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1234 Main St.
Vancouver, WA 98685
03/31/2020 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

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Agency Name

Congratulations on buying your new home! 

The process of buying a new home "should" be fun and exciting, but often times can be stressful. A home inspection is supposed to give you peace of mind, but often times has the opposite effect. You are required to absorb a lot of information in a short period of time. What should you do?.. Relax. The home inspectors job is to uncover and identify imperfections, problems, and potential problems. The good news however, is that most of the findings will consist of maintenance items, life expectancies, and minor imperfections. Information that's nice to know as you get aquatinted with your new home.

This Inspection Report is based on a visual, non-invasive inspection. While every effort is made to identify and report all current or potential issues with a home, please understand that there are areas that simply cannot be seen - behind walls, etc.  A home inspector is considered to be a "Generalist" not a "Specialist", in that the inspectors job is to identify and report potential issues rather than diagnose the specific cause or repairs. For this reason, you will find that it is often recommended to seek further evaluation by a qualified professional, such as an electrical, plumbing, or roofing contractor.

As a courtesy, the inspector may make comments regarding the number of occurrences and locations of defects. However, this is not a technically exhaustive inspection and all locations may not be noticed or mentioned in the report. Also, photos are used as a courtesy to help illustrate issues, but typically do not indicate all locations of an issue. It is recommended that a licensed contractor further review an issue to find all defects or locations.

The report includes Informational data on various components of the home, Limitations that affected the ability to inspect certain items/areas, and Recommendations for items that require immediate or future attention.

Observations and Recommendations are organized into three categories based on color: 

1) Minor Defects / Maintenance ItemsPrimarily comprised of minor defects and simple handyman or do-it-yourself maintenance items. These observations are more informational in nature and represent more of a future to-do list rather than something you might use as a negotiation or seller-repair item. A Summary Report can be created should you choose to view a report without these minor items or informational data.

2) Recommendations / Summary Items Most items fall into this category. These observations may require a qualified contractor to evaluate further and repair or replace.

3) Safety Items - This category is comprised of safety hazards and/or concerns that pose a current or potential risk to the home's occupants. 

Lower priority conditions contained in the body of the report that are neglected may become higher priority conditions. Do not equate low cost with low priority. Cost should not be the primary motivation for performing repairs. All repair and upgrade recommendations are important and need attention.

This report is a "snapshot" of the property on the date of the inspection. The structure and all related components will continue to deteriorate/wear out with time and may not be in the same condition at the close of escrow. As a homeowner, you should expect problems to occur. Roofs will leak, basements/crawl spaces may have water problems, and systems such as the furnace, water heater, etc. may fail without warning. Unfortunately, we cannot predict future events. For these reasons, you should keep a current comprehensive insurance policy in place.

Anywhere in the report that the inspector recommends further review, it is strongly recommended that this be done PRIOR TO THE CLOSE OF ESCROW. This report is not intended for use by anyone other than the client named herein. No other persons should rely upon the information in this report. Client agrees to indemnify, defend and hold inspector harmless from any third party claims arising out of client's unauthorized distribution of the inspection report.

With everything mentioned above, I encourage you to keep things in perspective. Don't give up on this home over things that don't really matter. It's not fair to demand that a seller address deferred maintenance, conditions already mentioned on the seller's discloser, or nit-picky items. Focus on the items that warrant attention. Your real estate agent will help you during this process, determining what items to focus on.

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Occupancy
Furnished, Occupied
Style
Ranch
Type of Building
Single Family
Weather Conditions
Clear
Temperature (approximate)
84 Fahrenheit (F)

2 - Roof

IN NI NP R
2.1 Coverings X X
2.2 Flashings X X
2.3 Roof Drainage Systems X X
2.4 Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations X X
Inspection Method
Walked Roof
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Flashings: Material
Metal

Recommend monitoring periodically and applying new sealant when needed.

Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Metal
Roof Drainage Systems: Roof Drainage
Gutter/Downspout
Number of Layers
Multiple locations
2
General View

We are not professional roofers. Feel free to hire one prior to closing. We do our best to inspect the roof system within the time allotted. We inspect the roof covering, drainage systems, flashings, skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations. We are not required to inspect antennae, interiors of flues or chimneys which are not readily accessible, and other installed accessories. This is not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes.
It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection. We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roofs age, repairs, etc... and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy.
 

Multiple Roofing Surfaces

There are currently multiple layers of roofing materials applied over this structure. In general, it is not a good roofing practice to overlay a traditional asphalt shingle roof versus a complete tear off and replacement with a new roof. Adding a second layer of shingles also voids the manufacturers warranty, and typically shortens the overall service life of the shingles. 

When the roof is replaced, all of these surfaces should be removed. Requirements vary between jurisdictions as to the maximum number of layers permitted.

Date on Plumbing Vent Flashing
Northeast

Date on plumbing vent flashing is 8/27/98. This is a good indication of when the roof was the last installed.

Coverings: Material
Asphalt, Architectural

Please refer to the seller's disclosure in reference to the roof system, age, condition, prior problems, etc. Only the property owner would have intimate, accurate knowledge of the roof system. For example, I can only guess the age. This inspection is not a guarantee that a roof leak in the future will not happen. Roofs leak. Even a roof that appears to be in good, functional condition may leak under certain circumstances. We will not take responsibility for a roof leak that happens in the future. This is not a warranty or guarantee of the roof system. 

Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Chimney

We are not certified chimney professionals. Only a level two inspection performed by a CSIA (Chimney Safety Institute of America) certified chimney sweep can determine the condition of the flue and wheather the fireplace is safe to use.
We recommend a cleaning and level two inspection of the fireplaces and chimney flues before closing. Clean chimneys don't catch on fire. More information about fireplaces and chimneys can be obtained at www.csia.com. 

Roof Drainage Systems: Underground Drains Not Visible
Multiple locations

The surface water drainage system on this property is below grade and cannot be viewed. Therefore, I am unable to determine if they are functioning properly.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Coverings

Exposed Fasteners
Multiple locations

Exposed fasteners were observed at one or more locations. Exposed fasteners will corrode over time, and expansion and contraction may eventually expand the nail holes enough to allow leakage. Recommend sealing on and around the nail with a proper sealant. All work should be performed by a qualified professional. 

Roof Roofing Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Coverings

Moss - Minor
Multiple locations

Minor/light moss build-up was observed at one or more locations on the roof shingles. Once established, moss acts like a sponge, soaking up and storing rainwater. Some of that water then wicks up under the shingles through capillary action and soaks into and through the roof underlayment, which is typically 15 or 30-pound felt. Eventually, it saturates the roof sheathing below. Never pressure wash asphalt shingles, as this can damage the shingles and shorten the overall service life. Depending on how steep the roof pitch, recommend removing moss by either a qualified handyman, or a roofing professional.

Roof Roofing Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.1.3 - Coverings

Roof Due for Replacememt

At the time of the inspection, asphalt composition shingles covering the roof of this home appeared to be at the end of their useful life. Recommend consulting with a qualified roofing contractor to discuss options and costs for replacement.

Roof Roofing Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.1.4 - Coverings

Tree Overhang
Southwest - Multiple Locations

One or more trees and limbs were in contact or in very close proximity to the roof. Physical damage to the roof will occur by branch/limb movement making contact with the roof system. Debris from trees can accumulate on shingles and promote algae growth, fill the gutter system and prevent proper shedding of rainwater, resulting in diminished life span of the roof system. Recommend that a professional arborist trim the invasive branches that are in contact with and overhanging on the roof. Homeowner should monitor condition for future problems and maintain adequate clearance as necessary. 

Yard scissors Tree Service
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Flashings

No Drip Edge Flashing
Multiple locations

There was no drip edge roof flashing installed. Drip edge flashing is the metal flashing located at the edge of a roofs exterior cover directly between the sheathing and the fascia board, which forms a drainage gap between the drip edge and the fascia board. As a result, the drainage improves water flow and protects the roof from potential water damage. When this roof covering was installed, drip edge and rake edge flashing was not required. As of July 1, 2013, drip edge flashing and rake edge flashing was required on all asphalt shingle roofing installations.

Roof Roofing Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Gutter; Debris - Moderate
Multiple locations

Moderate amount of debris had accumulated in the gutters. Debris needs to be cleaned to allow for proper water flow. In addition, debris in gutters can conceal rust, deterioration or leaks that are not visible until cleaned. I was unable to determine if such conditions exist. Recommend cleaning and maintaining the gutters as part of regular maintenance. 

Here is a DIY resource for cleaning your gutters. 

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Gutter; Debris - Major
South

Major amount of debris had accumulated in the gutters. Debris needs to be cleaned to allow for proper water flow. In addition, debris in gutters can conceal rust, deterioration or leaks that are not visible until cleaned. I was unable to determine if such conditions exist. Recommend cleaning and maintaining the gutters as part of regular maintenance. 

Here is a DIY resource for cleaning your gutters. 

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Rain Collar Boot(s); Deteriorating
Multiple locations

One or more rain collar boots were deteriorating and should be replaced. This area can leak if not corrected. Recommend further evaluation and repair by a qualified roofing contractor. 

Roof Roofing Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.4.2 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Minor Mortar Deterioration
Multiple locations

There was minor mirror deterioration of the chimney brick or crown. It is important to maintain brick and crown mortar to prevent further deterioration, and potential moisture issues with the chimney. Recommend further review by a qualified contractor and repair as necessary. 

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.4.3 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Chimney; Moss
Multiple locations

Minor moss build-up was observed at one or more locations on the chimney. Once established, moss acts like a sponge, soaking up and storing rainwater. If left untreated, it can lead to damaging/deteriorating the mortar joints. Recommend removing moss by a qualified handyman.

Wrenches Handyman

3 - Exterior

IN NI NP R
3.1 Siding, Flashing & Trim X X
3.2 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X X
3.3 Exterior Doors & Windows X X
3.4 Walkways, Patios & Driveways X X
3.5 Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps X X
3.6 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls X X
Inspection Method
Visual
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Wood
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Style
Panels
Exterior Doors & Windows: Exterior Entry Door
Aluminum, Glass, Wood, Sliding

Recommend re-keying all locks after moving into the home.

Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway & Walkway Material
Asphalt, Concrete, Gravel, Pavers
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Deck
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Wood
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Eaves, Soffits & Fascia
Inspection Restriction

Was unable to inspect underneath the deck due to lack of clearance. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Ground Clearance - Inadequate
Northwest - Multiple Locations

Inadequate clearance between siding and ground and/or concrete. The recommended minimum ground clearance is 6 inches between the bottom of siding and the ground. The minimum distance between the bottom of siding and concrete/pavers is 2 inches. Siding in contact with the ground or soil is a concern because that condition can provide direct access for wood destroying insects and moisture issues which can lead to wood rot/decay. Recommend further evaluation and/or correction by a qualified landscaper.

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding/Trim - Rot/Decay
West

Siding and/or trim was rotted/decayed in one or more areas. Decayed wood can potentially attract  pests such as insects. Recommend having a siding contractor further review siding and trim to find and repair all areas that need replacing. 

Siding Siding Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Seal Siding Penetration/Gap
Southwest

There were penetrations/gaps in the wall cladding in one or more areas where the hole or gap should be sealed with caulk/silicone, or a proper sealant to prevent water intrusion. All areas around utility penetrations, wiring, electrical fixtures and receptacles, etc. should be sealed and periodically inspected for necessary repairs to prevent water intrusion.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Faux Beam(s) - Rot/Decay
Northeast - Multiple Locations

One or more faux beams were rotted/decayed. These beams appeared for aesthetic use and not structural. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate & repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Exterior Doors & Windows

Head/Drip Cap Flashing - Missing
Multiple locations

One or more windows around the home appeared to be missing head and/or drip cap flashing. Flashing helps prevent moisture intrusion around the top of windows and doors. It is important to keep windows without head/drip cap flashing properly caulked to help prevent moisture intrusion. Recommend monitoring periodically and re-seal as needed.


Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Exterior Doors & Windows

Weatherstripping Damaged/Deteriorated/Missing
Garage

Weatherstripping was damaged/deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. Recommend replacement and installation of effective weatherstripping components by a qualified handyman.

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
3.3.3 - Exterior Doors & Windows

Glass Not Tempered

The glass in one or more exterior doos was not tempered, and should be. Glass within 24 inches of a door, is required to be tempered. I was unable to locate an etching or label indicating safety glass was installed in this area. Recommend further review and installing safety glass in this area by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Walkway - Uneven/Settling
Southwest

Walkway was uneven and/or settling in one or more areas. Also, there was a sprinkler head sticking up. Thanks This could be a potential trip hazard. Recommend correction by a qualified handyman. 



Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.4.2 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Driveway - Uneven/Settling
Multiple locations

Driveway was uneven and/or settling in one or more areas. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor as necessary. 


House front Driveway Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck - Loose Boards
Multiple locations

One or more deck boards were observed to be loose. Recommend they be refastened.

Here is a helpful article for minor DIY deck repair. 

House front 1 Deck Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.2 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck Due for Replacement

Deck had numerous rotted boards and should be replaced. From what I could see underneath the deck, (which was very limited due to lack of clearance) the joists and posts looked to be in fairly good condition. The boards may just need replacing. However, I recommend further review and repair by a qualified deck contractor. 

House front 1 Deck Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.3 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck Boards - Rotted
Multiple locations

One or more deck boards were showing signs of rot. Recommend a qualified deck contractor replace.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.4 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Direct Contact w/ Soil
Multiple locations

One or more areas of the deck, posts, or stair structure were in direct contact with the soil. This will contribute to deterioration of the wood over time. Recommend removing the soil if possible, and periodic monitoring/inspection of these areas to check for deterioration.

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Foundation Vent(s) - Below Grade

Foundation vent in one or more locations were below grade. This will allow water to enter the crawl space. Recommend correction by a qualified contractor.

Triangle Grading Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.6.2 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Vegetation
Multiple locations

Vegetation near/or in contact with the exterior walls. Water for plants will eventually soak into soil and may reach soil supporting the foundation. Excessively high moisture levels in soil supporting the foundation can effect its ability to support the weight of the structure above. In addition, vegetation in contact with siding can cause water damage by holding moisture against the home. Recommend removal of any vegetation near the foundation or in contact with the siding.

Tools Handyman/DIY

4 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

IN NI NP R
4.1 Foundation X X
4.2 Basements & Crawlspaces X X
4.3 Floor Structure X X
4.4 Wall Structure X
4.5 Ceiling Structure X X
4.6 Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement) X X
Flooring Insualtion
None
Inspection Method
Crawled
Foundation: Material
Concrete
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Dirt
Floor Structure: Material
Wood I-Joists, Wood Beams
Basements & Crawlspaces: Crawlspace Access Location
Front entryway closet
General View
Structure

We are not structural engineers. Feel free to hire one prior to closing to consult with and address concerns that you have with the property, even if I do not identify any structural material defects.
We inspect the structural components including foundation and framing by probing a representative number of structural components where deterioration is suspected or where clear indications of possible deterioration exist. Probing is not required where it could damage any finished surface or where no deterioration is visible. 

Foundation: Foundation Cracks Related to Tree Roots
Northeast
Foundation: Typical Vertical Foundation Cracks
South

There were some typical vertical cracks in the foundation wall and one or more areas. All concrete cracks, and these appear to be typical shrinkage cracks. No action is necessary.

Basements & Crawlspaces: Repairs Noted - Appear Adequate
North

An additional beam had been installed in one or more areas to support the structure. The repairs and supporting appeared to be adequate in general. 

Floor Structure: Sub-floor
Plank

The inspection of the floor structure was restricted by the insulation. Limited visual access. I'll move and probe a random sample of the insulation. However, much of the electrical wires, water and sewer pipes, heating ducts/pipes, and floor structure can not been seen. There may be components above the insulation that need improving or correcting that the inspector can not see. 

Sump Pump Not Inspected
Northeast

We do not test sump pumps. Recommend having a qualified contractor that deals specifically with sump pumps come out and verify it is operational and working properly. In addition, recommend consulting with a qualified drainage contractor to see if this is an adequate drainage solution, or if something else needs to be done.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Basements & Crawlspaces

Efflorescence
Multiple locations

Efflorescence noted on the crawlspace surface in one or more areas. This is a white powdery deposit that is a chemical reaction from wet soil that rest against the foundation on the exterior of the home. In most cases, this is not a drainage issue, but in some cases it can be. Recommend a qualified drainage contractor determine if a drainage issue is causing the efflorescence as necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Basements & Crawlspaces

Hatch - Missing Insulation

Crawlspace hatch(s) was missing insulation and/or weather stripping. This can lead to heat loss in the winter and cold air in the summer. Recommend correction.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
4.2.3 - Basements & Crawlspaces

Mice and/or Rat Droppings
Northwest

Apparent mice and/or rat droppings were observed in one or more areas. Recommend asking the seller if this is a past or present issue, and further evaluation by a qualified contractor as needed. In addition, recommend monitoring periodically. 

Pest control Pest Control Pro
$
Credit
Comment
4.3.1 - Floor Structure

Post(s) - Rotted
Northwest

One or more support posts were rotted/decayed towards the base. This will weaken and compromise the structural integrity of the post(s). Recommend further evaluation and correction by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Ceiling Structure

Insulation - Missing

Insulation was missing underneath the floor in the crawlspace. Although this may have been common at the time of construction, current building standards recommend a minimum of R25. Recommend a qualified insulation contractor install additional insulation.

House construction Insulation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
4.6.1 - Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement)

Exposed Soil
Multiple locations

Vapor barrier was out of place and/or missing in one or more areas exposing the soil. A vapor barrier is a thin layer of impermeable material, typically polyethylene sheeting, that helps reduce humidity levels in crawlspaces/unfinished basements by limiting moisture evaporation into the air from soil. Reducing humidity levels can help prevent conditions that encourage mold growth and wood decay. Recommend covering up sections of exposed soil.

Tools Handyman/DIY

5 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

IN NI NP R
5.1 Attic Insulation X X
5.2 Ventilation X
5.3 Exhaust Systems X X
5.4 Roof Decking, Joists & Trusses X X
5.5 Penetrations X
Attic Insulation: Approximate Average Depth
6”
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Fiberglass, Blown, Loose-fill
Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Soffit Vents, Roof Vents
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans
Fan Only, Fan with Light
General View
Inspection Method
Hallway
Attic Access
Attic Insulation: R-value
15

An insulating materials resistance to conductive heat flow is measured or rated in terms of its thermal resistance or R-value. The higher the R-value, the greater the insulating effectiveness. The R-value depends on the type of insulation, its thickness, and its density.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Attic Insulation

Hatch - Missing Insulation

Attic hatch (s) were missing insulation and/or weather stripping. This can lead to heat loss in the winter and cold air in the summer. Recommend correction. 

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
5.1.2 - Attic Insulation

Insufficient Insulation
Approximate Current R-Value: R15

Insulation depth was inadequate. Although depth may have been acceptable at the time of construction, current building standards recommends a minimum of R38. Recommend a qualified insulation contractor install additional insulation.



House construction Insulation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.1.3 - Attic Insulation

Missing Insulation
North

The attic was missing insulation in one or more areas. This condition can result in increased heating and cooling costs and reduced comfort levels. Recommend that insulation be properly distributed to cover all portions of the attic located above the home living space. All work should be performed by a qualified insulation contractor.

House construction Insulation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Exhaust Systems

Bathroom/Laundry Exhaust Fan Vent(s) - Not Sealed Properly
Southwest

One or more bathroom/laundry exhaust fan vents were not properly sealed through the roof. This can lead to excess moisture entering the attic, which can then lead to mold. Recommend correction by a qualified contractor.

Fire HVAC Professional
$
Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - Exhaust Systems

Vinyl/Foil Bathroom Exhaust Ducts
West

The bathroom vent exhaust duct was made of flexible vinyl or foil. Recommend replacement with either a smooth walled metal or semi-rigid metal exhaust pipe and having it insulated. Metal piping is less subject to damage, and insulating the piping will help prevent condensation forming inside the piping in colder months.


Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Roof Decking, Joists & Trusses

Discoloration
Multiple locations

Attic showed areas of discoloration and possible mold growth in one or more areas. Recommend further evaluation and/or correction by a qualified mold contractor. In addition, recommend finding source of moisture and/or lack of ventilation in attic space by a qualified professional.


Hardhat Mold Inspector

6 - Interior

IN NI NP R
6.1 Ceilings X
6.2 Walls X
6.3 Floors X
6.4 Windows (representative number) X X
6.5 Doors (representative number) X X
6.6 Steps, Stairways, Railings, Landings & Ramps X
6.7 Countertops & Cabinets X
6.8 Smoke Detectors X X
6.9 Carbon Monoxide Detectors X
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Gypsum Board
Walls: Wall Material
Gypsum Board
Floors: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Laminate, Linoleum or Vinyl
Windows (representative number): Window Manufacturer
Unknown
Windows (representative number): Window Type
Sliders
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Vinyl, Granite, Laminate
Smoke Detectors: Locations
Smoke Detectors: Manufacture Date
Hallway

7/12/2018

Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Location
Hallway
Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Manufacture Date

1/5/2019

Built Before 1978

Because this home was built before 1978, there is a good chance it has lead-based paint. In 1978, the federal government banned consumer uses of lead-containing paint as a potential health hazard, but some states banned it even earlier. Lead from paint, including lead-contaminated dust, is one of the most common causes of lead poisoning. Lead can be found in dust around the perimeter of the home exterior. It is a greater risk to young children than adults. You may wish to have the home inspected, or assessed for risk. Inspection: An inspection is a surface-by-surface investigation to determine whether there is lead-based paint in a home or child-occupied facility, and where it is located. Inspections can be legally performed only by certified inspectors or risk assessors. Lead based paint inspections determine the presence of lead-based paint. It is particularly helpful in determining whether lead-based paint is present prior to purchasing or renovating a home, and identifying potential sources of lead exposure at any time. Risk Assessment: A risk assessment is an on-site investigation to determine the presence, type, severity, and location of lead-based paint hazards (including lead hazards in paint, dust, and soil) and provides suggested ways to control them. Risk assessments can be legally performed only by certified risk assessors. Lead-based paint risk assessments are particularly helpful in determining sources of current exposure and in designing possible solutions.

Radon Testing
Southeast Bedroom

Radon gas is a naturally-occurring byproduct of the radioactive decay of Uranium in the soil. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, after smoking. The US EPA and Surgeon General strongly recommend taking further action when a homes radon test results are 4.0 pCi/l or greater. The concentration of radon in the home is measured in picocuries per liter of air (pCi/l). Radon levels less than 4.0 pCi/l still pose some risk and in many cases may be reduced. If the radon level in the home is between 2.0 and 4.0 pCi/l, the EPA still recommends that you consider fixing the home. The average indoor radon level is estimated to be about 1.3 pCi/l; roughly 0.4 pCi/l of radon is normally found in the outside air. The higher the homes radon level, the greater the health risk. Even homes with very high radon levels can be reduced to below 4.0 pCi/l, and many homes can be reduced to 2.0 pCi/l or less.

Ceilings: Popcorn Ceiling

Some ceiling areas contain a popcorn style ceiling texture. It is unknown whether this is older or newer ceiling covering. Some popcorn style ceiling covering up into the 1980s and before contained Asbestos. Asbestos was a very common product used in building materials and construction prior to the 1980s and is still in many structures today. Asbestos is only considered harmful if airborne (such as through grinding, cutting, construction demolition etc) and it is inhaled. Before disturbing or any demolition of the ceiling material, I recommend having the popcorn style ceiling cover tested for Asbestos.

For more reading about Asbestos and further information, you may visit this link. http://www.epa.gov/asbestos/pubs/ashome.html#3.

Walls: Repair(s) Noted
Dining Room

Repair(s) noted to the walls in one or more areas in the home. This is fore your information.

Smoke Detectors: Best Practice
According to the U.S Fire Administration (USFA), smoke detectors should be tested at least once a month and batteries should be replaced at least twice a year. A good way to help remember to do this is to change your batteries when you change your clocks for daylight saving time — when you spring forward or fall back.

According to the U.S. Fire Administration, most alarms have a life span of 8-10 years. After this time, the entire unit should be replaced. Most alarms have the date of manufacture inside the unit. If you cannot find the date, replace it. When you install the new alarm, write the purchase date inside the cover.
Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Best Practice

Carbon monoxide detectors last between five and seven years. The recommendation is to replace them every five years because their ability to detect carbon monoxide is questionable after that point.

Make sure to clear CO alarms of all dust and debris. Ensure that alarms are plugged all the way into the outlet or, if solely battery operated, have working batteries installed. Check or replace batteries when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall, and make certain each person in your home can hear the CO alarm sound from his or her sleeping room and that the sound is loud enough to awaken everyone.

If you have young children, you may want to consider an alarm that features both voice and location technology that tells you where in your home CO has been detected. Studies have shown that children ages 6 to 10 awaken more easily to a voice than to the traditional beep of an alarm.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - Windows (representative number)

Fogged Windows
Multiple locations

One or more windows around the home had a broken seal and there is some haziness between the panes. These windows still function fine as insulated windows, however statically they are not appealing and do not provide a clear view. Recommend having them repaired or replaced by a window contractor as necessary.


Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
6.4.2 - Windows (representative number)

Glass Not Tempered
Master Bathroom

The glass next to the front door was not tempered, and should be. Glass within 24 inches of a door, is required to be tempered. Recommend further evaluation and/or correction by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
6.4.3 - Windows (representative number)

Glass - Craked
Master Bedroom North

Glass was cracked in one or more windows. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
6.5.1 - Doors (representative number)

Door Doesn't Latch

One or more door(s) did not latch properly. Recommend a qualified handyman repair latch and/or strike plate.

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
6.5.2 - Doors (representative number)

Door Knob Loose
Master Bathroom

One or more door knob(s) were loose at the time of inspection. Recommend tightening. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
6.5.3 - Doors (representative number)

Door Sticks
Master Bathroom

One or more door(s) sticks and was tough to open and close. Recommend sanding down offending sides as needed.

Here is a helpful DIY article on how to fix a sticking door. 

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
6.8.1 - Smoke Detectors

Missing or Inadequate Number
Multiple locations

There was one smoke detector on each floor of the home. Although this was most likely adequate at the time of construction, current building standards require a smoke detector in each bedroom, immediate vicinity of all sleeping areas, living space, and on every level of the home, including the basement. Recommend correction by a qualified contractor.

Here is a link to Oregon law regarding smoke alarms.

Oregon smoke alarm law requirements

Tools Handyman/DIY

7 - Heating

IN NI NP R
7.1 Equipment X X
7.2 Normal Operating Controls X
7.3 Distribution Systems X X
7.4 Presence of Installed Heat Source in Each Room X
7.5 Vents & Flues X X
7.6 Fireplace, Woodstove X X
Location of Thermostat
Living Room
Equipment: Energy Source
Gas
Equipment: Heat Type
Forced Air
Equipment: Manufacture Date

2/2007

Equipment: Filter Location

Unknown 

Distribution Systems: Ductwork
Insulated
Presence of Installed Heat Source in Each Room: Functioning Properly
Multiple locations
AFUE Rating
Unknown

AFUE (Annual fuel utilization efficiency) is a metric used to measure furnace efficiency in converting fuel to energy. A higher AFUE rating means greater energy efficiency. 90% or higher meets the Department of Energy's Energy Star program standard.

HVAC Systems

We are not HVAC professionals. Feel free to hire one prior to closing.
We are not required to inspect the parts which are not readily accessible, like the heat exchanger, coil, compressor, or valves. We do not inspect the humidifier or dehumidifier, the electronic air filter, the solar space heating system, and determine heat or cooling supply adequacy or distribution balance.
Systems can fail prematurely with poor maintenance. We inspect the furnace/heat pump/AC system in accordance with the standards of practice, which means that we do not dismantle any components. We do not operate the system in heat mode when it is hot outside. We do not operate the system in cooling mode when it is too cool outside. It is essential that any recommendation that we make for service, correction, or repair be scheduled before the close of escrow, because the hired-professional could reveal additional defects or recommend further repairs that could affect your evaluation of the property.

This inspection is not a guarantee or warranty of the system. Things break. We do not accept responsibility for any problems that may happen in the future. Please consult the seller's disclosure. Only the present owner/occupant of the property will have intimate, accurate knowledge of the system, including past performance and age. For example, I can only guess at the exact age. 

Note: Health is a deeply personal responsibility. You should have the air quality tested and the ductwork cleaned as a prudent investment in environmental hygiene, especially if any family member suffers from allergies or asthma. 

Equipment: Brand
Goodman
Equipment: Filter

Theres no single answer to how often you should change your furnace filter. Below are some guidelines to help you know what to expect in terms of frequency. Every home runs their HVAC unit for different amounts of time, and every home has a unique amount of dirt, dust, pet dander and allergens in the air. A good rule of thumb is to change 1-2 inch filters every three months, 3-4 inch filters every six months, and 5 inch filters every 12 months.
Signs your air filter needs changed:
The filter is visibly dirty. Certainly if you cant see the material of the filter itself, it should be replaced.
The heating/cooling system is running more frequently than normal.
You home is more dusty than normal.
You notice strange smells, or a burning smell near you HVAC unit.

Fireplace, Woodstove: Type
Wood

The National Fire Protection Association Standard 211 says, "Chimneys, fireplaces, and vents shall be inspected at least once a year for soundness, freedom from deposits, and correct clearances. Cleaning, maintenance, and repairs shall be done if necessary." Recommend having the chimney inspected at least once a year.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Equipment

Approximate Age in Years: 12.5

The average life expectancy is estimated from 15 to 20 years. This particular unit may last for many more years, or it may fail very soon. Any system that is 15 years or older should be closely maintained, and budgeting for a replacement is recommended. 

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
7.1.2 - Equipment

Needs Servicing/Cleaning

Furnace should be cleaned and serviced annually. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean, service and certify furnace.

Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

Fire HVAC Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Distribution Systems

Insulation - Sagging
Multiple locations

Insulation was sagging from the air supply ducts in one more areas. This is fairly common with as much rain as we get during the winter months. Over time, the insulation absorbs moisture and starts to sag. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor reattch insulation to supply and return ducts for maximum efficiency.

Fire HVAC Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.3.2 - Distribution Systems

Insulation - Missing
Multiple locations

Insulation was missing in one or more areas around the air supply ducts. This will result in energy loss in the winter and summer months. Recommend further evaluation and correction by a qualified contractor.

Fire HVAC Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Vents & Flues

Type B Gas Vent - Inadequate Clearance

The type B gas appliance vent in one or more areas did not have the required clearance from combustible materials. One inch of clearance is required to combustible materials for type B gas vents. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend repair/adjustment to provide a minimum one inch clearance to combustible materials including roof sheathing and insulation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
7.6.1 - Fireplace, Woodstove

Seized Fireplace Damper
Living Room

The damper for the fireplace is rusted tight or seized (non-operational). Repairs should be made cell unit works properly. Recommend having a qualified contractor further review and repair as necessary.

Note: The damper lever was very rusted and bent slightly when I tried to close damper. 

Fire Fireplace Contractor

8 - Cooling

IN NI NP R
8.1 Cooling Equipment X X
8.2 Normal Operating Controls X
8.3 Distribution System X
8.4 Presence of Installed Cooling Source in Each Room X
Location of Thermostat
Living Room
Cooling Equipment: Location
Exterior North, Exterior East
Cooling Equipment: Manufacture Date

2/2008

Distribution System: Configuration
Central
Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric

Service Disconnect

Presence of Installed Cooling Source in Each Room: Functioning Properly
Multiple locations
Cooling Equipment: Brand
Goodman
Cooling Equipment: SEER Rating
13 SEER

Modern standards call for at least 13 SEER rating for new install. 

Read more on energy efficient air conditioning at Energy.gov.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Cooling Equipment

Approximate Age in Years: 11.5
Northeast

The average life expectancy is estimated from 7 to 15 years. This particular unit may last for many more years, or it may fail very soon. Any system that is 7 years or older should be closely maintained, and budgeting for a replacement is recommended. 


Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
8.1.2 - Cooling Equipment

Needs Servicing/Cleaning

AC unit or heat pump should be cleaned and serviced annually. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean, service and certify AC unit/heat pump.

Fire HVAC Professional

9 - Plumbing

IN NI NP R
9.1 Main Water Shut-off Valve X
9.2 Main Fuel Supply Shut-Off Valve X
9.3 Hot Water Equipement, TPR Valve, Seismic Straps, Controls, Flues & Vents X X
9.4 Water Supply & Distribution X
9.5 Fuel Storage and Distribution Systems X
9.6 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
9.7 Exterior Hose Bib X X
Main Fuel Supply Shut-Off Valve: Location Of Any Observed Fuel-Storage System
Unknown
Hot Water Equipement, TPR Valve, Seismic Straps, Controls, Flues & Vents: Capacity
50 gallons
Hot Water Equipement, TPR Valve, Seismic Straps, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacture Date

9/20/2013

Hot Water Equipement, TPR Valve, Seismic Straps, Controls, Flues & Vents: Power Source/Type
Gas
Water Supply & Distribution: Distribution Material
Hose, Copper
Water Supply & Distribution: Water Supply Material
Hose
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Drain Size
3"
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material
ABS
Water Supply & Distribution: Water Pressure Good
Approximate psi: 44

Recommended water pressure is between 40-80 psi.

Water Source
Appears to be:, Public

We are not professional plumbers. Feel free to hire one prior to closing.
All bathroom fixtures, including toilets, tubs, showers, and sinks are inspected. Approximately 5 minutes of water is run at each fixture.
Readily visible water-supply and drain pipes are inspected. We do not perform water leak tests on drain lines or shower pans. We simply look for active leaks, which is quite limited by our short time in the property. 

Main Water Shut-off Valve: Location
Curbside, Garage
Main Fuel Supply Shut-Off Valve: Main Gas Shut-off Location
Northeast
At Tank

The main fuel shut off is at the gas meter on the exterior of the home. Recommend knowing where the shutoff valve is located and having a wrench available to shut off gas quickly in case of an emergency.

Hot Water Equipement, TPR Valve, Seismic Straps, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Garage
Hot Water Equipement, TPR Valve, Seismic Straps, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
AO Smith

Recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. 

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help. 

Irrigation System Not Inspected

The home appeared to be equipped with an irrigation system. This system is mostly underground and not visible, is beyond the scope of the home inspection, and was not inspected. Recommend having an irrigation company test your irrigation system to verify it is working properly and does not have any leaks before closing. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Hot Water Equipement, TPR Valve, Seismic Straps, Controls, Flues & Vents

Approximate Age in Years: 7
Garage

The average life expectancy is estimated from 6 to 12 years. This particular unit may last for many more years, or it may fail very soon. Any system that is 6 years or older should be closely maintained, and budgeting for a replacement is recommended. 


Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
9.3.2 - Hot Water Equipement, TPR Valve, Seismic Straps, Controls, Flues & Vents

Above 120 Degrees Fahrenheit
Approximate Degrees Fahrenheit:

Water temperatures above 120 degrees Fahrenheit are considered a scalding and burn hazard, especially for children. Recommend lowering the water heater thermostat to 120 degrees Fahrenheit or below. 

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends adjusting all hot water heaters to a maximum temperature of 120 degrees Fahrenheit.


Pipes Plumbing Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
9.3.3 - Hot Water Equipement, TPR Valve, Seismic Straps, Controls, Flues & Vents

Bollard Missing

Missing bollard in front of water heater and/or furnace. A bollard is a metal pipe that is filled with concrete to protect the water heater/furnace from a vehicle running into it. Recommend having a qualified professional install a bollard.
Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
9.7.1 - Exterior Hose Bib

Loose Minor
West

Base of the hose bib was slightly loose. Recommend tightening.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
9.7.2 - Exterior Hose Bib

Missing Anti-Siphon Device
West - Multiple Locations

One or more hose bibs were missing an anti-siphon device. An anti-siphon device prevents unsanitary water from being pulled back through a garden hose and contaminating your water system. Otherwise known as a "cross connection." Recommend installing an anti-siphon device on each hose bib that does not have one.

Here's an article explaining the purpose of anti-siphon devices. Click Here

Tools Handyman/DIY

10 - Electrical

IN NI NP R
10.1 Service Entrance Conductors X X
10.2 Electric Meter and Base, Main Disconnect, Main and Distribution Panels, Grounding X
10.3 Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device X X
10.4 Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses X X
10.5 Lighting, Switches & Receptacles (GFCI & AFCI X X
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Overhead, Aluminum, 120 Volts, 240V
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Inspected

The main electrical panel was inspected.

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Manufacturer
Cutler Hammer
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Location
Not Present
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wire
Copper
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Romex
Electric Meter and Base, Main Disconnect, Main and Distribution Panels, Grounding: Meter
Southwest
Electrical

We are not electricians. Feel free to hire an electrician prior to closing.
If we feel that it is safe enough to open the electrical panel, we will check the interior components of service panels and sub panels, the conductors, and the over-current protection devices. Inside the house, we will check a representative number of installed lighting fixtures, switches, and receptacles. This is not an exhaustive inspection of every component and installation detail. There will be receptacles, switches and lights that we will not have time to inspect. Ask property owner about all of the wall switches.
Therefore, it is essential that any recommendations that we may make for correction should be completed before the close of escrow, because an electrician could reveal other problems or recommend repairs. 

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Garage

Recommend maintaining proper clearance around electrical panels, which is 30 inches wide measured either from the centerline (15 inches each way) or from one edge of the panel, 3 feet to the front of the panel, and 6 feet 6 inches high to the floor. It is important to keep this area clear for working access and for quick access in the event of an emergency.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - Service Entrance Conductors

Missing Anti-Oxidant Paste

Service entrance conductors were missing anti-oxidant paste. Aluminum entrance service conductors can oxidize over time, which can lead to the terminal overheating. Recommend applying anti-oxidant past by a qualified electrician. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Need Final Electrical Inspection

There is no final electrical inspection or permit sticker at the electrical panel. Contact the builder and ensure that the final electrical inspection is completed and signed off by the local Authority.

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Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

No AFCI

No arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection was installed to protect electrical circuits in bedrooms. This was not required at the time of construction, however, safety standards with which new homes are built today, require the installation of AFCI protection of all bedroom electrical receptacles. This type of protection is designed to detect electrical arcing, which is a potential fire hazard. Although AFCI protection was not required at the time the home was originally constructed, as general knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time, building standards have changed to reflect current understanding. Recommend updating the existing bedroom receptacles to provide AFCI protection by a licensed electrician.

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
10.5.1 - Lighting, Switches & Receptacles (GFCI & AFCI

No GFCI in Required Area
Exterior, Garage

No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection at electrical outlets in one or more areas currently required to prevent shock hazards. GFCI protection may not have been required at the time the home was built, but current standards require GFCI protection at receptacles located at kitchen countertops and islands, bathrooms, garages, the homes exterior, interior receptacles located within 6 feet of a plumbing fixture, and crawlspaces, as a safety feature. Recommend adding GFCI protection to these areas that don't have it as a safety upgrade.

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
10.5.2 - Lighting, Switches & Receptacles (GFCI & AFCI

Cover plates loose
Dining Room Northeast - Multiple Locations

One or more cover plates were loose at the time of inspection. Recommend tightening.

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
10.5.3 - Lighting, Switches & Receptacles (GFCI & AFCI

Receptacle No Power
Front Door

One or more receptacles did not have power at the time of inspection. Recommend further review and correction as necessary.

Electric Electrical Contractor

11 - Bathrooms

IN NI NP R
11.1 Floors, Walls and Ceilings X
11.2 Countertops & Cabinets X
11.3 Toilets and Sinks X X
11.4 Showers and Bathtubs X X
11.5 Doors & Windows X
11.6 Ventilation X X
11.7 Trim X
Floor Coverings
Vinyl
Wall Material
Gypsum Board
General View

We are not plumbers. Feel free to hire a plumber prior to closing.
All bathroom fixtures, including toilets, tubs, showers, and sinks are inspected. Approximately 5 minutes of water is run at each fixture. Readily visible water-supply and drain pipes are inspected. Normal foot pressure is applied around the base of each toilet, tub, and shower to check for deteriorated flooring. Re-grouting and sealant around the tub shower, and fixtures should be considered routine maintenance. We do not perform water leak tests on drain lines or shower pans. We simply look for active leaks, which is quite limited by our short time on the property. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
11.3.1 - Toilets and Sinks

Sink Stop Not Working
Master Bathroom

Sink stops did not operate properly at one or more plumbing fixtures. This is a minor defect. Recommend repair as necessary.

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
11.3.2 - Toilets and Sinks

Toilet Loose
Master Bathroom

Toilet bowl was loose at the floor flange connection. Most likely, the integrity of the wax ring has been compromised. Recommend replacing the wax ring, and tightening this connection to prevent leaks by a qualified plumbing contractor. In addition, recommend checking for any damage to the underlying materials while toilet is removed, and repairing any damage that may have occurred. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
11.4.1 - Showers and Bathtubs

Caulk/Sealant Deteriorating

Caulk/sealant was deteriorating along where the floor meets the tub and/or where the tub meets the wall. Recommend applying new caulk/sealant to prevent water damage to the underlying materials.

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
11.4.2 - Showers and Bathtubs

Tub Wall Edge Not Level
Master Bathroom

Top wall edge of the bathtub was not level and tilted toward the wall, allowing water to pool up against the wall. Recommend monitoring this areas, and making sure to use a proper caulk/sealant when needed to discourage water from damaging underlying materials. 

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
11.4.3 - Showers and Bathtubs

Shower Hose

The shower has a hand-held sprayer with a hose long enough allowing it to hang below the top rim of the bathtub, which is a potential cross contamination hazard. Recommend verifying there is a vacuum breaker on the sprayer, or remove the hose and sprayer and replace it with a normal shower head.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Credit
Comment
11.6.1 - Ventilation

Exhaust Fan - Noisy
Hallway - Multiple Locations

Exhaust fan was excessively noisy at the time of inspection. Recommend correction by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Kitchen & Built-in Appliances

IN NI NP R
12.1 Floors, Walls & Ceiling X
12.2 Dishwasher X
12.3 Refrigerator X X
12.4 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
12.5 Garbage Disposal X
12.6 Built-in Microwave X
12.7 Countertops & Cabinets X X
12.8 Sink (s) & Plumbing X
Dishwasher: Brand
Kitchenaid
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
Maytag
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Electric
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Refrigerator: Brand
LG
General View

We check some of the appliances only as a courtesty to you. Appliances are not within the scope of a home inspection. We are not required to inspect the kitchen appliances. We do not evaluate them for their performance nor for the accuracy of their settings or cycles. Appliances break. We assume no responsibility for future problems with the appliances.
If they are older than ten years, they may well exhibit decreased efficiency. Also, many older ovens are not secured to the wall to prevent tipping. Be sure to check that an anti-tip bracket has been installed, especially if children are in the house. 

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
12.3.1 - Refrigerator

Water/Ice Dispenser Not Working

The water and/or ice dispenser was not working at the time of inspection. Recommend repair by a qualified professional. 

Wash Appliance Repair
$
Credit
Comment
12.7.1 - Countertops & Cabinets

Cabinets Damaged - General Wear

Kitchen cabinets had damage from general wear in one or more areas. Recommend further evaluation and correction by a qualified contractor as needed.

House building Cabinet Contractor

13 - Garage & Carports

IN NI NP R
13.1 Ceiling X
13.2 Floor X X
13.3 Walls & Fire Wall X X
13.4 Garage Door & Opener X X
13.5 Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home) X X
Garage Door
Wall Mount Remote
Garage Door & Opener: Material
Wood
Garage Door & Opener: Type
Automatic
General View

We do not evaluate or measure the fire-ratings of the drywall/plaster in the garage or the rating of the door between the garage and the house. Different townships require different ratings. Ideally, there should be a 5/8-inch Type X drywall or equivalent on the walls and ceiling that separate the garage from habitable rooms. There should also be a 20-minute fire-rated door separating the house and garage.
We check for breaches of the firewall. We do not pressure test the garage door openers. 

Ceiling: Signs of Moisture Intrusion - Dry
Multiple locations

Garage walls and/or ceiling showed signs of moisture intrusion. Used a moisture meter to test for moisture and moisture levels were approximately 6%, which is normal, or not elevated.

Inspection Restriction

Home owner items were stored on all sides of the garage, making many areas of the floor and walls inaccessible. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
13.2.1 - Floor

Cracking - Minor
Multiple locations

Minor cosmetic cracks were observed on the garage floor, which indicates normal settling. Recommend monitoring periodically. 

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
13.3.1 - Walls & Fire Wall

Gap in Wall/Ceiling
Multiple locations

There was a gap in a penetration through the wall attached to living space and/or ceiling. This area should be sealed with a fire rated sealant, to help slow down the spread of a fire from the garage to the living space, in the event a fire ever started. Recommend correction by a qualified handyman.

Note: Attic hatch was missing at the time of inspection. Recommend asking seller if they have it somewhere. If not, replace hatch with minimum 1/2" drywall. 


Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
13.4.1 - Garage Door & Opener

Photoelectric Sensor - Missing

Missing photoelectric sensor. This sensor is designed to detect an obstruction while the door is closing and to send a signal to the garage door operator to reverse the door movement, thus avoiding a potential entrapment situation. Although at the time this garage door was installed, this sensor may not have been required, it is an important safety feature. Recommend correction by a qualified garage door contractor.


Garage Garage Door Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
13.5.1 - Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home)

Hinges Not Self-Closing

The door in the wall between the garage and the home living space did not have operable self-closing hinges as is required by generally-accepted current safety standards.
For safety reasons, we recommend action be taken to make the garage door compliant. 

DIY Resource Link.

Information from FEMA on garage fires


Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor

14 - Laundry Room

IN NI NP R
14.1 Floors, Walls & Ceiling X
14.2 Doors & Windows X
14.3 Countertops & Cabinets X
14.4 Dryer Venting & Connections X X
14.5 Plumbing X
14.6 Washing Machine X X
Dryer Power Source
220 Electric
Dryer Vent
Vinyl (Flex)
Floor Coverings
Linoleum
Dryer Venting & Connections: Dryer Vent

The U.S. Fire Administration reports that every year more than 2,900 home fires are started by clothes dryers, and the leading cause of these fires is a buildup of lint, due to lack of simple maintenance on the part of the owner. Each load of laundry that passes through your washing machine and makes its way to your clothes dryer contains lint, mostly small particles of cloth and fiber that are loosened from clothing by the action of agitating water. The problem is that not all of the lint is caught by the removable lint filter, but the lint that passes beyond the filter and is trapped in crevices deep inside the lint filter trap and all along the dryer vent hose or duct as it makes its way to the outside vent opening. Recommend having your dryer vent ducts cleaned annually.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • R = Recommendations
$
Credit
Comment
14.4.1 - Dryer Venting & Connections

Needs Cleaning
Southwest

Unable to determine when the last time the dryer ducts had been cleaned. Lint buildup in the dryer vent ductwork can be a fire hazard. Recommend having a qualified contractor clean dryer ducts, and have them cleaned annually thereafter. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
14.6.1 - Washing Machine

Drain Pan Missing
Laundry Room

The washing machine was missing a drain pan. Installing a washer drain pan is an easy, inexpensive way to prevent water damage from a leaking washing machine. This is especially important when washers are on the 2nd floor of a home. Recommend installing a drain pan after move in.

Tools Handyman/DIY