Loading
Document Name
Sort Generated Document By
Header Text
Total Credit Requested
$ 0.00
Preview
Create
Viewing:

1234 Main St.
Rio Rancho NM 87124
12/16/2018 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
12
Maintenance / comment
21
Recommendation / improvement
10
Major concern / safety hazard

1 - Inspection Details

General: In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent, Inspector
General: Temperature (approximate)
89 Fahrenheit (F)
General: Type of Building
Single Family
General: Weather Conditions
Clear, Dry
General: What Really Matters In A Home Inspection

Congratulations on buying your new home.

The process can be stressful. A home inspection is supposed to give you peace of mind, but often has the opposite effect. You will be asked to absorb a lot of information in a short time. This often includes a written report, checklist, photographs, environmental reports, and what the inspector himself says during the inspection. All this combined with the seller's disclosure and what you notice yourself makes the experience even more overwhelming. What should you do? 

Relax. Most of your inspection will be maintenance recommendations, life expectancies and minor imperfections. These are nice to know about. However, the issues that really matter will fall into four categories:

1. Major defects. An example of this would be a significant structural failure.

2. Things that may lead to major defects. A small water leak coming from a piece of roof flashing, for example.

3. Things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home. Structural damage caused by termite infestation, for example. 

4. Safety hazards. Such as a lack of GFCI-protection.

Anything in these categories should be corrected. Often a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4). 

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. Realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in the report. No home is perfect.

Keep things in perspective. Don't kill your deal over things that don't matter. It is inappropriate to demand that a seller address deferred maintenance, conditions already listed on the seller's disclosure, or nit-picky items.

General: Overview
Inspection Overview

Thank You for choosing Servant Property Inspections to perform your complete home inspection. 

The goal of this inspection and report is to put you in a better position to make an informed real estate decision. This report is a general guide and provides you with some objection information to help you make your own evaluation of the overall condition of the home and is not intended to reflect the value of the property, or to make any representation as to the advisability of purchase. Not all improvements, defects or hazards will be identified during this inspection. Unexpected repairs should still be anticipated.

This inspection is not a guarantee or warranty of any kind. Servant Property Inspections endeavors to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with InterNACHI s Standards of Practice. Please refer to the pre-inspection contract for a full explanation of the scope of the inspection. 

This Home Inspection Report contains observations of those systems and components that, in the professional judgement of the inspector, are not functioning properly, significantly deficient, unsafe, or are near the end of their useful service lives. If the cause for the deficiency is not readily apparent, the suspected cause or reason why the system or component is at or near end of useful service life is reported, and recommendations for correction or monitoring are made as appropriate.

This report is effectively a snapshot of the house recording the conditions on a given date and time. Home inspectors cannot predict future behavior, and as such, we cannot be responsible for things that occur after the inspection. If conditions change, we are available to revisit the property for an additional charge and update our report. 

Any oral statements made by the Inspector pertaining to Recommended Upgrades or any inclusion in the Inspection Report of information regarding Recommended Upgrades shall be deemed to be informational only and supplied as a courtesy to you and shall not be deemed to be an amendment to or waiver of any exclusions included in the "Home Inspection Agreement and Standards of Practice. Any and all recommendations for repair, replacement, evaluation and maintenance issues found should be evaluated by the appropriate trades contractors within the clients inspection contingency window or prior to closing.

This report has been prepared for your exclusive use, as our client. No use by third parties is intended. We will not be responsible to any parties for the contents of the report, other than the part named herein. The report itself is copyrighted, and may not be used in whole or in part without Servant Property Inspections express written permission. Again, thanks very much for the opportunity to conduct this home inspection for you. We are available to you throughout the entire real estate transaction process. Should you have any questions, please call or email.


Sincerely,


Pete Stagl

Owner/Certified Professional Inspector

Servant Property Inspections LLC

Mobile: 505-401-7996

pete@servantpi.com

www.ServantPropertyInspections.com

General: Perspective
Locations

For the purpose of this report, all directional references (Left, Right, Front, Back) are based on when facing the front of the structure as depicted in the cover image above.

General: Use Of Photos
Photos

Your report includes many photographs. Some pictures are intended as a courtesy and are added for your information. Some are to help clarify where the inspector has been, what was looked at, and the condition of the system or component at the time of the inspection. Some of the pictures may be of deficiencies or problem areas, these are to help you better understand what is documented in this report and may allow you to see areas or items that you normally would not see. Not all problem areas or conditions will be supported with photos.

General: Occupancy
Vacant
For furnished homes, access to some items such as electrical outlets, windows, wall/floor surfaces and cabinet interiors can be restricted by furniture and/or personal belongings. These items are limitations of the inspection and these items may be concealed defects.
General: Definitions
Explained

The following definitions of comment descriptions represent this inspection report. All comments by the inspector should be considered before purchasing this home. Any findings / comments that are listed under "Safety / Major" by the inspector suggests a second opinion or further inspection by a qualified contractor. All costs associated with further inspection fees and repair or replacement of item, component or unit should be considered before you purchase the property.

Inspected (IN) = The item, component or system was visually inspected and if no other comments were made, then it appeared to be functioning as intended allowing for normal wear and tear.

Not Inspected (NI) = The item, component or system was not inspected and no representations made of whether or not it was functioning as intended and will state a reason for not inspecting.

Not Present (NP) = The item, component or system is not in this home or building.

Observations (O) = The item, component or system was inspected and a concern, observation and/or deficiency was found.

General: Natural Gas Meter Not Present

City supplied natural gas meter was not present at time of the inspection.

Therefore all natural gas supplied appliances were not inspected for operational characteristics. 

2 - Roof

General: Inspection Method
Ground, Ladder, Roof
Coverings: Layers
1+ Layer
Coverings: Pitch
Medium
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Not Present
Flashings: Material
Aluminum
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Inspection Method
Roof
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Chimney Material
None
General: Roof Type/Style
Gable
General: Roof

We are not professional roofers. Feel free to hire one prior to closing.

We do our best to inspect the roof system within the time allotted. We inspect the roof covering, drainage systems, the flashings, the skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations. We are not required to inspect antennae, interiors of flues or chimneys which are not readily accessible, and other installed accessories. This is not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes. It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection. We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roof, and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy.

Coverings: Material
Asphalt
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Chimney

We are not certified chimney professionals. Only a level two inspection performed by a CSIA (Chimney Safety Institute of America) certified chimney sweep can determine the condition of the flue and whether the fireplace is safe to use.

We recommend a cleaning and level two inspection of the fireplaces and chimney flues before closing. Clean chimneys don't catch on fire. More information about fireplaces and chimneys can be obtained at www.csia.com.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Coverings

Shingles Missing

Observed areas that appeared to be missing sufficient coverings. Recommend qualified roofing contractor evaluate & repair.
Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.2.2 - Coverings

Unsealed/Lifted Shingles

Observed a large number of tabs that were unsealed. This may be a result of under-driven nails, debris, wind-driven damage or other factors. Recommend a qualified roofing professional evaluate and make recommendations.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.2.3 - Coverings

Previous Repair

Evidence of previous repair to shingles was apparent. Recommend asking seller if repair work was performed and why.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Flashings

Loose/Separated

Flashings observed to be loose or separated, which can lead to water intrusion and/or mold. Recommend a qualified roofing contractor repair.
Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.4.2 - Flashings

Caulk Nail Heads

As part of ongoing home maintenance, recommend caulking/sealing nail heads.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.4.3 - Flashings

Pipe Flashing Boot

Pipe flashing rubber boot was damaged which could allow moisture into the home, recommend repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional

3 - Exterior

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Trim Material
Engineered Wood, Steel/Metal/Aluminum
Windows: Window Type
Double-hung, Sliders
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Stoop/Steps
Concrete
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Patio
Concrete
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Deck/Balcony
None
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: General
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway Material
Concrete
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Porch
Covered Porch
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Exterior

We are not exterior experts. Feel free to hire an exterior contractor prior to closing.

Water can be destructive and foster conditions that can be harmful to health. For this reason, the ideal property will have the ground around the foundation perimeter that slopes away from the residence about 6 inches for the first 10 feet from the foundation. And the interior floors will be several inches higher than the exterior grade. Also, the residence will have roof gutters and downspouts that discharge into drains or trays that carry or divert water away from the foundation. The sellers or occupants will have a more intimate knowledge of the site than we will have during our limited visit. Recommend asking the seller about water problems including but not limited to water puddles in the yard, gutter or downspout problems, water penetration into the lowest level of the structure, and drainage systems. Recommend closely monitoring and inspecting the exterior during a heavy rainstorm to observe the way the surface water is managed. Standing puddles near the house foundation are to be avoided.

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Stucco
Exterior Doors: Exterior Entry Door
Wood, Vinyl
Windows: Window Material
Vinyl
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Walkway Material
Concrete
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Material
Engineered Wood, Vinyl

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding - Gap/Opening

There is opening, gap or hole in siding which should be repaired. This can allow water intrusion and rodent infestation as well as deterioration of the surrounding material.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Stucco Cracking - Minor

Siding showed cracking in one or more places. This can be a result of temperature changes, and typical as homes with stucco age. Recommend monitoring.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Trim - Damaged

Damaged trim at exterior.
Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Exterior Doors

Door Does Not Close or Latch
Living Room

Door does not close or latch properly. Recommend qualified handyman adjust strike plate and/or lock. Here is a DIY troubleshooting article on fixing door issues.
Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Exterior Doors

Weatherstripping Needs Repair

Door weatherstripping is in need of repair/replace. This can result in significant energy loss and moisture intrusion. Recommend repair/replacement of standard weatherstripping.Here is a DIY guide on weatherstripping.
Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.2.3 - Exterior Doors

Gate does not latch

The gate to the side yard does not latch. Recommend repairing to ensure access is secured.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Windows

Screen Damaged.
Kitchen

Window screen damaged. Recommend repairing screen to keep insects and pests out of house.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Gap

There is opening, gap or hole in fascia / soffit which should be repaired. This can allow water intrusion and rodent infestation as well as deterioration of the surrounding material.
Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Block Wall Not Secured Properly

Block wall was not securely fastened. Loose blocks can fall and cause injury.

Recommend repair by qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

General: General
General: Flooring System
Concrete
Foundation: Material
Slab on Grade
General: Structure

We are not structural engineers. Feel free to hire one prior to closing to consult with and address concerns that you have with the property ,even if I do not identify any structural material defects. 

We inspect the structural components including foundation and framing by probing a representative number of structural components where deterioration is suspected or where clear indications of possible deterioration exist. Probing is not required when probing would damage any finished surface or where no deterioration is visible.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

5 - Heating

Equipment: Heat Type
Gas-Fired Heat, Forced Air
Equipment: Energy Source
Natural Gas
Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Living Room
Distribution Systems: Ductwork
Insulated
Equipment: Heating

We are not HVAC professionals. Feel free to hire one prior to closing.

This inspection of the heating system is a visual inspection using only the normal operating controls for the system. The inspection of the heating is general and not technically exhaustive. A detailed evaluation of the interior components of the heating system is beyond the scope of a home inspection. We do not inspect the humidifier or dehumidifier, the electronic air filter, and determine heating supply adequacy or distribution balance. We do not operate the heating system when the air temperature is too hot, to prevent damaging the unit.

It is essential that any recommendation that we make for service, correction, or repair be scheduled prior to closing or purchasing the property, because the hired-professional could reveal defects or recommend further repairs that could affect your evaluation of the property. Note: Health is a deeply personal responsibility. You should have the air quality tested and the ductwork or baseboards cleaned as a prudent investment in environmental hygiene, especially if any family member suffers from allergies or asthma.

Equipment: Brand
York
Equipment: Natural Gas Turned Off

Natural Gas for house was turned off and therefore the heat source was not tested or inspected. Furnace excluded from the scope of inspection. If you are interested in having this area inspected, please contact me about a follow-up inspection.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;

lintels above the fireplace openings;

damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and

cleanout doors and frames.

II. The inspector shall describe:

the type of fireplace.

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;

manually operated dampers that did not open and close;

the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;

the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and

cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

inspect the flue or vent system.

inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.

determine the need for a chimney sweep.

operate gas fireplace inserts.

light pilot flames.

determine the appropriateness of any installation.

inspect automatic fuel-fed devices.

inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices.

inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted.

ignite or extinguish fires.

determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics.

move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents.

perform a smoke test.

dismantle or remove any component.

perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection.

perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Normal Operating Controls

Inoperable

Thermostat did not respond. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor replace.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Vents, Flues & Chimneys

Fresh Air Duct Blocked

Fresh air duct for furnace/ water heater blocked by pillow. 

Recommend asking Seller why the pillow was placed in the duct and have removed before closing.

Contractor Qualified Professional

6 - Cooling

Cooling Equipment: Brand
International Comfort
Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Living Room
Cooling Equipment: Cooling

We are not HVAC professionals. Feel free to hire one prior to closing.

We are not required to inspect the parts which are not readily accessible, like the coil, compressor, or valves. We do not inspect the humidifier or dehumidifier, the electronic air filter, and determine cooling supply adequacy or distribution balance. We do not operate the cooling system when the outside temperature is too cool, to prevent damaging the unit.

It is essential that any recommendation that we make for service, correction, or repair be scheduled prior to closing or purchasing the property, because the hired-professional could reveal additional defects or recommend further repairs that could affect your evaluation of the property.

Note: Health is a deeply personal responsibility. You should have the air quality tested and the ductwork or baseboards cleaned as a prudent investment in environmental hygiene, especially if any family member suffers from allergies or asthma.

Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric, Central Air Conditioner
Distribution System: Configuration
Central

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Cooling Equipment

Air Conditioner - Not Operable

The air conditioner was not operable and didnt respond to thermostat controls. Recommend qualified professional review and repair as needed.

Fire HVAC Professional

7 - Plumbing

General: Water Source
Public
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material
PVC
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Supply Material
Not Visible - Unknown
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Distribution Material
Not Visible - Unknown
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Power Source/Type
Natural Gas
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Capacity
40 gallons
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Kitchen Pantry
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Fuel Line Material
Black Iron
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
First Floor
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Main Gas Shut-off Location
Gas Meter
General: Plumbing

We are not professional plumbers. Feel free to hire one prior to closing.

All bathroom fixtures, including toilets, tubs, showers, and sinks are inspected. Approximately 15 minutes of water is run at each fixture. Readily visible water-supply and drain pipes are inspected. Plumbing access panels that we can find are opened, if readily accessible and available to open. We do not perform water leak tests on drain lines or shower pans. We simply look for active leaks, which is quite limited by our short time in the property.

Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: General
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
AO Smith
I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding. Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help.
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Not Visible
Drain/Waste/Vent piping was not visible due to finished coverings.
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Natural Gas Turned Off

Natural Gas was not connected, as such the water heater was not tested. Recommend testing water heater prior to closing to ensure proper operation.

Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Gas Shut Off
Gas was off at the main. Recommend local utility company turn on and check all gas appliances prior to deadlines.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

No Drip Pan

No drip pan was present. Recommend installation by a qualified plumber.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.5.2 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

Discharge Pipe

Water heater TPR discharge pipe should be installed as to allow gravity to drain water from pipe. Discharge pipe should not have a "T" or a trap.

Recommend a plumbing professional repair or replace.

Contractor Qualified Professional

8 - Electrical

Service Entrance Conductors: Conductor Material
Not Visible
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Voltage
120/240
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Manufacturer
Unknown
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Location
None
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wiring
Copper
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Not Visible
Carbon Monoxide Detectors: General

Smoke Detector & CO alarm combinations located throughout house.

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Amperage
100 AMP
General: Electrical

We are not electricians. Feel free to hire an electrician prior to closing.

If we feel that it is safe enough to open the electrical panel, we will check the interior components of service panels and sub panels, the conductors, and the over-current protection devices. Inside the house, we will check a representative number of installed lighting fixtures, switches, and receptacles. This is not an exhaustive inspection of every component and installation detail. There will be receptacles and switches and lights that we will not have time to inspect. Ask property owner about all of the wall switches.

Therefore, it is essential that any recommendations that we may make for correction should be completed before the close of escrow, because an electrician could reveal other problems or recommend repairs.

Service Entrance Conductors: Service Entrance
Underground
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Garage
Smoke Detectors: General

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any time controlled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Service Entrance Conductors

Ground Wire Sticking out of Meter

Ungrounded ground wire sticking out from meter.

Recommend a qualified professional to investigate and repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Receptacle Inoperable
Front Exterior Entryway

Receptacle was not working at the time of inspection, recommend repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.5.2 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Receptacle Scorched/Burn Marks

Receptacle contained burn/scorch marks. This can be an indication that an electrical hazard occurred or may occur again in the future. Recommend review.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.5.3 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Switch Broken

Broken light switch, recommend repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.5.4 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Receptacle Damaged
Back Yard Wall of House

Receptacle damaged. Recommend replacement by qualified professional.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.6.1 - GFCI & AFCI

No GFCI Protection Installed

No GFCI protection present in one or more locations. As a safety upgrade, recommend licensed electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles in recommended locations.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.2 - GFCI & AFCI

GFCI Not Operable

GFCI Receptacle was not responding to the test/reset button when pressed. Recommend qualified professional review and repair as necessary.
Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.7.1 - Smoke Detectors

Needs Replaced
Garage

Recommend smoke detector that is older than 10 years of age or if age is unknown, replace with new smoke detector.
Tools Handyman/DIY

9 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Batt, Fiberglass
Attic Insulation: Depth Of Insulation
~8 Inches
Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Gable Vents, Soffit Vents, Roof Vents
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans
Fan with Light
General: Inspection Method
Attic Access, Within The Attic
The attic space lacked adequate headroom and a walkway and access was obstructed to most of the attic area. As a result, inspection of the attic was limited. Attics may contain potential fire and/or health hazards, other safety issues, damage or defects that have the potential to cause damage to the home or unexpected repairs. Even when an inspection of the attic is completed from within the attic area, these limitations still exist the same.
General: Access Restricted

Access was restricted due to attic height and lack of walkway. Inspected from the access.

Attic Insulation: Restricted Access

Access was limited due to attic design with not enough space to safely walk throughout the attic. Attic excluded from the scope of inspection.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

10 - Interior

Floors: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Tile
Walls: Wall Material
Drywall
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Composite
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Doors: Interior

We check only a representative number of doors and windows. We are not required to inspect the paint, wallpaper, the carpeting, the window treatments and screens. We do not move furniture, lift carpets or rugs, empty closets or cabinets, and we do not comment on cosmetic deficiencies. We may not comment on the cracks that appear around windows and doors, or which follow the lines of framing members and the seams of drywall and plasterboard. These cracks are usually a consequence of movement, such as wood shrinkage and common settling, and will often reappear. We do not report on odors from pets and cigarette smoke.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Walls

Doorknob Hole

Wall had damage from doorknob. Recommend a qualified handyman or drywall contractor repair.
Putty knife Drywall Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.5.1 - Countertops & Cabinets

Poor/Missing Caulk

Bathroom countertop was missing sufficient caulk/sealant at the wall. This can lead to water damage. Recommend adding sealant at sides and corners where counters touch walls. 

Wrench DIY

11 - Bathroom

General: General
Plumbing & Fixtures: Shower/Tub Material
Metal, Tile
Plumbing & Fixtures: Whirlpool
No
Electrical & Other: Receptacles
Recommend GFCI
Electrical & Other: Other
Exhaust Fan Noisy, Exhaust Fan Not Present
General: Bathrooms

We are not plumbers. Feel free to hire a plumber prior to closing.

All bathroom fixtures, including toilets, tubs, showers, and sinks are inspected. Approximately 15 minutes of water is run at each fixture. Readily visible water-supply and drain pipes are inspected. Plumbing access panels are opened, if readily accessible and available to open. Normal foot pressure is applied around the base of each toilet, tub, and shower to check for deteriorated flooring. Normal hand pressure is applied carefully to the walls of each shower to check for deterioration. Re-grouting and sealant around the tub shower, and fixtures should be considered routine maintenance. We do not perform water leak tests on drain lines or shower pans. We simply look for active leaks, which is quite limited by our short time in the property.

Credit
Comment
11.2.1 - Plumbing & Fixtures

Low / No Water Pressure at Shower/ Tub

Low to No water pressure at Shower and tub facilities.

Recommend a qualified professional investigate and repair the problem.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
11.2.2 - Plumbing & Fixtures

Faucet Handle Not Operable
Master Bathroom

Faucet handle at master bath sink was not able to be operated.

Handle comes in contact with frame of mirror.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
11.3.1 - Electrical & Other

GFCI Upgrade

As a safety upgrade, recommend that the receptacle(s) be upgraded to GFCI receptacles.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
11.3.2 - Electrical & Other

Bathroom Vent Malfunction

Hall Bathroom exhaust vent emits screech when operated by switch.

Recommend repair or replacement by qualified professional.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
11.3.3 - Electrical & Other

Exhaust Fan Not Present
Master Bathroom

Bathroom exhaust fan was not present. As an upgrade recommend installing exhaust vent and terminate to the exterior.
Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Kitchen

Electrical & Other: Receptacles
Operable, Recommend GFCI
Electrical & Other: Other
Heat Source Present
Dishwasher: Dishwasher Plumbing
Drain Line Looped
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Gas
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Garbage Disposal: Present
Plumbing & Fixtures: Plumbing
Drainage Satisfactory, Flow Satisfactory
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
Frigidaire
General: Kitchen

We check some of the appliances only as a courtesy to you. Appliances are not within the scope of a home inspection. We are not required to inspect the kitchen appliances. We do not evaluate them for their performance nor for the accuracy of their settings or cycles. Appliances break. We assume no responsibility for future problems with the appliances.

If they are older than ten years, they may well exhibit decreased efficiency. Also, many older ovens are not secured to the wall to prevent tipping. Be sure to check the appliance, especially if children are in the house. We recommend installing a minimum five pound ABC-type fire extinguisher mounted on the wall inside the kitchen area.

Dishwasher: Brand
Frigidaire
Refrigerator: Brand
Frigidaire
Built-in Microwave: Brand
Frigidaire
Dishwasher: Not Operated

Dishwasher was not operated due to disconnected plumbing line.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Oven Not Hooked Up

Oven was not hooked up and therefore not inspected or tested for operation. Recommend testing prior to closing to ensure proper operation.

Credit
Comment
12.3.1 - Electrical & Other

Garbage Disposal Wiring

The electrical cable for the garbage disposal at the kitchen should be protected in a flexible metal conduit. This will help prevent damage to the wire from items being moved under the kitchen sink.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.4.1 - Dishwasher

Improper Installation
Kitchen

Dishwasher installation not completed.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.6.1 - Range/Oven/Cooktop

Oven Not Hooked Up

Oven was not turned on at time of inspection. Recommend testing prior to closing to ensure proper performance.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
12.6.2 - Range/Oven/Cooktop

Range Not Fastened

Range was not fastened to the floor. This poses a safety hazard to children. Recommend a qualified contractor secure range so it can't tip.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.7.1 - Garbage Disposal

Excessive Noise

Garbage disposal was excessively noisy. Recommend a qualified plumber evaluate and repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Laundry Room

Plumbing & Fixtures: Laundry Sink
No sink
Electrical & Other: Receptacles
Recommend GFCI
Electrical & Other: Other
None
Washer/Dryer: Dryer Power Source
Electric, Gas/LP
Washer/Dryer: Dryer Vent
Not Visible
Washer/Dryer: Dryer Brand
Not Present
Washer/Dryer: Washer Brand
Not Present
General: Laundry

We do not test clothes dryers, nor washing machines and their water connections and drainpipes. We can operate them, but only as a courtesy. 

If a water catch pan is installed, it is not possible for us to check its performance. We recommend turning off the water supplied to the washer after every load. We recommend having a professional inspect and clean the dryer exhaust pipe twice every year.

Credit
Comment
13.4.1 - Washer/Dryer

Exterior Dryer Vent Hood

Recommend that a dryer vent louvered hood be installed outside. This can prevent rodents and other pests from entering the dryer vent and causing damage.

14 - Garage

General: Type
Attached, 2-Car
Roofing: Material
Asphalt
Roofing: Layers
1+ Layer
Roofing: Pitch
Medium
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Not Present
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Brick Veneer, Stucco
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Trim Material
Engineered Wood, Steel/Metal/Aluminum
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Material
Steel/Metal/Aluminum, Vinyl, Wood
Floor: Flooring Material
Concrete
Floor: Source Of Ignition
None
Fire Separation Walls & Ceiling: General
Electrical & Other: Receptacles
Recommend GFCI
Electrical & Other: Other
None
Garage Door Opener: General
Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): General
General: Garage

We do not evaluate or measure the fire-ratings of the drywall/plaster in the garage or the rating of the door between the garage and the house. Different municipalities require different ratings. Ideally, there should be a 5/8-inch Type X drywall or equivalent on the walls and ceiling that separate the garage from habitable rooms. And a 20-minute fire-rated door separating the house and garage.

We check for breaches of the firewall. We do not pressure test the garage door openers.

Garage Overhead Door: Material
Steel/Metal/Aluminum
Credit
Comment
14.9.1 - Garage Overhead Door

Broken Hardware

Broken wheel on door roller hardware, recommend repair.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
14.11.1 - Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home)

Not Self-closing

Door from garage to home should have self-closing hinges to help prevent spread of a fire to living space. Recommend a qualified contractor install self-closing hinges.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor

15 - Conclusion

Pre-Closing Walk Through

The walk-through prior to closing is the time for Client to inspect the property. Conditions can change between the time of a home inspection and the time of closing. Restrictions that existed during the inspection may have been removed for the walk-through. Defects or problems that were not found during the home inspection may be discovered during the walk-through. Client should be thorough during the walk-through.

 Any defect or problem discovered during the walk-through should be negotiated with the owner/seller of the property prior to closing. Purchasing the property with a known defect or problem releases Servant Property Inspections of all responsibility. Client assumes responsibility for all known defects after settlement.

The following are recommendations for the pre-closing walk through your new house. Consider hiring a certified home inspector to assist you.

1. Check the heating and cooling system. Turn the thermostat to heat mode and turn the temperature setting up. Confirm that the heating system is running and making heat. Turn the thermostat to off and wait 20minutes. Turn the thermostat to cool mode and turn the temperature setting down. Confirm the condenser is spinning and the system is making cool air. The cooling system should not be checked if the temperature is below 60 degrees or if the temperature was below freezing the night before the walk-through. And you should not operate a heat pump in the heating mode when it is over 75 degrees outside.

2. Operate all appliances.

3. Run water at all fixtures and flush toilets. Look for plumbing leaks.

4. Operate all exterior doors, windows, and locks.

5. Test smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

6. Ask for all remote controls to any garage door openers, fans, gas fireplaces, etc.

7. Inspect areas that may have been restricted at the time of the inspection.

8. Ask seller questions about anything that was not covered during the home inspection.

9. Ask seller about prior infestation treatment and warranties that may be transferable.

10. Read the seller's disclosure.

Report Conclusion

We are proud of our service, and trust that you will be happy with the quality of our report. We have madee very effort to provide you with an accurate assessment of the condition of the property and its components and to alert you to any significant defects or adverse conditions. However, we may not have tested every outlet, and opened every window and door, or identified every problem. Also because our inspection is essentially visual, latent defects could exist. We can not see behind walls. Therefore, you should not regard our inspection as a guarantee or warranty. It is simply a report on the general condition of a property at a given point in time. As a homeowner, you should expect problems to occur. Roofs will leak, basements may have water problems, and systems may fail without warning. We can not predict future events. For these reasons, you should keep a comprehensive insurance policy current.

This report was written exclusively for our Client. It is not transferable to other people. The report is only supplemental to a seller's disclosure.

Thank you for taking the time to read this report, and call us if you have any questions. We are always attempting to improve the quality of our service and our report.