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1234 Main St.
Lander, WY 82520
03/30/2020 9:00AM

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It is recommended that any noted deficiencies be evaluated and repaired by a certified contractor of trade.

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.



1 - Inspection Information

General Info: In Attendance
Inspector Only
General Info: Occupancy
Vacant
General Info: Type of Building
Single Family
General Info: Construction Year (From Online Sources)
2005
General Info: Inspection Type
Pre-purchase
General Info: Structure Faces
North
General Info: Weather Conditions
Clear
General Info: Temperature at the Time of Inspection
Less Than 32 Degrees
General Info: Precipitation in the Last 48 hrs?
No
General Info: Ground Condition
Snow Cover
Important Information / Limitations: Overview

REFINE Home Inspection, LLC strives to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the InterNACHI Standards of Practice. As such, I inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of the home as designated in these Standards of Practice. When systems or components designated in the Standards of Practice were present but were not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected will be stated. This inspection is neither technically exhaustive or quantitative.

There may be comments made in this report that exceed the required reporting of the Standards of Practice, these comments (if present) were made as a courtesy to give you as much information as possible about the home. Exceeding the Standards of Practice will only happen when I feel I have the experience, knowledge, or evidence to do so. There should be no expectation that the Standards of Practice will be exceeded throughout the inspection, and any comments made that do exceed the standards will be followed by a recommendation for further evaluation and repairs by applicable tradespeople. 

This report contains observations of those systems and components that, in my professional judgement, were not functioning properly, significantly deficient, or unsafe. All items in this report that were designated for repair, replacement, maintenance, or further evaluation should be investigated by qualified tradespeople within the clients contingency period, to determine a total cost of said repairs and to learn of any additional problems that may be present during these evaluations that were not visible during a "visual only" Home Inspection. 

This inspection will not reveal every concern or issue that may be present, but only those significant defects that were accessible and visible at the time of inspection. This inspection can not predict future conditions, or determine if latent or concealed defects are present. The statements made in this report reflect the conditions as existing at the time of inspection only, and expire at the completion of the inspection, as conditions can change. Weather conditions and other changes in conditions may reveal problems that were not present at the time of inspection; including but not limited to: roof leaks, or water infiltration into crawl spaces or basements. This report is only supplemental to the Sellers Disclosure and Pest (WDI) Inspection Report. Refer to the Standards of Practice (linked to above), and the Inspection agreement regarding the scope and limitations of this inspection.

This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, regarding the operation, function, or future reliability of the home and it's components. AND IT SHOULD NOT BE RELIED ON AS SUCH. This inspection report should be used alongside the sellers disclosure, pest inspection (WDI) report, and quotes and advice from the tradespeople recommended in this report to gain a better understanding of the condition of the home. Some risk is always involved when purchasing a property and unexpected repairs should be anticipated, as this is unfortunately, a part of home ownership. One Year Home Warranties may cover future repairs on major items and components of the home. If a warranty is not being provided by the seller(s), your Realtor can advise you of companies who offer them. 

Important Information / Limitations: Notice to Third Parties

Notice to Third Parties: This report is the property of Refine Home Inspection, LLC and is Copyrighted as of 2019.  This document is non-transferrable, in whole or in part, to any and all third-parties, including; subsequent buyers, sellers, and listing agents. Copying and pasting deficiencies to prepare the repair request is permitted. THE INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT SHALL NOT BE RELIED UPON BY ANY ONE OTHER THAN THE CLIENT NAMED HEREIN. This report is governed by an Inspection agreement that contained the scope of the inspection, including limitations, exclusions, and conditions of the copyright. Unauthorized recipients are advised to contact a qualified Home Inspector of their choosing to provide them with their own Inspection and Report.  

Important Information / Limitations: Items Not Inspected and Other Limitations

ITEMS NOT INSPECTED - There are items that are not inspected in a home inspection such as, but not limited to; fences and gates, pools and spas, outbuildings or any other detached structure, refrigerators, washers / dryers, storm doors and storm windows, screens, window AC units, gas furnace heat exchangers, central vacuum systems, water softeners, alarm and intercom systems, and any item that is not a permanent attached component of the home. Also drop ceiling tiles are not removed, as they are easily damaged, and this is a non-invasive inspection. Subterranean systems are also excluded, such as but not limited to: underground sprinkler systems, sewer lines, septic tanks, water delivery systems, and underground fuel storage tanks. 

Water and gas shut off valves are not operated under any circumstances. As well, any component or appliance that is unplugged or "shut off" is not turned on or connected for the sake of evaluation. I don't have knowledge of why a component may be shut down, and can't be liable for damages that may result from activating said components/appliances. 

Also not reported on are the causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; The insurability of the structure or any of its items or components, Any component or system that was not observed; Calculate the strength, adequacy, design, or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility. 

Lastly a home inspection does not address environmental concerns such as, but not limited to: Asbestos, lead, lead based paint, radon, mold, wood destroying insects or organisms (termites, etc), cockroaches, rodents, pesticides, fungus, treated lumber, Chinese drywall, mercury, or carbon monoxide.

Important Information / Limitations: Recommended Contractors Information

CONTRACTORS / FURTHER EVALUATION: It is recommended that licensed professionals be used for repair issues as it relates to the comments in this report, and copies of receipts are kept for warranty purposes. The use of the term "Qualified Person" in this report relates to an individual, company, or contractor whom is either licensed or certified in the field of concern. If I recommend evaluation or repairs by contractors or other licensed professionals, it is possible that they will discover additional problems since they will be invasive with their evaluation and repairs. Any listed items in this report concerning areas reserved for such experts should not be construed as a detailed, comprehensive, and/or exhaustive list of problems, or areas of concern.

CAUSES of DAMAGE / METHODS OF REPAIR: Any suggested causes of damage or defects, and methods of repair mentioned in this report are considered a professional courtesy to assist you in better understanding the condition of the home, and in my opinion only from the standpoint of a visual inspection, and should not be wholly relied upon. Contractors or other licensed professionals will have the final determination on the causes of damage/deficiencies, and the best methods of repairs, due to being invasive with their evaluation. Their evaluation will supersede the information found in this report.

Important Information / Limitations: Thermal Imaging Information

THERMAL IMAGING: An infrared camera may be used for specific areas or visual problems, and should not be viewed as a full thermal scan of the entire home. Additional services are available at additional costs and would be supplemented by an additional agreement/addendum. Temperature readings displayed on thermal images in this report are included as a courtesy and should not be wholly relied upon as a home inspection is qualitative, not quantitative. These values can vary +/- 4% or more of displayed readings, and these values will display surface temperatures when air temperature readings would actually need to be conducted on some items which is beyond the scope of a home inspection.

Important Information / Limitations: Other Notes - Important Info

INACCESSIBLE AREAS: In the report, there may be specific references to areas and items that were inaccessible or only partly accessible. I can make no representations regarding conditions that may be present in these areas that were concealed or inaccessible for review. With access and an opportunity for inspection, reportable conditions or hidden damage may be found in these areas.

QUALITATIVE vs QUANTITATIVE - A home inspection is not quantitative, when multiple or similar parts of a system, item, or component are found to have a deficiency, the deficiency will be noted in a qualitative manner such as "multiple present" etc. A quantitative number of deficient parts, pieces, or items will not be given as the repairing contractor will need to evaluate and ascertain the full amount or extent of the deficiency or damage. This is not a technically exhaustive inspection. 

REPAIRS VERSUS UPGRADES - I inspect homes to today's safety and building standards. Therefore some recommendations made in this report may have not been required when the home was constructed. Building standards change and are improved for the safety and benefit of the occupants of the home and any repairs and/or upgrades mentioned should be considered for safety, performance, and the longevity of the homes items and components. Although, I will address some recommended upgrades in the report, this should not be construed as a full listing of items that could potentially be upgraded. To learn of ALL the ways the home could be brought up to today's building and safety standards, full and exhaustive evaluations should be conducted by qualified tradespeople. 

COMPONENT LIFE EXPECTANCY - Components may be listed as having no deficiencies at the time of inspection, but may fail at any time due to their age or lack of maintenance, that couldn't be determined by the inspector. A life expectancy chart can be viewed by visiting https://www.refinehomeinspection.com/lifeexpectancy

PHOTOGRAPHS: Several photos are included in your inspection report. These photos are for informational purposes only and do not attempt to show every instance or occurrence of a defect.

TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS: This report is proofread before sending it out, but typographical errors may be present. If any errors are noticed, please feel free to contact me for clarification.

Please acknowledge to me once you have completed reading this report. At that time I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, or provide clarification. Non-acknowledgement implies that you understood all information contained in this report.


Important Information / Limitations: Snow Cover

Snow cover was present at the time of inspection. This snow cover obscured the visibility of items, including but not limited to; driveways and walkways, the grading around the structure, deck surfaces, concrete surfaces, the roof surface, etc. Any comments relating to these items or components are limited to visual portions only. Any areas not visible are excluded from this inspection. 

Important Information / Limitations: Comment Key - Definitions

This report divides deficiencies into three categories; Major Defects (in red), Marginal Defects (in orange), and Minor Defects/Maintenance Items/FYI (colored in blue). Safety Hazards or Concerns will be listed in the Red or Orange categories depending on their perceived danger, but should always be addressed ASAP. 

  • Major Defects - Items or components that may require a major expense to correct. Items categorized in this manner require further evaluation and repairs or replacement as needed by a Qualified Contractor prior to the end of your contingency period. 
  • Marginal Defects - Items or components that were found to include a deficiency. These items may have been functional at the time of inspection, but this functionality may be impaired, not ideal, or the defect may lead to further problems (most defects will fall into this categorization). Repairs or replacement is recommended to items categorized in this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect, prior to the end of your contingency period. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a Handyman or Qualified Contractor and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs. 
  • Minor Defects/Maintenance Items/FYI - This categorization will include items or components that were found to be in need of recurring or basic general maintenance and/or may need minor repairs which may improve their functionality. This categorization will also include FYI items that could include observations, important information, recommended upgrades to items, areas, or components, as well as items that were nearing, at, or past the end of their typical service life, but were in the opinion of the inspector, still functional at the time of inspection. Major repairs or replacement should be anticipated, and planned for, on any items that are designated as being past, or at the end of their typical life. These repairs or replacement costs can sometimes represent a major expense; i.e. HVAC systems, Water Heaters, Plumbing pipes, etc. 

These categorizations are in my professional judgement and based on what I observed at the time of inspection. This categorization should not be construed as to mean that items designated as "Minor defects" or "Marginal Defects" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendations in each comment is more important than its categorization. Due to your perception, opinions, or personal experience you may feel defects belong in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once again it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining to each defect that is paramount, not its categorical placement. 

Important Information / Limitations: Home Maintenance E-Book

REFINE Home Inspection, LLC is pleased to provide you with a free e-book that will help you LEARN how your home works, KEEP it maintained & SAVE energy!

This book will guide you through the systems of a typical house, how they work, and how to maintain them. The systems include the following: 

HOME EXTERIORS 

HOME INTERIORS 

PLUMBING 

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM 

HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS 

MONTHLY MAINTENANCE/INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Download your copy here:  https://www.refinehomeinspection.com/homemaintenancebook


 

2 - Roof

General Info: Inspection Method
Walked the Roof Where Possible, From Ladder
Roof Covering Material: Shingles Stage of Life Estimation
Second Third of Life
Vents / Protrusions: Roof Protrusion Type(s)
Plumbing Stack Vent(s), Flue Vent(s)
Chimney: Chimney Material
Galvanized Flue Vent, Metal Flue Vent
Roof Covering Material: Roof Covering Material
Architectural Composite Shingles
General Info: Roof Views
General Info: Roof Limitations

The inspection of the roof and its covering material is limited to the conditions on the day of the inspection only. The roof covering material, visible portions of the roof structure from within the attic (if applicable), and interior ceilings, were inspected looking for indications of current or past leaks. Future conditions and inclement weather may reveal leaks that were not present at the time of inspection. Any deficiencies noted in this report with the roof covering or indications of past or present leaks should be evaluated and repaired as needed by a licensed roofing contractor.

General Info: Walked Where Possible

The roof surface was walked where possible, but not all areas could be physically walked due to the pitch of the roof and frost cover on the north side.  The areas not able to be walked where examined from the ground, or a ladder. This should be considered a limited inspection of the roof due to all areas not being able to be walked. If a more thorough inspection is needed I recommend consulting a roofing contractor.

Roof Covering Material: Shingles Stage of Life Information

I will do my best to estimate the stage of life that the shingles appeared to be in at the time of inspection. 

Architectural Composition shingles typically have a 24-27 year life span. This would equate to:

  • First Third of Life: 1-8 years in age
  • Second Third of Life: 8-16 years in age
  • Last Third of Life: 16-24 years in age


Roof Covering Material: Architectural Shingles

The roof covering was comprised of architectural composition shingles. Architectural shingles, also called dimensional shingles, are thicker and heavier (often 50% more) than traditional 3-tab shingles. These 'premium' shingles are manufactured by starting with a fiberglass reinforcement mat, multiple layer of asphalt are added over the mat, and lastly ceramic granules are added over the upper layer of asphalt for protection against the elements (wind, rain, UV rays from the sun). Architectural shingles typically have higher wind resistance numbers, resist leaks better, and typically have a longer warranty than their 3-tab counterparts

Due to the many variables which affect the lifespan of roof covering materials, I do not estimate the remaining service life of any roof coverings. This is in accordance with all industry inspection Standards of Practice.The following factors affect the lifespan of roof covering materials:

  • Roofing material quality: Higher quality materials, will of course, last longer.
  • Number of layers: Shingles installed over existing shingles will have a shorter lifespan.
  • Structure orientation: Southern facing roofs will have shorter lifespans.
  • Pitch of the roof: Shingles will age faster on a lower pitched roof in comparison with higher pitches.
  • Climate: Wind, rain, and snow will impact the lifespan of the roof.
  • Color: Shingles that are darker in color will have a shorter lifespan, than lighter colored shingles.
  • Attic Ventilation: Poorly vented attic spaces will decrease shingle life due to heat.
  • Vegetation conditions: Overhanging trees, branches, contacting the roof, or leaf cover drastically shorten lifespan.

Asphalt shingles must be installed to manufacturers' recommendations, for the warranty coverage to be upheld. These installation requirements vary widely from manufacturer to manufacturer, and across the multitude of different shingle styles manufactured. I will inspect the roof to the best of my ability, but confirming proper fastening, use and adequacy of underlayment, and adequacy of flashing is impossible as these items are not visible, Damaging and invasive means would have to be carried out to confirm proper installation. Therefore, the inspection of the roof is limited to visual portions only.

Roof Surface Condition: Shingles Information

The shingles were inspected at visible portions for excessive granule loss, signs of curling or delamination, loss of adhesion between the shingles, and any other signs of damage or excessive age. No significant deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Vents / Protrusions: Roof Protrusions Information

The plumbing stack vents, their related rain boots, and other roof penetrations were inspected by looking at their clearance, the integrity of their boots, for proper installation, or any significant defects. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Roof Flashings: Flashing Information

Visible portions of the flashings were inspected looking for installation related deficiencies or damage (drip edge, sidewall, headwall, counter, etc - if applicable). Typically most areas of flashings are not visible as they are covered by the roof covering material, and therefore functionality has to be determined by looking for moisture intrusion on the sheathing in the attic, or ceilings where the flashing was presumed to be in place. No deficiencies were observed at visible portions, at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Gutters / Downspouts: Gutters Information

The gutters were inspected looking for proper securement, debris in the channel, standing water, damage, etc. Leaking gutters can not be diagnosed if an active rain was not occurring at the time of inspection, and if leaks are noticed after taking ownership of the home, sealing or repairs may be needed at seams or endcaps. No deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Gutters / Downspouts: Downspouts Information

The downspouts were inspected to ensure they were diverting rainwater away from the foundation walls. Testing for blockages in downspouts or drainpipes is beyond the scope of a home inspection, as is locating their termination point. No deficiencies were present at visible portions at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Gutters / Downspouts: Recommend Maintaining Gutters

It is recommended to periodically clean debris from the guttering channels to prevent downspouts from clogging. Clogs in downspouts can allow the gutters to overflow; damaging roof sheathing, fascia boards, and saturating grounds at the foundation.

In accordance with the Standards of Practice the home inspector shall observe: The roof covering, roof drainage systems, visible flashings, skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and report on signs of leaks or abnormal condensation on building components. The home inspector shall: Describe the type of roof covering materials, and Report on the method used to observe the roofing.

The home inspector is not required to: Walk on the roofing (although every safe attempt to do so, will be taken), report on the age or remaining life of the roof covering, move leaves, snow, or other items on the surface that may block visual accessibility, or observe attached accessories including but not limited to solar systems, antennae, satellite dishes and lightning arrestors. No claims will be made as to remaining roof material life expectancy, and no guarantee or warranty should be expected from comments or observations. The sellers or the occupants of a residence will generally have the most relevant knowledge of the roof and of its history. Therefore, I recommend that you consult with the sellers about the age of the roof covering, and that you either include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy, or that you obtain a roof certification from an established local roofing company.

 

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Comment
2.3.1 - Roof Surface Condition

Full Roofing Evaluation Recommended

Due to the referenced roof conditions, a full evaluation of the roof structure and shingles is recommended by a roofing contractor with repairs or replacement made as needed. 

Roof Roofing Professional
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Credit
Comment
2.3.2 - Roof Surface Condition

Exposed Nail Heads - Shingles

Exposed nail heads were present on areas of the shingles. Sealing any exposed nail heads is recommended to be conducted by a qualified person, to prevent the possibility of leaking.

Roof Roofing Professional
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Comment
2.3.3 - Roof Surface Condition

Missing Shingles

There were missing shingle(s) present on the roof surface. Repairs are recommended as needed by a roofing contractor or other qualified person.

Roof Roofing Professional
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Comment
2.3.4 - Roof Surface Condition

Damaged Shingle(s)

There were damaged shingle(s) present on the roof surface. Repairs to the affected shingle(s) is recommended to be conducted as needed by a roofing contractor.

Roof Roofing Professional
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Comment
2.4.1 - Vents / Protrusions

Flashings Heavily Sealed

There were flashing present that were heavily sealed in a possible attempt to correct or prevent a leak, this is a temporary fix. Flashing boots when installed properly do not need to rely on heavy sealant to prevent leaks. An evaluation of the flashing boots with repairs or replacement made as deemed necessary is recommended by a roofing contractor. 

Roof Roofing Professional
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Comment
2.4.2 - Vents / Protrusions

Flue Vent Rusted

The gas flue vent was rusted and appeared to be nearing the end of it's useful life. Replacement is recommended by a qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.6.1 - Chimney

Chimney Flue(s) Sealed Off at Top

FYI - The chimney flue(s) were sealed off at the top and are considered inoperable. I recommend consulting with the seller(s) as to why this was done, as well as having the chimney and flues evaluated by a chimney sweep. The fireplace(s) should not be used until inspected for safety by a qualified chimney sweep.

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
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Comment
2.7.1 - Gutters / Downspouts

Downspouts Terminating Near Foundation

There were downspouts present that were discharging within five feet of the foundation of the home. Current standards require downspouts to be diverted at least five feet from the foundation of the home to prevent the grounds surrounding the foundation from becoming saturated. Saturated grounds can allow water / moisture to enter basement and crawl space areas, and in extreme cases can allow for settlement of the home. Properly extending all downspouts at least five feet away from the home is recommended by a gutter contractor.

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor
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Comment
2.7.2 - Gutters / Downspouts

Gutter Damaged

A portion of the gutter was damaged. Repairs or replacement of this area is recommended by a qualified person to ensure no leaking occurs. 

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor

3 - Exterior & Grounds

General: Foundation Material
Concrete
General: Driveway Material
Dirt
General: Vehicle Parking
Driveway
General: Sidewalk/Patio Material
N/A
General: Exterior doors
Metal
Door Exteriors: Most doors OK
At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of door exteriors. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report. Inspection of door exteriors typically includes examination of the following:
  • Door exterior surface condition;
  • Weather-stripping condition;
  • Presence of an effective sweep (sweeps are gaskets which seal the area between the bottom of a door and the threshold);
  • Jamb condition;
  • Threshold condition;  and
  • Moisture-intrusion integrity
Window Exteriors: Most window exteriors OK
The Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of window exteriors at the time of the inspection. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.
Soffit and Fascia: Soffit and Fascia OK

The inspector observed few deficiencies when inspecting the soffit and fascia. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Deck: Deck OK

The inspector observed few deficiencies when inspecting the deck. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Stairs/Handrails/Guardrails: Stairs/Handrails/Guardrails OK

The inspector observed few deficiencies when inspecting the stairs, handrails and guardrails. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Vegetation and Grading: Vegetation, Drainage & Grading Were Inspected

I inspected the vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.

The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement. 

Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps; swimming pools and related safety equipment, spas, hot tubs or saunas; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; ponds, water features, irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; sport courts, playground, recreation or leisure equipment; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses; retractable awnings. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. 
 

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Comment
3.3.1 - Window Exteriors

Peeling paint, wood

The wood windows had peeling paint and needed maintenance at the time of the inspection. Windows appeared to have suffered some damage from sun and moisture. Wood windows eventually operate poorly if wood is left exposed to sun and moisture. Repair of long-term neglect can be expensive. The Inspector recommends maintenance be performed by a qualified contractor.
Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
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Comment
3.3.2 - Window Exteriors

Damaged shutters

At the time of the inspection some window shutters were damaged

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
3.5.1 - Exterior issues

Damaged electrical receptacle and receptacle cover

 One or more exterior electrical receptacles were broken and covers were damaged or missing.  Energized electrical wiring was exposed.  This poses a risk of electrical shock.  Recommend repair 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.2 - Exterior issues

Firewood Storage

Firewood was stored so that it was in contact with or close to the building exterior. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend storing firewood outdoors in an open area, and as far away from buildings as practical to keep insects away from buildings.
Wrench DIY
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Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Deck

Ledger Board Missing lag bolts

Ledger boards for one or more decks, balconies or porches appeared to be attached with decking screws only. This method of attachment is substandard and may result in such structures separating from the main building. This is a potential safety hazard. Modern standards call for ledger boards to be installed with 1/2 inch lag screws or bolts into solid backing, and brackets such as Simpson Strong Tie DTT2 brackets and threaded rod, connecting interior and exterior joists. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Credit
Comment
3.6.2 - Deck

Soil Contact-support

Soil was in contact with one or more wooden deck, porch or balcony support posts. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying organisms. Even if posts are made of treated wood, the cut ends below soil may not have been field treated. Recommend grading soil or repairing as necessary to prevent wood-soil contact.
Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Stairs/Handrails/Guardrails

Handrail missing 3 steps

Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were missing. This is a potential fall hazard. Handrails should be installed at stairs with four or more risers or where stairs are greater than 30 inches high. Recommend that a qualified contractor install handrails where missing and per standard building practices.
Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
3.9.1 - Fences and Gates

Damaged fence

Areas of the fencing are deteriorated and damaged. Fencing should be repaired as needed.

Fence Fence Contractor

4 - Wall Exteriors

General: Exterior wall-covering Material
Composite Siding
Composite Siding: Mostly OK
The Inspector observed few deficiencies in composite siding covering exterior walls at the time of the inspection. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report Composite siding is composed of man-made boards which are manufactured for use as exterior siding from various combinations of wood fibers, fillers, binders and glue. These mixtures are heated and compressed into composite wood products. When these composites are intended for use as siding, an embossed overlayment is often added to simulate the look of wood. Inspection of composite siding typically includes visual examination of - Installation practices - Condition
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Comment
4.2.1 - Exterior Wall Penetrations

Unsealed Penetrations

There were holes through the exterior covering at the time of the inspection. All penetrations should be sealed to prevent both moisture, and pest intrusion. Larger holes may need to be filled as well as sealed. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Credit
Comment
4.3.1 - Composite Siding

Inadequate clearance from grade

Composite siding had inadequate clearance from grade. This condition may result in damage to lower courses of siding from moisture absorption. The manufacturer recommends maintaining a minimum of 6 inches from grade. The inspector recommends re-grading areas of the home where this condition exists to comply with the manufacturer's recommendations.
Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
4.3.2 - Composite Siding

Composite siding damaged/missing

Siding was damaged/cut/missing in areas.  Recommend evaluation and correction by a qualified contractor.

Hardhat General Contractor
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Comment
4.3.3 - Composite Siding

Missing Joint Covers

Joint Covers are intended for use with hardboard and cement siding. The Joint Covers protect the butt joint where two siding planks meet and provide an expansion joint to help prevent siding buckling

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
4.3.4 - Composite Siding

Caulking maintenance

Normal caulking maintenance is needed in areas

Tools Handyman/DIY

5 - Foundation

General Info: Foundation Type
Walk-Out Basement
General Info: Floor Structure Visual Obstructions
Finished Ceilings
General Info: Approximate Amount of Basement Finished
95+%
Moisture Presence: Indications of Moisture at Visible Portions
None Present
Foundation Walls: Foundation Wall Material
Poured Concrete
Foundation Walls: Amount of Foundation Walls Visible
0%
Foundation Walls: Foundation Wall Crack(s) Present?
Yes
Framing / Floor Structure: Floor Structure Materials
Not Visible
Framing / Floor Structure: Amount of Floor Structure Visible
0%
Framing / Floor Structure: Indications of Condensation Present
No
Floor Structure Support: Floor Structure Support Type (Piers or Columns)
Wood Posts
Ceiling: Ceiling Material
Paneling, Drywall
Subfloor: Subfloor Material
Not Visible
General Info: Basement View(s)
General Info: Visual Limitations Information

The referenced visual obstructions listed above may block or hinder visual accessibility of the floor structure and other areas. The inspection of the foundation area and floor structure is limited to visual portions only. Any items or areas not visible are excluded from this inspection. Insulation or any other item is not moved or disturbed for visual accessibility.

Moisture Presence: Moisture Infiltration Information - Areas Below Grade

Areas below grade were inspected for signs of past or present water intrusion by examining visible portions of the foundation walls, floors, and/or soil looking for moisture stains and/or other signs of current or prior water intrusion. No indications of water/moisture intrusion was present at visible areas below grade unless otherwise noted in this report. I can only report on the conditions as they existed at the time of inspection, and can not guarantee that water will not infiltrate this area at a future time due to a heavy rain or changes in conditions. I have inspected homes where no water or indications of water intrusion was present at the time of inspection, but days later water infiltration occurred due to a rainfall event. For this reason, I highly recommend consulting with the sellers as to prior moisture infiltration into areas below grade. 

Foundation Walls: Foundation Walls Information

Visible portions of the foundation walls were inspected looking for significant cracking, moisture intrusion, or any other indications of damage or significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Framing / Floor Structure: Floor Structure Information

Visible portions of the framing and floor structure were inspected looking for damage or other significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Floor Structure Support: Column(s) Information

Column(s) were present that supported the overhead floor structure. The column(s) appeared to be in satisfactory condition at visible portions, at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Floor / Slab Condition: Slab Information

The concrete slab was inspected looking for irregular cracking, signs of moisture, or significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were present at visible portions, at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.  

Any references to cracks on basement or garage concrete slabs will need to be sealed with an appropriate material by a qualified person at a minimum, regardless of the cracks size. This will prevent the possibility of moisture/water infiltration rising through the crack(s) during periods of heavy rainfall. 

Floor / Slab Condition: Typical Settlement / Shrinkage Cracking
Typical settlement / shrinkage cracks were present on the concrete slab floor. These cracks can be caused by the composition of concrete mix used when the slab was poured, the lack of expansion or relief joints, or standard settlement. If a concern, have a concrete contractor to evaluate.
Floor / Slab Condition: Not Fully Visible - Carpet

The concrete slab was not fully visible in the unfinished basement due to carpet & tile being present. These covered portions are excluded form this inspection. 

In accordance with the Standards of Practice the inspector will examine and report on the condition of: the foundation walls, the framing (including probing of any framing that looks to have damage / deterioration), columns / piers, the crawl space access, and insulation, if applicable.

The inspector is not required to: enter any area that could be considered a safety hazard to the inspector; report on the adequacy of structural components; or report on spacing, span, or size of structural components. Ductwork, framing, plumbing, and insulation may block visual accessibility of some areas. The inspection is limited to the conditions on the inspection day; I inspect several items to try and determine if moisture is or has infiltrated the basement / crawl space area. But, can not guarantee that water will not infiltrate the area at a future time due to conditions unforeseen at the time of inspection.

 

$
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Foundation Walls

Pitted / Flaking / Damaged concrete

Exterior foundation walls had areas of significant pitting, flaking, spalling or otherwise damaged concrete.  This often is a result of moisture penetration and freeze/thaw cycles.  Recommend evaluation and repair as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - Foundation Walls

Exposed wood - Sill plate

Sill plate on the south side of the home was missing flashing and is exposed to the elements. The siding should be hanging below the plate at least an inch to protect where the bottom of the plate meets the foundation from the elements or flashing should be installed to protect the sill plate.  This will cause weathering and rot.   Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Framing / Floor Structure

Beam Damage Present (moisture stains)

Damage was present to the main beam where it extends to the exterior (East). Exterior portion of beam is weather checked and moisture staining is visible on the interior.  This is the main structural member of the floor structure.  Evaluation and repair to prevent damage/rot as deemed necessary by a qualified contractor is recommended. 

Hardhat General Contractor

6 - Interior

General: Walls and Ceilings:
Drywall
General: Floor Covering Materials:
Carpet, Tile, Sheet Vinyl, Concrete
General: Interior Doors:
Hollow
General: Window Material:
Vinyl
General: Interior

Inspection of the interior typically includes examination of the following components:

 ROOMS

  • Wall, floor and ceiling surfaces;
  • Doors, interior, exterior and sliding glass including hardware (condition and proper operation);
  • Windows (type, condition and proper operation);
  • Ceiling fans (condition and proper operation)

ELECTRICAL

  • Switches and outlets (condition and proper operation);
  • Light fixtures (condition and proper operation)

INTERIOR TRIM

  • Door casing;
  • Window casing, sashes and sills (condition and proper operation);
  • Baseboard;
  • Molding (crown, wainscot, chair rail, etc.)
Floors: Mostly OK
At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of most floors in the home. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.
Walls: Walls mostly OK
At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of the home walls. Any exceptions will be listed in this report.
Windows and Door: Mostly OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the interior condition and operation of windows and doors of the home. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report.

Ceilings: Ceilings mostly OK
At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of the home ceilings. Any exceptions will be listed in this report.
Interior Trim: Mostly OK
At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of interior trim components. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report. Inspection of interior trim typically includes examination of the following:
  • Door and window casing;
  • Baseboard;
  • Any trim around walls and ceilings;
  • Any permanently-installed corner or cabinet trim; and
  • Built-in features such as book cases
Electrical: Electrical receptacles mostly OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of the electrical receptacles. Any exceptions will be listed in this report.

Stairs: Stair Inspection

Inspection of staircases typically includes visual examination of the following:

  • treads and risers;
  • landings;
  • angle of stairway;
  • handrails;
  • guardrails;
  • lighting;
  • headroom; 
  • windows;  and
  • walls and ceilings
Smoke and CO alarms: Smoke Alarms Present
Yes

Smoke detectors are not tested as part of a general home inspection. The Inspector recommends that all detectors be checked to confirm that they don't need battery replacement.

I. The inspector shall inspect: a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; railings, guards and handrails; and garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. inspect central vacuum systems.  inspect for safety glazing.  inspect security systems or components.  evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures.  move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure.  move suspended-ceiling tiles.  inspect or move any household appliances.  inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted.  verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door.  operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards.  operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices.  operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights.  inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens.  operate or examine any sauna, steam-generating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices.  inspect elevators.  inspect remote controls.  inspect appliances.  inspect items not permanently installed. discover firewall compromises.  inspect pools, spas or fountains. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects.  determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas. 

$
Credit
Comment
6.2.1 - Floors

Severe carpet damage
North

The bedroom had severe carpet damage visible at the time of the inspection. You should consult with a qualified flooring contractor to discuss options and costs for replacement.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
6.2.2 - Floors

Old and worn- possible replacement

Flooring in the laundry room was generally old and worn.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
6.2.3 - Floors

Severe floor tile damage

The basement had severe floor tile damage visible at the time of the inspection. You should consult with a qualified contractor to discuss options and costs for repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Walls

Minor cracks, long-term OK

Minor cracks at the corners of doors and windows and wall corners in walls appeared to be the result of long-term settling. Some settling is not unusual in a home of this age and these cracks may not be a structural concern.  Walls have been freshly painted and I recommend monitoring these areas for additional movement 

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
6.3.2 - Walls

Poor installation

Drywall in the basement exhibited evidence of poor installation practices at the time of the inspection.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - Windows and Door

Egress window requirements

One or more bedroom windows do not conform to current standards for egress requirements.  

Every room used for the purpose of sleeping requires a direct opening to the outdoors, to allow for emergency escape and rescue. At least one window in each bedroom must be of sufficient size to permit the occupants to escape a fire and also to allow a fully outfitted firefighter to enter.

Current standards for egress requirements are:

  • Minimum width of opening: 20 in.
  • Minimum height of opening: 24 in.
  • Minimum net clear opening: 5.7 sq. ft. (5.0 sq. ft. for ground floor).
  • Maximum sill height above floor: 44 in.
Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
6.4.2 - Windows and Door

Entry Door-Weatherstrip

The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
6.4.3 - Windows and Door

Window past leak

It appears that the window jambs and/or the sill at the drywall have leaked in the past. There are stains, soft drywall or peeling paint. The area was checked with a moisture meter as well as the surrounding areas, at the time of the inspection these ares have no elevated moisture. It is recommended to monitor the windows in the future.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - Electrical

Cover plate missing

Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
6.8.1 - Misc. Components: Ceiling fans, doorbells, Env. Hazards, etc.

Ceiling fan wobbled

A ceiling fan in the *Feature Location* wobbled during operation and appeared to be out of balance. This condition may eventually cause the fan to come loose from its mounting device and fall. The inspector recommends correction by a qualified contractor.
Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
6.9.1 - Stairs

No handrail

Although it had 4 or more risers, this staircase had no handrail installed. This condition is a potential fall hazard. In order to comply with generally-accepted current standards which require a handrail at stairways with 4 or more risers, this stairway would need a handrail installed. The Inspector recommends that a handrail be installed that complies with modern safety standards. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.
Tools Handyman/DIY

7 - Kitchen

Cabinets: Cabinets OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of the cabinets. Any exceptions beyond typical wear will be listed in this report.

Countertops-Backsplash: Counters OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of the counters and backsplash. Any exceptions beyond typical wear will be listed in this report.

Flooring: Flooring OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of the flooring. Any exceptions will be listed in this report.

$
Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Cabinets

Water Damage Minor

Water stains and/or minor water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made.
House building Cabinet Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Electrical

Receptacles recessed too far

One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are recessed too far.  A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
7.4.1 - Flooring

Damaged floor

The vinyl floor is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. 

Tile Tile Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Sink

Drain leak

Both sink drains have a active leaks. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

8 - Appliances

General: Dishwasher
Maytag
General: Disposer
N/A
General: Microwave
NA
General: Oven
General Electric
General: Cooktop
General Electric
General: Refrigerator
Samsung
Range-Cooktop-Oven: Normal operation

The heating elements for the oven and stove top functioned as expected.

Hood/Vent: Normal operation

The Hood/vent operated as expected.

General: Appliance Pictures
Refrigerator: Water and Ice maker

There is a water dispenser and an automatic ice maker installed.  Ice maker operation and water dispenser operation are not part of a home inspection.  We urge you to verify proper operation after it has been running for sometime.

Dishwasher: Sink leaking below

Dishwasher was not operated due to a leak below the sink

$
Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Dishwasher

Dishwasher No High loop

The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop" or "air gap". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices.

Also, no "air gap" is installed. Air gaps are another device meant to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. These are required in some municipalities for new construction and when remodeling. The client(s) should consult with a qualified contractor to determine if an air gap should be installed.
Wash Appliance Repair

9 - Bathrooms

General: Exhaust Fans
Fan with light
Toilet: Toilets OK

The toilets were flushed and operated in a satisfactory manner.

Electrical Receptacles and Switches: GFCI OK

Electrical receptacles in the Bathrooms had ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, which responded to testing in a satisfactory manner at the time of the inspection. Notable exceptions found will be listed in this report. The inspector tested a representative number of accessible receptacles.

Lighting: Bathroom lighting mostly OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed few deficiencies in the condition of the Bathroom lighting. Any exceptions will be listed in this report.

Ventilation: Ventilation OK

The Bathrooms had an operable source of ventilation at the time of the inspection.

$
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Doors, Cabinets and Countertops

Cabinet damaged

In the bathroom, the Cabinet was damaged.  Recommend repair or replacement as necessary. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.4.2 - Doors, Cabinets and Countertops

No backsplash

In the bathroom countertops had no backsplash. Backsplashes are typically installed to help protect the wall adjacent to the countertop.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.4.3 - Doors, Cabinets and Countertops

Minor cabinet damage- past leakage

In the master bathroom the undersink cabinet floor had minor damage which appeared to be the result of past leakage. The moisture meter showed no elevated levels of moisture present in the cabinet floor at the time of the inspection indicating that the source of leakage may have been corrected.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.5.1 - Ventilation

No ventilation

No switch was located to operate the exhaust fan for the basement bathroom. To avoid poor conditions resulting from excessively moist air, The Inspector recommends installation of an exhaust fan / switch by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - Toilet

Slow flush

In the bathroom the toilet was slow to flush. The Inspector recommends repair by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.6.2 - Toilet

No toilet supply shut-off

In the basement bathroom, no shut-off valve was installed at the toilet supply connection. This condition will complicate toilet repairs. The Inspector recommends that a shut-off valve be installed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.7.1 - Shower

Old and deteriorated

In the Bathroom the shower enclosure was old and deteriorated.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.8.1 - Bathtub

Inoperable diverter

In the bathroom the diverter valve was inoperable or did not operate correctly (the diverter is the valve that diverts water from the tub spout to the shower head). The Inspector recommends service by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.8.2 - Bathtub

Caulking moldy

In the *Bathroom Location*, sealant at the tub/shower was old and had visible discoloration consistent with microbial growth. The Inspector recommends that this sealant be removed and replaced to help prevent moisture intrusion and the development of unhealthy conditions.
Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.9.1 - Bathroom Components

Handle leaks when operated

In the Bathroom the bathtub handle leaked when operated, indicating need for valve stem seal replacement. The Inspector recommends service be performed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.9.2 - Bathroom Components

Sink slow to drain

The sink Bathroom was slow to drain. This is typically due to a clogged trap but may also indicate a blockage of the waste pipe. You may wish to have this condition investigated by a plumbing contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.9.3 - Bathroom Components

Tub slow to drain

The tub in the Bathroom was slow to drain. This is typically due to a clogged trap but may also indicate a blockage of the waste pipe. You may wish to have this condition investigated by a plumbing contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.9.4 - Bathroom Components

Old, worn components

Most components in the bathrooms were old, dirty, stained, deteriorated, or worn.
Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.9.5 - Bathroom Components

Leaked

In the master bathroom the door to the shower enclosure leaked when the shower was operated.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.9.6 - Bathroom Components

Old and deteriorated

In the master Bathroom, the shower enclosure was old and deteriorated.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.9.7 - Bathroom Components

Restricted water flow

Water flow at the shower in the Bathroom  appeared to be inadequate. The Inspector recommends that you have this condition evaluated by a qualified plumbing contractor to determine the potential need and costs for correction.

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Laundry Room

General: Dryer Power:
Both available
General: Dryer Vent:
Smooth-bore metal (UL-approved)
General: Dryer 240-volt electrical receptacle:
Modern 4-prong
Dryer Venting: Photos
Receptacles, Switches, Connections: Receptacles OK- no GFCI
At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of electrical receptacles in the laundry room but they had no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. For safety reasons, consider having GFCI protection installed for receptacles within 6 feet of a plumbing fixture. This can be achieved by:
  1. Replacing the current standard electrical receptacles with GFCI outlets;
  2. Replacing the electrical receptacle nearest the overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) protecting laundry room circuits with a GFCI receptacle; or
  3. Replacing the breakers currently protecting the electrical circuits in the Laundry room with GFCI breakers.

11 - Fireplace

General: Chimney type
Metal
General: Woodstove type
Metal
General: Fireplace type
Metal pre-fabrication
Hearth: Photos
Flue and damper: Clean Annually
All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
General: Firebox obscured
Significant amounts of ashes, wood and/or debris are in the fireplace. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate it.

The chimney inspection is limited to the visible and/or accessible components only. Inspection of concealed or inaccessible portions of the chimney is beyond the scope of this inspection. This includes determining the presence of a flue lining, if a flue lining is present, checking for deterioration, damage or cracks. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys; lintels above the fireplace openings; damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and cleanout doors and frames. II. The inspector shall describe: the type of fireplace. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers; manually operated dampers that did not open and close; the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace; the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material. IV. The inspector is not required to: inspect the flue or vent system. inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.  determine the need for a chimney sweep.  operate gas fireplace inserts.  light pilot flames.  determine the appropriateness of any installation.  inspect automatic fuel-fed devices.  inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices.  inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted.  ignite or extinguish fires.  determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics.  move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents.  perform a smoke test. dismantle or remove any component. perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection. perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection. 

$
Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Liner, Firebricks, Panels

Repair, replace bricks

Fire bricks in one or more fireplace fireboxes are loose / missing and/or significantly deteriorated or pitted. This is a fire hazard. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Fire Fireplace Contractor

12 - Attic, Roof Structure, & Ventilation

General Info/Limitations: Accessibility Limitations

Attics are navigated as best I can; levels of high insulation, HVAC ductwork, framing, and other factors can prevent physical and visual accessibility of some areas and items. The amount of the attic that was able to be safely physically and visually inspected will be listed as an approximate percentage above. Insulation is not moved or disturbed for visual accessibility of items. The inspection of this area is limited to visual portions only. Any areas that were not visible are excluded from this inspection.

General Info/Limitations: Attic Access Panel Not Readily Openable - Sealed

The attic access panel was sealed closed. This is considered to be not "readily openable" and the attic area was not inspected. The attic area and its components are excluded from this inspection.

In accordance with the Standards of Practice the inspector will examine: the attic area and report on the condition of the access opening (including location), insulation type (and current depth), ducts, visible electrical components, exhaust terminations, plumbing components, and ventilation if applicable.

The inspector is not required to: move or disturb insulation, or report on the adequacy of current ventilation, Calculate the strength, adequacy, or efficiency of any system or component including framing. Enter any attic that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely affect the health or safety of the home inspector or other persons. Therefore, I do not attempt to enter attics with less than 36" of headroom; where insulation obscures the ceiling joists; or where ducts block access. In these cases I will evaluate from the access opening as best I can.

 

13 - HVAC

General: Cooling source
None
General: Heat Source
Propane
General: Distribution
Sheet Metal Duct
General: Heat Type
Forced Air
General: Last Service Date
Unknown
Heating / Forced Air: Location
Interior closet
Heating / Forced Air: Energy source
Liquid propane
Ducts and Registers: Type
Ducts and Registers
Filter & Thermostat: Filter Location(s)
Forced air unit
Filter & Thermostat: Filter Size
20x30x1
Filter & Thermostat: T-stat Location(s)
1st Floor Family room
Heating / Forced Air: Estimated Year Mfg.
2005
Heating / Forced Air: Appears Functional

Heat system appears to be in working order. 

The photo(s) below is/are a thermal image of the supply air temperature at register(s) at the time of this inspection.

Heating / Forced Air: Equipment Photos

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

14 - Electric Service

Electric Panel: Panel Manufacturer
Culter Hammer
Electric Panel: Protection
Breakers
Electric Panel: Service Type
Overhead
Electric Panel: Branch Wiring
Copper
Electric Panel: Location of Main Disconnect
Bottom of Panel
Electric Panel: Service Conductor
Multi-strain Aluminum
Electric Panel: System Grounding
copper
Electric Panel: Location of Main Panel
Laundry room
Branch Wiring: Branch wiring OK

No signs of overheating were observed at the time of the inspection. 

Circuit Breakers: Circuit Breakers OK

Branch breaker distribution appeared normal

Electric Panel: Amperage
200
Electric Panel: Panel pictures

The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician. 

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Credit
Comment
14.3.1 - Circuit Breakers

AFCI Breaker

One or more arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) circuit breakers in panel(s) wouldn't trip / wouldn't reset when tested. AFCI breakers reduce the risk of fire by protecting against overheated or arcing receptacles or light fixtures. This is a potential fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
Electric Electrical Contractor

15 - Plumbing

General: Water Supply Source:
Private well on property
General: Water Distribution Pipes:
1/2-inch copper, Cross-linked Polyethylene (PEX)
General: Sewage System Type:
Septic system (not inspected)
General: Drain Waste and Vent Pipe Materials:
Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)
General: Gas Pipe Material:
Black Steel
General: Type of Gas:
Propane
General: Sump Pump:
None installed
General: Sewage Ejector:
None installed
General: Water Treatment Systems/Filters:
None installed
General: Main Water Supply Pipe:
Plastic
Water Supply and Distribution: Shut off location

The main water supply shut-off was located in the basement 

Gas System: Shut-off at penetration

The main gas shut-off was located at the home exterior at the point at which the supply pipe penetrated the home exterior wall of the home.

I. The inspector shall inspect: the main water supply shut-off valve; the main fuel supply shut-off valve; the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; all toilets for proper operation by flushing; all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; the drain, waste and vent system; and drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; and   toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: light or ignite pilot flames. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater.  inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems.  determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply.  determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source.  open sealed plumbing access panels.  inspect clothes washing machines or their connections.  operate any valve. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection.  evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping.  determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, back-flow prevention or drain-stop devices.  determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains.  evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. inspect wastewater treatment systems. inspect water treatment systems or water filters.  inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks.  evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements.  evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air.  test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene, polyethylene, or similar plastic piping. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof. 

16 - Water Heater

Water Heater Condition: Water Heater Location
Laundry Room
Water Heater Condition: Capacity
38 Gallons
Water Heater Condition: Energy Source
LP
Water Heater Condition: Water Heater Manufacturer
Rheem
Water Heater Condition: Manufacture Year
2005

The typical life expectancy of a water heater is 13-15 years. 

Venting: Venting Type
Atmospheric Vent
Venting: Vent Material
Type B Galvanized
TPRV Discharge Pipe: TPRV Discharge Tube Material
Copper
Combustion Chamber: Combustion Chamber Not Accessible
The combustion chamber was not accessible/visible.
Venting: Vent Termination Point
Roof
Water Heater Condition: Water Temperature
100-120 Degrees
Water Heater Condition: Water Heater Information

The water heater produced hot water at the time of inspection. No reportable deficiencies were observed with the unit unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Venting: Venting Information

The vent was inspected at visible portions reporting on its material, its clearance from combustibles (if applicable), and its termination point. No indications of deficiencies were present unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Venting: Gas Appliance Category
Category 1

Category 1 Appliances are the type most commonly used for residential heating. They include old-fashioned gravity-vent furnaces and the newer fan-assisted Plus-80 models, also known as induced-draft furnaces. In a gravity-vented furnace, the heat of combustion provides sufficient stack effect to enable safe venting of combustion byproducts. Stack effect occurs because the hot gases inside the flue have lower density than the cooler atmosphere outside the flue.

Category 2 Appliances include those not typically intended for residential use. Exceptions are boilers and wall-vented water heaters. In those cases, the manufacturers’ specifications prohibit interconnection of the exhaust systems with other gas-burning appliances.

Category 3 Appliances in residential use most often are tank-less water heaters that are vented with stainless steel. These appliances operate with positive vent pressure and, therefore, cannot be adjoined to a gravity-vented water heater.

Category 4 Appliances are mainly high-efficiency water heaters and furnaces that use plastic vent pipes. These appliances also operate with positive vent pressure and cannot share a common vent with a gravity-vented water heater.

Gas Pipe: Gas Pipe / Sediment Trap Information

A gas shut-off valve and sediment trap was present. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report. 

TPR Valve: TPR Valve Information

A TPR valve was in place, and appeared functional. These are not tested due to the fact that once they are tested, they tend to form a drip leak. These valves allow the water heater to expel water and pressure if the tank reaches a pressure over 150psi, or the water temperature exceeds 210 degrees. No deficiencies were observed with the valve unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Water Pipes: Water Pipes Information

Visible portions of the water pipes were inspected looking for significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

In accordance with the Standards of Practice the inspector will examine and report the condition: of the water heater enclosure, plumbing supply, energy source, venting, and TPR valve, if applicable. The inspector is not required to: activate the system if it is powered down, or the pilot flame is not lit, Inspect the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.

 

$
Credit
Comment
16.1.1 - Water Heater Condition

Aged Unit

FYI - The unit was at or past its typical service life. Major repairs or replacement should be anticipated in the future due to the age of the unit alone. Depending on prior maintenance and other factors the unit could last anywhere from months to years, the remaining life In not determinable.  

$
Credit
Comment
16.7.1 - Water Pipes

Galvanic Reaction

A galvanic reaction was present at a water pipe fitting. A galvanic reaction occurs when two dissimilar metals are connected without using a dielectric union. Evaluation and repairs as needed is recommended by a licensed plumber.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

17 - Environmental Concerns

Odors Present: Odor(s) Present in the Home
Sulphur smell
Fungal Growth: Fungal Growth Present
No
Radon: Radon Level
Not Tested
Odors Present: Odors Information

If any odors are noticed in the home I will include them in this section with recommendations made as needed. If no additional information is included in this report in respect to odors, then no discernible odors were present or noticed in the home at the time of inspection. 

Asbestos: Asbestos Information

The possibility exists that homes built prior to 1978 may contain building components or items (textured ceiling material, adhesives, tile, tapes, insulation, etc) that contain asbestos. In accordance with the Standards of Practice these items are not reported on during a home inspection. If I see obvious signs of a material that I may believe to contain asbestos, I will recommend further evaluation as a courtesy, but these individual references should not be construed as an all-inclusive list. Furthermore, any remodeling or repairs that may take place in the future may reveal asbestos or other environmental hazards that were not visible at the time of inspection. If asbestos is a concern, you are advised to have a full environmental inspection by an environmental contractor prior to the end of your inspection contingency period. 

More information can be found at this link: https://www.epa.gov/asbestos/protect-your-family-exposures-asbestos

Lead Based Paint: Lead Based Paint Information

The possibility exists that homes built prior to 1978 may contain paint that was lead based. In accordance with the Standards of Practice lead based paint is not reported on, or tested for during a home inspection. If lead based paint is a concern, you are advised to consult an environmental company prior to the end of your inspection contingency period and have additional inspections specializing in environmental hazards.

Fungal Growth: Fungal Growth and Mold Information

In accordance with the Standards of practice reporting on the presence of mold is excluded from a home inspection. If I see obvious signs of fungal growth, I will recommend further evaluation and testing as a courtesy, but these individual references should not be construed as an all-inclusive listing of areas of fungal growth present. Furthermore, the removal of personal belongings or any remodeling or repairs that may take place in the future may reveal fungal growth or mold that was not visible at the time of inspection. If mold is a concern, you are advised to have a full environmental inspection by an environmental contractor or industrial hygienist prior to the end of your inspection contingency period.

Pest/Insect/Wildlife Concerns: WDI-Termite Inspection Recommended

Inspecting for, and reporting on the presence of WDI activity (wood destroying organisms) including but not limited to; termites, powder post beetles, carpenter ants, carpenter bees, etc. is beyond the scope of a home inspection, is excluded by the Standards of Practice, and is excluded from this inspection. It is highly recommended that you have a WDI-Termite inspection prior to the end of your inspection contingency period. Any comments made in this report in regards to any such activity was done as a courtesy only, should not be viewed as an all-inclusive listing of activity, and requires further evaluation by a licensed pest control company. 

Items reported on in this section are beyond the scope of a home inspection and were included as a courtesy for your information, these items should not be viewed as an all-inclusive listing of deficiencies in the related area of concern. Evaluations are recommended by qualified professionals in any environmental or pest related field prior to the end of your inspection contingency period. 

18 - Thermal Imaging

General: Thermal Imaging:
Limited thermographic inspection

The thermal imaging camera is a tool I use in performing the General Home Inspection. Its use does not constituent a full thermographic inspection. Thermal imaging cameras detect radiation in the infrared spectrum, showing differences in temperature. Their ability to detect defects or deficiencies varies with conditions. Conditions identified by thermal imaging may need to be confirmed using other means.

Electrical: Electrical OK

No deficiencies were detected in electrical components with the thermal imaging equipment. AFCI is warm, but well within normal range. 

Thermal Envelope: Insulation OK

No deficiencies were detected in insulation with the thermal imaging equipment.

$
Credit
Comment
18.3.1 - Moisture

Moisture indication

Temperature differentials noted during thermal imaging of the home indicated possible elevated moisture levels in the main beam in the basement. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
18.4.1 - Thermal Envelope

Heat movement around door openings

Thermal imaging indicated significant heat movement around exterior doors, indicating that gaps between the door jambs and the framed openings were not well insulated at the time of original installation. Improved performance of the home thermal envelope would involve installation of thermal insulation at these gaps. Consider consulting with a qualified contractor to discuss options and costs for improvement.
Hardhat General Contractor

19 - Final Checklist

Oven Off: Oven Turned Off
Yes
GFCI Receptacles : All GFCI Receptacles Reset?
Yes
Thermostat Set Back: Thermostat Leaving Setting
55
Lights Off: All Lights Turned Off?
Yes
Doors Locked: All Exterior Doors Locked?
No
Doors Locked: Was instructed to leave front door unlocked
Oven Off: Photo of Oven in Off Position
Thermostat Set Back: Thermostat Initial Setting
55
Thermostat Set Back: Photo Of Thermostat When Leaving

Final checklist showing the home was left as it was found, and was locked when complete.