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1234 Main St.
Cottonwood, AZ 86326
02/22/2020 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
71
Items Inspected
10
Maintenance item
10
Repair item

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client's Agent
Occupancy
Furnished, Utilities On
Type and Style of Building
Single Family/Multi Level
Temperature (approximate)
82 Fahrenheit (F)
Inspection Key

Here is an explanation of what the different phrases used to report on the condition and function of systems means.


ACCEPTABLE CONDITION/FUNCTION: This means the system was inspected (i.e. opperated, tested) as much as was available to the inspector at the time of the inspection and it was found to be functioning properly.


MOSTLY ACCEPTABLE w/ AREAS of CONCERN: This implies the system was inspected (i.e. opperated, tested) as much as was available to the inspector at the time of the inspection and it was found to be overall functional, there happened to be issues found that did not hinder the main function of the system.


NEEDS ATTENTION: This means the system was inspected (i.e. opperated, tested) as much as was available to the inspector at the time of the inspection and the main function was damaged or not working as designed.

Setting Reasonable Expectations

Setting Reasonable Expectations When Things Go Wrong. 

There may come a time that you discover something wrong with the house, and you may be upset or disappointed with your home inspection.

Intermittent Or Concealed Problems
Some problems can only be discovered by living in a house. They cannot be discovered during the few hours of a home inspection. For example, some shower stalls leak when people are in the shower, but do not leak when you simply turn on the tap. Some roofs and basements only leak when specific conditions exist. Some problems will only be discovered when carpets were lifted, furniture is moved or finishes are removed.

No Clues

These problems may have existed at the time of the inspection but there were no clues as to their existence. Our inspections are based on the past performance of the house. If there are no clues of a past problem, it is unfair to assume we should foresee a future problem.

We Always Miss Some Minor Things
Some say we are inconsistent because our reports identify some minor problems but not others. The minor problems that are identified were discovered while looking for more significant problems. We note them simply as a courtesy. The intent of the inspection is not to find the $200 problems; it is to find the $2,000 problems. These are the things that affect peoples decisions to purchase.

Contractors Advice
The main source of dissatisfaction with home inspectors comes from comments made by contractors. Contractors opinions often differ from ours. Dont be surprised when three roofers all say the roof needs replacement when we said that, with some minor repairs, the roof will last a few more years.

Last Man In Theory
While our advice represents the most prudent thing to do, many contractors are reluctant to undertake these repairs. This is because of the Last Man In Theory. The contractor fears that if he is the last person to work on the roof, he will get blamed if the roof leaks, regardless of whether the roof leak is his fault or not. Consequently, he wont want to do a minor repair with high liability when he could re-roof the entire house for more money and reduce the likelihood of a callback. This is understandable.

Most Recent Advice Is Best
There is more to the Last Man In Theory. It suggests that it is human nature for homeowners to believe the last bit of expert advice they receive, even if it is contrary to previous advice. As home inspectors, we unfortunately find ourselves in the position of First Man In and consequently it is our advice that is often disbelieved.

Why Didnt We See It
Contractors may say I cant believe you had this house inspected, and they didnt find this problem. There are several reasons for these apparent oversights:

  • Conditions During Inspection - It is difficult for homeowners to remember the circumstances in the house, at the time of the inspection. Homeowners seldom remember that it was snowing, there was storage everywhere in the basement or that the furnace could not be turned on because the air conditioning was operating, et cetera. Its impossible for contractors to know what the circumstances were when the inspection was performed.
  • The Wisdom Of Hindsight - When the problem manifests itself, it is very easy to have 20/20 hindsight. Anybody can say that the basement is wet when there is 2 inches of water on the floor. Predicting the problem is a different story.
  • A Long Look - If we spent 1/2 an hour under the kitchen sink or 45 minutes disassembling the furnace, wed find more problems too. Unfortunately, the inspection would take several days and would cost considerably more.
  • We're Generalists - We are generalists; we are not specialists. The heating contractor may indeed have more heating expertise than we do.
  • An Invasive Look - Problems often become apparent when carpets or plaster are removed, when fixtures or cabinets are pulled out, and so on. A home inspection is a visual examination. We don't perform any invasive or destructive tests.

Not Insurance 
In conclusion, a home inspection is designed to better your odds. It is not designed to eliminate all risk. For that reason, a home inspection should not be considered an insurance policy. The premium that an insurance company would have to charge for a policy with no deductible, no limit and an indefinite policy period would be considerably more than the fee we charge. It would also not include the value added by the inspection.

We hope this is food for thought and helps to give a better understanding as to what to expect when reading your report.

Weather Conditions
Clear, Dry
The weather can play a key role in how the inspection is performed and what is actually inspected.

This report is the exclusive property of Sentry Inspecting LLC and the client whose name appears herewith, and its use by any unauthorized persons is strictly prohibited.

The observations and opinions expressed in this report are those of Sentry Inspecting LLC and supersede any alleged verbal comments. I inspect all of the systems, components, and conditions described in accordance with the standards of the Arizona Board of Technical Registration and the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI), and those that I do not inspect are clearly disclaimed in the contract and/or in the aforementioned standards. However, some components that are inspected and found to be functional may not necessarily appear in the report, simply because we do not wish to waste our client's time by having them read an unnecessarily lengthy report about components that do not need to be serviced.

In accordance with the terms of the contract, the service recommendations that I make in this report should be completed well before the close of escrow by licensed specialists, who may well identify additional defects or recommend some upgrades that could affect your evaluation of the property.
This report has been produced in accordance with our signed contract and is subject to the terms and conditions agreed upon therein.  All printed comments and the opinions expressed herein are those of the Inspection Company.
Most homes built after 1978, are generally assumed to be free of asbestos and many other common environmental contaminants. However, as a courtesy to our clients, we are including some well documented, and therefore public, information about several environmental contaminants that could be of concern to you and your family, all of which we do not have the expertise or the authority to evaluate, such as asbestos, radon, methane, formaldehyde, termites and other wood-destroying organisms, pests and rodents, molds, microbes, bacterial organisms, and electromagnetic radiation, to name some of the more commonplace ones. Nevertheless, we will attempt to alert you to any suspicious substances that would warrant evaluation by a specialist. However, health and safety, and environmental hygiene are deeply personal responsibilities, and you should make sure that you are familiar with any contaminant that could affect your home environment. You can learn more about contaminants that can affect your home from a booklet published by The Environmental Protection Agency, which you can read online at www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/insidest.htm. 

MOLD is one such contaminant. It is a microorganism that has tiny seeds, or spores, that are spread in the air then land and feed on organic matter. It has been in existence throughout human history and actually contributes to the life process. It takes many different forms, many of them benign, like mildew. Some characterized as allergens are relatively benign but can provoke allergic reactions among sensitive people, and others characterized as pathogens can have adverse health effects on large segments of the population, such as the very young, the elderly, and people with suppressed immune systems. However, there are less common molds that are called toxins that represent a serious health threat. All molds flourish in the presence of moisture, and we make a concerted effort to look for any evidence of it wherever there could be a water source, including that from condensation. Interestingly, the molds that commonly appear on ceramic tiles in bathrooms do not usually constitute a health threat, but they should be removed. However, some visibly similar molds that form on cellulose materials, such as on drywall, plaster, and wood, are potentially toxigenic. If mold is to be found anywhere within a home, it will likely be in the area of tubs, showers, toilets, sinks, water heaters, evaporator coils, inside attics with unvented bathroom exhaust fans, and return-air compartments that draw outside air, all of which are areas that we inspect very conscientiously. Nevertheless, mold can appear as though spontaneously at any time, so you should be prepared to monitor your home, and particularly those areas that we identified. Naturally, it is equally important to maintain clean air-supply ducts and to change filters as soon as they become soiled because contaminated ducts are a common breeding ground for dust mites, rust, and other contaminants. Regardless, although some mold-like substances may be visually identified, the specific identification of molds can only be determined by specialists and laboratory analysis and is absolutely beyond the scope of our inspection. Nonetheless, as a prudent investment in environmental hygiene, we categorically recommend that you have your home tested for the presence of any such contaminants, and particularly if you or any member of your family suffers from allergies or asthma. Also, you can learn more about mold from an Environmental Protection Agency document entitled "A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home,"  by visiting their website at: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/molds/moldguide.html/, from which it can be downloaded.

ASBESTOS is a notorious contaminant that could be present in any home built before 1978. It is a naturally occurring mineral fiber that was first used by the Greek and Romans in the first century, and it has been widely used throughout the modern world in a variety of thermal insulators, including those in the form of paper wraps, bats, blocks, and blankets. However, it can also be found in a wide variety of other products too numerous to mention, including duct insulation and acoustical materials, plasters, siding, floor tiles, heat vents, and roofing products. Although perhaps recognized as being present in some documented forms, asbestos can only be specifically identified by laboratory analysis. The most common asbestos fiber that exists in residential products is chrysotile, which belongs to the serpentine or white-asbestos group, and was used in the clutches and brake shoes of automobiles for many years. However, a single asbestos fiber is said to be able to cause cancer and is, therefore, a potential health threat and a litigious issue. Significantly, asbestos fibers are only dangerous when they are released into the air and inhaled, and for this reason authorities such as the Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and the Consumer Product Safety Commission [CPSC] distinguish between asbestos that is in good condition, or non-friable, and that which is in poor condition, or friable, which means that its fibers could be easily crumbled and become airborne. However, we are not specialists and, regardless of the condition of any real or suspected asbestos-containing material [ACM], we would not endorse it and recommend having it evaluated by a specialist.

POPCORN CEILING- In early formulations, it often contained white asbestos fibers. When asbestos was banned in ceiling treatments by the Clean Air Act of 1978 in the United States,[1] popcorn ceilings fell out of favor in much of the country. However, in order to minimize economic hardship to suppliers and installers, existing inventories of asbestos-bearing texturing materials were exempt from the ban, so it is possible to find asbestos in popcorn ceilings that were applied through the 1980s. According to the EPA, the use of asbestos in textured ceiling paint was banned in 1977. Inhaled in large quantities, asbestos fibers can cause lung disease, scarring of the lungs and lung cancer. However, not all popcorn ceilings contain asbestos. Moreover, if left undisturbed or contained, asbestos is not dangerous.

RADON is a gas that results from the natural decay of radioactive materials in the soil and is purported to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. The gas is able to enter homes through the voids around pipes in concrete floors or through the floorboards of poorly ventilated crawlspaces, and particularly when the ground is wet and the gas cannot easily escape through the soil and be dispersed into the atmosphere. However, it cannot be detected by the senses, and its existence can only be determined by sophisticated instruments and laboratory analysis, which is completely beyond the scope of our service. However, you can learn more about radon and other environmental contaminants and their effects on health, by contacting the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), at www. epa.gov/radon/images/hmbuygud.pdf, and it would be prudent for you to inquire about any high radon readings that might be prevalent in the general area surrounding your home.

LEAD poses an equally serious health threat. In the 1920's, it was commonly found in many plumbing systems. In fact, the word "plumbing" is derived from the Latin word "plumbum," which means lead. When in use as a component of a waste system, it is not an immediate health threat, but as a component of potable water pipes, it is a definite health hazard. Although rarely found in modern use, the lead could be present in any home build as recently as the nineteen forties. For instance, lead was an active ingredient in many household paints, which can be released in the process of sanding, and even be ingested by small children and animals chewing on painted surfaces. Fortunately, the lead in painted surfaces can be detected by industrial hygienists using sophisticated instruments, but testing for it is not cheap. There are other environmental contaminants, some of which we have already mentioned, and others that may be relatively benign. However, we are not environmental hygienists, and as we stated earlier we disclaim any responsibility for testing or establishing the presence of any environmental contaminant, and recommend that you schedule whatever specialist inspections that may deem prudent within the contingency period.

 CRACKS AND WINDOWS Unsealed cracks around windows, doors, and thresholds can permit moisture intrusion, which is the principal cause of the deterioration of any surface. Unfortunately, the evidence of such intrusion may only be obvious when it is raining. We have discovered leaking windows while it was raining that may not have been apparent otherwise. Regardless, there are many styles of windows but only two basic types, single and dual-glazed. Dual-glazed windows are superior because they provide a thermal as well as an acoustical barrier. However, the hermetic seals on these windows can fail at any time, and cause condensation to form between the panes. Many environmental factors come into play when and if hermetic seals have failed and Unfortunately, it is not always apparent, which is why we disclaim an evaluation of hermetic seals or unnoticed fogging glass. Nevertheless, in accordance with industry standards, we test a representative number of unobstructed windows and ensure that at least one window in every bedroom is operable and facilitates an emergency exit.

FURTHERMORE, you are advised to seek two professional opinions and acquire estimates of repair as to any defects, comments, improvements or recommendations mentioned in this report. We recommend that the professional making any repairs inspect the property further in order to discover and repair related problems that were not identified in the report. We recommend that all repairs, corrections, and cost estimates be completed and documented prior to closing or purchasing the property. Feel free to hire other professionals to inspect the property prior to closing. Including HVAC professionals, electricians, engineers, window professionals roofers etc.

All conditions are reported as they existed at the time of the inspection. The information contained in this report may be unreliable beyond the date of the inspection due to changing conditions.

2 - Roof

General Information & Components: Roof Type/Style
Flat, Shed
General Information & Components: Flashings
Acceptable Condition
General Information & Components: Drip Edge
Acceptable Condition
General Information & Components: Penetrations
Acceptable Condition
Asphalt Roofing: Covering Type
Architectural
Flat Roof: Covering Type
Elastomeric
General Information & Components: Inspection Method
Roof

Inspector will observe from the roof unless type of materials, structural integrity, lack of access or personal safety prohibit. In the event that the roof can not be safely walked a visual inspection will be made from either a ladder or other means i.e. drone binoculars or pole cam.

Asphalt Roofing: Covering Condition
Acceptable Condition

Unless otherwise stated, coverings were in acceptable condition at the time of the inspection.


If isolated issues are present they will be detailed separately.

Asphalt Roofing: Estimated Roof Age (Years)
5-10

This is an informational only estimation that is made based on the age of home, the  inspectors experience and personal judgement and is in no way a guarantee.

Asphalt Roofing: Estimated Remaining Life (Years)
12-15 Years

This is an informational only estimation of remaining life expectancy that is made based on the inspectors experience and personal judgement and is in no way a guarantee.

Asphalt Roofing: Number of Layers
1

The maximum amount of layers a roof is allowed to have is 2 (two) for site built homes and 1 (one) for manufactured which is to stay within weight limits and to prevent excessive thermal retention which can deteriorate roofing materials prematurely.

Flat Roof: Covering Condition
Acceptable Condition

Unless otherwise stated, the coverings were functional with an acceptable remaining life expectancy at the time of the inspection.

If isolated issues are present they will be detailed separately.

Flat Roof: Estimated Roof Age (Years)
5-10

This is an informational only estimation that is made based on the age of home, the  inspectors experience and personal judgement and is in no way a guarantee.

Flat Roof: Estimated Remaining Life (Years)
7-10 Years

This is an informational only estimation of remaining life expectancy that is made based on the inspectors experience and personal judgement and is in no way a guarantee.

Flat Roof: Parapet Condition
Acceptable Condition

Unless otherwise stated, the parapets and their systems were observed to be in acceptable condition.

If isolated issues are present they will be detailed separately.

Flat Roof: Drainage
Acceptable Function

Unless otherwise stated, the drainage on the flat roof was working properly. Only minimal normal ponding was observed.

Metal Roofing: Covering Condition
Acceptable Condition

Unless otherwise stated, the coverings were functional with an acceptable remaining life expectancy at the time of the inspection.

If isolated issues are present they will be detailed separately.

Metal Roofing: Fastening
Acceptable Function

The inspector will observe and report on the fastening system it's installation and its condition.

Gutter Systems: Gutters Condition
Clean-Acceptable Condition
Skylights: Skylights/Atrium Condition
Acceptable Condition

Unless otherwise stated, the skylights were observed to have normal weathering and no visible signs of moisture penetration.

Structure & Attic: Structure Type
Unknown No Access

The roof/attic structure was evaluated and in good repair at the time of the inspection.

Structure & Attic: Structure Condition
Unknown-No Access

The inspector will report on the condition of observable  structure materials and construction.

Structure & Attic: Insulation Type
Unknown No Access

The attic insulation was inspected as much as possible, normal/minimal compression and shifting was observed and found to be in overall good shape.

Structure & Attic: Ventilation Type
NO VENTING

The inspector will observe and report any damage or leaking, as well as effectiveness of thermal energy transfer.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspector’s opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

$
Credit
Comment
2.7.1 - Structure & Attic

No Attic Access

INFORMATION: Due to the construction, the attic area could not be physically inspected. The inspector will observe and report on the condition of the roof, walls and ceilings to determine if there are underlying issues that need further investigation. 

3 - Foundation

Foundation: Inspection Method
Visual-Via Crawlspace
Crawlspace: Crawlspace Floor - Material & Condition
Dry, Gravel
Crawlspace: Vapor Barrier
Acceptable Condition
Crawlspace: Crawlspace Access Location
Basement
Foundation: Material/Type
Masonry Block Stem Wall

The foundation showed only the normal signs of movement and or weathering at the time of the inspection.

Foundation: Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on condition of observable amount of the foundation.

Floor, Wall & Ceiling Structure: Floor Structure
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the physically observable portion of the flooring structure.

Floor, Wall & Ceiling Structure: Ceiling Structure
Wood truss, Wood Beams, Textured Drywall

The inspector will report on the physically observable portion of the ceiling structure.

As some may be obscured by insulation, drywall, vapor barriers etc. it may be possible that other methods were used and not reported on.

Floor, Wall & Ceiling Structure: Walls Structure
Wood Stud/Plaster

The inspector will report on the physically observable portion of the wall structure.


As some may also be obscured by insulation, drywall, vapor barriers etc. it may be possible that other methods were used and not reported on.

Crawlspace: Crawlspace Photos
Crawlspace: Inspection Method
Visual Inside Crawlspace

The inspector will enter and inspect all attic and crawlspaces that have no physical or safety limitations, and is limited to the comfort of the inspector.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

$
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Crawlspace

Moisture Staining

CONCERN: This may be caused by a past/present leak or grading issues which can create conditions to attract pests and or damage the structure. 


RECOMMENDATION: Evaluation and correction by a qualified licensed professional. 

Mag glass Monitor

4 - Electrical

Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Manufacturer
Sun Valley
Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Meter Panel/Stand: Main Breaker Amperage
200 AMP Fusable Disconnects
Meter Panel/Stand: Main Service Conductor Type
Below Ground 240 Volts
Meter Panel/Stand: System Grounding Method
Earth Ground Rod
Sub Panel: Panel Manufacturer
Eaton
Sub Panel: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Sub Panel: System Grounding Method
Grounded to Main Panel
Sub Panel 2: Panel Manufacturer
Eaton
Sub Panel 2: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Sub Panel 2: System Grounding Method
Grounded to Main Panel
Sub Panel 3: Panel Manufacturer
Eaton
Sub Panel 3: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Sub Panel 3: System Grounding Method
Grounded to Main Panel
Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Location
Right Side
Meter Panel/Stand: INTERIOR PHOTOS
Sub Panel: Panel Location
Mechanical Room
Sub Panel 2: Panel Location
Mechanical Room
Sub Panel 3: Panel Location
Garage
Meter Panel/Stand: EXTERIOR PHOTOS
Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Capacity
600 AMP

Panel amperage capacity is determined by the manufacturer. Due to the ability for the breakers to be changed by anyone the manufacturers label must be followed. If he labels are missing then the capacity will be marked "unknown".

Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the main service panel.

Meter Panel/Stand: Breakers/Fuses Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the circuit breakers or fuses.

Meter Panel/Stand: Panel Bonding
Acceptable Method

This is the connection of the panel to the grounding system. The inspector will report on the physically observable method and adequacy of the bond to the panel.

Sub Panel: EXTERIOR PHOTOS
Sub Panel: Panel Capacity
200 AMP

Panel amperage capacity is determined by the manufacturer. Due to the ability for the breakers to be changed by anyone the manufacturers label must be followed. If he labels are missing then the capacity will be marked "unknown".

Sub Panel: Panel Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the main service panel.

Sub Panel: INTERIOR PHOTOS
Sub Panel: Breakers/Fuses Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the circuit breakers or fuses.

Sub Panel: Branch Conductor Material
Aluminum & Copper

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the branch wiring.

Info: Aluminum wiring can be used if sized adequately and proper installation methods are followed.

Sub Panel: Branch Wiring Style
Romex, Gauged Wiring

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the wiring system.

Sub Panel: Branch Conductor Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the wiring system.

Sub Panel: Panel Bonding
Acceptable Method

This is the connection of the panel to the grounding system. The inspector will report on the physically observable method and adequacy of the bond to the panel.

Sub Panel: Neutral/Ground Separation
Proper Separation

Sub panels must have separation of the neutrals and grounds to prevent electrical feedback and possible shock.

Sub Panel 2: EXTERIOR PHOTOS
Sub Panel 2: Panel Capacity
200 AMP

Panel amperage capacity is determined by the manufacturer. Due to the ability for the breakers to be changed by anyone the manufacturers label must be followed. If he labels are missing then the capacity will be marked "unknown".

Sub Panel 2: Panel Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the main service panel.

Sub Panel 2: INTERIOR PHOTOS
Sub Panel 2: Breakers/Fuses Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the circuit breakers or fuses.

Sub Panel 2: Branch Conductor Material
Aluminum & Copper

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the branch wiring.

Info: Aluminum wiring can be used if sized adequately and proper installation methods are followed.

Sub Panel 2: Branch Wiring Style
Romex, Gauged Wiring

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the wiring system.

Sub Panel 2: Branch Conductor Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the wiring system.

Sub Panel 2: Panel Bonding
Acceptable Method

This is the connection of the panel to the grounding system. The inspector will report on the physically observable method and adequacy of the bond to the panel.

Sub Panel 2: Neutral/Ground Separation
Proper Separation

Sub panels must have separation of the neutrals and grounds to prevent electrical feedback and possible shock.

Sub Panel 3: EXTERIOR PHOTOS
Sub Panel 3: Panel Capacity
200 AMP

Panel amperage capacity is determined by the manufacturer. Due to the ability for the breakers to be changed by anyone the manufacturers label must be followed. If he labels are missing then the capacity will be marked "unknown".

Sub Panel 3: Panel Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the main service panel.

Sub Panel 3: INTERIOR PHOTOS
Sub Panel 3: Breakers/Fuses Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the circuit breakers or fuses.

Sub Panel 3: Branch Conductor Material
Aluminum & Copper

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the branch wiring.

Info: Aluminum wiring can be used if sized adequately and proper installation methods are followed.

Sub Panel 3: Branch Wiring Style
Romex, Gauged Wiring

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the wiring system.

Sub Panel 3: Branch Conductor Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the wiring system.

Sub Panel 3: Panel Bonding
Acceptable Method

This is the connection of the panel to the grounding system. The inspector will report on the physically observable method and adequacy of the bond to the panel.

Sub Panel 3: Neutral/Ground Separation
Proper Separation

Sub panels must have separation of the neutrals and grounds to prevent electrical feedback and possible shock.

Smoke/Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Carbon Monoxide Detectors
Present

Carbon monoxide detectors are an important addition to the safety system in the home. It is recommended they be replaced every 7 years with the smoke detectors.

Smoke/Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Smoke Detectors
Operational/Acceptable Condition

It is recommended that smoke and carbon monoxide detectors be present in every room, and should be replaced every 7 years.

Although they are not required in Arizona, we also recommend installing carbon monoxide testers in the house if they are not already present.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

5 - Plumbing

Water System: Water Source
Public Utility
Waste System: Type Of Disposal System
Public Sewer
Waste System: Sewage Clean Out Material & Size
3", PVC
Gas Fuel System: Fuel Source & Type
Private Fill - LP/Propane
Gas Fuel System: Meter/Tank Location
Could Not Locate
Hot Water System: Location
Mechanical Room
Hot Water System: Power/Fuel Type
Solar, Electric
Hot Water System: Capacity
119 GAL
Hot Water System: Approximate Age
6 Years Old
Water System: Meter Location
Next to Street
Water System: Main Shut-Off Location
Next To Meter
Waste System: Clean Out Location
Rear
Gas Fuel System: Main Gas Shut-off Location
Rear
Hot Water System: TPR Valve
Needs Attention
Water System: Distribution Material
Copper

The inspector will attempt to observe a representative amount of the plumbing system to report on type of materials present.

Water System: Distribution System Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the water distribution system.

Water System: System Pressure
50 PSI - Acceptable

The water pressure was tested and was within normal operating parameters. The maximum recommended pressure for a residence is 80 psi. Anything over this can cause premature wear on the seals in your plumbing fixtures.

Water System: Pressure Regulator
Present/Acceptable Condition

The pressure regulator is not tested or adjusted and its presence is noted for information purposes only.

Water System: Hose Bibs
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the condition and function of the accessible hose bibs.

Waste System: Visual Condition
Acceptable Condition

Based on industry recommended water tests, the system drainage was tested and function will be reported on. However, only a video-scan of the main drainpipe can confirm its actual condition which is beyond the scope of a general home inspection.

Hot Water System: Equipment Photos
Hot Water System: Manufacturer
State

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding.

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help.

Hot Water System: Drip Pan
Not Present

Drip pans are helpful if properly installed to prevent undetected leaks from doing damage to the surrounding areas.

Hot Water System: Water Temp
118 Degrees - 118-130 Acceptable

Water temperature should be set between 115 and 130 for sanitation and anti scalding purposes.

Water Softener - Information Only: Present - Not Inspected

Water softener operation is outside the scope of the inspection, we did note that the equipment appeared to be in good repair and working indicated by the valve being in the "IN SERVICE" position at the time of the inspection.

Fire Sprinkler System - Information Only: Outside of Scope

The fire suppression system is outside the scope of the inspection. We are only documenting the equipment that is present for information purposes only. If system function verification is needed we recommend having it evaluated by a qualified licensed professional. 

Fire Sprinkler System - Information Only: Main Valve Panel Location
Garage
Fire Sprinkler System - Information Only: Current System PSI
125 PSI
Water pressure is measured in pounds per square inch – also called psi. The average water pressure for most homes and businesses is between 30 psi and 50 psi; most sprinkler systems are designed to use pressures of around 30 psi.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

$
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Gas Fuel System

Could Not Locate Tank

INFORMATION: We attempted to locate the tank on the property unsuccessfully. Have the owner reveal the location for fill and maintenance purposes. 

$
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Hot Water System

TPR Discharge Line Not Installed

CONCERN: This is to prevent flooding should a malfunction or leak on the water heater or valve occur.

RECOMMENDATION: Evaluation and installation by a qualified licensed professional.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

6 - Exterior

Siding Systems: Siding Material
Stucco, Stone veneer
Siding Systems: Paint/Sealant
Acceptable Condition
Siding Systems: Trim Condition
Acceptable Condition
Hard Surfaces: Pillar/Post Material & Condition
Acceptable Condition, Wood
Decks & Balconies: Decks Guard Railing
Acceptable Condition
Stairs: Hand Railing
Acceptable Condition
Stairs: Landing Areas
Acceptable Condition
Vegetation, Grading & Drainage: Vegetation
Mostly Acceptable w/ Areas of Concern
Vegetation, Grading & Drainage: Grading & Drainage
Acceptable Function
Electrical: Lighting
Acceptable Function
Exterior Doors: Screen Doors
Mostly Acceptable w/ Areas of Concern
Hard Surfaces: Walkways
Acceptable Condition
Hard Surfaces: Guard Railing
Acceptable Function
Stairs: Treads & Risers
Acceptable Condition
Electrical: Door Bell
Acceptable Function
Electrical: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Function
Exterior Doors: Main Entry Door
Wood/Glass Hinged
Outdoor Kitchen: Heaters
Acceptable Function
Siding Systems: Siding Condition
Acceptable Condition
Siding Systems: Fascia/Soffits
Acceptable Condition
Siding Systems: Exterior Thermal Scan
Hard Surfaces: Driveway
Acceptable Condition
Hard Surfaces: Steps/Stoops
Acceptable Condition
Hard Surfaces: Porch/Patios
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the observable condition. Normal cracking will be reported as acceptable.

Hard Surfaces: Coverings
Acceptable Condition

The porch covering including posts and beams, soffits and fascia were inspected.

Hard Surfaces: Pergola
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the pergola structure.

Decks & Balconies: Decks
Acceptable Condition

Here is a helpful DIY link: CLICK HERE

Walls & Fencing: Retaining Walls - Material & Condition
Mostly Acceptable w/ Areas of Concern, Masonry Block/Stucco

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the walls structure.

Walls & Fencing: Fencing Condition
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will report on the visually observable portion of the fencing structure.

Automatic Watering System: Opperation
Acceptable Function

The automatic watering system is outside the scope of the inspection. As a courtesy the inspector will attempt to verify basic function of the system.

Electrical: Exterior Receptacles
GFCI Protected

The exterior outlets were tested and were functioningat the time of the inspection.

Exterior Doors: Exterior Doors
Mostly Acceptable w/ Areas of Concern
Outdoor Kitchen: Grill
Acceptable Condition
Outdoor Kitchen: Refrigerator
Acceptable Function
Outdoor Kitchen: Ice Maker
Acceptable Function
Outdoor Water/Fire Features: Fountains
Acceptable Function
Outdoor Water/Fire Features: Outdoor Showers
Acceptable Function
Outdoor Water/Fire Features: Fire Pits/Places
Acceptable Function

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

$
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Siding Systems

Gaps/Holes in Soffits

CONCERN: This can allow pests and moisture into the attic area.

RECOMMENDATION: Evaluation and repair by a qualified licensed professional.

Siding Siding Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
6.1.2 - Siding Systems

Wood Trim Needing Sealed

RECOMMENDATION: This is typically due to weathering and lack of maintenance. It should be sealed by a qualified licensed professional to prevent further damage. 

Siding Siding Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
6.2.1 - Hard Surfaces

Sign of Bats

CONCERN: Bats can carry disease and can create a mess with their droppings on the ground and walls.


RECOMMENDATION: Evaluation and treatment by a qualified licensed professional. 

Pest control Pest Control Pro
$
Credit
Comment
6.5.1 - Walls & Fencing

Walls - Moderate Cracking

CONCERN: This may be due to poor drainage and or nearby plants which has slowly eroded the foundation of the wall causing it to shift and crack.


RECOMMENDATION: Evaluation and repair by a qualified licensed professional.

Brick Masonry, Concrete, Brick & Stone
$
Credit
Comment
6.6.1 - Vegetation, Grading & Drainage

Vegetation Touching Structure

RECOMMENDATION: This provides conditions for termites and other pests to cause damage to the paint and siding and should be trimmed or removed by a qualified licensed professional to maintain separation. 

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
6.8.1 - Electrical

Motion/Photo Activated Lighting

INFORMATION: These types of lights are not always able to be verified due to the timing of the inspection. You may want to have the homeowner verify proper function or have it evaluated by a qualified licensed professional. 

$
Credit
Comment
6.9.1 - Exterior Doors

Screen Door - Dificult To Opperate

RECOMMENDATION:This is likely due to normal wear and can usually be a simple guide and or roller replacement and should be repaired by a qualified licensed professional.

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
6.9.2 - Exterior Doors

Glass Needing Re-Sealed

CONCERN: This is usually caused by normal weathering and lack of maintenance and may allow moisture to penetrate and possibly damage the structure. 


RECOMMENDATION: Evaluation and repair by a qualified licensed professional. 

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
6.10.1 - Outdoor Kitchen

Burner Not Lighting

CONCERN: The burners not lighting could pose a hazard for allowing gas to be turned on without knowing.

RECOMMENDATION: Evaluation and or repair by a qualified licensed professional.


Here is a DIY resource on possible solutions.

Wash Appliance Repair
$
Credit
Comment
6.11.1 - Outdoor Water/Fire Features

Damaged Tile/Stone Surround

RECOMMENDATION: This is usually due to age and normal weathering which can loosen the tile/stone over time. Have a qualified licensed professional evaluate and repair the damage to prevent it from allowing moisture and debris to cause further damage. 

Tile Tile Contractor

7 - Garage/Shop/Sheds

Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Fire Separation
Fire Rated

The inspector will observe and report on the fire rating of the door.

Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Room: Walls/Firewall
Acceptable Condition
Room: Window Screens
Acceptable Condition
Overhead Door: Track System
Acceptable Condition
Overhead Door: Cabling/Tension System
Acceptable Condition
Overhead Door: Opener Controls
Acceptable Condition
Overhead Door: Auto Reverse Sensors
Acceptable Condition
Overhead Door: Pressure Safety Sensor
Acceptable Condition
Overhead Door: Manual Operation Latch
Acceptable Condition
Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Overhead Door: Electric Opener
Acceptable Condition
Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Door
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will observe and report on the condition and function of the door.

Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): Self Closing & Latching
Acceptable Function - Closes and Latches

The inspector will observe and report on whether the door closes and latches completely from a reasonable distance.

Room: Room Photos
Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Room: Sink
Acceptable Condition
Overhead Door: Overhead Door
Acceptable Condition, Insulated

8 - Bedrooms & Bathrooms

Bedroom: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Window Screens
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bedroom 3: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bedroom 4: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Window Screens
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Guest Bedroom: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Window Screens
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bathroom: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Exhaust Fans
Not Present
Bathroom: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bathroom 3: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bathroom 4: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 4: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 4: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bathroom 5: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 5: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 5: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Guest Bathroom: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Bedroom: Room Photos
Bedroom: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Room Photos
Bedroom 3: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 3: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Room Photos
Bedroom 4: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Bedroom 4: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Guest Bedroom: Room Photos
Guest Bedroom: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bedroom: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Bathroom: Room Photos
Bathroom: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Bathroom: Cabinets/Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Room Photos
Bathroom 3: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Cabinets/Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Toilet
Acceptable Function
Bathroom 4: Room Photos
Bathroom 4: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 4: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 4: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 4: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 4: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Bathroom 4: Cabinets/Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 4: Toilet
Acceptable Function
Bathroom 5: Room Photos
Bathroom 5: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 5: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 5: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 5: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 5: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 5: Cabinets/Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 5: Toilet
Acceptable Function
Guest Bathroom: Room Photos
Guest Bathroom: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Guest Bathroom: Cabinets/Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Toilet
Acceptable Function
Bedroom: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Bathroom: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Bathroom: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom: Toilet
Acceptable Function
Bathroom: Tub/Shower
Acceptable Condition

If the tub is jetted we recommend it be cleaned by filling and running water with bleach through it for usually an hour.

Bathroom 3: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Bathroom 3: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 3: Tub/Shower
Acceptable Condition

If the tub is jetted we recommend it be cleaned by filling and running water with bleach through it for usually an hour.

Bathroom 4: Lights
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 4: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Bathroom 4: Sink/Faucet
Mostly Acceptable w/ Areas of Concern
Bathroom 4: Tub/Shower
Acceptable Condition

If the tub is jetted we recommend it be cleaned by filling and running water with bleach through it for usually an hour.

Bathroom 5: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Bathroom 5: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Bathroom 5: Tub/Shower
Acceptable Condition

If the tub is jetted we recommend it be cleaned by filling and running water with bleach through it for usually an hour.

Guest Bathroom: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Guest Bathroom: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Guest Bathroom: Tub/Shower
Acceptable Condition

If the tub is jetted we recommend it be cleaned by filling and running water with bleach through it for usually an hour.

The inspector shall observe: A. walls, ceiling and floors. B. steps, stairways, balconies and railings. C. counters and a representative number of cabinets. D. a representative number of doors and windows. E. separation walls, ceilings, and doors between a dwelling unit and an attached garage or another dwelling unit. F. sumps. 11.2 The inspector shall: A. operate a representative number of primary windows and interior doors. B. report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.

11.3 The inspector is NOT required to observe: A. paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors. B. carpeting. C. draperies, blinds or other window treatments. D. household appliances. E. recreational facilities or another dwelling unit.

$
Credit
Comment
8.7.1 - Bathroom 4

Faucet - Drain Plug Not Actuating

RECOMMENDATION:This could be caused by a bad seal or loose jam nut which could be a simple adjustment and repair by a qualified licensed professional.

Wrenches Handyman

9 - Interior

Mechanical Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Mechanical Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Heating/Cooling Source
Yes
1/2 Bath: Switches
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Walls
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Window Screens
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Guest Wet Bar: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Patio 1/2 Bath: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Patio 1/2 Bath: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Patio 1/2 Bath: Exhaust Fans
None Present
Patio 1/2 Bath: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Stairway: Lighting
Acceptable Function
Stairway: Treads & Risers
Acceptable Condition
Stairway: Handrail
Acceptable Condition
Stairway: Guardrail
Acceptable Condition
Stairway: Landing Areas
Acceptable Condition
Mechanical Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Closets
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Room Photos
1/2 Bath: Door
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

1/2 Bath: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Windows
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
1/2 Bath: Toilet
Acceptable Condition
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Room Photos
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Door
Acceptable Condition
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Toilet
Acceptable Condition
Guest Wet Bar: Room Photos
Guest Wet Bar: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Guest Wet Bar: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Function
Guest Wet Bar: Cabinets & Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Patio 1/2 Bath: Room Photos
Patio 1/2 Bath: Door
Acceptable Condition
Patio 1/2 Bath: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Patio 1/2 Bath: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Patio 1/2 Bath: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Patio 1/2 Bath: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Patio 1/2 Bath: Toilet
Acceptable Condition
Mechanical Room: Room Photos
Mechanical Room: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Mechanical Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Mechanical Room: Ceiling
Mostly Acceptable w/ Areas of Concern
Mechanical Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Room Photos
Hallway: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Switches
Acceptable Condition

The inspector will opperate and report on the function and condition of all accessible switches.

Hallway: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Hallway: Flooring
Acceptable Condition

The flooring was found to be in acceptable condition with only normal wear at the time of the inspection.

If there is isolated damage, it will be noted separately.

1/2 Bath: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Upstairs 1/2 Bath: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Guest Wet Bar: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All of the accessible receptacles were tested. All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Guest Wet Bar: Garbage Disposal
Acceptable Function
Guest Wet Bar: Refridgerator
Acceptable Function
Patio 1/2 Bath: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Stairway: Stairway Photos

The inspector shall observe: A. walls, ceiling and floors. B. steps, stairways, balconies and railings. C. counters and a representative number of cabinets. D. a representative number of doors and windows. E. separation walls, ceilings, and doors between a dwelling unit and an attached garage or another dwelling unit. F. sumps. 11.2 The inspector shall: A. operate a representative number of primary windows and interior doors. B. report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.

11.3 The inspector is NOT required to observe: A. paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors. B. carpeting. C. draperies, blinds or other window treatments. D. household appliances. E. recreational facilities or another dwelling unit.

$
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Mechanical Room

Minor Settling Cracks

RECOMMENDATION: This appeared to be due to long term settling and may not be a current issue. Patching, painting by a qualified licensed professional and monitoring for future occurrence.

If you would like further confirmation a structural engineer should be contacted.

Mag glass Monitor

10 - Living Areas

Den: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Den: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Den: Window Screens
Acceptable Condition
Den: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Exercise/Game Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Exercise/Game Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Exercise/Game Room: Window Screens
Acceptable Condition
Exercise/Game Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Guest Living Room: Ceiling Fans
Needs Attention
Guest Living Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Guest Living Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Guest Living Room: Window Screens
Acceptable Condition
Guest Living Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Living/Dining Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Living/Dining Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Living/Dining Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Sun Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Sun Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Sun Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Den: Room Photos
Den: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Den: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Den: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Den: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Den: Closet
Acceptable Condition
Den: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Exercise/Game Room: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Exercise/Game Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Guest Living Room: Room Photos
Guest Living Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Guest Living Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Guest Living Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Guest Living Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Guest Living Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition
Living/Dining Room: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Condition
Living/Dining Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Living/Dining Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Living/Dining Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Living/Dining Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Sun Room: Room Photos
Sun Room: Doors
Mostly Acceptable w/ Areas of Concern
Sun Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Sun Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Sun Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Sun Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Den: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Exercise/Game Room: Room Photos
Exercise/Game Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Exercise/Game Room: Ceiling Fans
Acceptable Condition
Exercise/Game Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Exercise/Game Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Exercise/Game Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Living/Dining Room: Room Photos
Living/Dining Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition

The inspector shall observe: A. walls, ceiling and floors. B. steps, stairways, balconies and railings. C. counters and a representative number of cabinets. D. a representative number of doors and windows. E. separation walls, ceilings, and doors between a dwelling unit and an attached garage or another dwelling unit. F. sumps. 11.2 The inspector shall: A. operate a representative number of primary windows and interior doors. B. report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.

11.3 The inspector is NOT required to observe: A. paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors. B. carpeting. C. draperies, blinds or other window treatments. D. household appliances. E. recreational facilities or another dwelling unit.

$
Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Guest Living Room

Ceiling Fan - Not Functional

CONCERN: An attempt to operate the ceiling fan was made and it would not turn on. If the fan is controlled by a remote this could be a dead battery. 

RECOMMENDATION: Asking owner to demonstrate function, otherwise evaluation and or repair by a qualified licensed professional.

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
10.5.1 - Sun Room

Door - Rubbing

RECOMMENDATION:This is common as homes age can cause damage to the jamb which can wear out hardware prematurely and should be repaired by a qualified licensed professional.


Here is a helpful DIY article on how to fix a sticking door.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor

11 - Laundry

Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Room: Window Screens
Acceptable Condition
Room: Dryer Hookup Options
220V Electric
Washer & Dryer: Dryer Energy Source
220 Electric
Washer & Dryer: Dryer Vent
Metal (Flex)
Room: Room Photos
Room: Doors
Acceptable Condition
Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Room: Receptacles
Acceptable Condition
Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Room: Exhaust Fans
Acceptable Condition
Room: Washer Hookups
Acceptable Condition
Washer & Dryer: Equipment Photos
Room: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Washer & Dryer: Washing Machine
Acceptable Function

The inspector ran the washer for a full cycle and reported on the function and completion.

Washer & Dryer: Dryer
Acceptable Function

The inspector ran the dryer and checked to make sure it came to temperature and reported on the function and completion.

12 - Kitchen

Room: Switches
Acceptable Condition
Room: Walls
Acceptable Condition
Room: Cabinet Doors & Drawers
Acceptable Condition
Room: Heating/Cooling Source Present
Yes
Dishwasher: Brand
Miele
Dishwasher: Drain Line (High Loop)
Acceptable Function
Refrigerator: Brand
Sub-Zero
Countertop/Built-in Microwave: Brand
Miele
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Brands
WOLF
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Energy Source
LP/Propane
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Available Hookup Options
LP/Propane
Room: Lighting
Acceptable Condition
Room: Receptacles
GFCI Protected

All receptacles within 6 feet of sink should be GFCI protected.

Room: Ceiling
Acceptable Condition
Room: Flooring
Acceptable Condition
Room: Windows
Acceptable Condition, Double Pane
Room: Pantry
Acceptable Condition
Refrigerator: Water & Ice Function
Water Functions, Ice Functions

The water and or ice dispenser were tested for function.

Room: Room Photos
Room: Cabinets & Countertops
Acceptable Condition
Room: Sink/Faucet
Acceptable Condition
Garbage Disposal: Equipment Photos
Garbage Disposal: Equipment Function
Acceptable Function
Dishwasher: Equipment Photos
Dishwasher: Function
Acceptable Function

The inspector will run the dishwasher for a full cycle and report on the operation and condition.

Refrigerator: Equipment Photos
Refrigerator: Function/Temperatures
Acceptable Function
Countertop/Built-in Microwave: Equipment Photos
Countertop/Built-in Microwave: Equipment Function
Acceptable Function

The inspector will test and observe function, if you see a red light on the photo the microwave is functional.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Equipment Photos
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Equipment Function
Acceptable Function

The inspector will operate the appliances under normal controls and report on the findings.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type/Function
Acceptable Function

The inspector shall observe: A. walls, ceiling and floors. B. steps, stairways, balconies and railings. C. counters and a representative number of cabinets. D. a representative number of doors and windows. E. separation walls, ceilings, and doors between a dwelling unit and an attached garage or another dwelling unit. F. sumps. 11.2 The inspector shall: A. operate a representative number of primary windows and interior doors. B. report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components.

11.3 The inspector is NOT required to observe: A. paint, wallpaper and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors. B. carpeting. C. draperies, blinds or other window treatments. D. household appliances. E. recreational facilities or another dwelling unit.

13 - Pool & Spa

Barriers: Barrier Condition
Acceptable Condition
Decking & Coping: Decking Material
Tile, Flagstone
Decking & Coping: Coping Material
Tile
Liner, Circulation & Drainage: Liner Material
Pebble Tec
Electrical & Controls: Panel Condition
Acceptable Condition
Electrical & Controls: Breakers Condtion
Acceptable Condition
Electrical & Controls: Wiring Condition
Acceptable Condition
Electrical & Controls: Grounding
Earth Grounding
Pumping, Heating & Filtration Equipment: Heater Condition/Function
Acceptable Condition/Function
Decking & Coping: Coping Condition
Acceptable Condition
Liner, Circulation & Drainage: Auto Fill Valve
Present, Acceptable Condition
Liner, Circulation & Drainage: Spa Aerator
Acceptable Condition/Function
Liner, Circulation & Drainage: Skimmer
Acceptable Condition
Liner, Circulation & Drainage: Circulation and Jetting
Acceptable Function
Electrical & Controls: Pool/Spa Lighting
Acceptable Function
Suna: Exterior Condition
Acceptable Condition
Suna: Interior Condition
Acceptable Condition
Barriers: Barrier Type
Self Closing Gates

The barriers should meet all current safety requirements

  • Must be at least 5 ft tall
  • Must encompass the entire pool
  • Must have no means of which can be used to climb.
  • Can not have holes or gaps large enough for a 4 in round object to fit through.
  • Must be at least 20 in from the waters edge.

The gates need to meet all current safety requirements:

  • Must be self closing and latching 
  • Latches were 54 in above the deck
  • Opens outward, away from the pool

CLICK HERE If you would like more information on pool barrier requirements.

Decking & Coping: Decking Condition
Acceptable Condition
Liner, Circulation & Drainage: Liner
Acceptable Condition
Liner, Circulation & Drainage: Suction and Drainage
Acceptable Function

There should be 2 suction ports with anti-vortex covers on them.

Electrical & Controls: Exterior Photos
Electrical & Controls: Control Panel Buttons Condition and Function
Acceptable Condition/Function
Electrical & Controls: Interior Photos
Pumping, Heating & Filtration Equipment: Visible Plumbing
Acceptable Condition
Pumping, Heating & Filtration Equipment: Filtration Type
Cartridge
Pumping, Heating & Filtration Equipment: Filtration Condition/Function
Acceptable Condition/Function

The Inspector will base opinion off of the visible pressures of the system indicating whether the system is functioning properly.

Pumping, Heating & Filtration Equipment: Heater Type
Gas Fired

The inspector will attempt to test the function of the heater and report on its condition. Solar heaters are not operated, we recommend having a qualified licensed pool professional check and verify function

Pumping, Heating & Filtration Equipment: Pump & Motor HP
3 HP

The pump and motor were observed to have proper grounding, clean filer baskets, and operating smooth and quiet while building proper pressures at the time of the inspection.

Pumping, Heating & Filtration Equipment: Pump and Motor Condition/Function
Acceptable Condition/Function
Suna: Condition & function
Functions Properly
The sauna is outside the scope of the inspection but as a courtesy the inspector will do a cursory examination of the physical condition and the basic function of the unit. 
$
Credit
Comment
13.1.1 - Barriers

Exterior Door Not Self Closing

CONCERN: This poses a safety concern as it could allow children unsupervised access to the pool area. 


RECOMMENDATION: Evaluation and repair by a qualified licensed professional. 

$
Credit
Comment
13.2.1 - Decking & Coping

Possible Vessel Leak

CONCERN: There were signs of moisture that appeared to be coming from the pool which could indicate a failed liner.


RECOMMENDATION: Evaluation and repair by a qualified licensed professional. 

Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor