bracket can be purchased at home improvement stores for approximately ten dollars and the installation of this bracket is highly recommended.

http://www.sears.com/ search=anti%20tip%20bracket%20for%20oven

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.6.2 - Oven/Range

Display Not Functioning Properly

The oven display panel was not functioning properly, this prevented the panel from displaying the set temperature for the oven. Repairs are recommended as needed by an appliance repair company for proper operation. 

Wash Appliance Repair

6 - Bathroom(s)

Ventilation: Ventilation Sources
Ventilation Fan(s), Window(s)
Bathroom View(s)
Shower Pan Limitations

Shower pans are not tested for leaks as this would be a technically exhaustive test. The only way to test shower pans for leaks is to block off the drain and fill the shower pan with 1-2" of water, looking for leaks on drywall or framing below, which would cause damage to the home. Therefore the shower is operated as normal and the areas under the bathroom are examined for indications of leaks. These pans are known to leak and can potentially be a major expense to correct. A licensed plumber should be consulted if more invasive testing is desired.

Tub and Shower Drain Information

Water was ran through the drains of tubs and showers for an extended period of time, and the areas under these drains (if applicable) were then inspected with thermal imaging looking for indications of leaks. No leaks were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

What I can't replicate is the affects of weight applied to these drains. When showering or bathing the forces from weight can put strain on gaskets or joints on the drain pipes that can possibly result in leaking, this can be even more likely if the home has been vacant for an extended period of time. 

Tub and Sink Overflow Limitations

Tub and sink overflows are not tested for functionality due to the very high likelihood the gaskets will leak. Care should be exercised in filling tubs to not allow water into the overflow. While they will likely drain away the bulk of water, some amount of leaking should be anticipated. As an improvement, a licensed plumber could check the gaskets and make repairs deemed necessary. Again, it should be assumed these overflows will not be water tight.




Cabinets, Countertops: Cabinet & Countertop(s) Information

The cabinets and countertops were inspected by looking for significant defects. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Mirror(s): Mirror Information

The bathroom mirror(s) were inspected looking at their attachment to the wall and for any damage. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Ventilation: Ventilation Information

The bathroom ventilation is reported on by its source; windows or ventilation fans are acceptable forms of ventilation for bathrooms containing a tub and/or shower. If fans are present they will be tested by operating the switch and listening for proper air flow. Although windows in a bathroom can substitute for a fan, a fan is still recommended due to not utilizing windows in colder winter months. No deficiencies were observed with the ventilation at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Sink(s): Sinks Information

The sink(s) were inspected by operating the faucet water valves and checking for proper flow and drainage, looking for leaks, operating pop-ups, etc. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Visible Plumbing: Sink Plumbing Information

The visible portions of the sink plumbing was inspected by running water through the drain pipe for over one minute and looking for leaks from the drain pipe / trap assembly, water supply lines, and areas underneath of the sink area (ceiling below/basement/crawl space). Other significant defects are also looked for with the plumbing. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Shower(s): Showers Information

The shower(s) were inspected by operating the water valve(s) and ensuring proper flow and drainage was present, looking for leaks, and/or any significant defects. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Shower Walls: Shower Walls Information

The shower walls were inspected looking for any significant damage or areas that could allow for water infiltration behind the walls. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Bathtub(s): Bathtub(s) Information

The bathtub(s) were inspected by operating the faucet valves checking for proper flow and drainage and looking for leaks and/or any cracks or damage to the tub itself. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Toilet(s): Toilet(s) Information

The toilets were inspected by flushing them to ensure they were flushing adequately and to determine no leaks were present at the water supply line or tank location. Toilets will also be checked for an adequate connection at the floor. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

In accordance with the Tennessee Standards of Practice the inspector will examine and report the condition of the: sinks, showers, tubs, enclosures, toilets, exposed plumbing, presence of leaks from plumbing, fixtures, and/or faucets. As well as the walls, floors, ceilings, a representative number of windows and doors, heating/cooling source, ventilation, and presence of GFCI protection, if applicable. GFCI protection in bathrooms was not required in homes built prior to 1975; but upgrading is recommended for safety.
The home inspector is not required to: Operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets; or Inspect the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.
 

Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - Sink(s)

Pop-Up Not Functioning Properly
Bathroom Right Side of Home

The pop-up was not functioning properly on the sink. Repairs are recommended as needed by a qualified person for proper operation.
Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
6.4.2 - Sink(s)

Pop-Up Stopper Not Sealing Properly
Hallway Bathroom Addition

The pop-up stopper was not sealing properly in the sink. Repairs are recommended as needed by a qualified person for proper operation.
Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
6.5.1 - Visible Plumbing

Flex Drain Line Present
Bathroom Right Side of Home

A flex drain pipe was present. Flex drain pipes are not recommended as they may clog more often and affect water drain flow. Current standards call for smooth walled drain pipes only.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
6.6.1 - Shower(s)

Shower Water Pipe Loose
Hallway Bathroom Original Portion of Home

The shower head water supply pipe was loose at the wall. Proper securement of the water pipe is recommended by a licensed plumber or other qualified person.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
6.8.1 - Bathtub(s)

Seal Floor to Bathtub
Hallway Bathroom Original portion of home

Gaps were present where the floor transitions to the tub. Sealing the area where the floor transitions to the bathtub is recommended by a qualified person to prevent water intrusion to subfloor below.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
6.10.1 - Ceiling Heat

Ceiling Heat Not Functional
Bathroom Right Side of Home, Hallway Bath Addition

The electric fixture ceiling heat was not functional. Repairs or replacement as needed is recommended by a licensed electrician
Electric Electrical Contractor

7 - Interior Areas

Smoke Alarms / Detectors: Smoke Alarms Present at All Required Locations
Missing in Sleeping Areas
CO Detectors: CO Alarms Present at all Recommended Locations?
Missing Outside of Sleeping Areas
Windows: Window Glazing
Double Pane
Ceiling Condition: Moisture Stains Present on Ceilings
No
Room Views
Bedroom Locations

Bedrooms are determined by starting with the front bedroom in the original portion of the home, after walking out of bedroom 1, bedroom 2 will be the first bedroom you come to, bedroom 3 the next, and so on. 

Smoke Alarms / Detectors: Smoke Alarms Information

Smoke alarms are recommended for each sleeping room and (1) outside of each sleeping room(s), and one per level including habitable attics and basements. I recommend testing the smoke alarms before spending your first night in the home, and monthly thereafter. Several other recommendations relating to smoke alarms and fire safety are recommended by the NFPA, and can be found here:

http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/by-topic/smoke-alarms/installing-and-maintaining-smoke-alarms

Smoke Alarms / Detectors: Smoke Alarms Testing Information

The smoke alarm(s) that were present were tested by depressing the "test" button and an audible alarm sounded. Any exceptions will be listed below. A true test of the alarm(s) would require the use of a smoke can and is beyond the scope of a Home Inspection. It is recommend to test the alarms as soon as you move in, and monthly thereafter, replace the batteries every six months, and replace the alarms themselves every five to ten years (manufacturer specific). If the home is older than 5 years old I recommend removing the smoke alarms to check the manufacturing date on the back. Dual sensor alarms incorporating both an ionization sensing chamber and photoelectric eyes are recommended.

http://www.amazon.com/Kidde-Pi9010-Battery-Photoelectric-Ionization/dp/B00PC5THCU

Smoke Alarms / Detectors: Alarm Company

Some smoke detector(s) that were present were a part of the Central alarm system of the home, and couldn't be tested independently. I recommend confirming proper operation of the smoke detector(s) with the monitoring company as soon as moving into the home for re safety. Independent battery powered alarms are recommended to be installed as well, in case of service interruption with the monitoring company.

CO Detectors: CO Alarm Information

Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors are recommended to be installed outside of each sleeping area, in the area(s) of any gas appliances, and any fireplace(s). CO alarms are recommended if any gas appliances are present in the home or if the home contains a garage. More information about CO detectors and there requirements can be found here:

https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Fire-and-life-safety-equipment/Carbon-monoxide

Windows: Windows Information

The windows were inspected by operating a representative number (I will try and operate every window in the home, but personal belongings may block accessibility to some). Their operation was tested, along with looking for damage, broken glass, failed seals, etc. No reportable deficiencies were present unless otherwise noted in this report.

Windows: No Glass Seal Failure Observed

At the time of inspection all double pane glass units appeared to be in satisfactory condition with no seal failure observed. Seal failure is where the double pane glass loses its adhesion with the inner spacer, allowing moisture and debris in between the panes of glass. Some windows may not show signs of seal failure due to the desiccant in the glass spacer absorbing moisture in between the panes, also future weather conditions (high humidity, etc.) may reveal seal failure that was not visible at the time of inspection.

Closets: Closets Information

The closets were inspected by testing the operation of their doors and looking for significant defects. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Interior Doors: Interior Doors Information

A representative number of interior doors were inspected by operating them ensuring that they opened and closed properly, as well as latched properly without binding on jambs or the floor. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Doorbell: Doorbell Information

The doorbell was tested by depressing the button and listening for a chime. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Surfaces - Overall: Surfaces Information

Visible portions of the interior wall, floor, and ceiling surfaces were inspected looking for indications of moisture intrusion, settlement, or other significant defects. Cosmetic and minor deficiencies are not typically reported on, but may be noted while looking for significant defects, any listing of these items should not be construed as an all-inclusive listing. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Surfaces - Overall: Cosmetic Deficiencies

Cosmetic deficiencies were present and are typically not reported on. If these cosmetic deficiencies are a concern, evaluation and repairs as needed should be conducted by qualified trades people.

Surfaces - Overall: Indications of Movement Information
Left Side of Home

There were indications of settlement or movement throughout areas of the home which may include; sloping floors, cracks on interior walls and/or ceilings, visible drywall joints, visible drywall tape, and/or door openings that were out of square. I can only report on the visible conditions of these items as they existed at the time of inspection, as I do not know how long they have been in this condition, or if any further movement could occur. Only a structural engineer can determine the exact cause of settlement or movement, and they should be consulted as desired. 

Typical cracking can occur in the first five years after a home is constructed as the soil is considered "disturbed earth". The weight of the structure will bear on this graded/disturbed soil, and the soil will compact allowing for "settlement" or movement of the home. After approximately five years the soil is once again considered "undisturbed earth", and the majority of the settlement has taken place. Some settlement can still occur after this five year period, but typically not to the degree that occurred in the first five years. 

Other conditions can also allow for settlement or movement, including but not limited to; excessive rain, drought conditions, improper grading surrounding the structure, inadequate footer drains, the composition of the soil, the floor structure design, etc. Cracks or movement associated with these conditions typically will require some degree of repairs. 

Wall Condition: Walls Information

Visible portions of the interior walls were inspected looking for signs of moisture infiltration, settlement cracking, significant damage, or other significant deficiencies. No reportable deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Wall Condition: Portion of Wall Bowed
Bedroom 2

A portion of the wall was bowed. No cause could be determined at visual portions, and this may be due to a construction variance. If a concern, an invasive evaluation is recommended by a contractor. 

Ceiling Condition: Ceilings Information

The ceilings throughout the home were inspected looking for moisture intrusion/staining due to roof leaks or leaking plumbing pipes. Settlement cracks, and significant defects were also inspected for. No reportable conditions or moisture stains were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Ceiling Condition: No Moisture Stains Present

Moisture stains were inspected for on the ceilings throughout the home, and no moisture stains were present on the ceilings at the time of inspection. 

Floor Condition: Floors Information

Visible portions of the floors throughout the home were inspected looking for significant floor deficiencies. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Floor Condition: Sloping Floors
In original portion of home

The interior floors were sloped or uneven in some areas. Individual perception and sensitivity to floor sloping varies greatly. If a concern I recommend further evaluation by a contractor.

In accordance with the Tennessee Standards of Practice the home inspector shall observe: walls, ceilings, and floors; steps, stairways, balconies, and railings; counters and a representative number of installed cabinets; and a representative number of doors and windows; fireplaces by examining the firebox, operating the damper, and reporting on the presence of a gas shut off valve. The home inspector shall: Operate a representative number of receptacles, switches, windows, and interior doors; and report on signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.
The home inspector is not required to observe: Paint, wallpaper, and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors; Carpeting, tile; or Draperies, blinds, or other window treatments. Gas fireplaces are not tested for functionality, and the pilot light will not be lit if it's off at the time of inspection. An evaluation by a gas company is recommended before using any gas appliances in the home.
 

Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Smoke Alarms / Detectors

Smoke Alarms Not Present at all Recommended Locations

Smoke alarms were not present at all required locations (referenced above). The installation of smoke detectors is recommended to be installed at all recommended locations for fire safety. Dual sensor alarms incorporating both an ionization sensing chamber and photoelectric eyes are recommended.

http://www.amazon.com/Kidde-Pi9010-Battery-Photoelectric-Ionization/dp/B00PC5THCU

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
7.2.1 - CO Detectors

CO Alarm(s) Not Present at Recommended Locations

CO alarms were not present at all recommended areas. CO alarms are recommended for any homes containing gas appliances or an attached garage. The installation of CO detectors is recommended outside of sleeping areas by a qualified person, for safety. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Windows

Fall Protection Recommended
Some Addition Bedrooms

There were windows present that were within 24 inches of the floor, and higher than 72 inches from finished grade outside. Fall protection is recommended to be installed on these windows for child safety by a qualified person. More info can be found at the link below. 

https://pubstore.aamanet.org/docs/TB_03-12_8-13-12.pdf

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Interior Doors

Door Not Latching Properly
Garage Closet

The door was not latching properly. Adjustments or modifications as needed for proper operation is recommended by a qualified person.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
7.9.1 - Ceiling Condition

Wavy / Sagging Ceilings
Carport Addition Area

Wavy and/or sagging ceilings were present in areas. Evaluation of the drywall or plaster is recommended by a qualified person to determine the cause of the sagging, with repairs made to correct it as desired. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.10.1 - Floor Condition

Buckled Area Present
Kitchen

A portion of the flooring was buckled. Evaluation of this area and repairs as needed is recommended by a qualified person as desired. 

Flooring Flooring Contractor

8 - Laundry

Dryer Energy Source
Electric
Dryer Vent: Dryer Vent Termination Point
Exterior
Laundry View
Cabinets : Satisfactory

No reportable deficiencies were observed with the cabinets at the time of inspection.

Countertop: Satisfactory
No deficiencies were observed with the countertops at the time of inspection.
Visible Plumbing: Plumbing Information - No Washer Present

The washing machine water supply valves were operated and no deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. The standpipe (washer drain line) was not tested for leaks as a washing machine would need to be present to discharge water into the drain. The functionality of the drain is excluded from this inspection.

Dryer Vent: Dryer Vent Information

The dryer vent was inspected to ensure it terminated to the exterior of the home and that no damage was present at visible portions. No deficiencies were observed with the dryer vent at visible portions unless otherwise noted in this report.

Wash Basin: Wash Basin Information

The wash basin was inspected by operating the faucet and faucet valves looking for deficiencies or leaks. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

In accordance with the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice the inspector will examine and report on the condition of: the exposed plumbing; presence of a 240 volt receptacle, GFCI receptacles, dryer vent condition and termination, as well as the walls, floors, ceilings, doors, cabinets, counters, and windows, if applicable.
The inspector is not required to: Inspect or move washers and dryers, operate water valves where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance, Inspect the plumbing for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.

Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Dryer Vent

Vent Duct Flexible Material

The dryer vent duct was construed of a flexible material. Exhaust ducts are recommended to have a smooth interior finish and be constructed of metal a minimum 0.016 inch (0.4 mm) thick. Replacement of the vent with proper materials is recommended by a qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional

9 - Garage

Garage Door(s): Garage Door Type(s)
Aluminum Sectional (Insulated)
Garage Door Opener(s): Opener Drive Type
Belt Drive
Garage Door Opener(s): Opener Button Proper Height
No (within 60" of standing surface)
Ceiling / Framing: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Ceiling / Framing: Proper Separation Present
No
Walls: Walls Material
Framed Walls, Drywall, CMU Block
Garage Area to Living Space Separation Information

Current building standards for homes require "garage to living space separation". This separation helps to slow a garage oriented fire and to help prevent CO gases from entering living areas. This is achieved by the installation of a steel or solid wood door between the garage and living areas measuring no less than 1 3/8" thick, or a 20 minute fire rated door. The walls require the installation of 1/2" drywall, and the installation of 5/8" Type X drywall on the ceiling (if living areas are overhead). No protrusions should be present on the walls and/or ceiling in the area unless properly sealed with an approved sealant. These upgrades are recommended for safety if not present, and a qualified contractor can be consulted for more information. 

Garage Door(s): Garage Door Information

The garage door(s) were tested by operating the wall mounted transmitter and checking for proper operation. The door(s) were examined for significant damage or installation related deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garage Door Parts: Garage Door Parts Information

The rollers, brackets, door panels, springs, and tracks were inspected looking for damage or loose components. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garage Door Opener(s): Garage Door Opener Information

The garage door opener(s) were inspected by depressing the wall mounted transmitter and observing the openers functionality (remote transmitters are not tested). No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garage Door Safety: Eye Beam(s) Information

The safety eye beam(s) were inspected by closing the garage door and "breaking" the path of the eye beam(s) to ensure the door auto-reversed properly. The system was functional unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garage Door Safety: Resistance Not Tested

The "Resistance" test of the garage door(s) was not conducted due to the possibility of damaging the door and/or the opener, should the resistance feature not function properly, and this functionality is excluded from this inspection. Garage doors contain two safety measures to prevent someone from being injured or pinned by a closing garage door. Photoelectric eyes, and the ability to auto reverse, if the door meets resistance or a solid object. I recommend testing this feature for functionality once taking ownership of the home. The test can be conducted by placing a 2" X 4" laid on the ground, underneath of the door. When the door is closed, it should contact the 2" X 4", and auto-reverse. If it does not, adjustments to the "force close" setting on the opener may need to be made, and/or a garage door contractor should evaluate.

Interior Door : Interior Garage Door Information

The door between the garage and living areas was in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. Current safety standards require for these doors to be comprised of steel or solid wood measuring at least 1 3/8" thick for proper garage to living space separation. These doors built on homes prior to 2006 (dependent on local municipality) may not meet these standards and should be upgraded as desired for safety. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Stairs: Satisfactory

The stairs appeared to be in satisfactory condition. No deficiencies were present unless otherwise noted in this report.

Ceiling / Framing: Ceiling Information

The ceiling area was inspected looking for indications of leaks or other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Ceiling / Framing: Ceiling Information - Separation

The framing in the garage is required to be covered with a 5/8" type X drywall if living areas are overhead and the home was constructed after 2006 (year dependent on local municipality). Confirmation of the proper drywall is not possible in a "visual only home inspection", but the presence of drywall will be reported on. Homes built prior to 2006 were not required to meet these requirements but upgrading to proper drywall is recommended as desired for safety. 

Walls: Walls Information

The walls appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed at visible portions unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garage Floor: Slab Information

Visible portions of the concrete slab was inspected looking for significant deficiencies and significant cracking. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

In accordance with the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice the inspector will examine: the Attached garage and report the condition of the: garage door(s) (including related parts), the garage door opener, the presence and operability of photoelectric eyes (safety feature) and the doors ability to auto reverse when met with resistance, doors, ceilings, floors, a representative number of windows and receptacles, and the presence of GFCI receptacles. Current safety standards require the presence of 1/2" Type X drywall for wall/ceiling surfaces, as well as a steel or fire rated door between the garage and living areas for fire safety. We recommend that these improvements be considered for the safety of the occupants.The home inspector is not required to inspect: Remote controlled garage door opener transmitters.
 

Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Garage Door Opener(s)

Opener Button Within 5 Feet of Standing Surface

The garage door opener button(s) were within five feet of a standing surface. Opener buttons are recommended to be elevated at least 60" to prevent a child from operating the door. Raising the button to proper height is recommended. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Garage Door Safety

Eyes Installed Too High

The photoelectric eye sensors were installed too high. These sensors are recommended to be installed between 6 and 8 inches from the floor (dependent on manufacturer). Repairs are recommended by a garage door contractor or other qualified person to achieve the proper height.

Garage Garage Door Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.7.1 - Ceiling / Framing

Unsealed Protrusions Present in Drywall Ceiling

Protrusions were present through the garage ceiling that were not sealed. This compromises the separation of garage to living spaces. Sealing these areas with an approved material is recommended by a qualified contractor. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Heating, Cooling

Exterior Unit(s) - Split System : Exterior Unit Location
Rear of home, Left side of home
Exterior Unit(s) - Split System : Exterior Unit Energy Source
Electric
Exterior Unit(s) - Split System : Exterior Unit Type
Condensing Unit (Heat Pump)
Exterior Unit(s) - Split System : Exterior Unit Max Circuit Breaker Size
35amps
Interior Unit(s) - Split System : Interior Unit(s) Location
Bedroom Closet, Basement, Garage
Interior Unit(s) - Split System : Interior Unit(s) Energy Source and Distribution
Electric Forced Air
Auxiliary Drain Pan: Auxiliary Drain Pan Present
No
Condensate Drain Pipe: Condensate Drain Termination Point
Left Side of Home, Rear of Home
Air Return: Return Air Temp - Right Side of Home
71
Air Return: Return Air Temp - Left Side of Home
70
Air Return: Return Air Temp - Garage
70
Air Supply: Temperature Differential Cooling Mode - Right Side of Home
15-20 Degrees
Air Supply: Temperature Differential Cooling Mode - Left Side of Home
20+ Degrees
Air Supply: Temperature Differential Cooling Mode - Garage
15-20 Degrees
Air Supply: Temperature Differential Heating Mode - Right Side of Home
20+ Degrees
Air Supply: Temperature Differential Heating Mode - Left Side of Home
15-20 Degrees
Air Supply: Temperature Differential Heating Mode - Garage
20+ Degrees
Thermostat(s): Thermostat Location(s)
Hallway, Garage
Air Filter / Return Plenum: Filter Location(s)
Hallway, Garage
Air Filter / Return Plenum: Filter Size
20 X 30, 20 X 24
Cooling Source Present in Each Room: Cooling Source Present in Each Room
No
Heating Source Present in Each Room: Heating Source Present In Each Room
No
General Info: Split System HVAC Present

This home contains a split system for heating and cooling which typically consists of four main parts: 

  • An Exterior unit (Heat Pump or AC Unit)
  • An Interior unit (Electric Air Handler or Gas Furnace)
  • A Thermostat
  • And Interior ductwork to distribute conditioned air throughout the home
General Info: HVAC Testing Information

The inspection of the HVAC system is limited to the response of the system at the thermostat in both heating and cooling modes; a visual observation of the exterior and interior equipment, and the removal of any access panels made for removal by a homeowner (not requiring ANY tools). If a more thorough inspection is desired, an HVAC contractor should be consulted.

Exterior Unit(s) - Split System : Exterior Unit Manufacture Year
2010, 2012

The typical life expectancy of exterior units is approximately 13-15 years. 

Exterior Unit(s) - Split System : Exterior Unit Information

The exterior unit(s) were inspected visually and tested by ensuring they respond to normal operating controls in cooling mode (at the thermostat), and that cool air was produced. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Interior Unit(s) - Split System : Interior Units Manufacture Year
2012, 2010

The typical life expectancy of electric units is approximately 13-15 years, and 15-17 years for gas units. 

Interior Unit(s) - Split System : Interior Unit(s) Information

The interior unit(s) were inspected visually and tested by ensuring they responded to normal operating controls in heating mode (at the thermostat), and that heated air was produced. The unit(s) responded to normal operating controls and no indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Auxiliary Drain Pan: Auxiliary Drain Pan Information

Interior HVAC units are inspected for the presence of an auxiliary drain pan if they are located in or adjacent to finished areas. These pans may contain a float switch to sense when the pan fills with water, shutting the unit off; or may contain a drain pipe that will allow any accumulated water to drain to the exterior. The functionality of either the float switches or drain pipes are not tested for. No deficiencies were present at visible portions unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Condensate Drain Pipe: Drain Pipe Information

The condensate drain pipe was inspected looking for the presence of a "trap" and significant deficiencies, as well as reporting on its termination point. Often times the pipe or vinyl tubing passes through walls and/or ceilings, rendering it non-visible in these areas, and the condition of the pipe in these areas is excluded from this inspection. No deficiencies were observed at visual portions, at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Condensate Drain Pipe: Condensate Pump Information

A condensate pump was present to carry condensate from the air handler location to the exterior. Condensate pumps are not tested for functionality, as water would have to be poured into the unit to initiate a pump cycle. These units are inspected by looking for water spillage around the unit, which would indicate a failure of the unit. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Refrigerant Lines: Refrigerant Line Information

Pipe insulation was continuous on the refrigerant lines at visible portions. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Air Return: Temperature Reading

A temperature reading of the return air was taken at the time of inspection, to provide a baseline to compare output temperatures to, to show the system responded to normal operating controls.

Air Supply: Air Supply Information

The typical temperature differential between return and supply air is 10 - 20 degrees in cooling mode, and 16 - 25 degrees in heating mode. Several factors can affect these numbers, such as, but not limited to: indoor ambient air temperature, exterior ambient air temperature, humidity, cleanliness of the air filter and evaporator, etc. Furthermore HVAC thermometers (wet bulb) are required for accurate readings, and measurement points would be carried out at a different location by an HVAC contractor. These readings are shown to show the system responded to normal operating controls at the time of inspection, and not to show the exact temperature differential produced by the system, the efficiency, or performance of the system; which lies beyond the scope of a home inspection.

Thermostat(s): Thermostat Information - Multiple

The thermostats were operated and they initiated the HVAC systems at the time of inspection. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Air Filter / Return Plenum: Filter/Plenum Information

The return air grille, air filter, and return air plenum were inspected at visible portions looking for any significant deficiencies, gaps in the plenum, dirty filter(s), or an accumulation of dust. I recommend changing the filter every 30 days - 3 months depending on the style of filter used. This is one of the most important "maintenance" items you can perform as a dirty filter puts additional strain on the air handler and may cause damage to the unit.

HVAC Supply Registers: HVAC Supply Information

Conditioned air supply was present at the supply register(s) as seen with thermal imaging. CFM air flow is not inspected for. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Visible Ductwork: Ductwork Information - Finished Ceilings

Most portions of the ductwork were not visible due to finished ceilings in the basement. No deficiencies were present at visible portions unless otherwise noted in this report. 

In accordance with the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice the home inspector shall observe: the permanently installed heating and cooling systems including: Heating and cooling equipment that is central to the home; visible ducts and piping, air filters, registers, and the presence of an installed heating and cooling source in each room. The home inspector shall describe: the energy source and heating equipment. The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls. The home inspector shall open readily accessible access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector is not required to: Operate heating systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; Operate automatic safety controls; Ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or Observe: Humidifiers; Electronic air filters; or The uniformity or adequacy of heat supply to the various rooms. Efficiency of the units and load testing are not conducted. Air conditioning units can not be tested when temperatures are lower than 60 degrees, due to the possibility of damaging the compressor. Clients are advised to have an HVAC company to perform maintenance on the system on an annual basis.
 

Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - General Info

HVAC System Present in Garage

An HVAC system was present in the garage. This is not recommended as it compromises garage to living space fire separation. An evaluation of this system and how it compromises garage to living space separation is recommended by an HVAC contractor. 

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.2.1 - Exterior Unit(s) - Split System

Exterior Unit Not Level
Left Side of Home

The exterior unit was not level. This can put strain on the fan motor, prevent proper lubrication of the compressor, and affect system performance. Properly leveling the unit and/or pad is recommended by an HVAC contractor or other qualified person.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
10.2.2 - Exterior Unit(s) - Split System

Pipe Insulation Missing / Damaged
Left Side of Home

The pipe insulation was damaged or missing on the unit's suction line. Replacement of the insulation as needed is recommended by a qualified person.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Auxiliary Drain Pan

Drain Pan Not Present
Bedroom 3 Closet

An auxiliary drain pan and float switch was not present for the unit. A drain pan and float switch is recommended due to the unit being in or adjacent to living areas. A drain pan will contain condensate (water) from the unit in case of a clogged condensate drain line or other deficiency. Installation of a proper auxiliary drain pan is recommended by an HVAC contractor.

Credit
Comment
10.10.1 - Air Filter / Return Plenum

Dirty Filter

The air filter(s) was dirty. I recommend replacement ASAP. This puts additional strain on the unit, can shorten the life of the unit, and affects the efficiency of the unit.

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
10.10.2 - Air Filter / Return Plenum

Air Filter Incorrect Size
Hallway

The wrong size air filter was installed. This allows dust to enter the air handling unit. Servicing and maintenance of the unit is recommended.
Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
10.11.1 - HVAC Supply Registers

Air Supply Register Covered by Cabinetry
Laundry Room

An HVAC air supply duct has been covered by cabinetry, as seen with thermal imaging. The installation of a toe kick register is recommended by an HVAC contractor.

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.12.1 - Cooling Source Present in Each Room

Cooling Source Not Present in Each Room
Hallway Bathroom

An installed cooling source was not present in the referenced room(s). The installation of an installed proper cooling source is recommended by a qualified person.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
10.13.1 - Heating Source Present in Each Room

Heating Source Not Present in Each Room
Hallway Bathroom

An installed heating source was not present in the referenced room(s). The installation of an installed proper heating source is recommended by a qualified person. 

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
10.14.1 - Visible Ductwork

Air Supply Present in Garage/Basement

There was an air supply register present in the garage/basement. This should be sealed over or removed as carbon monoxide from a vehicle can enter the ductwork here and be dispersed throughout the home. Removal or sealing of this supply air vent is recommended by an HVAC contractor or other qualified person.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
10.14.2 - Visible Ductwork

Damaged Plastic Wrap
Attic

The plastic wrap was missing or damaged on insulated ductwork. This is typically a minor concern with no serious repercussions other than affecting energy efficiency slightly. These areas with damaged plastic can be resealed as needed by an HVAC contractor. 

Fire HVAC Professional

11 - Water Heater

Water Heater Condition: Water Heater Location
Basement
Water Heater Condition: Capacity
50 Gallons
Water Heater Condition: Energy Source
Electric
Water Heater Condition: Manufacture Year
2000

The typical life expectancy of a water heater is 13-15 years. 

Water Heater Condition: Water Temperature
Not Tested
TPRV Discharge Pipe: TPRV Discharge Tube Material
Not Present
Water Heater Condition: Not Tested-Breaker Off
The breaker was off for the water heater at the time of inspection, and the unit was not tested for functionality. I recommend confirming proper operation prior to closing.
TPR Valve: TPR Valve Information

A TPR valve was in place, and appeared functional. These are not tested due to the fact that once they are tested, they tend to form a drip leak. These valves allow the water heater to expel water and pressure if the tank reaches a pressure over 150psi, or the water temperature exceeds 210 degrees. No deficiencies were observed with the valve unless otherwise noted in this report. 

In accordance with the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice the inspector will examine and report the condition: of the water heater enclosure, plumbing supply, energy source, venting, and TPR valve, if applicable. The inspector is not required to: activate the system if it is powered down, or the pilot flame is not lit, Inspect the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.
 

Credit
Comment
11.1.1 - Water Heater Condition

Aged Unit

FYI - The unit was at or past its typical service life. Major repairs or replacement should be anticipated in the future due to its age alone. Depending on prior maintenance and other factors the unit could last anywhere from months to years, the remaining life is undeterminable. 

A typical life expectancy chart can be found here:

http://prohitn.com/component-life-expectancies/

Credit
Comment
11.1.2 - Water Heater Condition

Wiring Connection Improper

The wiring connection for the water heater was made improperly. All wiring connections should be properly secured and made in a junction box or inside of the panel on top of the unit. Repairs are recommended as needed by a licensed electrician.
Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.3.1 - TPRV Discharge Pipe

TPRV Discharge Pipe Missing

A TPR valve discharge pipe was not present. A copper, CPVC, or Pex pipe with a 3/4 inch I.D. should be connected to the TPR valve and terminate no more than 6 inches from the floor. The installation of this pipe is recommended by a licensed plumber or other qualified person.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Water Pipes

Expansion Tank Not Present

No expansion tank was installed for the water heater. Current standards and manufacturers instructions recommend that expansion tanks be installed during water heater installations on closed loop systems. The presence of a pressure regulator where the water line enters the home, prevents back flow, and makes this a closed loop system. The expansion tank provides an area for heated water to enter. When water is heated, it expands, and can put pressure on the water heater or plumbing components. The installation of an expansion tank is recommended by a licensed plumber. More info can be found here:


https://plumbertalk.wordpress.com/2014/01/07/expansion-tank-that-thing-on-top-of-your-waterheater/

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.4.2 - Water Pipes

Rust / Corrosion On Lines

Corrosion and / or rust was present on the water lines where they connect to the water heater. Dielectric unions may have not been used, or a prior leak may have been present. Evaluation, and repairs if needed, is recommended by a licensed plumber.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor

12 - Water Heater 2

Water Heater Condition: Water Heater Location
Garage
Water Heater Condition: Capacity
80 Gallons
Water Heater Condition: Energy Source
Electric
Water Heater Condition: Manufacture Year
2012

The typical life expectancy of a water heater is 13-15 years. 

Water Heater Condition: Water Temperature
Not Tested
TPRV Discharge Pipe: TPRV Discharge Tube Material
Not Present
Water Heater Condition: Not Tested-Breaker Off
The breaker was off for the water heater at the time of inspection, and the unit was not tested for functionality. I recommend confirming proper operation prior to closing.
TPR Valve: TPR Valve Information

A TPR valve was in place, and appeared functional. These are not tested due to the fact that once they are tested, they tend to form a drip leak. These valves allow the water heater to expel water and pressure if the tank reaches a pressure over 150psi, or the water temperature exceeds 210 degrees. No deficiencies were observed with the valve unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Water Pipes: Water Pipes Information

The visible portions of the water pipes appeared functional. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

In accordance with the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice the inspector will examine and report the condition: of the water heater enclosure, plumbing supply, energy source, venting, and TPR valve, if applicable. The inspector is not required to: activate the system if it is powered down, or the pilot flame is not lit, Inspect the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.
 

Credit
Comment
12.3.1 - TPRV Discharge Pipe

TPRV Discharge Pipe Missing

A TPR valve discharge pipe was not present. A copper, CPVC, or Pex pipe with a 3/4 inch I.D. should be connected to the TPR valve and terminate no more than 6 inches from the floor. The installation of this pipe is recommended by a licensed plumber or other qualified person.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.4.1 - Water Pipes

Expansion Tank Not Present

No expansion tank was installed for the water heater. Current standards and manufacturers instructions recommend that expansion tanks be installed during water heater installations on closed loop systems. The presence of a pressure regulator where the water line enters the home, prevents back flow, and makes this a closed loop system. The expansion tank provides an area for heated water to enter. When water is heated, it expands, and can put pressure on the water heater or plumbing components. The installation of an expansion tank is recommended by a licensed plumber. More info can be found here:


https://plumbertalk.wordpress.com/2014/01/07/expansion-tank-that-thing-on-top-of-your-waterheater/

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

13 - Plumbing

Main Shut Off Valve : Main Shut Off Valve Location
Basement
Water Pressure: Water Pressure
80 psi
Water Distribution Pipes: Service Pipe Material (Visible Portions)
Galvanized Steel
Water Distribution Pipes: Water Distribution Pipe Material (Visible Portions)
Copper, Aquapex
Drain, Waste, and Vent Pipes (DWV): Sewer/Septic Lateral Material (Visible Portions)
PVC
Drain, Waste, and Vent Pipes (DWV): DWV Material Type (Visible Portions)
PVC
Sewer Clean Out: Cleanout Location
Rear of Home
Sump/Ejector Pump: Sump/Ejector Pump Present
Not at Visible Portions
Sump/Ejector Pump: Not Present

No sump/ejector pump(s) were observed at the home at visible portions.

Functional Flow: Functional Flow
Yes
Functional Drainage: Functional Drainage
Yes
Main Shut Off Valve : Main Shut Off Information

The shut off valve appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report. The valve is not operated to test it's functionality.

Pressure Regulator: Pressure Regulator Information

The pressure regulator appeared to be in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection. No indications of deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Water Pressure: Water Pressure Information

The water pressure tested at an acceptable level at the time of inspection. 80psi or less is generally recommended to protect distribution pipes and connections from leaking (60 - 70psi is preferred). Most pressure regulators are adjustable from 25 - 75 psi.

Water Distribution Pipes: Water Distribution Pipes Information

Visible portions of the water distribution pipes were inspected looking for leaks or other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were visually present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Drain, Waste, and Vent Pipes (DWV): Drain, Waste, and Vent Pipes Information

Visible portions of the (DWV) drain, waste, and vent pipes were inspected looking for leaks or indications of other deficiencies. No reportable conditions (significant defects) were visibly present unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Sewer Clean Out: Cleanout Information

A sewer cleanout was present. Sewer cleanouts are reported on with regards to their presence only and are not attempted to open or verify any other information. 

Functional Flow: Flow Information

Water was ran from multiple faucets simultaneously to gauge that there was not a significant reduction in flow as a result of doing so. No significant reduction occurred at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Functional Drainage: Drainage Information

Water was ran through all drains in the home for an extended period of time to determine if functional drainage was occurring. No hindered drainage was present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. Lived-in conditions can not be adequately replicated during an inspection and I have no control of future drainage conditions due to heavy or frequent use.

In accordance with industry standards the home inspector shall observe at visible portions: Interior water supply and distribution system, including: piping materials and supports; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections. Interior drain, waste, and vent system, including: traps; drain and waste lines; leaks; and functional drainage. The home inspector shall describe: Water supply and distribution piping materials; Drain, waste, and vent piping materials; and Location of the main water supply shutoff device. The home inspector shall operate all plumbing fixtures, including their faucets and all exterior faucets attached to the house, except where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance.
The home inspector is not required to: State the effectiveness of anti-siphon devices; Determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; Operate automatic safety controls; Operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets; Observe: Water conditioning systems; Fire and lawn sprinkler systems; On-site water supply quantity and quality; On-site waste disposal systems; Foundation irrigation systems; Spas, except as to functional flow and functional drainage; Swimming pools; Solar water heating equipment; or Observe the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.
 

Credit
Comment
13.5.1 - Water Distribution Pipes

Service Pipe Galvanized

The water service pipe entering the home from the service provider was comprised of galvanized steel. Galvanized lines typically have a 50 - 60 year life and will eventually develop inner corrosion and rust that will lead to weakened water pressure and line failure. These lines will need to be monitored for their performance, with the understanding that major repairs or replacement will be needed at some point in the future due to their age.

Credit
Comment
13.6.1 - Drain, Waste, and Vent Pipes (DWV)

Area(s) of Improper Pitches Present
Basement

Area(s) of improper pitches were present on areas of the waste/drain pipes. Lines less than 3" in diameter should be pitched at 1/4" p/foot or more, and pipes 3" or greater should be pitched 1/8" p/foot or more. Evaluation and repairs as needed to achieve the proper pitch is recommended by a licensed plumber.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

14 - Electrical

Service Entrance: Service Entrance Type
Underground Service Lateral
Service Disconnect: Main Breaker / Service Disconnect Location
At Main Breaker by Exterior Meter
Service Amperage: Service Entrance Conductors Type
4/0 Aluminum, Presumed
Service Amperage: Service Amperage
400amps (2 X 200amps) 120/240VAC
Electrical Panel / Service Equipment: Electrical Panel / Service Equipment Location
By Service Meter
Distribution Panel: Distribution Panel(s) Location
Garage, Basement
Service Grounding / Bonding: GEC Present
Yes
Service Grounding / Bonding: Grounding Electrode Type
Rebar (Ground Rod), Presumed
Service Grounding / Bonding: Water Pipe Bonding Present
Not Visible
Breakers: AFCI Breakers Present
Partial
Breakers: Breakers in Off Position
2
Branch Wiring : Visible Branch Wiring Type
Polyvinyl Chloride (Romex-like) - Copper
GFCI Protection: GFCI Protected Areas
Exterior, Kitchen, Bathroom(s), Garage
GFCI Protection: GFCI Missing/Damaged - Installation Recommended
Kitchen, Basement, Garage
General Info: Low Voltage Systems/Wiring Not Inspected

Any low voltage systems in the home were not inspected and are excluded from this inspection. Including but not limited to: phone/telecom systems, cable coaxial systems, ethernet wiring, alarm systems, low voltage lighting and applicable wiring, etc.

General Info: Transfer Switch Not Inspected

The inspection of transfer switches is beyond the scope of a home inspection and the unit was not tested. I recommend evaluation by a licensed electrician if a concern. 

Service Entrance: Underground Service Lateral Information

Power was supplied to the home via an underground service lateral. The meter and conduit appeared to be in satisfactory condition. No deficiencies were observed at visible portions unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Service Disconnect: Service Disconnect Information

The service disconnect or main OCPD (over current protection device) was inspected looking for any deficiencies and reporting on its location. This disconnect can be a breaker, fuse block, or kill switch. This is the means of shutting off all electricity entering the home. 

Service Disconnect: Service Disconnect Independent of Main Panel

The service disconnect was independent of the "main" interior panel, and this panel containing the service disconnect is considered the service equipment. This renders the "main" panel in the home to a distribution panel. The distribution panel will be inspected to determine that the proper rules for distribution panels were followed. 

Service Amperage: Service Amperage

The service amperage is determined by inspecting the service entrance conductors size as well as the service disconnects size. Voltages are not tested for and therefore not confirmed, so 120/240VAC is assumed. If a concern, a licensed electrician could test for proper voltages to see if 120/208VAC is present. In some situations the sizing of the service entrance conductors will not be legible or marked and the stated amperage will be followed by "presumed" as it could not be verified. 

Service Amperage: SEC's Not Legibly Marked
The service entrance conductors were not legibly marked in regards to their size. The amperage or voltage was not tested, and is beyond the scope of a home inspection. The listed amperage is based on the amperage listed on the service panel.
Electrical Panel / Service Equipment: Electrical Panel / Service Equipment Information

The main electrical panel (called service equipment when it contains the service disconnect) was inspected looking for any wiring deficiencies or damage that may be present in the panel. No indications of reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Distribution Panel: Distribution Panel Information

The distribution panel was inspected to ensure all distribution panel rules were followed; that a 4-wire feed was present, that the EGC's and grounded conductors were isolated, that the grounded conductors were floating, that the EGC's were bonded, etc. No significant deficiencies were present in the panel(s) at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Service Grounding / Bonding: GEC Present

The grounding electrode conductor (GEC) was present and connected in the service equipment panel. Typically the attachment point to a grounding rod, etc. is not visible. No indications of deficiencies were observed at visible portions.

Service Grounding / Bonding: Water Pipe Bonding Not Visible - Finished Ceilings

Water pipe bonding was not visible and could not be confirmed due to finished ceilings in the basement. Further evaluation is recommended by a licensed electrician. 

Breakers: Breakers Information

The breakers were inspected looking for any visible signs of damage due to arcing, heat, etc. Corresponding conductors were inspected looking for multiple lugging, sizing, damage, etc. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Breakers: AFCI Not Present

AFCI breakers were not present in the electrical panel gorgeous all Sleeping rooms and were not required on homes built prior to 2004-2008, depending on the local municipality. The installation of AFCI breakers is recommended as an upgrade for circuits servicing bedrooms and living areas due to their ability to sense damage to wiring and "shut off" if an arc is detected in conductors or at connections. A licensed electrician can be consulted for more information. It may not be possible to install AFCI breakers in some older panels - upgrading the panel should be considered in these situations.

Breakers: AFCI Breakers Tested

The AFCI (Arc fault circuit interrupter) breakers in the panel tripped when the test button was depressed. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Breakers: Breakers Present That Were in the Off Position

There were breakers present that were in the "off" position at the time of inspection. These breakers were not turned on to test for functionality of components they may power. I recommend confirming proper operation of any circuits or appliances that were off at the time of inspection, prior to closing. 

Branch Wiring : Branch Wiring Information

The branch wiring was inspected at visible portions looking for any significant deficiencies or defects that could be a fire and/or safety hazard; including but not limited to: connections made outside of a junction box, wiring terminations, open junction boxes, damage, the wiring material, improper support, etc. The majority of branch feeders are not visible due to being behind wall and ceiling coverings, insulation, etc. No significant deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Receptacles: Receptacle Information

A representative number of receptacles were tested with a polarity tester to confirm proper wiring. No wiring deficiencies were reported by the tester unless otherwise noted in this report.

Receptacles: 220V/240V Receptacle(s) Not Tested

220V/240V receptacles are not tested for functionality or polarity, as they can not be tested with a standard receptacle polarity tester. Only visual deficiencies will be reported on with relation to these receptacle(s).

GFCI Protection: GFCI Information

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) is a protection feature that allows a circuit or receptacle to "trip" or "shut off" if as little as a 5 milliamp differential is detected between the "hot" and "neutral" conductors. This protection is required at locations near a water source or where something plugged into the receptacle could come into contact with water, including: bathrooms, kitchens, on the exterior, in garages, and basements. Although GFCI protection may not have been required in some or all of these areas when the home was built, their installation is highly recommended and is typically inexpensive. This protection, if present, was tested and was in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Ceiling Fans: Ceiling Fan Information

A representative number of ceiling fans were inspected by ensuring they powered on and did not wobble excessively, as well as looking for other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Ceiling Fans: Ceiling Fan Light Not Tested - No Remote
Large Entertainment Room

There were ceiling fans in the home were controlled by a remote, and the remotes were not found to test the functionality of the lights. I recommend confirming proper operation prior to closing.

Switches, Lights: Switches, Lights Information

A representative number of switches and lights were tested throughout the home and were found to be in good working order. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Switches, Lights: Lights Not Tested

Exterior dusk to dawn lights, motion lights, landscape lighting, or any light not attached to the structure are not included in a home inspection, and were not tested for functionality. These items are excluded from this inspection.

In accordance with the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice the home inspector shall observe: Service entrance conductors; Service equipment, grounding equipment, the main over current device, and main and distribution panels; Amperage and voltage ratings of the service (if the conductors' sizing text is present / legible); Branch circuit conductors, their over current devices, and the compatibility of their ampacities and voltages. The home inspector shall describe: Service amperage and voltage (if known); Service entry conductor materials; Service type as being overhead or underground; and the location of main and distribution panels. The home inspector shall report on: the presence of any observed aluminum branch circuit wiring.
The home inspector is not required to: Insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels; Test or operate any over current device except ground fault circuit interrupters; Dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels; or Observe: Motion or Dusk to Dawn lighting, Low voltage systems; Security system devices, heat detectors, or carbon monoxide detectors; Telephone, security, cable TV, intercoms, or other ancillary wiring that is not a part of the primary electrical distribution system.
 

Credit
Comment
14.5.1 - Electrical Panel / Service Equipment

Aged Panel/Electrical System
Distribution Panel Basement

This electrical panel was more than 30 years old. The electrical system is the most important system in the home in my opinion due to the possibility of age and defects creating a safety hazard. Any panels over 30 years of age and electrical conductors over 40 years of age are recommended to be evaluated by a licensed electrician to ensure they are performing as intended. These items should also be upgraded/replaced at your earliest convenience as panels manufactured in recent years are inherently safer due to more rigorous testing, safety features, etc. Below is a link to a great document by the Casualty Underwriters Association of America.

https://www.cauinsure.com/Include/Documents/P11%20-%20Aging%20Electrical%20Systems.pdf

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.6.1 - Distribution Panel

Panel Cover Screws Missing
Basement

Some panel cover screw(s) were missing. All panel cover screw locations are required to be utilized to adequately secure the cover to the panel. Replacement of the screws is recommended.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.6.2 - Distribution Panel

Inadequate Wiring Support at Panel
Basement

The conductors exiting the panel were not secured properly. Conductors / wiring should be secured within 12 inches of exiting the panel. Proper securement of the wiring here is recommended by a licensed electrician.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.6.3 - Distribution Panel

Grounding Bus Not Bonded To Panel Enclosure
Basement

The grounding bus was not bonded to the distribution panel enclosure. Proper bonding of the grounding bus to the panel enclosure is recommended by a licensed electrician for safety.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.6.4 - Distribution Panel

Open Knockouts
Garage

Open knockout(s) were present in the distribution panel. Knockout caps should be installed to keep mice out of panel box, and to avoid potential electrocution hazard.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.8.1 - Breakers

Double Lugged Breaker(s) Present
Basement

Double lugged breaker(s) were present in the panel. This is where two conductors (wires) are under the lug (screw) of a breaker. The breakers are only rated for one conductor, and the lug can not be torqued to proper specs with two wires present, which could cause overheating or other deficiencies. As well, depending on which wires are connected here, this could put two circuits on the breaker, dividing the supplied amperage to each circuit by two. Repairs are recommended here as deemed necessary by a licensed electrician.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.9.1 - Branch Wiring

Exposed Wiring - Interior
Above Microwave

There was exposed wiring present that was not in conduit, and therefore is subject to physical damage. The installation of conduit to protect this wiring is recommended by a licensed electrician.
Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.9.2 - Branch Wiring

Multiple Wiring Deficiencies
Basement, Attic

Multiple wiring deficiencies were present. Including but not limited to: junction boxes missing covers, unsupported wiring and junction boxes, wiring connections made outside of junction boxes, wiring terminations, etc. A full evaluation of the wiring with repairs made as needed is recommended by a licensed electrician.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.10.1 - Receptacles

Open Ground
Kitchen

There were receptacle(s) present that tested as having an open ground. Evaluation and repairs as needed is recommended by a licensed electrician.
Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.10.2 - Receptacles

Missing Cover Plate(s)
Above Microwave, Large Entertainment Room, Den

The were receptacles present with missing cover plate(s). This is a safety hazard, as someone could be shocked by touching live wires. I recommend the installation of new plates by a qualified person on any and all plates that are missing throughout the home.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.10.3 - Receptacles

Older Style 220/240V Receptacle(s) Present
Laundry Room

Older "three prong" 220/240V receptacles were present. This style of receptacle contains two 120V "hot" conductors, with the third conductor being a neutral, or ground and neutral tied together. This could potentially allow for current to energize the metal housing of the appliance that is powered by this three prong receptacle. A newer style "four prong" receptacle is recommended for safety. I recommend consulting a licensed electrician for upgrade options. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.11.1 - GFCI Protection

GFCI Protection Not Present
Basement

GFCI protection was not present or not functioning properly at the areas referenced at the top of the electrical section of the report, at the time of inspection. GFCI protection is recommended for the exterior, garage, and basement receptacles for safety, as well as kitchen and bathroom receptacles within 6 feet of a water source. Installation or repairs as needed to ensure GFCI protection is present at all required locations for safety is recommended by a licensed electrician. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.11.2 - GFCI Protection

GFCI Not Present Near Water Source
Kitchen

Receptacle were present that were within 6 feet of a water source and were not GFCI protected. GFCI protection is recommended here. Installation is recommended by a licensed electrician.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.11.3 - GFCI Protection

GFCI Not Present on all Garage Receptacles

GFCI protection was not present on all garage receptacles. All garage receptacles are required to have GFCI protection. Repairs are recommended as needed by a licensed electrician.
Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.13.1 - Switches, Lights

Switch Not Found
Living Room

A switch was not found for the ceiling fan. Evaluation and repairs as needed is recommended by a licensed electrician.

Electric Electrical Contractor

15 - Attic / Roof Structure

Inspection Method: Inspection Method
Walked/Crawled Where Possible, From Access Opening
Inspection Method: Amount of Attic Visually Accessible
30-40%
Inspection Method: Portions of Attic Not Visibly Accessible or Fully Accessible
Left Side of Home, Rear Of Home, Front of Home
Attic Access: Access Location(s)
Den, Bedroom Ceiling
Attic Access: Access Type(s)
Pull Down Stair(s), Scuttle Hole(s)
Ventilation: Ventilation Types
Ridge Exhaust Venting, Soffit Inlet Vents
Roof Structure / Framing: Roof Structure Type
Roof Trusses, Plywood Sheathing, OSB Sheathing
Roof Structure / Framing: Indications of Condensation Present
Yes
Insulation: Insulation Type
Blown-in Fiberglass
Insulation: Insulation Amount (Average)
12"+
Attic View(s)
Accessibility Limitations

Attics are navigated as best I can; levels of high insulation, HVAC ductwork, framing, and other factors can prevent physical and visual accessibility of some areas and items. The amount of the attic that was able to be safely and visually inspected will be listed as an approximate percentage above. Insulation is not moved or disturbed for visual accessibility of items. The inspection of this area is limited to visual portions only. Any areas that were not visible are excluded from this inspection.

Inspection Method: From Opening - Insulation Obscuring Ceiling Joists/Trusses
Over Addition

The attic area was evaluated from the access opening due to a high insulation level obscuring the bottom chord of the trusses or ceiling joists. Traversing an attic with a high level of insulation is dangerous, as footing can be lost. Also compressing or disturbing insulation by stepping on it affects its R-value and essentially "damages" it. This insulation coverage also may obscure wiring, HVAC ductwork, and plumbing pipes, and these items can be damaged by stepping on them. The inspection of the attic area is limited to visible portions from the opening only, hidden damage may exist in areas that were not visible from the opening. 

Inspection Method: Walked Where Possible - Insulation Obscuring Ceiling Joists/Trusses
Over Original Portion of Home

The attic area was walked where possible, but not all areas were able to be safely traversed due to insulation obscuring the bottom chord of the truss/ceiling joists. Traversing an attic with a high level of insulation is dangerous, as footing can be lost. Also compressing or disturbing insulation by stepping on it affects its R-value and essentially "damages" it. This insulation also obscures wiring and plumbing pipes, and these items can be damaged by stepping on them. The inspection of the attic area is limited to visual portions only, hidden damage may exist in areas that were not visible from accessible areas. 

Attic Access: Attic Access Information

The attic access(es) were inspected by reporting on their location and type, as well as looking for any significant defects in association with the access. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Ventilation: Ventilation Information

The attic ventilation was reported on by a visual inspection of said ventilation sources, and looking for indications of improper ventilation. Measurements of ventilation sources are beyond the scope of a home inspection and were not conducted. No indications of inadequate ventilation was observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Roof Structure / Framing: Roof Structure Information

The roof structure was inspected at visible portions looking for any signs of moisture infiltration, damage, or other deficiencies. No reportable conditions or indications of past or present leaks were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Insulation: Insulation Information

The insulation was inspected to determine the approximate depth and type. Current energy star standards recommend approximately 14 inches of insulation to achieve an R-38 rating. Depending on when the home was constructed anywhere from 8-14 inches may be present. No reportable deficiencies were observed with the insulation unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Plumbing Stack Vents: Vent Stack Information

Visible portions of the plumbing stack vent(s) were inspected looking for any disconnected portions and looking at the condition of the sheathing or decking surrounding them for indications of past or present leaks. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

In accordance with the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice the inspector will examine: the attic area and report on the condition of the access opening (including location), insulation type (and current depth), ducts, visible electrical components, exhaust terminations, plumbing components, and ventilation if applicable.
The inspector is not required to: move or disturb insulation, or report on the adequacy of current ventilation, Calculate the strength, adequacy, or efficiency of any system or component including framing. Enter any attic that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely affect the health or safety of the home inspector or other persons. Therefore, I do not attempt to enter attics with less than 36" of headroom; where insulation obscures the ceiling joists; or where ducts block access. In these cases I will evaluate from the access opening as best I can.
 

Credit
Comment
15.6.1 - Exhaust Vent(s)

Bathroom Fans Terminating in Attic

The bathroom exhaust fan(s) were terminating in the attic. Fans should be ducted to exterior air to limit condensation and moisture in the attic. Repairs are recommended by a qualified person.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
15.7.1 - Plumbing Stack Vents

Plumbing Stack Terminated in Attic
Rear of Home

A plumbing stack vent(s) terminated in the attic. This can lead to moisture and sewer gas exhausting into the attic area. Only one vent needs to be terminated to the exterior, other vents may use an AAV (air admittance valve) and terminate in the attic. Repairs are recommended as needed by a licensed plumber. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

16 - Basement, Crawl Space, & Foundation

Foundation Type
Basement Below Grade, Walk-Out Basement, Post and Beam
Floor Structure Visual Obstructions
HVAC Ductwork, Plumbing Pipes
Moisture Presence: Indications of Moisture at Visible Portions
Moisture Content on Walls
Framing / Floor Structure: Floor Structure Materials
Wood Floor Joists
Framing / Floor Structure: Indications of Condensation Present
Yes
Subfloor: Subfloor Material
Plywood
Foundation Walls: Foundation Wall Material
CMU Block
Floor Structure Support: Floor Structure Support Type (Piers or Columns)
Steel Columns
Garage Door Opener(s): Opener Drive Type
Belt Drive
Garage Door Opener(s): Opener Button Proper Height
Yes
Insulation: Insulation Present at Unfinished Areas
Partial
Basement View(s)
Visual Limitations Information

The referenced visual obstructions listed above may block or hinder visual accessibility of the floor structure and other areas. The inspection of the foundation area and floor structure is limited to visual portions only. Any items or areas not visible are excluded from this inspection. Insulation or any other item is not moved or disturbed for visual accessibility.

Current Standards - Separation
Current standards require the presence of 5/8" Type X drywall to be installed over the framing (on the ceiling) above the basement garage area as well as a steel or solid wood door measuring no less than 1 3/8" thick between the basement garage area and living areas for separation of garage and living areas. These upgrades are recommended for fire safety.
Moisture Presence: Moisture Infiltration Information - Basement

The basement area was inspected looking for signs of past or present water intrusion by inspecting visible portions of the foundation walls and floors looking for moisture stains and/or other signs of prior water intrusion. No signs of water / moisture intrusion was present at visible portions at the time of inspection in the basement area unless otherwise noted in this report. I can only report on the conditions as they existed at the time of inspection, and can not guarantee that water will not infiltrate this area at a future time due to a heavy rain or changes in conditions. I have inspected homes where no water or indications of water intrusion was present at the time of inspection, but days later standing water was present due to a rainfall event, and for this reason, I highly recommend consulting with the sellers as to prior moisture infiltration into this area, and reading the sellers disclosure which should list such a condition. 

Framing / Floor Structure: Floor Structure Information

Visible portions of the framing and floor structure were inspected looking for damage or other significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Subfloor: Subfloor Information

Visual portions of the subfloor were inspected looking for damage or other significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Foundation Walls: Foundation Walls Information

Visible portions of the foundation walls were inspected looking for significant cracking, moisture intrusion, or any other indications of damage or significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Foundation Walls: Foundation Wall Cracks Information/Limitations

Cracks are reported on by their presence, location, and visual condition as existing at the time of inspection only. I can not render a professional opinion as to a cracks severity, cause, or whether it has been recently active. Only a Structural Engineer can render a judgement on a cracks severity and repercussions and they should be consulted as desired.

Any references to cracks on foundation walls below grade will need to be sealed at a minimum by a qualified person to prevent the possibility of moisture/water infiltration, regardless of the cracks size.

Floor Structure Support: Column(s) Information

Columns were present that supported the overhead floor structure. The column(s) appeared to be in satisfactory condition at visible portions, at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Floor / Slab Condition: Slab Information

The concrete slab was inspected looking for irregular cracking, signs of moisture, or significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at visible portions, at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.  

Floor / Slab Condition: Floor Drain
Garage

A floor drain was present in the basement area of the foundation. Floor drains are not tested for functionality. 

Basement Garage Door: Garage Door Information

The garage door(s) were tested by operating the wall mounted transmitter and checking for proper operation. The door(s) were examined for significant damage or installation related deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garage Door Parts: Garage Door Parts Information

The rollers, brackets, door panels, springs, and tracks were inspected looking for damage or loose components. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garage Door Opener(s): Garage Door Opener Information

The garage door opener(s) were inspected by depressing the wall mounted transmitter and observing the openers functionality (remote transmitters are not tested). No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garage Door Safety: Eye Beam(s) Information

The safety eye beam(s) were inspected by closing the garage door and "breaking" the path of the eye beam(s) to ensure the door auto-reversed properly. The system was functional unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garage Door Safety: Resistance Not Tested
The "Resistance" test of the garage door(s) was not conducted due to the possibility of damaging the door and/or the opener. Garage doors contain two safety measures to prevent someone from being injured or pinned by a closing garage door. Photoelectric eyes, and the ability to auto reverse, if the door meets resistance or a solid object. I recommend testing this feature for functionality once taking ownership of the home. The test can be conducted by placing a 2" X 4" laid at on the ground, underneath of the door. When the door is closed, it should contact the 2" X 4", and auto-reverse. If it does not, adjustments to the "force close" setting on the opener will need to be made, or a garage door contractor should evaluate.
Exterior Door: Exterior Basement Door Information

The exterior basement door was inspected by looking for damage, lack of proper flashing, deficiencies with its operation, etc. No reportable deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Stairs: Stairs Information

The stairs were inspected by evaluating the risers and treads, applicable railings, etc. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Wash Basin: Wash Basin Information

The wash basin was inspected by operating the faucet and faucet valves looking for leaks or any significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

In accordance with the Tennessee  standards of practice the inspector will examine and report on the condition of: the foundation walls, the framing (including probing of any framing that looks to have damage / deterioration), columns / piers, the crawl space access, and insulation, if applicable.

The inspector is not required to: enter any area that could be considered a safety hazard to the inspector; report on the adequacy of structural components; or report on spacing, span, or size of structural components. Ductwork, framing, plumbing, and insulation may block visual accessibility of some areas. The inspection is limited to the conditions on the inspection day; I inspect several items to try and determine if moisture is or has infiltrated the basement / crawl space area. But, can not guarantee that water will not infiltrate the area at a future time due to conditions unforeseen at the time of inspection.

 

Credit
Comment
16.1.1 - Moisture Presence

Elevated Moisture Content Present
Front of Home, Left side of Home in garage

Moisture intrusion / elevated moisture content was present on the referenced foundation wall(s). Evaluation is recommended by a foundation or grading contractor with repairs made as needed to prevent or manage moisture infiltration into the structure.

Foundation Foundation Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.2.1 - Framing / Floor Structure

Holes Bored Larger Than 1/3
Basement

There were holes bored through a beam or joist(s) that were larger than 1/3 of the depth of the joist / beam. This can affect the structural integrity of the framing member. Evaluation and repairs as deemed necessary is recommended by a contractor.

Hardhat General Contractor
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Comment
16.2.2 - Framing / Floor Structure

Holes Bored Within 2" of Bottom Edge of Framing Member

There were holes bored through a beam or joist(s) that were within 2 inches of the top or bottom of the joist(s) or beam. This can affect the structural integrity of the framing member. Evaluation and repairs are recommended as needed by a contractor.
Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.4.1 - Foundation Walls

Horizontal Cracking Present
Left Side and Front of Home

A horizontal crack was present on the foundation wall with heavy bowing of the wall present (approx 1.5" in four feet). This is typically indicative of hydrostatic pressure from expansive soils, pushing against the wall, but can not be confirmed. Repairs have been made here with carbon fiber strips, but this repair would have had to been engineer designed. I recommend consulting with the sellers as to a copy of the engineers report or design, and/or having a structural engineer to evaluate. 

House construction Structural Engineer
Credit
Comment
16.5.1 - Floor Structure Support

Columns Not Lagged to Framing

The steel columns were not lagged to the framing overhead. Proper attachment to the framing is recommended by a contractor or other qualified person.
Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
16.5.2 - Floor Structure Support

Bottom Plates of Columns Visible

The bottom plate of a steel column in the basement was visible. Typically columns are installed on 2 feet by 2 feet by 2 feet footers below the slab, and the slab then poured to the column to secure it in place. No cracks were observed radiating out from the column location at the slab, and the slab may be reinforced below this area. I recommend having a qualified person to evaluate the blueprints for the home (if available), and evaluation by a contractor and/or structural engineer. At a minimum the base plates should be attached to the slab to prevent lateral displacement. 

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.7.1 - Basement Garage Door

Door Not Operating Smoothly

The garage door did not operate smoothly and may be out of alignment. Repairs are recommended as needed by a garage door contractor for proper operation. 

Garage Garage Door Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.10.1 - Garage Door Safety

Eyes Installed Too High

The photoelectric eye sensors were installed too high. These sensors are recommended to be installed between 6 and 8 inches from the floor (dependent on manufacturer). Repairs are recommended by a garage door contractor or other qualified person to achieve the proper height.

Garage Garage Door Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.12.1 - Insulation

Insulation Orientation Incorrect

There was insulation present that was installed "upside down". The vapor barrier (kraft paper) face should face the conditioned side of the home. This can potentially allow condensation to form between the subfloor and insulation. Evaluation of the orientation of the insulation is recommended by an insulation contractor with repairs made as needed. 

House construction Insulation Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.12.2 - Insulation

Insulation Missing in Areas

Insulation was not present between all of the floor joists. Current energy standards recommend for insulation to be installed between the floor joists for energy efficiency when living areas are overhead. The installation of insulation is recommended by an insulation contractor as needed.

House construction Insulation Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.13.1 - Stairs

Stair Railing Not Present

Vertical stair railing was not present on the basement steps. Vertical stair railing with no more than 4 3/8 inch spacing between the balusters, is recommended for safety.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
16.13.2 - Stairs

Open Risers

There were "open risers" present on the basement steps. This is where no facing is present on the risers, creating an opening greater than 4 inches. This is a potential trip hazard and/or a child's leg could be caught in the opening. Current safety standards require that the risers are closed, or designed in a way to prohibit the passage of a 4 inch sphere. Closing the risers or decreasing this spacing is recommended for safety. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
16.13.3 - Stairs

Rise and/or Tread Design Deficiencies

There were risers and or tread design deficiencies present. Current safety standards require that treads are 10" in depth, and that riser heights between the treads are no greater than 7 3/4" in height. There also shouldn't be more than a 3/8" variance between the individual riser heights. Any variances from these numbers can result in a potential trip hazard. Corrections or modifications to the stairs to try and achieve the proper depths or heights are often very difficult or costly. If a concern, I recommend consulting a contractor who specializes in stairs. 

Credit
Comment
16.13.4 - Stairs

Stair Stringer Spacing Improper

There was greater than 36 inches of spacing between the stair stringers. Another stringer will need to be added here. Repairs are recommended by a contractor or other qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional

17 - Environmental Concerns

Odors Present: Odor(s) Present in the Home
None
Odors Present: No Odors Present

No discernable odors were present or noticed in the home at the time of inspection. 

Asbestos: Asbestos

The possibility exists that homes built prior to 1986 may contain building components or items (textured ceiling material, adhesives, tile, tapes, insulation, etc) that contain asbestos. In accordance with the State of Tennessee standards of practice these items are not reported on during a home inspection. If I see obvious signs of a material that I may believe to contain asbestos, I will recommend further evaluation as a courtesy, but these individual references should not be construed as an all-inclusive list. Furthermore, any remodeling or repairs that may take place in the future may reveal asbestos or other environmental hazards that were not visible at the time of inspection. If asbestos is a concern, you are advised to have a full environmental inspection by an environmental contractor prior to closing.

Lead Based Paint: Lead Based Paint

The possibility exists that homes built prior to 1978 may contain paint that was lead based. In accordance with the State of Tennessee standards of practice lead based paint is not reported on, or tested for during a home inspection. If lead based paint is a concern, you are advised to consult an environmental company prior to closing and have additional inspections specializing in environmental hazards.

Fungal Growth: Fungal Growth

There were visible areas of fungal growth and/or related pathogenic organisms at the home. The State of Tennessee standards of practice do not require fungal growths or molds to be reported on during a home inspection, but nonetheless if I observe visible fungal growth or conditions that are conducive to fungal growth, I will note it in the report and recommended further evaluation and testing by an environmental company as a courtesy. These indicated areas should not be viewed as an all-inclusive listing, as fungal growth could be present at areas that were not visible. Once spores from fungal growth are present in the home, they can collect at other "damp" locations and grow. If mold is a concern, you are advised to have an environmental inspection of the structure by an environmental company or industrial hygenist prior to closing.

Credit
Comment
17.4.1 - Fungal Growth

Fungal Growth - Attic
Over Original Portion of Home

There was fungal growth present on areas of the roof sheathing/decking in the attic. This can be the result of a range of issues from improper air sealing of ceiling protrusions (lights, ceiling fans, etc.) allowing conditioned air into the attic area, which can allow condensation to form. But can also be present from improper ventilation of the attic, moisture present in crawl space or basement areas reaching the attic via stack effect, and/or bathroom exhaust fans terminating in the attic. Or some combination of all of these issues. Evaluation and repairs to the source of the growth is recommended by a qualified contractor familiar with building sciences and ventilation, and then evaluation of the fungal growth is recommended by a environmental contractor with remediation conducted as needed.

Mold Environmental Contractor
Credit
Comment
17.4.2 - Fungal Growth

Fungal Growth (Evidence of Condensation) - Basement
Basement

Fungal growth was present on the floor structure in areas. This is typically indicative of high humidity and/or condensation forming on the framing members. This can be caused by moisture intrusion through the foundation walls, leaks in HVAC ductwork, or other issues. Evaluation and repairs to the source of the condensation is recommended by a qualified contractor familiar with building sciences. Then evaluation and testing of the growth, and remediation if needed, is recommended by an environmental company.

Mold Environmental Contractor

18 - Final Checklist

Oven Turned Off
Yes
All GFCI Receptacles Reset?
Yes
Thermostat Initial Setting
Cool, 74
Thermostat Leaving Setting
Cool, 74
All Lights Turned Off?
Yes
All Exterior Doors Locked?
Yes
Photo of Oven in Off Position
Photo Of Thermostat When Leaving

Final checklist showing the home was left as it was found, and was locked when complete.