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Residential Inspection Report - Guest House

Attachments
The Safe Home Book | Certified Master Inspector
THE_SAFE_HOME.pdf
Home Life Expectancy Guide
HOME_LIFE_EXPECTANCY_1.pdf
Standards of Practice | Code of Ethics
InterNACHI_SOP_COE_2017.pdf
GFCI Guidelines
GFCI_GUIDELINES.pdf
California Water Heater Checklist
CA_WATER_HEATER_CHECKLIST.pdf
California Water Heater Strapping Requirement & Guidelines
WATER_HEATER_STRAPPING_-_CALIFORNIA.pdf
Cement Cracks - Information
Shrinkage_Cracks_in_Concrete.pdf
ABOUT SMOKE & CO2 ALARMS WITH FAQ
ABOUT_SMOKE____Co2_ALARMS.pdf
HOW PHOTOELECTRIC SMOKE DETECTORS WORK
Photoelectric_smoke_alarm_chart_(1).pdf
HOW IONIZATION SMOKE DETECTORS WORK
Ionization_smoke_alarm_chart.pdf
Water Quality
WATER_QUALITY.pdf
90-DAY GAP HOME WARRANTY
90_DAY_GAP_HOME_WARRANTY.pdf
Causes of Concrete Deterioration
CAUSES_OF_CONCRETE_DETERIORATION.pdf
California Carbon Monoxide Detector Requirements FAQ
CA_STATE_CO2_FAQ.pdf
The Safe Home Book | Certified Master Inspector
THE_SAFE_HOME.pdf
Home Life Expectancy Guide
HOME_LIFE_EXPECTANCY_1.pdf
Standards of Practice | Code of Ethics
InterNACHI_SOP_COE_2017.pdf
GFCI Guidelines
GFCI_GUIDELINES.pdf
California Water Heater Checklist
CA_WATER_HEATER_CHECKLIST.pdf
California Water Heater Strapping Requirement & Guidelines
WATER_HEATER_STRAPPING_-_CALIFORNIA.pdf
Cement Cracks - Information
Shrinkage_Cracks_in_Concrete.pdf
ABOUT SMOKE & CO2 ALARMS WITH FAQ
ABOUT_SMOKE____Co2_ALARMS.pdf
HOW PHOTOELECTRIC SMOKE DETECTORS WORK
Photoelectric_smoke_alarm_chart_(1).pdf
HOW IONIZATION SMOKE DETECTORS WORK
Ionization_smoke_alarm_chart.pdf
Water Quality
WATER_QUALITY.pdf
90-DAY GAP HOME WARRANTY
90_DAY_GAP_HOME_WARRANTY.pdf
Causes of Concrete Deterioration
CAUSES_OF_CONCRETE_DETERIORATION.pdf
California Carbon Monoxide Detector Requirements FAQ
CA_STATE_CO2_FAQ.pdf

1234 Main St.
Yreka, CA 96097
04/23/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
138
Items Inspected
18
Maintenance item
16
Deficiency observed
4
Safety advisory

Any summary of this report is not the entire report. The complete report includes attachments and/or additional information items that are of importance to the client. It is recommended that the client read the complete report to fully understand the inspection.

A third-party repair estimate report is available for this inspection. Please visit our website at www.shacksandshanties.com, or call us at 530-598-7856, to order a repair estimate report based on this inspection.

ANY AND ALL PHOTOS INCLUDED IN THIS PUBLISHED REPORT ARE REPRESENTATIVE AND FOR REFERENCE PURPOSES ONLY, AND DO NOT NECESSARILY DEFINE THE ENTIRE EXTENT OF ANY MAINTENANCE, DEFICIENCY, OR SAFETY ITEM. Photos are to be used as a guide only, and the entire system or component should be taken into consideration when being evaluated.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Thank you for choosing Shacks & Shanties Inspection Services for your home inspection. We appreciate your confidence.

We understand that whatever the circumstances of your new house purchase - first time, second home, rental/investment property, etc. - it is a big investment that you want to make sure is right for you. With that in mind, please remember and understand that no house is perfect; there will always be something that needs minor (or sometimes major) repair or maintenance. Small or minor (and even big or major) repair and/or maintenance items do not necessarily make a house unlivable, does not mean that it will fall down around you after you move in, nor make it unsafe. Ongoing maintenance and repairs are a part of homeownership, and there is always something that needs attention. An inspection endeavors to help you determine what those items might be, at the date and time specified in the inspection report. This information is to help you decide how those items figure in to your desire to purchase. Your Real Estate Agent, and Shacks & Shanties Inspection Services are here to help you realize your goals of homeownership.

Best Wishes,

Shacks & Shanties Inspection Services

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

All photos are representative, for narrative purposes only, are taken on the date noted in the report, are not intended to convey or imply the condition, safety, service life, nor a guaranty or warranty, nor do they define the entire scope of any deficiency. Photos are to be used as a guide only, and the entire system or component should be taken into consideration when being evaluated.

This inspection report covers systems and components of the inspected property on the date and time as noted in the report and does not extend beyond said date. No guaranty or warranty is stated or implied as to any inspected system or component. The general home inspection will not reveal every issue that exists or ever could exist, nor does it predict future conditions.

This inspection report was prepared only for the client named in this report, for the property address noted and is valid only for the date and time stated in this report. This report is not transferrable and cannot be sold. 

Shacks & Shanties Inspections Services and the client named herein, retain exclusive ownership of this report, and it is not transferrable and cannot be sold. No rights, permission or privileges are given, extended to, or implied to any other person or persons besides the client named in this report. No rights, permission, or privilege is granted, implied or given to any other party besides the client named in this report to use this report in any transaction.

Since this report is provided for the specific benefit of the client(s) named in this report, third-parties to this information should hire Shacks & Shanties Inspection Services (530-598-7856) to perform an inspection to meet their specific needs and to obtain current information concerning this property.

This inspection was conducted in accordance with InterNACHI Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics by an InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector, and certified by the Master Inspector Certification Board as a Master Inspector.

OWNERSHIP AND USE OF REPORT

This report is the exclusive property of Shacks & Shanties Inspection Services and our client. Shacks & Shanties is not responsible for misinterpretations by third parties. This report cannot be sold and is not transferrable. If you’re reading this report but did not hire Shacks & Shanties Inspection Services to perform the original inspection, please note that no rights or privileges for the use of this report are granted, extended to or implied to any other person or persons not named in this report, and this report cannot be used in any other transaction. Shacks & Shanties Inspection Services, and the inspector of record on this report disclaims the reliability of any part of this report if used in any "third-party" transactions.

It is very likely that conditions related to the house have changed, even if the report is recent. You should not rely on an outdated inspection report. Minor problems noted may have become worse, recent events may have created new issues, and items may have been corrected and improved. Don’t rely on old information about one of the biggest investments you’ll ever make. Remember that the cost of a home inspection is very small compared to the value of the home. Protect your family and your investment, and please call us at (530) 598-7856, or email to lori@shacksandshanties.com so that we can arrange for a fresh inspection. Thank you!

Copyright 2018, Shacks & Shanties Inspection Services, All Rights Reserved.

1 - Inspection Information

In Attendance
Listing Agent, Property Owner
Occupancy
Occupied
Type of Building
Single Family
Style
Log Cabin
Approximate Age
10 - 20 Years
Front Faces
North
Temperature (approximate)
60 Fahrenheit (F)
Weather Conditions
Clear
Thermal/Infrared Imaging
No
Water Testing
No
Well Pump & Systems Testing
No
Septic System Video Inspection
No
Mold Testing
No
Radon Testing
No
Inspection Highlights

THIS REPORT WAS UPDATED ON ON MARCH 27, 2019

The following sections were updated:

  1. Electrical
  2. Fireplace - Living Room
  3. Fireplace - Master Bedroom
  4. Garage - Attached - 2


The subject property is a 19 year old house that appeared to be in good condition, overall. No major structural issues were observed during the course of this visual, non-invasive inspection.

The areas of concern are as follows:

  1. The decks are of concern with regard to construction methods observed and the condition of the Trex decking. Find more information regarding Trex decking class action lawsuit and possible replacement under the Exterior Section; Information.
  2. The crawlspace, especially the floor insulation, was observed to be heavily infested with rodents or other vermin. As rodents and their fecal matter may cause health problems, they should be cleared and the area cleaned. 

These highlights are not the full report. Please read the full report carefully, including Information and Limitation sections; and review attachments for the complete inspection information. Please call us with any questions - we are here to help!

Non-technical, Non-invasive, Visual Inspection

A non-technical, non-invasive, visual-only assessment of the systems and components of the house was performed at the time of inspection. However, this is a general visual inspection and is not technically exhaustive, and special equipment may or may not have been used. This visual only evaluation is only intended to provide information and education on the condition of these systems.

This inspection provides observed conditions a the time of inspection only, and does not provide or imply any warranty or guarantee of any system, component, or unit performance beyond this date, nor does it predict safety, future damage, operability, or failure of any system, component or unit.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: 

Your general home inspection is a non-invasive, non-technical visual inspection of the general condition of the house systems and components at the date and time set for inspection. Nothing is removed, disassembled, or relocated during the general home inspection. A representative number of working doors, windows and access hatches are opened, and normal operating controls may be used to inspect the condition of systems. Appliances may be operated with normal operating controls; however, if any appliance, including heating, cooling and hot water systems are disconnected from a power source, the inspector will not connect that appliance for inspection and it will not be inspected. Any electrical circuit breakers that are off at the time of inspection will not be turned on for the inspection, and anything served by that circuit will not be inspected. If public water service or main water valves are off, they will not be turned on for the inspection. 

The general home inspection is based on the observations made on the date and time of the inspection, and is not a prediction of safety or future conditions. The general home inspection will not reveal every issue that currently exists or ever could exist, but only those conditions that were observed on the date of the inspection.

Additionally, if the observations were made during dry weather conditions and no visual indication of deficiency was noted; the conditions may change during the wet season.

Condition Indication

Any system, component, unit or item that may have a condition indicator (i.e.: good, fair, poor, aged, damaged, etc.) is indicative of the overall general condition; is based on non-invasive, non-technical, visual-only observations made at time of inspection only, with any maintenance, deficiency, or safety conditions noted.

Dry Conditions

A visual, non-invasive inspection was performed. All observations were made during the dry season or in dry weather conditions, and while no visual indication of deficiency may be noted; the conditions may change during the wet season or during wet weather.

Inspection Method
Non-Invasive, Visual, Tactile, Auditory, Olfactory, Operating Controls

Your general residential inspection is a non-invasive, non-technical visual inspection of the general condition of the house systems and components at the date and time set for inspection.  The general residential inspection will not reveal every issue that exists or ever could exist, but only those items observed and reported on the date of the inspection.

2 - Roof

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
2.1 Covering X
2.2 Flashing X X
2.3 Chimney or Flue X
2.4 Skylights X
2.5 Other Roof Penetrations X
2.6 Roof Drainage System X X
Inspection Method
Binoculars, Ground, Ladder
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Roof Structure
Engineered Trusses, OSB/Plywood Sheathing
Covering: Material
Architectural Asphalt Shingles
Covering: Layers
Single Layer
Covering: Overall Condition
Good
Flashing: Material
Metal
Flashing: Condition
Good
Chimney or Flue: Chimney Exterior
Metal Flue Pipe
Chimney or Flue: Condition
Good
Skylights: Number of Skylights
None
Skylights: Condition
N/A
Other Roof Penetrations: Type
Plumbing Vent Pipe, Exhaust Venting, Attic Venting
Other Roof Penetrations: Condition
Good
Roof Drainage System: Gutter Material
Metal
Roof Drainage System: Condition
Good
Annual Inspection Recommended

Roof systems become vulnerable and fail for various reasons, including moisture damage, wood destroying pests, mechanical damage, vegetation, aging, etc. It is recommended that an annual inspection be conducted to determine the condition of the roof system that will make repair & maintenance recommendations. This will protect your investment and prolong the service life of these systems. If desired, when the snow cover clears, an appointment for a more complete exterior roof inspection may be scheduled.

Covering: Architectural Asphalt Shingles Description

The roof was covered with laminated fiberglass composition asphalt shingles. Laminated shingles are composted of multiple layers bonded together. Laminated shingles are also called "architectural" or "laminated" shingles. Composition shingles are composed of a fiberglass mat embedded in asphalt and covered with ceramic coated mineral granules. Shingles with multiple layers bonded together are usually more durable than shingles composed of a single layer. This type of shingle have an average expected life of thirty (30) years.

With any exceptions noted, the composition asphalt shingles observed on the roof of this house appeared to be in good condition with normal signs of aging and wear. They appeared to be adequately protecting the underlying house structure at the time of inspection.  

Covering: Architectural Asphalt Shingles - Remaining Life Expectancy

Asphalt composition shingles have a total average life expectancy of thirty (30) years. However, there are many variables that will impact the actual years of service that will be realized from the shingles; such as attic temperature, weather, installation method, manufacturing defects, mechanical damage, etc. The asphalt composition shingles covering the roof of this house exhibited general deterioration commensurate with normal aging of the roof covering. They appeared to be adequately protecting the underlying house structure at the time of inspection. It is estimated that the remaining service life of the roof covering is ten (10) or more years.


The inspector does not hereby provide a certification, guarantee, or warranty as to roof condition, installation, or remaining life expectancy of the roof covering. Any estimates made herein are based solely upon general observation at the time of inspection. Estimated life and/or remaining life expectancy is given for information only, is not a certification, guarantee, or warranty. For a certification of roof covering condition and remaining life expectancy, it is recommended that you contact a properly licensed, experienced roofing contractor for evaluation.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Flashing

Loose/Separated

Flashings observed to be loose or separated, which can lead to water penetration. Recommend repair. 

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.6.1 - Roof Drainage System

Downspout Termination

One or more downspouts were observed to terminate (discharge or drain) too close to the foundation. This can result in excessive saturation of the soil around the foundation, which can lead to foundation deterioration, damage and structural movement. Recommend installing downspout extensions to direct water at least four feet from the foundation. 

Here is a helpful DIY link and video on draining water flow away from your house. 

Tools Handyman/DIY

3 - Exterior

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
3.1 Grading & Drainage X
3.2 Retaining Wall X
3.3 Driveway X X
3.4 Walkways X X
3.5 Porch & Covered Entryway X X X
3.6 Siding X X
3.7 Trim X X
3.8 Doors X X X
3.9 Windows X
3.10 Eave & Soffit X
3.11 Fascia X X
3.12 Deck X X X
3.13 Balcony or Veranda X
3.14 Patio X
3.15 Stairways, Steps, Stoops, & Ramps X X
3.16 Railing & Handrails X X X
3.17 Patio Cover X
3.18 Deck Cover X
3.19 Carport X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile
Grading & Drainage: Grading
Good
Grading & Drainage: Drainage
Good
Retaining Wall: Information
N/A
Retaining Wall: Condition
N/A
Driveway: Information
Asphalt, Gravel
Driveway: Condition
Good, Fair
Walkways: Information
Concrete, Pavers
Walkways: Condition
Good
Porch & Covered Entryway: Information
Covered Porch
Porch & Covered Entryway: Material or Construction
Wood, Pavers
Porch & Covered Entryway: Condition
Good
Siding: Siding Material
Fiber Cement, Stone Veneer, Wood
Siding: Siding Style
Clapboard, Lap, Log, Stone Veneer
Siding: Condition
Good
Trim: Material
Wood
Trim: Condition
Good
Doors: Type
Wood, Vinyl
Doors: Condition
Good
Windows: Type
Slider, Single Hung
Windows: Condition
Good
Eave & Soffit : Material
Wood
Eave & Soffit : Condition
Good
Fascia: Material
Wood
Fascia: Condition
Good
Deck: Information
Deck
Deck: Material or Construction
Wood, Composite
Deck: Condition
Good
Balcony or Veranda: Information
N/A
Balcony or Veranda: Material or Construction
N/A
Balcony or Veranda: Condition
N/A
Patio: Information
N/A
Patio: Material or Construction
N/A
Patio: Condition
N/A
Stairways, Steps, Stoops, & Ramps: Information
Stairs, Stoops
Stairways, Steps, Stoops, & Ramps: Material or Construction
Wood, Composite Trex-type, Concrete, Pavers
Stairways, Steps, Stoops, & Ramps: Condition
Good
Railing & Handrails: Material or Construction
Wood
Railing & Handrails: Condition
Good
Patio Cover: Information
N/A
Patio Cover: Material or Construction
N/A
Patio Cover: Condition
N/A
Deck Cover: Information
N/A
Deck Cover: Material or Construction
N/A
Deck Cover: Condition
N/A
Carport: Information
N/A
Carport: Material or Construction
N/A
Carport: Condition
N/A
Annual Inspection Recommended

Exterior house systems become vulnerable and fail for various reasons, including moisture damage, wood destroying pests, mechanical damage, vegetation, aging, etc. It is recommended that an annual inspection be conducted to determine the condition of the exterior systems of the house that will make repair & maintenance recommendations. This will protect your investment and prolong the service life of these systems.

Doors: Possible Water Penetration

Evidence of possible water penetration at South facing exterior door in laundry room. This does not appear to be due to a construction or door deficiency, and is due to ordinary storm activity. There is not much that can be done to correct this beyond constructing a cover over the door to protect it from storm activity.

Eave & Soffit : Type
Open Eave

ABOUT EAVES, SOFFITS & FASCIA:  The eaves are the edges of the roof that overhang the face of a wall and, normally, project beyond the side of a building. The eaves form an overhang to direct water clear of the walls and may be decorated, or the ends left exposed as part of an architectural style. Soffits are actually eaves that have been "boxed" in so that the rafters are not seen. 

Hip roofs have a continuous eave that extends completely around the building. A gable roof has an eave along the side walls, formed at the rafter ends. Most gable roofs also have a rake eave, or rake extension formed on the gable ends. This is created by extending the rafters out past the building ends. Not only does the eave add to the appearance of the home, it also helps protect the building from sun, rain and snow. 

The rafter tails, or ends are finished with a fascia board that helps protect the rafters from water penetration, which will lead to wood rot.  Fascia boards must be monitored and maintained so that water does not penetrate the wood and cause wood rot. Fascia boards are vulnerable to leaking rain gutters and at the corners, where often, the cut ends were not painted or sealed to keep out moisture, and in either instance, wood rot will set in.  With the exception of intentionally exposed rafter tails as part of an architectural feature, fascia boards should always be installed.

In many instances the eaves of todays houses are finished off with a soffit - the covering on the underside of the overhang. Older houses often have an open eave, with the rafters adding to the decor. Some houses, such as might be seen on a Craftsman-style, have exposed rafter tails, or ends.  Exposed rafter tails must be monitored and maintained yearly to prevent rain water penetration of the wood, which causes wood rot.

Soffits must be designed and installed properly. One of the most important factors is proper ventilation. If soffits are not ventilated, they can cause the formation of ice dams at the eaves. As the attic warms from the house heat, it allows the roof surface to melt snow, or ice, which then runs down into the colder eave surfaces and freezes back again. This creates an ice dam that allows water to work its way back into the walls and ceilings of the house. Venting both the attic with eave vents and the soffit with vent systems increases air circulation and prevents this problem. Ventilation not only prevents ice dams, but helps reduce heat build-up in the summer.

Deck: Trex Decking - Early Problems

SOURCE: Trex Company, Inc.

Trex Company, Inc.

October 19, 2016 11:26 ET

Trex Company Re-announces to Consumers the Replacement Program for Defective Decking Manufactured between 2002 and 2007 for Sale in the Western United States

Warns of Potential Step-Through Injury Hazard if Decking Not Replaced

WINCHESTER, VA--(Marketwired - October 19, 2016) - Trex Company, Inc. (NYSE: TREX), the world's largest manufacturer of wood-alternative decking and railing products, has previously announced that a small percentage of decking boards manufactured at its Fernley, Nevada plant between 2002 and 2007 exhibit surface flaking due to a manufacturing problem. Trex is once more notifying consumers in 16 western states who may have purchased defective Trex decking product exhibiting surface flaking to contact the company and receive replacement materials.

Trex is issuing this re-announcement notice because boards exhibiting the surface flaking defect may continue to deteriorate over time and ultimately break, posing a safety hazard. Trex has received reports of step-through incidents that have occurred as a result of boards that have not been replaced. These incidents have not involved significant injury, however, the potential for serious injury exists if deteriorating boards are not replaced on a timely basis.

Trex strongly encourages homeowners in the western United States to closely examine their decks, particularly in high traffic areas, for any signs of cracking or peeling. If a homeowner notices evidence of flaking or board deterioration, they should contact Trex immediately and participate in the established replacement program.

In 2010, a class action settlement was approved that provides for a comprehensive replacement program for any decking affected by surface flaking. Under the terms of the settlement, Trex replaces any decking boards exhibiting the defect, and provides a portion of the labor payment to replace the decking.

The surface flaking issue only affected a small percentage of product manufactured at Trex's Fernley, Nevada plant between 2002 and 2007, and sold in the western United States (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming). This issue does not apply to any Trex products sold in other states or to any product manufactured at Trex's Fernley, Nevada plant after 2007, when industry-leading manufacturing improvements and rigorous testing were instituted to ensure the quality and structural integrity of Trex decking products.

In general, Trex recommends that homeowners always monitor their decks to ensure the structure is in good condition. Any issues should be rectified as soon as possible, as the situation can grow more severe with the passing of time.

"Trex fully stands behind the quality of its product and urges consumers affected by this defect to remedy the potential safety hazard by taking advantage of the existing replacement program," said Jim Cline, president and CEO of Trex. "The replacement program currently in place has been very successful in reaching consumers who purchased defective decking materials. We encourage affected consumers who have not yet participated in our program to contact us as soon as possible to replace their decking materials."

Consumers may download a claim form and instructions on how to file such form at www.trex.com/legal/classactionsettlement.aspx, or they may call 866-241-4396.

About Trex Company

Trex Company is the world's largest manufacturer of high performance wood-alternative decking and railing, with more than 20 years of product experience. Stocked in more than 6,700 retail locations worldwide, Trex outdoor living products offer a wide range of style options with fewer ongoing maintenance requirements than wood, as well as a truly environmentally responsible choice. For more information, visit trex.com. You also can follow Trex on Twitter (@Trex_Company), Instagram (@trexcompany) Pinterest (trexcompany), or Houzz (trex-company-inc), "like" Trex on Facebook, or view product and demonstration videos on the brand's YouTube channel (TheTrexCo).

Follow this link regarding possible claim for replacement.

Deck: Annual Inspection Recommended

Decks commonly become compromised and fail, causing injury. There are various reasons this happens - aging, dry rot or other wood destroying organisms, fasteners aging, and incorrect construction methods. It is recommended that the deck is inspected annually to determine the condition and safety of the structure. 

Deck: Limited Access

Access beneath the deck was limited and structural members and deck attachment was not inspected in non-visible areas. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Driveway

Asphalt Damage

Cracks were observed in asphalt driveway apron that appeared to be caused by tree roots. Repair will entail removing the tree and repaving driveway apron. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Walkways

Damaged

Damaged areas of the walkway were observed. These areas may be a tripping/injury hazard and should be repaired.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Porch & Covered Entryway

Deteriorated - Wood Rot

The structural post was observed to have a small area of moisture damage with wood rot (dry rot.) Recommend repair.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:  

Dry Rot: Wood rot/dry rot is caused by biological fungal organisms that require a certain amount of moisture to thrive. The fungus digests the parts of the wood that give the wood strength and stiffness. Scraping or painting only, will not stop dry rot from continuing to infiltrate the wood and compromise its integrity.  

Treating and preventing dry rot is a three-step process. Step 1 is to locate and stop the source of the moisture. Step 2 is to remove and replace any damaged wood that has become structurally weakened. Step 3 is to treat new and existing wood with borate wood preservative to prevent growth of the dry rot fungus and kill any fungus already in the wood.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.5.2 - Porch & Covered Entryway

Deterioration or Damage

One or more areas of damage or deterioration was observed in the veneer treatment. Recommend repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Siding

Paint or Seal

The wood log veneer siding was observed to be have one or more areas of deteriorated, missing, peeling paint, or seal. This will allow moisture penetration that will further deteriorate siding. Additionally, all areas where cracking (or checking) is present should be sealed before painting. Recommend re-painting or sealing house siding.

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.6.2 - Siding

Ground Contact

Inadequate clearance between siding and/or trim and ground was observed, with deterioration and/or damage present. Recommend a minimum ground clearance between bottom of siding and ground of 6" to 8".  Siding was observed to be in contact with ground, with evidence of wood rot (dry rot). Wood that touches the ground/soil will wick moisture and and start to deteriorate. This also sets up ideal conditions for dry rot to damage wood, and invites wood destroying pests. Recommend soil be pulled away from all trim for a minimum ground clearance between bottom of trim and ground of 6" to 8" and replace and treat areas of dry rot, as necessary.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
3.6.3 - Siding

Minor Cracks

Small stress cracks were observed in masonry siding. This type of crack can occur due to stress, age, damage, settling over time and other causes. These were not, at the time of inspection, observed to be compromising the integrity of the siding; however, due to water penetration, which will contribute to and hasten deterioration, it is recommended that these cracks be sealed. 

Additionally, the mortar in some areas was observed to be deteriorating and falling away. This can happen with normal shrinkage and the quality of the mortar. Recommend these areas be repaired, as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Trim

Paint or Seal

Trim was observed to have deteriorated, peeling, missing paint, or seal. Trim that is unsealed and open to weathering will deteriorate and be vulnerable to wood rot (dry rot) conditions. Trim functions as more than an aesthetic accoutrement to the house structure. Trim is an important part of protecting the house structure from water and pest infiltration. Recommend painting or sealing all trim. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.8.1 - Doors

Door Sill, Framing, or Trim

Paint or seal around door sill, framing, and/or trim was observed to damaged, deteriorated or worn. Recommend repainting.

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.8.2 - Doors

Hardware Damaged

One or more pieces of door hardware are damaged. Recommend repair or replace.
Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.9.1 - Windows

Screens

One or more screens were observed to be missing or damaged. Recommend repair or replacement. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.11.1 - Fascia

Paint or Seal

The fascia were observed to have deteriorated, peeling, or missing paint. Wood exposed to moisture and weather becomes vulnerable to deterioration and dry rot conditions. Fascia board functions as more than just an aesthetic accoutrement to the house. Fascia serves to keep water away from the rafter tails and prevents or discourages water damage. Recommend painting, as necessary.

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.12.1 - Deck

Ground Clearance

Deck support members were observed to be in contact with ground. Wood that touches the ground/soil will wick moisture and and start to deteriorate. This also sets up ideal conditions for dry rot to damage wood, and invites wood destroying pests. Composite Trex-type of material should also not be in contact with the ground as it will become moisture damaged and deteriorate. Recommend all soil be pulled away from all wood structures.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
3.12.2 - Deck

Multiple Observations

Deck failures account for thousands of injuries each year in the US. Most of these injuries are caused by deficient construction methods and unsafe guardrails and handrails. Deck failures can happen in an instant when loads become more than the structure can bear. Multiple observations regarding potential deck safety were made.

  1. Ledger Board:  The ledger board is not properly attached to the building. This can cause the deck to pull away from the building and possibly collapse.
  2. Missing Flashing: Flashing was observed to be missing at ledger/siding.
  3. Construction Method: It appeared that the visible deck was constructed over an existing, older deck structure. Support structures were not observed to be constructed in a professional manner and the extra load of the new deck on top of the older deck may be more than the original deck was designed for. 
  4. Hot Tub Deck: The deck the hot tub is sitting on was observed to not be constructed in a professional manner. Connections and support structures may not be adequate to handle the load safely. 
  5. Ground Contact: Many structural members were observed to be in direct contact with the ground. This will allow moisture damage, dry rot, and encourage wood destroying organisms to infiltrate wood and compromise the structure. 

Recommendations:  

  1. Ideally, a licensed contractor experienced in safe deck construction should evaluate the entire structure. 
  2. At least, the deck structure should be closely monitored for structural integrity, stability and safety. Especially prior to exerting a heavy load (such as a party with numerous people.)


Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.12.3 - Deck

Trex Deterioration

Trex, or Trex-type decking was observed to be deteriorated and may eventually loose its its load-bearing ability. Deteriorated boards were observed to be deflecting (soft, bending) when walked. As the Trex company warns of possible step-through injuries, it is recommend replacing deck boards for safety. 

See the INFORMATION tab in this section for more

Follow this link for more information about possibility of filing a claim for replacement.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.15.1 - Stairways, Steps, Stoops, & Ramps

Ground Clearance

Deck support members were observed to be in contact with ground. Wood that touches the ground/soil will wick moisture and and start to deteriorate. This also sets up ideal conditions for dry rot to damage wood, and invites wood destroying pests. Recommend all soil be pulled away from all wood structures.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.15.2 - Stairways, Steps, Stoops, & Ramps

Concrete Cracks

One or more cracks were observed in cement stairs. These do not impact your foundation, nor do they represent failure of the concrete patio slab. Shrinkage and minor settling cracks can make the cement vulnerable to further deterioration when water penetrates and the freeze/thaw cycle starts to damage the concrete. Sealing cracks with the proper sealant can help prevent weathering deterioration at these cracks. Also, using a cement stain, or paint will help prevent spalling. Otherwise, monitor for further, or widening of the cracks and repair as necessary.

Follow this link for DIY tips on repairing concrete cracks.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.16.1 - Railing & Handrails

Missing Railing

Handrail and/or guardrail was observed to be missing at time of inspection. Requirements vary among states and municipalities; however, generally where the surface of the deck is thirty inches (30") above grade (from the ground) a guardrail is required. Consider installing a guardrail. 

Hammer Carpentry Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.16.2 - Railing & Handrails

Water Seal

One or more areas was observed have deteriorated, missing, peeling paint or water seal; allowing for deterioration from weathering. Recommend water sealant/weatherproofing be applied.

Tools Handyman/DIY

4 - Structural

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
4.1 Roof Structure X
4.2 Ceiling Structure X
4.3 Wall Structure X
4.4 Floor Structure X
4.5 Foundation - Crawlspace & Exterior X X
4.6 Foundation - Basement & Exterior X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile
Attic Information
Attic Hatch - Interior Utility/Laundry Room
Crawlspace Information
Exterior Hatch
Roof Structure: Construction
2 X 4 Engineered Trusses
Roof Structure: Condition
Good
Ceiling Structure: Ceiling Structure
2 X 4 Joists
Ceiling Structure: Condition
Good
Wall Structure: Structure
2 X 6 Wood, 2 X 4 Wood
Wall Structure: Condition
Good
Floor Structure: Structural Material
Wood I-Joists, Engineered Wood Beams, Concrete Piers, Wood Posts
Floor Structure: Basement or Crawlspace Floor
Dirt, No Vapor Barrier
Floor Structure: Sub-floor
OSB/Plywood
Floor Structure: Condition
Good
Foundation - Crawlspace & Exterior: Type & Material
Concrete Perimeter Foundation, Post & Pier
Foundation - Crawlspace & Exterior: Structure
4 X 4 Posts, Concrete Piers, Engineered Beams, Wood I - Joists
Foundation - Crawlspace & Exterior: Condition
Good
Foundation - Basement & Exterior: Type & Material
N/A
Foundation - Basement & Exterior: Structure
N/A
Foundation - Basement & Exterior: Condition
N/A
Annual Inspection Recommended

Structural systems become vulnerable and fail for various reasons, including moisture damage, settling, wood destroying pests, mechanical damage, aging, etc. It is recommended that an annual inspection be conducted to determine the condition of the structural systems of the house that will make repair & maintenance recommendations. This will protect your investment and prolong the service life of these systems.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Foundation - Crawlspace & Exterior

Foundation Cracks - Common

One or more cracks were observed in the perimeter foundation that are consistent with normal concrete shrinkage, age, or some settling; however, this does not necessarily mean the foundation is failing, or compromised. Shrinkage and some other types of cracks in concrete are typical, and are usually characterized as being less than three millimeters in width and are not offset. These types of cracks may also appear when the soil supporting the foundation becomes too wet. Recommend sealing with appropriate sealant to prevent moisture penetration and prolong service life, and continued monitoring. 

Follow this link to an informational article on foundation cracks.

Also, see information in the Attachments regarding cement cracks and what causes deterioration.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
4.5.2 - Foundation - Crawlspace & Exterior

Evidence of Vermin

Evidence of moderate to heavy infestation of rodents and/or other vermin was observed in the crawlspace as evidenced by large amounts of fecal matter and damage to the insulation. This was observed throughout the entire crawlspace. Rodents and their droppings can carry disease that can become airborne and pose a health risk. Recommend extermination and remediation.

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Electrical

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
5.1 Service Mast, Head, Drip Loop, & Conduit X
5.2 Meter & Base X
5.3 Service Entrance Conductors X
5.4 Main Panel X
5.5 Main Service Disconnect X
5.6 Sub-panel - Hot Tub X
5.7 Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses X
5.8 Lighting Fixtures (Including Ceiling Fans) X X
5.9 Switches & Receptacles X X X
5.10 AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupt) X
5.11 GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupt) X
5.12 Smoke Detectors X X
5.13 Carbon Monoxide Detectors X X
Inspection Method
Visual, Test Equipment
Service Drop
Underground
Service Mast, Head, Drip Loop, & Conduit: Condition
N/A
Meter & Base: Meter Type
Digital
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Not Visable
Main Panel: Main Panel Location
Garage 2
Main Panel: Panel Manufacturer
Cutler Hammer
Main Panel: Overcurrent Protection Device Type
Circuit Breaker
Main Panel: Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Main Service Disconnect: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Sub-panel - Hot Tub: Sub-Panel Location
Exterior, West
Sub-panel - Hot Tub: Sub-Panel Manufacturer
Unknown
Sub-panel - Hot Tub: Sub-Panel Capacity
Unknown
Sub-panel - Hot Tub: Sub-Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Unknown
Branch Wiring, Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Type NM (Romex)
Lighting Fixtures (Including Ceiling Fans): Condition
Good
Main Service Disconnect: Location
Garage 2
Service Provider
Pacific Power

Pacific Power:  1-888-221-7070;  https://www.pacificpower.net/res/moving-center.html

Smoke Detectors: Meet Current Standard
No

Currently, in California, smoke alarms are required to be installed on each floor, in each sleeping room and in the immediate vicinity outside of the bedrooms (i.e. a hallway). Proper smoke alarm placement also depends on local ordinance. [Calif. Building Code R314.3] However, currently, in California, operable hardwired and battery-operated smoke alarms that were approved and listed when they were installed don't need to be replaced immediately. [Health & S C 13113.7(a)(4); 13113.7(d)(3)]

Smoke detectors, as observed, may or may not not meet current California requirements and/or standards. The smoke detectors, as observed, did appear to meet California requirements and/or standards that were in place at the time of construction. 

It is easy to bring a house up to current California requirement for smoke detectors, as battery powered (as approved by California State Fire Marshall) units are allowed for older construction, and do not have to be hard-wired.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A part of all residential properties: Smoke alarms approved by the State Fire Marshal are required to be placed in all residential properties in California. The State Fire Marshal lists all approved smoke alarms. [Calif. Health & Safety Code 13113.7] Beginning July 1, 2014, the State Fire Marshal required all battery-operated smoke alarms to contain a non-replaceable battery that lasts at least ten years. [Health & S C 13114(b)]

Beginning January 1, 2015, the State Fire Marshal required all smoke alarms (battery-powered, or powered by electricity) to:

  • display the date of manufacture;
  • provide a place where the date of installation can be written; and
  • incorporate a hush feature.

Operable hardwired and battery-operated smoke alarms that were approved and listed when they were installed dont need to be replaced immediately. [Health & S C 13113.7(a)(4); 13113.7(d)(3)]

Note Local ordinance may require replacement sooner. [Health & S C 13113.7(a)(4)]

When an existing smoke alarm no longer works, the replacement smoke alarm is to meet all new requirements.

Smoke alarms are not required if a State Fire Marshal-approved fire alarm system with smoke detectors is installed on the property. An existing fire sprinkler system no longer exempts a residential property owner from smoke alarm installation requirements. [Health & S C 13113.7(a)(5)]

Violations of smoke alarm rules incur a maximum fine of $200 for each offense. [Health & S C 13113.7(e)]

Enforcement on a transfer of a single family residence: Enforcement of smoke alarm rules is also triggered on the transfer of a single family residence (SFR). Sellers certify the property is in compliance with smoke alarm rules on the Transfer Disclosure Statement (TDS). The certification TDS is handed to the buyer as soon as practicable (ASAP) before the seller enters into a purchase agreement or counteroffer. [Health & S C 13113.8(b)-(c)]

Smoke alarm rules for rentals: Owners of multi-unit residential property or a single family residence (SFR) rental property are required to install, maintain and test smoke alarms on their property. [Health & S C 13113.7(d)(2)] Owners (or property managers, as owners agents) are required to ensure smoke alarms are operable when a new tenancy is created. [Health & S C 13113.7(d)(2)(B)] However, tenants are responsible for notifying the owner or property manager if the smoke alarm becomes inoperable. The owner is not in violation of smoke alarm requirements if they are unaware of a malfunction in the smoke alarm after the tenant is given possession. [Health & S C 13113.7(d)(2)(B)] Additionally, owners of any residential rental property are to install additional smoke alarms to ensure devices are located in accordance with current local building standards. [Health & S C 13113.7(d)(3)] 

In California, smoke alarms are to be installed on each floor, in each sleeping room and in the immediate vicinity outside of the bedrooms (i.e. a hallway). Proper smoke alarm placement also depends on local ordinance. [Calif. Building Code R314.3] Smoke detector laws dont mandate the frequency of owner inspections. However, landlords have a duty to inspect the premises upon entry for any purpose. Inspections need not be exhaustive, but landlords are liable for any dangerous condition that is observable by a reasonable person. [Mora v. Baker Commodities, Inc. (1989) 210 CA3d 771]
Thus, if a smoke alarm defect can be reasonably ascertained visually during a landlords visit to the unit, the landlord needs to repair or replace the device.

Smoke Detectors: Smoke Detectors

All smoke detectors should be checked for adequate number and placement, and should be tested for proper operation upon moving into the house.

See Additional Documents for more information about smoke detectors/alarms.

Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Meet Current Standard
No

Carbon monoxide detectors, as observed, may or may not not meet current California requirements and/or standards. 

CALIFORNIA CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR REQUIREMENTS

The California's Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act of 2010 dictates that, starting from July 1, 2011, all residential property, 1 to 4 units must be equipped with approved carbon monoxide detector equipment.

The equipment must be approved by the California State Fire Marshal. New construction or remodels shall be hard-wired with battery back-up, interconnecting all detectors so that when one alarm sounds, they all do. Finally, Carbon Monoxide alarms are not intended and neither suitable for fire and smoke detection.

California's Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act of 2010

A carbon monoxide detector is a plug-in device, either battery supplied or wired to alternate current that emits a highly distinctive sound when carbon monoxide is detected. A carbon monoxide detector is not the same as a smoke detector; however, if a combination detector is being installed, it should be capable of identifying both fumes with different sounds.

Every builder must install these approved devices, Cal. Health & Safety Cod17926(a), in each dwelling unit as following this applicable time period:

For all existing single-family dwelling units on or before July 1, 2011

For all other existing dwelling units, duplex/apartment/condominium complex, on or before Jan. 1, 2013. The Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act of 2010 mandates that detectors must be installed if the residential unit has any of the following:

  • Gas appliances such as gas stove, fireplace, gas water heater, etc.
  • Fireplace
  • An attached garage

From January 1, 2013, all multi-family units will be required to install Carbon Monoxide detectors, even if the property is listed as a rental property.

Information specific to the Act is found in the California Health and Safety Code Sections 13260 through 13263. See the California Health & Safety Code Sections 13261 & 17926.

Carbon Monoxide Detector California Code Requirements

California building code standards require that all new constructions, per section R315, mandate that the detector must be:

Installed outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedroom(s) in dwelling units and on every level including basements within which fuel-fired appliances are installed and in dwelling units that have attached garages.

Under section 420 of the CBC also requires that the monoxide detector must be:

Installed outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedroom(s) in dwelling units and on every level including basements within which fuel-fired appliances are installed and in dwelling units that have attached garages.

Carbon Monoxide Detector Installation

Carbon monoxide detectors required by the law on the State of California should be installed properly. As a general practice carbon monoxide detectors shall be installed:

  • On a wall about five feet above from floor level.
  • It is recommended installing the detector at least 6 inches from all exterior walls and at least 3 feet from HVAC vents.
  • Carbon monoxide detectors can be installed on ceiling; however, wall installation is recommended.
  • Each floor needs its own set of monoxide detectors when required by building codes.
  • It is recommended installing carbon monoxide detectors near the sleeping area.
  • Follow manufacturer's recommendations or follow guidelines by Standard 720 of the National Fire Protection Association.

Carbon Monoxide Approved Manufacturers

The following is a list of carbon monoxide detectors manufacturers approved by the State Fire Marshall Office. Please check the current and updated approved manufacturers for the most recent list.

BRK BRANDS, INC.

GENTEX CORPORATION

Linear LLC

Universal Security Instruments

KIDDE SAFETY

PATRICK PLASTICS INC

QUANTUM GROUP INC


Carbon Monoxide Risk

Carbon monoxide can be deadly and extreme harmful. It is produced by burning fuels, coal, wood, oil, gas and several other petroleum-based products. It is also produced by common industrial equipment, cars, and electrical generators. Lower levels of carbon monoxide poisoning could produce:

  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Disorientation
  • Nausea
  • Fatigue

Please see California Carbon Monoxide Requirement FAQ attached to the report.


Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Carbon monoxide detectors are required when any liquid (gas, diesel, kerosene, etc.) or solid fuel (wood, wood pellets, etc.) appliances, fireplaces, or stoves are used for the house. Existing carbon monoxide detectors, if any, should be tested for proper operation upon moving into the house.

See Additional Documents for more information about carbon monoxide detectors/alarms.

Main Panel & Meter Inaccessible

The main electrical panel and meter were inaccessible at the time of inspection. The main panel and meter were located inside a garage that had an inoperable door that could not be opened. The meter base and main electrical panel were not inspected. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
5.8.1 - Lighting Fixtures (Including Ceiling Fans)

Cover Missing

One or more lighting fixtures were observed to be missing a protective cover (aka: shade.) This allows for short and shock risk. Recommend installation of cover.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
5.9.1 - Switches & Receptacles

Interior Cover Plate

One or more receptacles were observed have missing or damaged cover plate. This allows for short and shock risk. Recommend installation of plates.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
5.9.2 - Switches & Receptacles

No Power

The receptacles and switches servicing one/or more rooms in the house were observed to be without power, or current, when tested. If circuit breaker(s) in electrical panel(s) are tripped or in the off position, it is recommended that an electrician evaluate before to ensure there are no faults in the circuit. Recommend evaluation and repair, as necessary.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.12.1 - Smoke Detectors

Non-Functioning and/or Missing

One or more smoke detectors were observed to be installed, but not functioning properly; or, smoke detector units were observed to be missing. Recommend replacement or installation.

See the attached "About Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors" for more information. Also, see the attached "The Safe Home" Book.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
5.13.1 - Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Missing

Carbon monoxide detector(s) were observed to be missing, an inadequate number placed, or placed in an incorrect location. Recommend evaluation and installation where necessary. See the attached "About Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors" for more information. See the attached "About Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors" for more information. Also, see the attached "The Safe Home" Book.

Tools Handyman/DIY

6 - Plumbing

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
6.1 Main Water Shut-off Device X
6.2 Water Supply & Distribution System X
6.3 Plumbing Fixtures (Faucets, Sinks, Toilets, etc.) X X
6.4 Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting X
6.5 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
6.6 Sewer Ejector Pump System X
6.7 Basement or Crawlspace Sump Pump System X
6.8 Exterior Hose Bibs (Faucets) X
6.9 Fire Suppression Systen X X
Water Source
Well
Sewer
Septic System
Service Provider
N/A
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
At Well
Water Supply & Distribution System: Distribution Material
Copper
Water Supply & Distribution System: Water Supply Material
PVC
Plumbing Fixtures (Faucets, Sinks, Toilets, etc.): Condition
Good
Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting: Location
Garage
Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting: Manufacturer
Reliance
Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting: Power Source/Type
Electric
Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting: Capacity
55 gallons
Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting: Model No.
6 50 DORT 210

Owner's manual attached, if available.

Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting: Serial No.
1402J000229
Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting: Manufacture Date
January 2014
Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting: Unit Age
5 years
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material
PVC
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Washer Drain Size
2"
Sewer Ejector Pump System: Location
None
Sewer Ejector Pump System: Sewer Pump System
Not Applicable
Basement or Crawlspace Sump Pump System: Location
None
Basement or Crawlspace Sump Pump System: Sump Pump System
Not Applicable
Fire Suppression Systen: Information
Not Present
Filters, Softener, or Conditioner System
Unknown

Water filter, softener, or conditioner systems are not part of the home inspection and these systems were not inspected. Recommend having the system serviced by technician upon moving in to the house.

Annual Inspection Recommended

Plumbing systems develop problems at various points for various reasons. Plumbing leaks in walls, under sinks, in the crawlspace, and other locations can cause significant damage over time. It is recommended that an annual inspection be conducted to determine the condition of the plumbing system that will make repair & maintenance recommendations. This will protect your investment and prolong the service life of these systems.

Hot Water System - Controls, Flue & Venting: Annual Maintenance Recommended

It is recommended to flush and service your water heater tank unit annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Plumbing Fixtures (Faucets, Sinks, Toilets, etc.)

Fixture in Disrepair

One or more fixtures were observed to be in disrepair or not functioning correctly. Recommend repair or replacement, as necessary.

Tools Handyman/DIY

7 - Fuel Storage & Distribution

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
7.1 Fuel Storage X
7.2 Main Shut Off X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile
Fuel Type
Propane
Fuel Storage: Storage Location
East
Fuel Storage: Storage Type
Above Ground
Main Shut Off: Location
At Tank

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; and B. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; The inspector shall report as in need of correction: The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory

8 - Heating

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
8.1 Equipment X
8.2 Normal Operating Controls X
8.3 Distribution System X
8.4 Vents, Flues & Chimneys X
8.5 Presence of Installed Heat Source in Each Room X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile
Equipment: Information
Forced Air, Split System
Equipment: Manufacturer
Unknown
Equipment: Energy Source
Unknown
Equipment: Location
Unknown
Equipment: Filters
Disposable
Equipment: Model No.
Unknown

Owners manual attached to report, if available.

Equipment: Serial No.
Unknown
Equipment: Manufacture Date
Unknown
Equipment: Age
Unknown
Normal Operating Controls: Location of Thermostat
In Hallway
Distribution System: Configuration
Split, Heat Pump
Distribution System: Ductwork
Insulated
Presence of Installed Heat Source in Each Room: Information
Present
Equipment: Servicing/Cleaning

Recommend a qualified HVAC technician clean and perform routine service of the system upon moving into the house, and annually thereafter. 


Equipment: Inaccessible

This unit or area was obstructed or inaccessible and was not inspected.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory

9 - Cooling

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
9.1 Cooling Equipment X
9.2 Normal Operating Controls X
9.3 Distribution System X
9.4 Presence of Installed Cooling Source in Each Room X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile
Cooling Equipment: Air Conditioning Information
Split System, Heat Pump
Cooling Equipment: Manufacturer
York
Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Cooling Equipment: Location
Exterior West
Cooling Equipment: Filters
Disposable
Cooling Equipment: Model No.
E4FH030S06A

Owners manual attached to report, if available.

Cooling Equipment: Serial No.
WAMM016933
Cooling Equipment: Manufacture Date
January 2003
Cooling Equipment: Age
16 years
Normal Operating Controls: Location of Thermostat
In Hallway
Distribution System: Configuration
Heat Pump, Split System
Distribution System: Distribution
Insulated Ducts
Presence of Installed Cooling Source in Each Room: Information
Present
Cooling Equipment: Unit Age & Warranty

Due to the age of the unit, the home warranty included with the inspection may not cover this unit.

Cooling Equipment: Servicing/Cleaning

Recommend a qualified HVAC technician clean and perform routine service of the system upon moving into the house.

Cooling Equipment: Low Ambient Temperature

The air conditioning unit or system was not operated due to low ambient outdoor temperature. This may cause damage to the unit. Recommend having the unit or system serviced by a HVAC technician prior to warm season operation. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory

10 - Fireplace - Living Room

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
10.1 General X X
10.2 Clean-out Doors & Frames X
10.3 Damper Operation X
10.4 Exterior - Hearth, Cladding, & Clearances X
10.5 Interior/Fire Box X
10.6 Mantels/Lintels Above Fireplace Opening X
General: Information
Gas Log Fireplace
Clean-out Doors & Frames: Condition
Good
Damper Operation: Condition
N/A
Exterior - Hearth, Cladding, & Clearances: Condition
Good
Interior/Fire Box: Condition
Good
Mantels/Lintels Above Fireplace Opening: Condition
Good
General: Annual Inspection Recommended

It is recommended that an annual inspection be conducted to determine the condition of the fireplace system that will make repair & maintenance recommendations. This will protect your investment and prolong the service life of these systems.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys; B. lintels above the fireplace openings; C. damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and D. clean-out doors and frames. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of fireplace. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers; B. manually operated dampers that did not open and close; C. the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace; D. the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and E. clean-outs not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect the flue or vent system. B. inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels. C. determine the need for a chimney sweep. D. operate gas fireplace inserts. E. light pilot flames. F. determine the appropriateness of any installation. G. inspect automatic fuel-fed devices. H. inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices. I. inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted. J. ignite or extinguish fires. K. determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics. L. move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents. M. perform a smoke test. N. dismantle or remove any component. O. perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection. P. perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - General

Service Before Use

Followup Inspection Date:  March 27, 2019

While the gas fireplace did ignite and sustain a flame. It is strongly recommended that the unit be service by a qualified technician prior to use, and perform any necessary adjustments to flame, cleaning, maintenance and any necessary repairs (to include chimney, flue and/or flue pipe) prior to use, and once each year before cold season.

Contractor Qualified Professional

11 - Fireplace - Master Bedroom

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
11.1 General X X
11.2 Clean-out Doors & Frames X
11.3 Damper Operation X
11.4 Exterior - Hearth, Cladding, & Clearances X
11.5 Interior/Fire Box X
11.6 Mantels/Lintels Above Fireplace Opening X
General: Information
Gas Log Fireplace
Clean-out Doors & Frames: Condition
Good
Damper Operation: Condition
N/A
Exterior - Hearth, Cladding, & Clearances: Condition
Good
Interior/Fire Box: Condition
Good
Mantels/Lintels Above Fireplace Opening: Condition
Good
General: Service Before Use

Recommend service by qualified technician/chimney sweep for cleaning, maintenance and any necessary repairs (to include chimney, flue and/or flue pipe) prior to use, and once each year before cold season.

General: Annual Inspection Recommended

Fireplace systems develop problems at various points for various reasons. Damage to fireboxes, flue and other systems can cause various hazards for the house and its residents. It is recommended that an annual inspection be conducted to determine the condition of the fireplace system that will make repair & maintenance recommendations. This will protect your investment and prolong the service life of these systems.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys; B. lintels above the fireplace openings; C. damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and D. clean-out doors and frames. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of fireplace. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers; B. manually operated dampers that did not open and close; C. the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace; D. the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and E. clean-outs not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect the flue or vent system. B. inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels. C. determine the need for a chimney sweep. D. operate gas fireplace inserts. E. light pilot flames. F. determine the appropriateness of any installation. G. inspect automatic fuel-fed devices. H. inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices. I. inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted. J. ignite or extinguish fires. K. determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics. L. move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents. M. perform a smoke test. N. dismantle or remove any component. O. perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection. P. perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
11.1.1 - General

Service Before Use

Followup Inspection Date:  March 27, 2019

While the gas fireplace did ignite and sustain a flame. It is strongly recommended that the unit be service by a qualified technician prior to use, and perform any necessary adjustments to flame, cleaning, maintenance and any necessary repairs (to include chimney, flue and/or flue pipe) prior to use, and once each year before cold season. 

Additionally, the wall switch needs to be connected correctly for operation.

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Wood Stove

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
12.1 Clean-out Doors & Frames X
12.2 Damper Operation X
12.3 Interior/Fire Box X
12.4 Hearth & Wall Clearances X
Information
None
Clean-out Doors & Frames: Condition
N/A
Damper Operation: Condition
N/A
Interior/Fire Box: Condition
N/A
Hearth & Wall Clearances: Condition
N/A

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys; B. lintels above the fireplace openings; C. damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and D. clean-out doors and frames. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of fireplace. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers; B. manually operated dampers that did not open and close; C. the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace; D. the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and E. clean-outs not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect the flue or vent system. B. inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels. C. determine the need for a chimney sweep. D. operate gas fireplace inserts. E. light pilot flames. F. determine the appropriateness of any installation. G. inspect automatic fuel-fed devices. H. inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices. I. inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted. J. ignite or extinguish fires. K. determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics. L. move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents. M. perform a smoke test. N. dismantle or remove any component. O. perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection. P. perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory

13 - Interior

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
13.1 Doors X
13.2 Windows X
13.3 Floors X
13.4 Walls X
13.5 Ceilings X
13.6 Skylights X
13.7 Stairways & Steps X
13.8 Railings & Handrails X
13.9 Kitchen Cabinets & Countertops X
13.10 Bathroom Cabinets & Countertops X
13.11 Shower/Tub & Enclosure X
13.12 Central Vacuum System X
13.13 Laundry Room X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile, Operated
Doors: Type/Material
Wood
Doors: Condition
Good
Windows: Manufacturer
Milgard
Windows: Window Type
Single-hung, Sliders
Windows: Condition
Good
Floors: Floor Covering
Carpet, Tile, Hardwood
Floors: Condition
Good
Walls: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls: Condition
Good
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall, Wood
Ceilings: Condition
Good
Skylights: Condition
N/A
Stairways & Steps: Condition
N/A
Railings & Handrails: Condition
N/A
Kitchen Cabinets & Countertops: Cabinetry
Wood
Kitchen Cabinets & Countertops: Countertops
Tile
Kitchen Cabinets & Countertops: Condition
Good
Bathroom Cabinets & Countertops: Cabinetry
Wood
Bathroom Cabinets & Countertops: Countertops
Tile
Bathroom Cabinets & Countertops: Condition
Good
Shower/Tub & Enclosure: Condition
Good
Central Vacuum System: Information
Not Present
Laundry Room: Cabinets
Wood
Laundry Room: Countertops
N/A
Laundry Room: Condition
Good
Laundry Room: Dryer Power Source
220 Electric
Shower/Tub & Enclosure: Shower Pan(s) Not Leak Tested

The shower pan(s), if any, was NOT tested for leaking at the time of inspection. This inspection provides visual-only observations at the time of inspection, and does not provide or imply any warranty or guarantee of any system, component, or unit performance beyond this date, nor does it predict safety, future damage, operability, or failure of any system, component or unit.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory

14 - Appliances

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
14.1 Refrigerator X X
14.2 Range/Oven Combo X
14.3 Cooktop (No Oven) X X
14.4 Oven (No Cooktop) X
14.5 Exhaust Hood X
14.6 Built-in Microwave X
14.7 Dishwasher X
14.8 Garbage Disposal X X
14.9 Garbage Compactor X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile, Operating Controls
Refrigerator: Manufacturer
Frigidaire
Refrigerator: Cubby Dimensions
37”W X 70”H
Refrigerator: Model No.
FRS26KR4AB0
Refrigerator: Serial No.
LA11904062
Refrigerator: Manufacture Date
May 2001
Refrigerator: Unit Age
18 years
Range/Oven Combo: Manufacturer
None
Range/Oven Combo: Energy Source
N/A
Range/Oven Combo: Model No.
N/A or Unknown
Range/Oven Combo: Serial No.
N/A or Unknown
Range/Oven Combo: Manufacture Date
N/A or Unknown
Range/Oven Combo: Unit Age
N/A or Unknown
Cooktop (No Oven): Manufacturer
Jenn-Air
Cooktop (No Oven): Energy Source
Electric
Cooktop (No Oven): Serial No.
N/A or Unknown
Cooktop (No Oven): Manufacture Date
N/A or Unknown
Cooktop (No Oven): Unit Age
N/A or Unknown

 

Oven (No Cooktop): Manufacturer
Kenmore
Oven (No Cooktop): Energy Source
Electric
Oven (No Cooktop): Serial No.
N/A or Unknown
Oven (No Cooktop): Manufacture Date
N/A or Unknown
Oven (No Cooktop): Unit Age
N/A or Unknown
Exhaust Hood: Manufacturer
Jenn Air
Exhaust Hood: Type
Down-Draft
Exhaust Hood: Model No.
N/A or Unknown
Exhaust Hood: Serial No.
N/A or Unknown
Exhaust Hood: Manufacture Date
N/A or Unknown
Exhaust Hood: Unit Age
N/A or Unknown
Built-in Microwave: Manufacturer
None
Built-in Microwave: Model No.
N/A or Unknown
Built-in Microwave: Serial No.
N/A or Unknown
Built-in Microwave: Manufacture Date
N/A or Unknown
Built-in Microwave: Unit Age
N/A or Unknown
Dishwasher: Manufacturer
Kenmore
Dishwasher: Model No.
665 13093N412
Dishwasher: Serial No.
F71018011
Dishwasher: Manufacture Date
March 2017
Dishwasher: Unit Age
2 years
Garbage Disposal: Manufacturer
Waste King
Garbage Disposal: Model No.
N/A or Unknown
Garbage Disposal: Serial No.
N/A or Unknown
Garbage Disposal: Manufacture Date
N/A or Unknown
Garbage Disposal: Unit Age
N/A or Unknown
Garbage Compactor: Manufacturer
None
Garbage Compactor: Model No.
N/A or Unknown
Garbage Compactor: Serial No.
N/A or Unknown
Garbage Compactor: Manufacture Date
N/A or Unknown
Garbage Compactor: Unit Age
N/A or Unknown
Cooktop (No Oven): Model No.
N/A or Unknown
Oven (No Cooktop): Model No.
N/A or Unknown
Refrigerator: Unit Age & Warranty

Due to the age of the unit, the home warranty included with the inspection may not cover this unit.

Refrigerator: Average Life Expectancy

Unit was observed to be past the average expected service life for appliance category. Due to the age of the unit, it is unknown how much longer it will perform, and parts may no longer be available for repair.

Cooktop (No Oven): Unit Age & Warranty

Due to the age of the unit, the home warranty included with the inspection may not cover this unit.

Oven (No Cooktop): Do Not Use Foil
Garbage Disposal: Unit Age & Warranty

Due to the age of the unit, the home warranty included with the inspection may not cover this unit.

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
14.1.1 - Refrigerator

Minor Damage

The door handle was observed to be damaged. Recommend repair.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
14.3.1 - Cooktop (No Oven)

Cracked Glasstop

Glass cooktop was observed to be damaged. Recommend repair.

Wash Appliance Repair
Credit
Comment
14.8.1 - Garbage Disposal

Inoperable

Garbage disposal was inoperable at the time of inspection. Recommend repair or replacement.

Wash Appliance Repair

15 - Insulation (As Observed From Attic & Crawlspace)

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
15.1 Ceiling Insulation X
15.2 Floor Insulation X
15.3 Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement) X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile
Ceiling Insulation: Insulation Type
Blown
Ceiling Insulation: Thickness or R-Value
8" Blown
Ceiling Insulation: Condition
Good
Floor Insulation: Information
Batt
Floor Insulation: Thickness or R-Value
12” Batt
Floor Insulation: Condition
Good
Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement): Vapor Barrier
None
Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement): Material
None
Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement): Condition
N/A

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory

16 - Ventilation (As Observed From Attic & Crawlspace)

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
16.1 Ventilation in Attic X
16.2 Ventilation in Foundation or Basement X
16.3 Exhaust Systems X X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile
Dryer Vent
Not Visible
Ventilation in Attic: Attic Ventilation
Eave Vents, Ridge Vents
Ventilation in Foundation or Basement: Foundation Ventilation
None
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans
Fan/Heat/Light

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
16.3.1 - Exhaust Systems

Attic Termination

One or more bathroom and/or laundry room exhaust fans appeared to be venting into the attic, which can cause moisture and mold. All exhaust vent ducts should terminate to the outside of the house with correct penetration and termination ductwork. Recommend repair and/or modifications to ensure correct venting to exterior. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

17 - Garage - Attached

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
17.1 Garage Door X X
17.2 Ceiling X
17.3 Walls X
17.4 Floor X
17.5 Windows X
17.6 Firewall Separation X
17.7 Occupant Door X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile
Garage Door: Type & Material
Roll-up, Automatic, Metal
Garage Door: Automatic Door Opener
Overhead Door
Garage Door: Insulated
Yes
Garage Door: Condition
Good
Ceiling: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Ceiling: Insulated
Yes
Ceiling: Condition
Good
Walls: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls: Condition
Good
Floor: Floor Material or Covering
Cement
Floor: Condition
Good
Windows: Manufacturer
Milgard
Windows: Window Type
Sliders
Windows: Condition
Good
Firewall Separation: Present
Yes
Firewall Separation: Condition
Good
Occupant Door : Self Closing
Yes
Occupant Door : Fire Door
Yes
Occupant Door : Condition
Good
  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
17.1.1 - Garage Door

Auto Reverse

The auto reverse was missing or the sensor was not responding at time of inspection. This is a safety concern for children and pets. Recommend checking alignment of sensors and repair/replace, if necessary. 

18 - Garage - Attached - 2

IN LI NI NP MI DO SA
18.1 Garage Door X X
18.2 Ceiling X
18.3 Walls X
18.4 Floor X
18.5 Windows X
18.6 Firewall Separation X
18.7 Occupant Door X X
Inspection Method
Visual, Tactile
Garage Door: Type & Material
Roll-up, Metal, Automatic
Garage Door: Automatic Door Opener
Unknown
Garage Door: Insulated
Unknown
Garage Door: Condition
Damaged
Ceiling: Ceiling Material
Unfinished
Ceiling: Insulated
No
Ceiling: Condition
Good
Walls: Wall Material
Unfinished
Walls: Condition
Good
Floor: Floor Material or Covering
Asphalt
Floor: Condition
Good
Windows: Manufacturer
Unknown
Windows: Window Type
Unknown
Windows: Condition
Unknown
Firewall Separation: Present
N/A
Firewall Separation: Condition
N/A
Occupant Door : Self Closing
No, None
Occupant Door : Fire Door
N/A
Occupant Door : Condition
N/A
Not Accessible

The garage was not accessible at time of inspection and was not inspected.

  • IN = Inspected
  • LI = Limited Inspection
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • MI = Maintenance Item
  • DO = Deficiency Observed
  • SA = Safety Advisory
Credit
Comment
18.1.1 - Garage Door

Damaged - Not Operable

Followup Inspection Date:  March 27, 2019

Due to damage observed, the automatic door was not operated. Door was removed at the time of inspection. Condition of automatic door operator was undetermined. 

Garage Garage Door Contractor
Credit
Comment
18.2.1 - Ceiling

Active Moisture Penetration

Followup Inspection Date:  March 27, 2019

The roof was observed to have evidence of active moisture penetration, with damage in one or more areas. The source of the moisture was unidentified during the inspection. A definitive determination of the source of the moisture will require a more invasive inspection by a licensed contractor. Recommend determining the source of the moisture and repair as necessary.

Hardhat General Contractor