Loading
Document Name
Sort Generated Document By
Header Text
Total Credit Requested
$ 0.00
Preview
Create
Viewing:

1234 Main St.
Newport KY 41071
11/11/2018 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

The Report contains a Grouping of Major Concerns (RED), Moderate Concerns (ORANGE), and Minor Concerns (BLUE) noted that, in the inspector’s professional opinion, need further evaluation, repair, or attention. The colors and classifications are done for illustrative purposes and convenience. All issues should be considered and evaluated equally.

A Major Concern (Material Defect) is a specific issue with a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk (Unsafe) to people or property.

Concerns that inevitably lead to, or directly cause (if not addressed in a timely manner) adverse impact on the value of the home, or unreasonable risk (Unsafe) to people or property are considered Moderate Concerns or Minor Concerns. The fact that a system or component is near, at or beyond the end of its normal useful life is not, in itself, a material defect, but may be listed as a Major Concern because of associated cost.

Unsafe is defined as “A condition in a readily accessible, installed system or component that is judged to be a significant risk of bodily injury during normal, day-to-day use; the risk may be due to damage, deterioration, improper installation, or a change in accepted residential construction standards.”

The Grouping is not intended to determine which items may need to be addressed per the contractual requirements of the sale of the property. All items of concern to you should be addressed as deemed necessary by you. Any areas of uncertainty regarding the contract should be clarified by consulting an attorney.

The complete report may include additional information of concern. It is recommended that you read the complete report. The entire Inspection Report, including the InterNACHI Standards of Practice, limitations and scope of Inspection, and Pre-Inspection Agreement must be carefully read to fully assess the findings of the inspection.

It is strongly recommended that you have appropriately licensed contractors evaluate each concern listed in the report further, along with the entire system, for additional concerns that may be outside our area of expertise or the scope of our inspection before the close of escrow. Please call us for any clarifications or further questions.

This report is the property of the client for whom it was prepared. Any unauthorized use or sharing of this report can leave the client vulnerable to liability. This report should only be shared as it pertains to the purchase contract of the client. Should the client choose not to buy this house the seller does not have the right to share or distribute this report. The disclosure form for the property should be updated appropriately and the report discarded.

CONCERN CATEGORIES:

MINOR CONCERN

  • Maintenance items, DIY items, or recommended upgrades will fall into this category. These concerns will ultimately lead to Moderate Concerns and Major Concerns if left neglected for extended periods of time. These Concerns may be more straightforward to remedy.

MODERATE CONCERN

  • Most items will fall into this category. Concerns that inevitably lead to, or directly cause (if not addressed in a timely manner) adverse impact on the value of the home, or unreasonable risk (Unsafe) to people or property. These concerns typically require further evaluation or may be more complicated to remedy.

MAJOR CONCERN

  • A specific issue with a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk to people or property. These Concerns are often imminent or may be very difficult or expensive to remedy.

1 - Inspection Details

Type of Building
Single Family
Style
Italianate
Approximate Square Footage
1501 - 2500
Garage
None
Occupancy
Vacant
Weather Conditions
Recent Rain (Within 3 Days)
Temperature (approximate)
50 Fahrenheit (F)
Ground Conditions
Wet
Ancillary Services
Wood Destroying Insect Report
In Attendance
Client
Incomplete Construction: Missing Permits

There are no permits and inspections for the HVAC. There are no permits and inspections for new water heater. Building Combo may not be finalized. Contact the local building department for more information.

Limitations: Present Condition

The condition of the premises may change after the date of inspection due to many factors such as weather, moisture, leaks, actions taken by the owner or others, or the passage of time. Seasonal changes such as wind-driven rain, ice, and humidity may bring some defects to light that were not noted during your home inspection. Basements and attics that were dry at the time of the inspection can be damp or leak in later weeks or months. This report reflects the condition of the premises at the time of the inspection.

Limitations: Visible Limitations

The inspection is limited to visible and accessible components and areas only. Due to insurance restrictions, we are not permitted to operate any main shutoff valves (water or gas) or switch on any circuit breakers that may be shut off. We also can not move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice or debris that obstructs access or visibility. We also cannot allow you, the buyer, to move any items or operate any shutoff valves or breakers in the home. No disassembly of equipment, opening of walls, moving of furniture, appliances or stored items, or excavation was performed. Some items or areas may not be inspected if they are blocked by furniture or stored items.  Please note that we cannot make phone calls or wait for someone to arrive while on site regarding any items that have not been properly prepared. The property was inspected regardless of limitations or hindrances. All components and conditions which by the nature of their location are concealed, camouflaged or difficult to inspect are excluded from the report.

Limitations: "Flipped" House

When a home is "flipped" or a significant amount of work is done to a property that was obtained cheaply (typically abandoned or bank-owned) our inspection can be limited. Issues have likely been hidden or covered up. This can be intentional or unintentional and is simply the result of a large amount of construction work very recently. Evidence to larger issues such as wall cracks, stains, damage, etc that we use to ascertain that a larger problem exists has likely been covered up or removed for aesthetic purposes. We can not and will not be able to find all of the concerns that may exist in this home. For this reason we recommend the buyer proceed with caution. All recommendations in this report should be followed prior to purchasing the home. 

Click here to read our blog post about this type of house.

The presence or evidence of the following environmental hazards shall not be addressed in the report: (1) Air-borne hazards; (2) The air quality or the sickness of any building, including, but not limited to, the presence of absence of all manner of biological activity, such as hazardous plants, insects, birds, pets, mammals, and other flora and fauna, and their consequent physical damage, toxicity, noxiousness, odors, waste products, and wood destroying animals and fungi; (3) Animals, insects, or rodents; (4) Asbestos; (5) Carcinogens, including but not limited to radon; (6) Contaminants in soil, water, and air; (7) Electro-magnetic fields; (8) Hazardous materials including, but not limited to, the presence of lead in paint; (9) Hazardous waste conditions; (10) Mold, mildew, or fungus; (11) Hazardous plants or animals including, but not limited to wood destroying organisms, wood destroying insects, or diseases harmful to humans including molds or mold-like substances; (12) Noise; (13) Potability of any water; (14) Toxins; (15) Urea formaldehyde; (16) The effectiveness of any system installed or method utilized to control or remove suspected environmental hazards; and (17) Compliance with regulatory requirements (codes, regulations, laws, ordinances, etc.), any manufacturer's recalls, conformance with manufacturer installation or instructions, or any information for consumer protection purposes. (32 Ky.R. 2403; 33 Ky.R. 780; eff. 10-6-2006; 41 Ky.R. 626; 1374; 1554; eff. 2-6-2015.)

2 - Orientation Details

Included Photos

Your report includes many photographs. Some pictures are informational and of a general view, to help you understand where the inspector has been, what was looked at and the condition of the item or area at the time of the inspection. Some of the pictures may be of problem areas, these are to help you better understand what is documented in this report and to help you see areas or items that you normally would not see. Not all problem areas or conditions will be supported with photos. Inversely the included photos may not show all problem areas or conditions. A representative example of photos may be used.

Location References

For the purpose of this report all directions are given as if you are standing facing the front of the house. Items listed as Multiple Locations may not directly reference all effected locations. Examples may be given that should not be construed as the only affected areas. Further evaluation will need to take place to determine every effected location. 

Elevation Images

3 - Exterior

Siding / Trim Material
Aluminum, Wood, Brick Veneer
Walkway/Patio/Driveway Material
None
Appurtenance Type(s)/Material
Wood, Porch
Site Topography
Flat
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Shared Driveway

The driveway appears to be shared with a neighboring property. It is recommend that you fully understand the property division and maintenance division prior to purchasing the home. 

Limitations: Deck - Low Elevation
Low elevation of the deck prevented an inspection of the areas below the deck.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Cracking / Crushing of Faux Brick
Multiple Locations

This home is constructed with a faux brick siding. The siding showed cracking and / or recent repairs in one or more areas. This is likely representative of damage to the internal wood frame structure. Cracking can be from structural movement, rusting lintels above windows, water intrusion, etc. Enough damage was visible at the interior that it should be assumed that there is also hidden damage because many areas where the siding is crushed or cracked was not visible from the exterior. Invasive inspection is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

In Contact With Ground
Left Side

Without proper air space the trim can rot. Materials behind the trim may also rot. This is also conducive conditions for wood destroying insects. Termite activity and damage was visible at the interior of this area. Recommend installing material appropriate for ground contact.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Drains Towards the House - Concrete
Right Side

When a hard surface such as a driveway, sidewalk, or patio slopes toward the house it can direct a very large amount of water towards the foundation. Over time this water can cause foundation damage. Foundation repairs were noted in the adjacent area.

The concrete appears to be at the end of its life and removal/replacement is recommended.

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.4.2 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Trip Hazard
Front Right

Trip hazards observed. Patch or repair recommended.
Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Stairs, Steps, & Stoops

Risers Are Unsafe
Front

Riser heights that are more than 7 3/4 inches and vary by more than 3/8 inch can be a safety hazard. Repair is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Roof

Inspection Method
Drone, Limitations
Roof Style
Gable
Roof Material(s)
Asphalt, Laminated
Gutter Material/Type
Aluminum, K Style
Roof Drainage Location
Below Grade
Coverings: Racking Method
Shingles installed with joints aligned vertically at every other course is called "racking". Racking is an improper installation method for many most laminated shingles. Possible issues are improper nailing, stress cracks, and incorrect color blends or an odd aesthetic appearance. No recommendation is made, but being aware of the installation method can be useful should problems develop. Here is a technical bulletin from a shingle manufacturer. Here is a video demonstrating the installation method.
Limitations: Below Grade Drainage
Underground drains are beyond the scope of this inspection. In older homes these drains may tie directly into the sewer system of the home. It is recommended that all below ground drains be monitored for clogging or overflowing. Also be sure to note any foundation movement or cracks in the house near the underground drains. If any deficiency is noted with the drains or the house near the drains, remove the downspout from the underground pipe immediately and begin troubleshooting for blockage or damage. Here is a good article further detailing underground drains.
Limitations: Inspection Method - Drone

A drone was used to photograph the roof and the top of the chimney. This does not constitute a full roof or chimney inspection, only an attempt to view the area for major defects that may be apparent from above. This was done because no access to these areas was possible otherwise. This should be considered a tool and not a replacement for walking the roof. It is strongly recommended that you have the roof and/chimney fully evaluated by a licensed and insured contractor to provide a thorough inspection.

Limitations: Shingles Installed on Roof 2/12 - 4/12 Pitch

Shingles are not recommended on roofs with less than 4/12 pitch unless certain precautions are taken as directed by the manufacturer. Typically a double underlayment is required. We are not able to determine if the proper precautions were taken.

Limitations: Steep Pitch

The roof pitch was too steep to safely walk on. We used other methods to inspect the roof. 

Limitations: The Attic is Not Accessible

One or more portions of the attic in this home does not have an access point or the access point was blocked. Inferences about the condition of the roof structure were made using only the inspection method for the roof.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Coverings

Improper/Incomplete Nailing
Multiple Locations

Roof coverings showed signs of improper installation and fastening. The shingles are not properly aligned and the seal strip is visible in multiple locations. Recommend a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and repair.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Coverings

Repaired
Left Front

A portion of the roof has recently been repaired. Inquire with the seller as to the history of these repairs. This is typically a sign that the roof is nearing the end of its life and replacement should be budgeted for.
Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.3 - Coverings

Too Flat For Shingles
Left Side And Front

The roof is less than 2/12 pitch. Shingle manufacturers do not have provisions for installations below 2/12 pitch. Recommend removing the shingles and installing an appropriate roof covering. 

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.4 - Coverings

Improper Installation
Multiple Locations

It appears the shingles line up in more than one area or have been lapped incorrectly. Recommend a full evaluation of the roof installation by a qualified roofing professional.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
4.3.1 - Flashings

Counter Flashing is Missing or Damaged - Brick
Multiple Locations

Counter flashing is designed to keep water from going behind the step flashing. Have a qualified roofing contractor install counter flashing that is let into the mortar.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
4.3.2 - Flashings

Drip Edge Flashing is Missing
Multiple Locations

Drip edge flashing protects the edges of the sheathing and prevents water from running behind the gutters. Have reviewed by a qualified roofing contractor to install drip edge flashing as required by local or state building codes.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Chimneys

Chimney Spark Arrestor / Weather Cap Missing
Both Locations

A spark arrestor / weather cap can keep rain and animals out of the flue and can greatly prolong the life of the chimney. Recommend adding a spark arrestor / weather cap.
Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.4.2 - Chimneys

Unlined Chimney
Water Heater Chimney

Chimney was unlined, which can deteriorate the chimney structure and allow harmful gasses to enter home. Recommend a qualified masonry or chimney contractor install a liner.

NOTE: This condition can simulate a persistent roof leak at the interior of the home. The condensation of the gases and water entering from the top can make its way into the home. If a persistent leak is noted in the area adjacent to the chimney this condition should be remedied first, and then further evaluation made to determine if the leak continues.

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.4.3 - Chimneys

Damaged - Crown and Brick
Both Locations

A damaged crown allows water to enter into the brick chase. Over time the water erodes away the mortar and damages the chase. Once this happens some rebuilding may be necessary. It is also recommended to have the interior flue evaluated by a certified chimney sweep. The chimney is likely unsafe to use in its current condition.

CSIA - Chimney Safety Institute of America has a wealth of resources.

Have a certified chimney sweep make a full evaluation and repair as necessary.

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor

5 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

Inspection Method
Not Inspected, Limitations
Attic Entry Type/Location
No Access
Roof Structure Material/Type
Unknown
Insulation Type
Unknown
Limitations: Some Attic Areas Are Not Accessible

The home has multiple attic spaces or areas. Some of the attic spaces do not have an access point or the access point was blocked.

Limitations: Insulation R-Value

Any estimates of insulation R values or depths are rough average values. Insulation/ventilation type and levels in concealed areas, like exterior walls, are not inspected. Insulation and vapor barriers are not disturbed and no destructive tests (such as cutting openings in walls to look for insulation) are performed.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Ventilation

Attic Ventilation May be Inadequate

There is no visible attic ventilation. Inadequate ventilation can lead to reduced roof covering life. Without proper venting, moisture can build up in the attic, potentially causing mold growth.  The excessive heat may also damage roof decking and roof shingles as well as cause cooling equipment to work harder.

Generally one square foot of free vent is required for every 300 square feet of floor area.  This is typically accomplished through a balanced combination of soffit and ridge / roof vents. Cooler air enters through soffit vents and warmer air exits through ridge or roof vents. In situations where soffit vents are not possible, a power vent with a humidistat may also be used.

Recommend a qualified professional evaluate and modify / add ventilation as necessary

Here is more information about proper attic ventilation.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Dryer Connections

Dryer Vent is Not Hard Piped
Laundry Area

Flex pipe should be minimized to a few feet in length and should be UL listed. Flex pipe should not be installed outside of the room the dryer is installed. Install smooth wall 4 inch pipe at all sections of the dryer vent from the wall of the laundry room to the exterior. 

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
5.8.1 - Exhaust Systems

No Exhaust Fan Installed
Both Bathroom Locations

Humidity buildup can be very inefficient on your cooling system and can lead to mold or other damage over time. All bathrooms are recommended to have exhaust fans to expel humidity to the exterior of the home.
Recommend a qualified contractor install a bath van that exhausts to the exterior of the home.
Contractor Qualified Professional

6 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Floor Covering Material(s)
Carpet, Hardwood
Wall Material
Drywall, Plaster
Ceiling Material
Drywall, Plaster
Window Material
Vinyl
Window Type
Double-hung
Window Manufactured Date / Estimated Age
10 - 15
Window Manufacturer
Unknown
Dryer Power Source
220 Electric
Range/Oven Fuel Source
Gas

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

Credit
Comment
6.2.1 - Windows

Failed Seal
2nd Bedroom

Observed condensation between the window panes, which indicates a failed seal. Replacement or repair will depend greatly on the window type/brand/style.
Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
6.2.2 - Windows

Unsafe Modification
1st Floor Bathroom

A mirror has been installed / attached to the window pane. This is not a safe installation as the mirror will likely come loose and fall out after some time. The window would have to be used since there is no exhaust fan installed in the room. Recommend removing this mirror.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
6.6.1 - Ceilings

Insufficient Height For Living Space
3rd Floor

Typically at least 50 percent of the floor area of the room is recommended to have a ceiling height of at least 7 feet.

The room may not be considered living space and may not be attributable to the square footage of the property or safely used for regular habitation. The MLS listing shows this as a bedroom. For safety reasons the area should not be used as a bedroom or sleeping room. A life safety hazard exists should a fire start and a person is occupying this room. Recommend not using the area as sleeping space. Inquire with the local building department and county auditor to determine the exact requirements for space attributable to living space square footage. 

Here is an article discussing safe ceiling heights.

Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

No Handrail
3rd Floor

Staircase is missing a complete handrail. This is a safety hazard. Recommend a qualified contractor install a handrail. 

Hammer Carpenter
Credit
Comment
6.9.1 - Range/Oven/Cooktop

Anti-Tip Device Not Installed
Kitchen

Range was not fastened to the floor. This poses a safety hazard to children. Secure the range so it can't tip. 

Wrenches Handyman

7 - Foundation & Structure

Foundation Type
Basement, Crawlspace, Combination
Inspection Method
Fully Accessible, Limitations
Basement/Crawlspace Access Location
Interior Stairs, Interior Hatch
Foundation Material
Concrete
Floor Structure Material
Nominal Lumber
Sub-floor Material
Plank
Structural Beam Material
None
Structural Column Material
Concrete
Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Concrete, Dirt
Limitations: Insulation
Crawlspace

Most of the walls were covered with insulation which prevented a full inspection.

Limitations: Insulation In Joists
Crawlspace

Most of the floor joists were covered or filled with insulation. This significantly reduces the visible area of the floor structure.

Limitations: Brick Installed in Box Sills
Basement Multiple Locations

Brick has been installed in the box sills preventing viewing.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

Credit
Comment
7.2.1 - Foundation

Foundation Cracks - Previous Repairs
Right Side

The foundation has been repaired in one or more areas. Typically bolts are installed at the wood attached to the joist, the wood spans several floor joists, the gap between the beam and the foundation is filled with non-shrink grout, the beams are typically spaced no more than 5 feet apart.

Recommend obtaining documentation regarding the repair from the seller. Most foundation repairs come with some type of transferable warranty. If there is no transferable warranty you may wish to have the foundation evaluated by a structural engineer.

House construction Structural Engineer
Credit
Comment
7.2.2 - Foundation

Water Intrusion
Rear

Water intrusion was evident on the surface of the floor slab and running down the wall in the basement. This can compromise the foundations ability to stabilize the structure and could cause damage. The source of the moisture should be identified and corrected. Make all necessary grading, drainage, and gutter repairs. Recommend further evaluation by a basement waterproofing contractor to repair as necessary.

Foundation Foundation Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.4.1 - Floor Structure

Joists, Wall Studs And Sill Plates Need Repairs
Multiple Locations

One or more floor joists were damaged or improperly repaired. Termite damage and water damage was noted in multiple locations to the floor joists, wall studs, and the sill plates. This can cause damage to the structural integrity of the home. A large portion of the framing was not visible. It is recommended that access be made to view all of the framing from the basement. Recommend a qualified structural engineer evaluate and advise on how to correct. A qualified contractor should implement the correction and the engineer should return to verify the repair was properly performed. Corrections to sill plates in balloon frame construction can be difficult to achieve. 

House construction Structural Engineer

8 - Heating

Equipment Location
Basement
Thermostat Location
Living Room
Heat Type
Forced Air
Energy Source / Brand
Gas, Goodman
Venting Material / Type
PVC, Side Wall
Distribution System
Non-insulated, Ductwork
Equipment Model #
GMSS960603BN
Equipment Serial #
1801454105
Year of Manufacture
2018
  • The average lifespan of a furnace is 16 - 20 years.
Filter Size
16 x 20 x 1
AFUE Rating
90+

AFUE (Annual fuel utilization efficiency) is a metric used to measure furnace efficiency in converting fuel to energy. A higher AFUE rating means greater energy efficiency. 90% or higher meets the Department of Energy's Energy Star program standard.

Heating Equipment: Equipment Image

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Heating Equipment

Filter Door Not Secured

Without a secure filter door dirt can be drawn into the system. This can also create inefficient return flow. We recommend Allergy Zone covers that can be purchased BY CLICKING HERE.

Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Distribution Systems

Disconnected
Basement

Ductwork was disconnected in one or more areas. This can create inefficiency. 

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - Vents, Flues & Chimneys

Flue Improperly Installed
Exterior Right

Exhaust flue was improperly installed. The vent terminates within 4 feet of the door.  Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor evaluate and repair.

Fire HVAC Professional

9 - Cooling

Equipment Location
Exterior Right
Brand / Type
Goodman
Size
2 Tons
Equipment Model #
GSC130241DA
Equipment Serial #
0904034485
Year of Manufacture
2009
  • The average lifespan of an AC system is 12 - 15 years.
Cooling Equipment: Equipment Image
Limitations: Low Temperature

The A/C unit was not tested due to low outdoor temperature. This may cause damage to the unit. This limitation affects all other items marked NI (Not Inspected) in this section.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Cooling Equipment

Needs Servicing / Cleaning

Central air systems should be cleaned and serviced annually. Ask the property owners when the furnace was last serviced.If it was more than a year ago, recommend a licensed HVAC contractor clean and service the cooling system.Follow all repair recommendations made at the time of servicing

Here is a resource on how to take care of your air conditioning unit.

Fire HVAC Professional

10 - Heating 2

Equipment Location
Closet, 2nd Floor
Thermostat Location
Bedroom
Heat Type
Forced Air
Energy Source / Brand
Gas, Goodman
Venting Material / Type
PVC, Side Wall
Distribution System
Non-insulated, Ductwork
Equipment Model #
GMPN060-3
Equipment Serial #
9505804859
Year of Manufacture
1995
  • The average lifespan of a furnace is 16 - 20 years.
Filter Size
16 x 25 x 1
AFUE Rating
90+

AFUE (Annual fuel utilization efficiency) is a metric used to measure furnace efficiency in converting fuel to energy. A higher AFUE rating means greater energy efficiency. 90% or higher meets the Department of Energy's Energy Star program standard.

Heating Equipment: Equipment Image

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

Credit
Comment
10.2.1 - Heating Equipment

Beyond it's Expected Useful Life
2nd Floor

The life expectancy of a gas-fired furnace is ~18 - 20 years. Old furnaces may be inefficient and have a high probability of failure in the near future. 
Have a licensed HVAC technician fully evaluate the system. Discuss pros/cons to replacement at this time. If replacement is not elected at this time, budget for replacement in the near future.
Here are some questions to help determine if replacement is a good option at this time.
Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
10.2.2 - Heating Equipment

Needs Servicing/Cleaning

Furnace should be cleaned and serviced annually. Ask the property owners when the furnace was last serviced. If it was more than a year ago, recommend a licensed HVAC contractor clean and service the heating system. Follow all repair recommendations made at the time of servicing.

Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
10.5.1 - Vents, Flues & Chimneys

Flue Improperly Installed
Exterior Left Side

Exhaust flue was improperly installed. The flue discharges directly towards the soffit vents.  Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor evaluate and repair.

Fire HVAC Professional

11 - Cooling 2

Equipment Location
Exterior Right
Brand / Type
Ameristar
Size
2.5 Tons
Equipment Model #
M4AC3030B1000NA
Equipment Serial #
161750144M
Year of Manufacture
2017
  • The average lifespan of an AC system is 12 - 15 years.
Cooling Equipment: Equipment Image
Limitations: Low Temperature

The A/C unit was not tested due to low outdoor temperature. This may cause damage to the unit. This limitation affects all other items marked NI (Not Inspected) in this section.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

12 - Plumbing

Water Source
Public
Sewer System
Public
Water Supply Material
Copper
Water Distribution Material
Copper
Drain, Waste, & Vent Material
PVC
Fuel / Gas Source
Natural Gas
Fuel / Gas Shut-off Location
Gas Meter, Exterior
Water Heater Energy Source / Brand
Natural Gas, AO Smith


Water Heater Location
Basement
Water Heater Capacity
40 gallons
Water Heater Model #
G6-T4034NV 400
Water Heater Serial #
1812109705436
Water Heater Year of Manufacture
2018
  • The average lifespan of a water heater is 8 to 12 years.
Water Shut-off Location
Basement
Water Supply Systems: Maintenance Recommendations

WATER HEATER: I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding.

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help.

HOSE FAUCETS: Remember to shut your faucet off annually.

Here is a quick article to ensure you're hose faucets are ready for winter.

Water Heating Appliance: Equipment Image
Limitations: Sewer Camera Evaluation

Underground utilities are not visible during a standard home inspection, and are therefore specifically excluded from the scope of this report. Waste lines are susceptible to a variety of problems, including blockage and collapse. Tree roots may infiltrate the interior of waste lines, acting as a source of blockage in all pipe and material types. Older drain pipes, which include Orangeburg Pipe and clay tile (pipe) are commonly known to suffer problems like sudden failure, blockage or collapse. Cast Iron pipe can deteriorate from the inside out. For this reason, the Inspector suggests you consider getting a video scan of the sanitary drain line prior to closing.

Limitations: Drain / Waste / Vent Plumbing - Not Visible

Areas of the DWV system was not visible or not accessible because the pipes were concealed.

Limitations: Supply Plumbing - Not Visible

Areas of the supply plumbing in the home are located inside of walls or floors and was not visible at the time of inspection.

Limitations: Shower Was Not Able to be Operated Without Getting Wet
2nd Floor Bathroom

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

Credit
Comment
12.2.1 - Dishwasher

Improperly Installed Drain Pipe
Kitchen

Dishwasher drain pipe was installed improperly. Without a high drain line loop or air gap, risk of a potential back-flow of water in to the dishwasher and incomplete drainage of water is increased. Manufacturers instructions typically require the line loop up to a point 32 inches from the floor. Some local codes require air gaps to be installed. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.9.1 - Sinks

Drain Stopper is Not Working
1st Floor Bathroom

Recommend repairing the drain stop.

Here is an article explaining how a drain stopper can be repaired.
Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
12.9.2 - Sinks

Leaking Drain
Bathroom

 The drain lines should be attempted to be tightened. If tightening does not work, have a licensed plumbing contractor repair or replace as necessary.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.9.3 - Sinks

Seal is Missing Between Sink and Counter
Kitchen

Without a proper seal food and bacteria can build up in the area. This can also reduce the attachment strength to the counter.

Recommend cleaning and sealing the area.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
12.10.1 - Shower/Tub

Shower Spray Can Not be Contained
2nd Floor Bathroom

The shower is installed in a manner that renders it non-functional. The water can not be turned on with the door open without fully spraying water onto the floor. This means a person must enter the shower, close the door, then turn the water on. Recommend relocating the shower head.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.11.1 - Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems

Drain Pan Missing
Laundry Area

A drain pan should be installed for the washing machine when the machine is to be installed in a location where flooding can cause damage. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Electrical

Service Conductors
Overhead, 120V, 240V
Main Panel Location
Basement
Panel Capacity
100 AMP
Panel Manufacturer
Square D
Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Wiring Method
Copper, Romex
Main Service Panel: Equipment Image
Smoke Detectors: Recommended Placement
Smoke detectors have a lifespan of 10 years and should be replaced after they reach that age. Smoke alarms are required in each bedroom, outside each sleeping area (hallway) and each additional story (including basement).

Here is some useful information regarding smoke alarms.
Limitations: Furniture Blocks Testing

Furniture or stored items prevents testing at some switches and receptacles.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

Credit
Comment
13.3.1 - Main Service Panel

Missing Labels on Panel

At the time of inspection, panel was missing labeling. Recommend a qualified electrician or person identify and map out locations. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
13.5.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Ungrounded Receptacle
3rd Floor

One or more receptacles are ungrounded. To eliminate safety hazards, all 3-prong receptacles should be grounded. Where grounding is not possible (No ground wire present) a 2-prong receptacle or GFCI protected receptacles can be installed.
NOTE: GFCI protection of an ungrounded 3-prong outlet will not protect electronics. A physical grounding system is required to protect electronics or allow surge protectors to function properly. We recommend at least one physically grounded outlet in each room to protect electronics.
Have a licensed electrical contractor make further evaluation and repair as necessary for the safest operation.
Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
13.6.1 - GFCI & AFCI

No GFCI Protection Installed
Laundry Area

No GFCI protection present in recommended locations. Typical recommended locations are: Bathrooms, garages and accessory buildings, exterior locations, unfinished basements, crawlspaces, kitchens, laundry areas, utility areas, bar areas, and pool/spa areas. Recommend licensed electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles in recommended locations. 

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. Here is a link to read more about recommended locations.

Electric Electrical Contractor