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1234 Main St.
Greenwich CT 06831
01/22/2019 9:00AM

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agent

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Agency Name

1 - Inspection Details

Standards of Practice
New York
Building Type
Single Family (2 Story)
Approximate Square Footage
2500 Square Feet
Approximate Year of Construction
1974
Approximate Age of Building
43 Years Old
Occupancy
Unoccupied
Outside Temperature
32 Fahrenheit
Weather Conditions
Sun
Attending The Inspection
Buyer, Buyers Agent
Client Present for Inspection
Yes
Significant Precipitaton in Last 3 Days
Yes
Enviornmental Testing
Radon Testing - Results Will Follow
Pool Disclaimer

The pool and pool equipment were not part of this home inspection.  Recommend having a qualified pool company review and inspect the pool and its components for compliance with safety ordinances and to make sure the pool equipment is functioning as intended. Safety requirements for fences, gates, pool drains, electrical safety and pool safety change all the time - make sure your pool is safe by today's standards.


Thank you for choosing Sterling Home Inspections (SHI) to inspect your new home! Please carefully read your entire Inspection Report. If you have any questions throughout the closing process don't hesitate to ask. This report is based on an inspection of the visible portion of the structure at the time of the inspection with a focus on safety and function, not on current building or municipality codes. Any and all evaluations or repairs recommended by SHI should be carried out prior to closing. We recommend that you and/or your representative carry out a final walk-through inspection immediately before closing to check the condition of the property.


The following definitions of comment descriptions represent this inspection report. All comments by the inspector should be considered before purchasing this home. Any recommendations by the inspector to repair or replace suggests a second opinion or further inspection by a qualified contractor. All costs associated with further inspection fees and repair or replacement of item, component or unit should be considered before you purchase the property.

Inspected (IN) = I visually observed the item, component or unit and if no other comments were made then it appeared to be functioning as intended at the time of inspection allowing for normal wear and tear.
Not Inspected (NI) = I did not inspect this item, component or unit and made no representations of whether or not it was functioning as intended and will state a reason for not inspecting.
Repair or Replace (RR) = The item, component or unit is not functioning as intended, or needs further inspection by a qualified contractor. Items, components or units that can be repaired to satisfactory condition may not need replacement.
Suggested Improvement (SI) = Indicates recommendations to upgrade items for safety, convenience or energy efficiency.

This report and the inspection were performed in accordance with the code of ethics and standards of practice set for by NY Department of State.  To review the standards of practice which dictate what is and what is not inspected during the home inspection visit: https://www.dos.ny.gov/licensing/homeinspect/hinspect_ethics.html  These same standards are included at each section of the report at the 'standards' tab.

Note: Photographs accompanying comments in this report should be considered to be examples of the item or condition being described.  Not every instance of an item or condition are necessarily represented with individual photographs.


CONCERN CATEGORIES

MAINTENANCE ITEM

  • Maintenance items, DIY items, or recommended upgrades will fall into this category. These concerns will ultimately lead to Moderate Concerns and Major Concerns if left neglected for extended periods of time. These Concerns may be more straightforward to remedy.

RECOMMENDATION

  • Most items will fall into this category. Concerns that inevitably lead to, or directly cause (if not addressed in a timely manner) adverse impact on the value of the home, or unreasonable risk (Unsafe) to people or property. These concerns typically require further evaluation or may be more complicated to remedy.

SAFETY HAZARD

  • A specific issue with a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk to people or property. These Concerns are often imminent or may be very difficult or expensive to remedy.

2 - Roof System, Drainange and Roof Penetrations

Roof Style
Gable
Roofing Material
Wood Shakes
Number of shingle layers:
One
The roof was inspected:
From the ground, Using binoculars
Drainage system description:
Gutters and downspouts installed
Gutters/downspout material:
Aluminum
Sky Light(s)
None
Chimney (exterior)
Brick
Roofing Limitations

The roof of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Roof coverings and skylights can appear to be leak proof during inspection and weather conditions. Our inspection makes an attempt to find a leak but sometimes cannot. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

The home inspector shall observe and report on readily accessible: roofing materials and condition; roof drainage systems; flashings; skylights chimneys and roof penetrations; and the methods used to observe the roof and the condition of the roof. Home inspectors are not required to observe and report on: antennas, lightning arrestors, flue or chimney interiors; other installed accessories. Home inspectors are not required to determine: the remaining life expectancy of roof coverings, manufacturers' defects, installation methods or to determine the number of roof layers present. Home inspectors are not required to: walk on or access a roof where to do so could result in damage to the roof or endanger the health and safety of the home inspector.

Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Wood Shake Roof

End Of Life

The wood shake roof covering appeared to be at the end of its long term service life and was in need of replacement.  The wood shakes exhibited widespread splitting, decay and rot with interlayment exposed in several areas.  A general rule of thumb is complete replacement is waranted when the percentage of cracked, damaged or missing shingles exceedes aproxmately 30 percent of the roof-covering material.  I recommend you consult with a qualified roofing contractor to discuss options and costs for roof replacement.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Roof Drainage System

Gutters Full

The roof gutters and downspouts were completely filled with leaf debris and no performing their intended functions. Recommend having gutters replaced when roof is replaced, installing larger gutters to better capture the rain water at the roof thereby diverting water away from the foundation and sidewalls

Contractor Qualified Professional

3 - Exterior Components

Siding Style
Clapboard
Siding Material
Wood
Exterior Entry Doors
Wood
Appurtenance
Deck with steps
Driveway
Asphalt
Retaining Walls:
Concrete
Exterior Component Limitations

The exterior components of the home were inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.


The home inspector shall observe and report on: all attached or adjacent decks, balconies, stoops, steps, porches and railings;  vegetation and trees that adversely effect the building; grading and drainage directly adjacent to the foundation; driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls with respect to their effect on the condition of the building. The home inspector is not required to observe and report on: fences and privacy walls; geological conditions; soil conditions; recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); the health and condition of trees shrubs and other vegetation; detached buildings or structures other than garages or carports; the presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks; erosion control and earth stabilization measures. The home inspector is not required to: move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice or debris that obstructs access or visibility.


Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Deck, Porch & Patio

Rot at Deck Joists

The cantilevered wood supports for the deck at the rear of the home were showing signs of heavy wood rot. A cantilevered deck relies on the integrity of the wood supports as the decks only means of support. When wood rot is found in the supports the deck is no longer safe for use. Recommend having a qualified person remove and rebuild the deck as a conventional deck with an attached ledger board and support posts at the outer end of the deck

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Deck, Porch & Patio

Loose Railings

The railings at the deck are not safely attached to the deck and can easily be pushed off of the deck. Recommend having the railings replaced with new railings that conform to current building and safety standards. This is a fall hazard that needs to be corrected.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.3 - Deck, Porch & Patio

Missing Posts

The deck main beams at the new section of the deck are missing support posts where they meet the house. Recommend having posts installed under the beams as needed for proper support.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Driveway & Walkways

Driveway Well Worn

The asphalt driveway was well worn with several large cracks and depressions.  As driveways age they become brittle and develop more cracks and holes until the driveway is repaved or replaced.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Exterior Electrical

Damaged Outlets

There were damaged outlet boxes, open/uncovered boxes and open pull boxes around the exterior of the home.
Recommend having all repaired with new waterproof covers as needed for safety

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.9.1 - Retaining walls (with respect to their effect on the condition of the building)

Retaining Wall Damage

The retaining wall at the bottom ofthe driveway was deteriorated and in need of repair or replacement. Recommend having further evaluated by a qualified person to identify if patching is possible or if replacement is needed.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Wall Exteriors

Exterior wall-covering Material
Wood Clapboard Siding
Exterior Doors:
Wood
Exterior Patio Door Material
Plastic, Aluminum
Exterior Window Material
Aluminum Clad, Vinyl
Wall Exterior Limitations

The wall exteriors of the home were inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

The home inspector shall observe and report on: all exterior walls and coverings, flashing and trim; all exterior doors; all eaves, soffits and fascias where accessible from the ground level; the condition of a representative number of windows. The home inspector is not required to observe and report on: screening, shutters, awnings and other seasonal accessories; the operation of security locks, devices or systems; out buildings other than garages and carports; the presence of safety-type glass or the integrity of thermal window seals or damaged glass.


Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Door & Window Exteriors

Kitchen Door

The kitchen sliding doors were showing signs of wood rot along their bottom edges. Recommend having repaired as needed.

Hammer Carpenter
Credit
Comment
4.1.2 - Door & Window Exteriors

Window Damaged

Rot was found on a window along the right side of the home and along the deck doors. Repair as needed

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Exterior Trim

Failing Paint

The paint or stain finish in some areas was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning) Exterior Trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture. Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the building exterior where necessary and per standard building practices.  Any repairs needed to the trim should be made prior to this.
Paint roller Painter

5 - Garage

Garage Limitations

The garage of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

The home inspector shall observe and report on: all garage doors and operators; floor, wall and ceiling surfaces; operation of all accessible conventional doors and door hardware; vehicle door condition and operation; garage electrical; garage door safety devices; and proper firewall separation from living space. The home inspector is not required to: test the operation of garage door remote control devices or determine the remaining life of garage doors, openers or other garage components.

6 - Structural Components

Foundation Configuration:
Basement, Crawlspace
Foundation Method/Materials:
Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU) foundation walls
Method used to Inspect Crawlspace:
Inspector entered the crawlspace
Main Floor Structure- Intermediate Support:
Built-up girder
Exterior Wall Structures:
Conventional 2x4 Wood Frame
Typical Ceiling Structure:
Not visible
Structural Limitations

The structure of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

The home inspector shall observe and report on: any deteriorated or damaged structural component including the building foundation and framing where visible: the floor structure; the wall structure; the ceiling structure; the roof structure.   The home inspector is not required to: Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely effect the health of the home inspector or other persons; enter crawlspaces with less than 48" in headroom or with standing water or other dangerous conditions.

Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Floor Structure

Sill Plate Rot

Sill plates along the rear of the building have some rot at different location. Recommend having the damaged wood framing members
replaced as needed

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - Report Any Signs of Water Intrusion or Unusually Damp Areas

Damp Walls

There were signs of moisture along the foundation walls at the front of the building. Recommend having a qualified person repair the problem as needed.

Contractor Qualified Professional

7 - Plumbing Systems

Water Source
Well
Water Distribution Pipes:
1/2-inch and 3/4-inch copper
Plumbing Water Supply (into home)
Poly
Plumbing Waste
PVC
Sewage System Type:
Septic system (not inspected)
Water Heater Power Source
Electric
Manufacturer
GE
Water Heater Capacity
50 Gallon
Water Heater Age
9 Years Old
Water Heater Location
Basement
Water Treatment Systems/Filters:
Sediment Filter
Plumbing Limitations

The plumbing in the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Washing machine drain line for example cannot be checked for leaks or the ability to handle the volume during drain cycle. Older homes with galvanized supply lines or cast iron drain lines can be obstructed and barely working during an inspection but then fails under heavy use. If the water is turned off or not used for periods of time (like a vacant home waiting for closing) rust or deposits within the pipes can further clog the piping system. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

Private On-site Wastewater Treatment (Septic) System: Septic tank installed
The onsite wastewater treatment system included a underground septic tank that uses gravity to settle solids to the bottom of the tanks. Septic tanks have little dissolved oxygen and solids should be pumped out on a schedule that varies with tank size and frequency of use. Inspection of septic systems lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. Because these can be one of the more expensive systems in the home to repair or replace, I strongly recommend that you have it Inspected by a qualified specialist.

The home inspector shall observe and report on the following visibly and readily accessible components and systems:  Interior water supply and distribution system, including faucets and fixtures; interior drain, waste, and vent system; water heating equipment and vents and pipes; fuel storage and fuel distribution systems and components; drainage sumps, sump pumps, ejector pumps and related piping; active leaks. The home inspector shall operate all readily accessible: fixtures and faucets; domestic hot water systems; drain pump and waste ejector pumps; the water supply at random locations for functional flow; waste lines from random sinks tubs and showers for functional drainage. Home inspectors shall describe: the water supply, drain waste and vent piping materials; the water heating equipment including capacity and the energy source and the location of the main water shut-off valves; weather the the water supply and waste disposal systems are public, private or unknown.  Home inspectors are not required to: operate any main, branch or fixture valve, except faucets, or to determine water temperature; observe and report on any system that is shut down or secured; on any plumbing component that is not readily accessible; on any exterior plumbing component or system or any underground drainage system; fire sprinkler systems; evaluate the potability of any water supply; observe and report on any water conditioning equipment including softener and filter systems; private water supply systems; test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage; observe and report on any gas supply system for materials, installation or leakage; evaluate any part of water wells and related components, the quality or quantity of water from on site water supplies or the condition or operation of on-site sewage disposal systems such as cesspools, septic tanks or any other related component; observe and report on any spas, saunas, hot-tubs or jetted tubs; any solar water heating systems.

Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Main Water Supply

Low Water Flow

The water pressure in the home was not good. Water only ran from a faucet for a few seconds before the pressure disappeared. I recommend having a qualified well company further evaluate to determine the cause of low/ no pressure and the costs to fix or repair.

Water Well Service Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.1.2 - Main Water Supply

Poor Pressure

Without adequate water flow at the fixtures I was unable to determine of there were any leaks in the drain and waste system.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Electric Water Heater

Water Heater NG
Basement

The water to the water heater was turned off as was the power to the water heater. The water heater showed signs of leaking (rust stains on floor around water heater) and will need to be replaced. the installed heater is no longer any good.

Contractor Qualified Professional

8 - Electrical Systems

Electrical Service Conductors
Below ground, Aluminum, 220 volts
Location Of Main Electrical Panel
Basement
Panel Type
Circuit breakers
Branch wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper
Wiring Methods
Romex, Metal Clad
Service Panel Ampacity:
150 amps
Service Panel Manufacturer:
PushMatic
Number of Sub-panels:
1
Ground Fault Circuit Interruptor (GFCI) Protection:
Partial
Arc Fault Circuit Interruptor (AFCI) Protection:
NO
Smoke Detectors
Present
Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Present
Electrical Limitations

The electrical system of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Outlets were not removed and the inspection was only visual. Any outlet not accessible (behind the refrigerator for example) was not inspected or accessible. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Alarm Age
Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may have been installed more than 10 years ago. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA.  Recommend having the alarms further evaluated by an alarm company and repaired or replaced as needed.

The home inspector shall observe and report on readily accessible and observable portions of: the service drop; service entrance conductors, cables and raceways; the main and branch circuit conductors for property over current protection and condition by by visual observation; service grounding; interior components of service and sub-panels; a representative number of installed lighting fixtures, outlets and switches; a representative number of ground fault circuit interrupters. Home inspectors shall describe: amperage and voltage rating of the service; the location of main disconnects and sub-panels; the presence of aluminum branch wiring; the presence or absence of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors; the general condition and type of visible branch circuit conductors that may constitute a hazard to the occupant of the residential building by reason of improper use or installation of the electrical component. The home inspector is not required to: observe and report on remote control devices; alarm systems or components; low voltage wiring systems and components such as doorbells and intercoms; ancillary wiring systems not not part of the primary electrical power distribution system; insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels; activate electrical systems or branch circuits which are not energized; test every switch, receptacle and outlet; remove switch and outlet plates; measure voltage amperage or impedance; observe and report on any solar powered equipment or standby emergency generators or components; test or operate any over current device except ground fault circuit interrupters; dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels; any solar powered electrical component or any standby generators or components: telephone, security, cable TV, intercoms, or built-in vacuum equipment; low voltage relays; low voltage relays, smoke and/or heat detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, antennas, electrical de-icing tapes, lawn sprinkler wiring, swimming pool wiring or any system controlled by timers.  

Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Main & Distribution Panels

Bonded Neutral at Sub Panel
Basement

Neutral and equipment ground wires were bonded (connected) at the electrical sub-panel. This should only occur in the main service panel, not sub-panels, and is a shock hazard.  Neutral wires should be attached to "floating" neutral bar and not bonded to the panel, and grounding wires should be attached to a separate grounding bar bonded to the sub-panel.  Recommend having a licensed electrician repair as per standard building practices.




Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.2.2 - Main & Distribution Panels

Panel Slost Missing
Basement

One or more slots where circuit breakers are normally installed were open in the front of the electrical panel.  Energized equipment was exposed and is a shock hazard.  Recommend that a licensed electrician install closure covers where missing.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.2.3 - Main & Distribution Panels

Missing Knockouts
Basement

One or more knockouts were missing from the electrical panel.  Holes in the panel enclosures are a potential fire hazard if a malfunction ever occurs inside the panel.  Recommend that a licensed electrician install knockout covers where missing as per standard building practices.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.2.4 - Main & Distribution Panels

Pushmatic

Suggested Improvement - The main electrical panel was a "Pushmatic" brand panel.  These panels are found in older electrical systems. Their circuit breakers are known to become very stiff and difficult to operate or reset over time.  Breakers may remain on after attempts to trip or turn them off have been made.  They also have an indicator flag that falsely indicated the on/off tripped state.  The breakers rely on thermal tripping only, whereas modern breakers have both thermal and magnetic trip mechanism.  These conditions pose shock and fire hazards. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace pushmatic brand panels with more modern panels that off more flexibility for new, safer protective technologies like GFCIs (ground fault circuit interrupts) and AFCIs (arc fault circuit interrupts).
Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Connected Devices, Fixtures & Outlets

Missing Cover Plates
Attic and Crawlspace

One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles (outlets) or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.4.2 - Connected Devices, Fixtures & Outlets

Generator

The generator wiring was done improperly and is unsafe to use. This was not done by an electrician and was not inspected by the electrical inspector. Recommend immediate removal by a qualified person.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.8.1 - Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors

SIP Smokes

Suggested Improvement - By current safety standards smoke alarms were missing from some bedrooms, from hallways leading to bedrooms, on one or more levels, in the attached garage. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning alarm exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, on each level and in any attached garage.  For more information visit: http://www.sterlinghomeinspections.com/index/#/smoke-alarms/
Credit
Comment
8.8.2 - Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors

SI Carbon

Suggested Improvement - Carbon monoxide alarms were missing from one or more sleeping areas, on one or more levels.  This is a potential safety hazard.  Most states or municipalities require CO alarms to be installed in the vicinity of each sleeping area, on each level and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations.  Recommend installing additional carbon monoxide alarms as per these standards.  For more information visit: http://www.sterlinghomeinspections.com/index/#/carbon-monoxide/

9 - Heating

Heating System
Forced hot air furnace
Energy Source
Oil
Number of Heat Systems
One
Heat System Brand #1
AMANA
Heat System #1 Age
17 Years Old
Ductwork
Insulated, and, Non-insulated
Filter Type
Disposable
Air Filter Location:
Behind return air registers
Heating Limitations

The heating and cooling system of this home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. The inspection is not meant to be technically exhaustive. The inspection does not involve removal and inspection behind service door or dismantling that would otherwise reveal something only a licensed heat contractor would discover. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.


The home inspector shall: describe the type of fuel, heating equipment and heating distribution system; operate the system using thermostats; open readily open able access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. Observe and report on: the condition of normally operated controls and components of the system; visible flue pipes, dampers and related components; the presence of and condition of a representative number of heat sources in each habitable space in the residence; the condition of fixed supplemental heating units; visible components of vent systems flues and chimneys: the presence of and condition of a representative number of heat sources in each habitable space of the residential building. The home inspector is not required to:  activate or operate the heating system that does not respond to the thermostat or has been shut down; observe, evaluate and report on heat exchangers; dismantle any equipment controls or gauges; observe and report on the interiors of chimney flues; heating system accessories, such as humidifiers, air purifiers, motorized dampers and heat reclaimers; activate heating, heat pump systems or any other system when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conductive to safe operation or may damage the equipment; evaluate any type of material contained in insulation and/or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets and boilers; evaluate the capacity, adequacy or efficiency of a heating system; test or operate gas logs, built in gas burning appliances, grills space heaters or solar heating systems; determine clearance to combustibles or adequacy of combustion air; test for gas leaks or carbon monoxide; observe and report on in floor or in-ceiling radiant heating systems.

Credit
Comment
9.5.1 - Thermostat

Thermostat not Working
Basement

The basement thermostat was not operating. Recommend having replaced as needed.  The basement level heat was not tested as a result.

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Central Air Conditioning

Cooling Equipment Type
Air conditioner unit
Cooling Equipment Energy Source
Electricity
Number of AC Only Units
One
Central Air Manufacturer
CARRIER
Central Air Age
29 Years Old
Ductwork
Insulated, Non-insulated
Filter Type
Disposable
Filter Location
At Air Handler
Cooling System Limitations

The cooling system of this home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. The inspection is not meant to be technically exhaustive. The inspection does not involve removal and inspection behind service door or dismantling that would otherwise reveal something only a licensed HVAC contractor would discover (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning). Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

Central Air Conditioner: Below 65

Air conditioning systems are not tested when the outdoor temperature is below 65 degrees fro more than a 24 hour period as per the NY State standards of practice for home inspections.  Running air conditioning systems when the outside temperatures are below 65 degrees can cause harm and/or damage to the system.  Recommend having a qualified HVAC contractor inspect the systems if you are concerned about their operational status.

The home inspector shall: observe, describe and report on: the type of air conditioning equipment and distribution system; operate the system using the thermostat; observe and report on the condition of normally operated controls and components of the system. The home inspector is not required to: activate or operate air conditioning systems that have been shut down; observe and report on gas fired refrigeration systems, evaporative coolers, or wall and window mounted units; check the pressure of the system coolant or determine the presence of leakage; evaluate the capacity, efficiency or adequacy of the system; operate equipment or systems if exterior temperature is below 65 degrees Fahrenheit or when other conditions are not conductive safe operation or may damage equipment; dismantle any controls , equipment or gauges; check the electrical current drawn by the unit; observe and report on electronic air filters.


Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - Central Air Conditioner

15-20 Years Old

The estimated useful life for most ir conditioning equipment is 15-20 years. This equipment appeared to be near, at, or beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor

11 - Insulation and Ventilation

Exhaust Fans
None
Floor System Insulation
Fiberglass, R-19
Attic Insulation
Fiberglass, R-19
Insulation and Ventilation Limitations

The insulation and ventilation of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Venting of exhaust fans or clothes dryer cannot be fully inspected and bends or obstructions can occur without being accessible or visible (behind wall and ceiling coverings). Only insulation that is visible was inspected. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.


The home inspector shall: observe, describe and report on insulation in accessible visible unfinished spaces; observe, describe and report on ventilation of accessible attics and foundation areas; observe and report on mechanical ventilation systems in visible accessible locations. Home inspectors are not required to: disturb insulation; operate mechanical ventilation systems when weather or other conditions are not safe or may damage the equipment.

Credit
Comment
11.1.1 - Insulation in Attic

Ceiling Insulation

Suggested Improvement - Ceiling insulation installed in the attic was less than the amount recommended by today's building standards. Recommend that a qualified contractor install insulation for better energy efficiency and per current standard building practices (typically 12" with an R rating of R-38). 
Credit
Comment
11.2.1 - Insulation Under Floor System

Insulation Fouled

The insulation in the crawlspace was fouled by heavy rodent activity. I recommend having the insulation removed and replaced by a qualified person.

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Interior Rooms

Ceiling Materials
Gypsum Board
Wall Material
Gypsum Board
Floor Covering(s)
Carpet, Hardwood Tounge & Groove
Interior Doors
Hollow core
Window Types
Thermal/Insulated
Interior Limitations

The interior of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. The inspection did not involve moving furniture and inspecting behind furniture, under area rugs or areas obstructed from view. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

The home inspector shall:  observe and report on the material and general condition of the floors, walls and ceilings; steps, stairways and railings; a representative number of primary windows and interior doors; visible signs of water penetration.  Home inspectors are not required to: observe and report on paint, wallpaper or other interior wall finishes; window treatments; household appliances; central vacuum systems; recreational facilities; lifts elevators, dumbwaiters or other similar devices.

Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Ceilings, Walls & Floors

Spongy Floor

The floor along the rear wall of the building in the living room was spongy and slightly sunken. The framing under the floor may be damaged by wood rot and termite activity that could not be seen from below due to insulation and ductwork. Recommend further evaluation when insulation is removed from crawlspace.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.2.1 - Doors (representative number)

Dangerous Step

The basement sliding door was dangerous. The step to the exterior was far in excess of a typical seven inch step. Anyone unfamiliar with the door could fall and become injured. Recommend correcting as needed by adding steps or sealing up the door.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.2.2 - Doors (representative number)

Need Fall Protection

The 2nd floor doors in the master bedroom do not have adequate fall protection and what is installed has been damaged by wood rot.
Recommend installing railing as per current building standards for safety

Hammer Carpenter
Credit
Comment
12.4.1 - Lighting & Outlets

Lights Not Working
Kitchen +Living Room

The lighting in the kitchen and the lighting in the living room did not work. Recommend having repaired as needed by a qualified person.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.4.2 - Lighting & Outlets

Lights Poorly Installed

Light fixtures throughout the house were missing, improperly/unsafely hung. Recommend having repaired as needed for safety

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.5.1 - Stairs, Balconys & Railings

Unsafe Guardrails

A handrail assembly at this staircase had spaces between balusters that allowed the passage of a 4 3/8-inch sphere. To improve child safety, the Inspector recommends altering the handrail assembly in a manner which will prevent the passage of a 4 3/8-inch sphere. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Bathrooms and Laundry

Dryer Vent:
Ribbed plastic
Dryer 240-volt electrical receptacle:
Installed
Dryer Gas Supply:
Electric
Bathroom Limitations

The bathrooms and laundry of the home were inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.


Washer and Dryer: Washer/Dryer NT
The washing machine and dryer were not tested as part of this inspection.

The home inspector shall observe: walls, ceiling, and floors; counters and a representative number of installed cabinets; plumbing fixtures; shower enclosures and ventilation systems. The home inspector shall: operate a representative number of windows and interior doors; and report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components; where visible and readily accessible, observe and report on bath vent fan ducting to determine if it exhausts to the exterior of the building. The home inspector is not required to observe: any plumbing component that is not readily accessible; test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage; spas, jetted tubs or whirlpools; or observe and report on any system that is shut down or secured.

Credit
Comment
13.10.1 - Exhaust Fan

No Vent Fans

Recommended upgrade - Some bathrooms did not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture can accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth.  Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it may not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when windows are closed.  Recommend having a qualified contractor install exhaust fans per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers or bathtubs.

Credit
Comment
13.15.1 - Dryer Venting

Ribbed plastic vent
Basement

The dryer was vented using a flexible, ribbed plastic vent that is not approved by the Underwriter's Laboratory (UL). This type of dryer exhaust vent is more likely to accumulate lint than a smooth metal vent, creating a potential fire hazard. Excessive lint accumulation can also increase drying time and shorten the dryer's lifespan. Recommend replacing this plastic vent with a properly-installed, UL-approved dryer vent. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.
Credit
Comment
13.16.1 - Washer and Dryer

Loose Outlet
Basement

The 240-volt dryer electrical receptacle in the laundry area was loose. The Inspector recommends that it be securely re-attached by a qualified electrical contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional

14 - Kitchen

Countertop
Stone
Cabinetry
Wood
Dishwasher
ASKO
Range
GENERAL ELECTRIC
Exhaust/Range hood
VENTED
Refrigerator
NONE
Kitchen Limitations

The built-in appliances of the home were inspected and reported on with the above information. The inspection was limited to the appliances turning on and off- nothing more. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

The home inspector shall: observe and report on the general condition of the floors, walls and ceilings; a representative number of windows and doors; visible signs of water penetration; where visible and readily accessible, observe and report on the kitchen vent fan ducting to determine if it exhausts to the building exterior.   The home inspector is not required: observe and report on household appliances.

Credit
Comment
14.5.1 - Condition of Plumbing Under the Sink

Leaking Trap Connections
Kitchen

Leaking connections at the trap assembly beneath the kitchen sink should be repaired to avoid future/additional damage to the cabinet floor and possibly the wall/floor structures below. The Inspector recommends repair by a qualified plumbing contractor.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.7.1 - Range Hood

Broken Range Hood
Kitchen

The range hood was broken and missing pieces. Recommend having repaired or replaced as needed for proper operation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
14.8.1 - Dishwasher

Dishwasher Not Tested
Kitchen

Due to low water pressure the dishwasher could not be tested for proper operation.  I Recommend having tested prior to the closing when the water pressure issue has been corrected.

Contractor Qualified Professional

15 - Attic and Roof Structure

Ventilation
Gable vents
Roof Construction
Traditional stick framed
Attic Inspected From
Inside the attic
Attic Limitations

The attic and roof structure of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Roof coverings and skylights can appear to be leak proof during inspection and weather conditions. Our inspection makes an attempt to find a leak but sometimes cannot. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.

The home inspector shall observe:  attic structure; ventilation systems; roof penetrations and signs of' leaks or abnormal condensation on building components. The home inspector shall: describe the methods used to observe the attic. The home inspector is not required to: enter attics with no flooring installed; attics with restrictive hatches or where entry would, in the opinion of the inspector, be unsafe.

16 - Fireplaces

Types of Fireplaces
Wood burning open hearth
Operable Fireplaces
One
Number of Woodstoves
None
Firreplace Limitations

The Fireplace system of this home was inspected and reported on with the above information but it is incomplete. The liner or the safety aspect of the liner was not inspected. The inspection is not meant to be technically exhaustive and does not substitute an inspection by a certified chimney sweep. The inspection does not determine the safety of the fireplace in terms of the condition of liner or the absence of a liner. Any comments made by the inspector does not remove the need for an inspection by a certified chimney sweep. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that a certified chimney sweep inspect the liner for safe operation.


Fireplace: Wood Burning

One or more wood-burning fireplaces or stoves were found at the property. When such devices are used, they should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually to prevent creosote build-up and to determine if repairs are needed. The National Fire Protection Association states that a "Level 2" chimney inspection should be performed with every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Recommend consulting with the property owner about recent and past servicing and repairs to all wood-burning devices and chimneys or flues at this property. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate all wood-burning devices and chimneys, and clean and repair as necessary.

The inspector shall: observe and report on visible and accessible system components; visible and accessible chimneys and vents; chimney caps; fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances; accessible fireplace dampers. Home inspectors are not required to: observe and report on the interiors of flues and chimneys; fire screens and doors; automatic fuel feed devices; mantles and fireplace surrounds; combustion make up air devices; heat distribution systems; ignite or extinguish fires; determine draft characteristics; move fireplace inserts and stoves or fireplace contents; perform chimney smoke tests; evaluate the installation of inserts wood burning stoves, or other modifications to a fireplace stove or chimney; operate gas fireplace inserts; light pilot flames.

Credit
Comment
16.2.1 - Damper Condition and Function

Seized Damper

The damper for the fireplace was rusted tight or "seized" (non-operational). Repairs should be made so unit works properly. I recommend a qualified contractor inspect and repair as needed.

Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
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Comment
16.6.1 - Chimney Structure/Exterior

Chimney Repointing

Mortar at the top or sides of the brick chimney was deteriorated (e.g. loose, missing, cracked). As a result, water is likely to infiltrate the chimney structure and cause further damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, by repointing the mortar or replacing damaged bricks.

Credit
Comment
16.6.2 - Chimney Structure/Exterior

Chimney Crown

The chimney crown (concrete) at the top of the chimney was cracked/damaged and in need of repair or replacement.  The chimney crown keeps water from entering the chimney and causing damage to the chimney structure.  Recommend having a qualified person repair/replace as needed.
Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor

17 - Envionmental Concerns

Underground Oil Tank: Burried Tank in Use
A buried (underground) heating fuel/oil storage tank is currently installed at this property and is currently in use. Such components are not inspected during a home or building inspection.  Recommend having the tank tested to verify its integrity.  Leaking oil tanks can be a significant expense to remove and clean up.  For additional information visit:  http://www.sterlinghomeinspections.com/index/#/oil-tanks/

Home inspectors are not required to: determine the presence of any suspected hazardous substance including but not limited to, latent surface or subsurface volatile organic compounds, PCB's, asbestos, urea formaldehyde insulation, toxins, carcinogens, diseases, wood destroying organisms, mold, hazardous plants, illicit drugs or drug making equipment, lead paint, noise or contaminants in soil, water, air quality, wet lands or any other environmental hazard.  All of the above conditions/hazards require specialized testing to properly identify and in many cases require specific licensing by the state of New York.  Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist.  Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation.  

Credit
Comment
17.1.1 - Rodents

Rodent Infestation

Evidence of rodent infestation was found in the form of urine stains, traps, poison, dead rodents, rodent droppings, and damaged insulation.  Consult with the property owners about this.  A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary.  For additional information, visit: http://www.sterlinghomeinspections.com/index/#/mice/

Pest control Pest Control Pro
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Comment
17.2.1 - Possible Microbial Growth

Mold
Basement

Possible microbial growths were found at one or more locations. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to identify what organism or substance this staining is.  However, such staining is normally caused by excessively moist conditions, which in turn can be caused by plumbing or building envelope leaks and/or substandard ventilation.  These conducive conditions should be corrected before making any attempts to remove or correct the staining. Normally, affected material such as drywall are removed, enclosed spaces are allowed to dry thoroughly, a mildewcide may be applied, and only then is drywall reinstalled. For evaluation and possible mitigation, consult with a qualified or NYS Licensed industrial hygienist or mold/moisture assessment specialist.  For more information, visit: http://www.sterlinghomeinspections.com/index/#/mold/

Mold Environmental Contractor
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Comment
17.4.1 - Insect Damage

Visible Insect Damage

Visible insect damage was observed at the time of the inspection.  In many houses where the basement is finished, like this one, it is not possible to observe for activity in a majority of the house.  I recommend having an qualified pest control company install termite bait stations proactively in the ground at the building's exterior to make sure there is no activity in the ground around the house.  If no activity is found the bait stations can be removed.

Pest control Pest Control Pro

18 - Detached Garage

Roof Covering
Wood shakes
Siding Style
Bevel
Foundation
Steel Beams
Credit
Comment
18.1.1 - Foundations (If all crawlspace areas are not inspected, provide an explanation. An opinion on performance is necessary)

Structural Damage
Garage

The garage floor was a floating or elevated floor, being supported by two steel beams exposed to the elements. The steel beams were heavily rusted and may no longer be able to support the intended loads. I recommend having a structural engineer further evaluate and recommend if repairs are needed such as replacing the steel beams.

House construction Structural Engineer
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Comment
18.5.1 - Roof Covering (If the roof is inaccessible, report the method used to inspect)

Past Life Expectancy

The roof was well worn and in need of replacement same as the main house.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
18.16.1 - Polarity and Grounding of Receptacles within 6 feet of interior plumbing fixtures, all receptacles in garage, carport and exterior walls of inspected structure

GFCI Missing
Garage

One or more electrical receptacles (outlets) at the *LOCATION (GFCI)* had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if if GFCI protection was present.  If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard.  Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices/ General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:
  • Outdoors (since 1973)
  • Bathrooms (since 1975)
  • Garages (since 1978)
  • Kitchens (since 1987)
  • Crawlspaces and unfinished basements (since 1990)
  • Wet bar sinks (since 1993)
  • Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005)

For more information visit: http://www.sterlinghomeinspections.com/index/#/ground-fault-circuit-interupts/