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1234 Main St.
Lumberton Texas 77657
12/14/2018 9:00AM

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agent

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Agency Name

1 - Information

In Attendance
Seller
Occupancy
Vacant
Building Status
Not furnished at the time of Inspection
Type of Building
Single Family
Utilities
All Utilities On
Front Faces
West
Inspector Time In:
3:00pm
Inspector Time Out:
6:00pm
Construction Date*
Year: 2013
Weather Conditions*
Rain
IMPORTANT NOTICES:


THIS REPORT IS PREPARED EXCLUSIVELY FOR THE CLIENT AND IS NOT TRANSFERABLE OR VALID WITHOUT SIGNED INSPECTION AGREEMENT.


Some information may be obtained from publicly available data. Its accuracy is dependent upon the data source and is not warranted by Tactical Inspections.


All deficiencies noted in this report should be deferred to a qualified and licensed technician in the appropriate trade for evaluation and recommended remediation.


Location references may be made in this report: Front, Back, Right and Left as viewed from the street facing the structure. Example: "Damage noted to the RIGHT slope of the FRONT LEFT dormer."


Digital photographs have been included in this report to provide examples of deficient items and/or to provide a better understanding of a condition or location. Photographs may not be present for every location and/or condition discovered during the inspection. There may be conditions and/or deficiencies not represented with photographs.

2 - I. Structural Systems

IN NI NP D
2.1 A. Foundations X
2.2 B. Grading and Drainage X
2.3 C. Roof Covering Materials X X
2.4 D. Roof Structure & Attic X X
2.5 E. Walls (Interior and Exterior) X X
2.6 F. Ceilings and Floors X
2.7 G. Doors (Interior and Exterior) X X
2.8 H. Windows X X
2.9 I. Stairways (Interior and Exterior) X
2.10 J. Fireplaces and Chimneys X X
2.11 K. Porches, Balconies, Decks, and Carports X
Inspector Opinion

All of the information contained herein is the opinion of the inspector, on the day of the inspection.  Conditions may change.  

A. Foundations: Type of Foundation(s)
Slab on Grade

Visual Inspection of the exterior.

A. Foundations: Crawl space viewed from
No crawl space
A. Foundations: Comments
A. Foundations: Foundation Performance Opinion

Foundation Is Performing Adequately

Based on visible evidence it is the inspectors opinion that the foundation was performing as intended at the time of inspection. In the inspector's opinion the foundation did not appear to be in need of immediate remedial leveling at the time of the inspection. 

At this time, I did not observe any evidence that would indicate the presence of significant deflection in the foundation. There were no notable functional problems resulting from foundation movement. The interior and exterior stress indicators showed little affects of movement and I perceived the foundation to contain no significant unlevelness after walking the 1st level floors.

This is a cursory and visual observation of the conditions and circumstances present at the time of this inspection. Opinions are based on observations made without sophisticated testing procedures. Therefore, the opinions expressed are one of apparent conditions and not absolute fact and are only good for the date and time of this inspection. No warranty against future movement can be made.

A. Foundations: Suggested Foundation Maintenance and Care

Proper drainage and moisture management around foundations is essential due to the expansive nature of the area's load bearing soils. Drainage must be directed away from all sides of the foundation through proper grading, and carried away from the structure via grade slopes, drainage systems or swale's designed for this purpose. 

Maintenance of these drainage systems is essential for effective moisture control and foundation performance.  

As is typical, in all but the most severe cases, floor coverings and/or stored articles prevent recognition of the signs of settlement. It is important to note that this inspection is not a structural engineering survey nor is any specialized testing done of any sub-slab plumbing systems during this limited visual inspection. In the event that structural movement is noted, the client is advised to consult with a Structural Engineer who is licensed by the State of Texas and familiar with local soil conditions. A properly qualified and licensed Structural Engineer is trained and equipped to perform the necessary excavation and perform specialized testing necessary to isolate and identify causes of foundation damage and instability. The Structural Engineer will use the testing data to offer remediation recommendations to stabilize and correct structural damage and / or movement.

A. Foundations: Corner Pop
Various locations

One or more of the foundation perimeter beam corners were observed to be sheared off (corner pop). This is a common condition in slab on grade foundations. This condition does not adversely affect the performance of the foundation. However, in some cases, some cosmetic improvements may be desired.

B. Grading and Drainage: Drainage

Proper grading and drainage are required to maintain proper foundation performance and prevent water penetration, which is a conducive condition for wood rot, wood destroying insect intrusion and possible mold growth.


B. Grading and Drainage: Gutters Present

Yes


B. Grading and Drainage: Downspout 36 inches
Various locations

Note: 

The gutter downspouts should discharge water at least thirty-six inches (36) away from the foundation perimeter beam. 

Storm water should be encouraged to flow away from the structure at the points of discharge.


B. Grading and Drainage: Surface Drainage System

Notice: 

There is an underground and/or surface drainage system in place. The inspector cannot and will not be able to verify the operation, sizing, efficiency or adequacy of the underground and/or surface drainage system. If there are any questions or concerns with this system or the effectiveness of the system, you should consult with the current homeowner or the appropriate specialist related to this type of system.

B. Grading and Drainage: Sub Surface Drains Present

Yes

C. Roof Covering Materials: Types of Roof Covering
Asphalt Composition shingle
C. Roof Covering Materials: Viewed From
Ladder, Drone
C. Roof Covering Materials: Water Penetrations
Not Present
C. Roof Covering Materials: Prior Repairs
Not Present
C. Roof Covering Materials: Comments

Overview:

The roof is a complex system comprised of many components that must work well together to provide weather protection for the house. The major elements in this system include the roofing or roof covering (shingles, tile, membrane), the underlayment (impregnated felt or paper, ice and water shield), metal flashing (lead, copper, aluminum, galvanized steel), sheathing (plywood, OSB, dimensional lumber boards), the roof rafters and other roof framing components.

C. Roof Covering Materials: Further Evaluation

You are strongly encouraged to have a properly certified roofing contractor to physically inspect the roof, prior to the expiration of any time limitations such as option or warranty periods, to fully evaluate the condition of the roofing material.

D. Roof Structure & Attic: Viewed From
Accessible portions of attic, Decked space only

Attic access and walkway 

D. Roof Structure & Attic: Framing Type
Conventional Wood Frame, Convent w/radiant deck
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Average Attic Floor Insulation Depth
7-10
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Insulation Type
Blown

The attic space in a home in Texas is the most important area for insulation. Attic floor insulation should be at least R-30, however for best energy efficiency R-38 is preferable. A properly installed radiant barrier system can significantly reduce attic temperatures.

D. Roof Structure & Attic: Vertical Insulation Thickness
2-4

Unable to determine 

D. Roof Structure & Attic: Water Penetrations
Not Present
D. Roof Structure & Attic: Comments

The visible areas of the roof structure and attic were inspected according to today's Texas Standards of Practice and were performing as intended at the time of the inspection.

D. Roof Structure & Attic: Overview:

In this climate, the three most important factors affecting energy efficiency are conduction, radiant solar heat gain, and infiltration gains and losses. Conduction (or direct heat gain or loss through the walls and ceiling) is primarily controlled by insulation. Infiltration loss or gain (drafts or air leakage) is controlled by caulking and weather stripping. Solar heat gain is controlled by the external shading of windows exposed to the sun or reflected sun.

D. Roof Structure & Attic: Method of Inspection:

Inspection of the roof structure and attic is performed via visual observation of this areas and components which can reasonably and safely accessed. Areas and components which are inaccessible are noted. Signs of water penetration, A/C or plumbing leaks will be noted as will deficiencies in framing, access, insulation and ventilation.

E. Walls (Interior and Exterior): Comments
E. Walls (Interior and Exterior): Material
Brick, Vinyl siding
E. Walls (Interior and Exterior): Method

The inspection of interior and exterior walls focuses on structural performance, water penetration, thermal, and fire separation issues. The condition of surface finishes and cosmetic blemishes are not noted, except where they may contribute to or be symptomatic of other problems. Areas within finished walls and concealed flashing details (e.g. doors, windows, brick ledges, etc.) are not accessible and beyond the scope of the inspection. Home furnishings, artwork, stored goods, heavy foliage, etc. can obscure damage, water stains, previous repairs, etc., and preclude assessment of these conditions.

As a matter of general home maintenance, it is recommended that all deficiencies in the "exterior envelope" be sealed for energy efficiency and to help prevent water and moisture penetration into the structure. Examples would be caulking doors/windows, replacing worn weather-strip seals, and sealing wall penetrations or openings (around light fixtures, a/c lines etc.)

F. Ceilings and Floors: Comments
F. Ceilings and Floors: Ceiling Type
Drywall
F. Ceilings and Floors: Floor Type
Tile, Carpet, Laminate
F. Ceilings and Floors: Garage Floor Cracks

Some cracking of the garage concrete floor finish was observed.

G. Doors (Interior and Exterior): Comments
G. Doors (Interior and Exterior): Overview:

Interior doors serve primarily to separate space and provide privacy, while exterior doors also serve important security, egress, and water penetration prevention functions. Exterior doors and doors separating conditioned and unconditioned spaces also form a part of the building thermal envelope. Doors separating the garage from the house form part of the essential fire separation between the garage and the house.

G. Doors (Interior and Exterior): Method of Inspection

Interior and exterior doors are inspected for proper functioning, including latches and locking mechanisms. Exterior doors are also inspected for signs of water damage and penetration as well as functional weather-stripping. Garage doors are inspected for proper operation, including safety devices for spring failure and those for automatic operators.

H. Windows: Comments
H. Windows: Method

Windows, where accessible, are inspected for proper function including latches and locking mechanisms. Broken panes, broken thermal seals, missing or damaged screens and caulking deficiencies are noted. Safety issues including lack of safety glass in required locations, and egress issues in sleeping areas are noted.

I. Stairways (Interior and Exterior): Comments
I. Stairways (Interior and Exterior): Method

The inspection of the stairways is a visual observation of the required component's and focuses on handrails, spindles, railings, and guards etc. The inspector does not exhaustively measure every stairway component.

J. Fireplaces and Chimneys: Comments
Living Room

Inspected and appeared to be performing at the time of the inspection. 

J. Fireplaces and Chimneys: Method of Inspection:

Inspection of fireplaces and chimneys focuses on observation of visible and accessible components of the firebox, hearth extension, fuel source, combustion air source, doors, circulating fan, lintel, damper, flue, fire blocking at attic penetration, chimney crown, cap and spark arrester. Defects observed in the visible portions of these components are noted in the report. No testing of the draft performance is performed.

K. Porches, Balconies, Decks, and Carports: Comments

Inspected and appeared to be performing at the time of the inspection.

K. Porches, Balconies, Decks, and Carports: Method

Porches, decks, driveways and carport's are visually inspected for structural defects and safety related deficiencies (e.g. cracks, trip hazards, negative slope towards the structure, differential movement, etc.). Outbuildings and detached structures other than the primary garage are not inspected except by special prior arrangement.

A. Foundations: Access Limitation

Foundation inspections are limited to observation of accessible interior and exterior structural components. 

No engineering studies or measurements are made.

Factors preventing accurate assessment of structural conditions include but are not limited to paint, repairs, surfaces hidden by floor or wall coverings, furnishings, foliage, and masonry.

B. Grading and Drainage: Method

General lot drainage and slope is inspected by visual means only (no measuring devices are used-such means and devices are beyond the scope of our inspection). The findings are, to a great extent, subjective. Our evaluation of the slope of the grade and lot drainage is a visal review and represents the opinion of the inspector based on his personal experience with similar homes. The inspection does not predict or guarantee future performance. If actual measurements and a professional drainage evaluation are desired, a qualified engineer should be consulted.

Inspection of the homes grading and drainage is done by a visual observation of the site around the structure, including surface grade, rain gutters and down spouts, etc. Any visible conditions or symptoms that may indicate a situation that may adversely affect the foundation or indicate water penetration are noted. No soil, topographical or flood plain studies are performed.



C. Roof Covering Materials: Limitation

Roof inspections are limited to visual observations of the accessible surfaces. The roof is inspected from the roof level, only if in the opinion of the inspector it can be done safely and without damaging the roof. Certain types of damage and/or poor workmanship (e.g., improper fastening, manufacturer defects, improper installation etc) may not be apparent during a non-invasive, visual only inspection. As such the inspector cannot guarantee that the roof will be free of leaks, nor can the inspector determine the remaining service life of the roof covering. If deficiencies are noted and/or you have concerns about life expectancy, insurability or potential for future problems, we highly recommend consulting with a Qualified Roofing Contractor prior to the expiration of any warranty or option period.  

C. Roof Covering Materials: Life Expectancy

Notice: Life expectancy of the roofing material is not covered by this property inspection report.  If any concerns exist about the roof covering life expectancy or potential for future problems, a roofing specialist should be consulted.  The Inspector cannot offer an opinion or warranty as to whether the roof has leaked in the past, leaks now, or may be subject to future leaks, either expressed or implied.  
The inspection of this roof may show it to be functioning as intended or in need of minor repairs. This inspection does not determine the insurability of the roof. You are strongly encouraged to have your Insurance Company physically inspect the roof, prior to the expiration of any time limitations such as option or warranty periods, to fully evaluate the insurability of the roof.

C. Roof Covering Materials: Wet Roof

It was raining or had recently rained at the time the roof was inspected. A wet roof can hide flaws. If there are any concerns the buyer is encouraged to have the roof further evaluated by a qualified roofing company.

D. Roof Structure & Attic: Roof Structure Limitations

Almost all attics have spaces which are inaccessible to inspection, whether due to stored items, duct-work, mechanical equipment, roof structural components, roof geometry (e.g., eaves). Areas which cannot be readily or safely accessed are not inspected.

E. Walls (Interior and Exterior): General Limitations

In accordance with industry standards, the inspection is limited to only those surfaces that are exposed and readily accessible. The Inspector does not move furniture, lift floor-covering materials, or remove or rearrange items within closets or on shelving. On your final walk through, or at some point after furniture and personal belongings have been removed, it is important that you inspect the interior portions of the residence that were concealed or otherwise inaccessible at the time of the inspection. Contact the Inspector immediately if any adverse conditions are observed that were not commented on in your inspection report.


In the event the residence was furnished at the time of the inspection and portions of the interior were hidden by the occupant's belongings. In accordance with industry standards, the inspection is limited to only those surfaces that are exposed and readily accessible. The Inspector does not move furniture, lift floor-covering materials, or remove or rearrange items within closets or on shelving. On your final walk through, or at some point after furniture and personal belongings have been removed, it is important that you inspect the interior portions of the residence that were concealed or otherwise inaccessible at the time of the inspection. Contact the Inspector immediately if any adverse conditions are observed that were not commented on in your inspection report.


F. Ceilings and Floors: Ceiling and Floor Limitations

Inspection of ceilings and floors focuses on structural performance and water penetration issues. The condition of surface finishes and cosmetic blemishes are not noted, except where they may contribute to or be symptomatic of other problems. Areas concealed within finished spaces are not accessible and are beyond the scope of an inspection. Home furnishings, artwork, personal items, etc. can obscure damage, water stains, previous repairs, etc., and prevent assessment in these areas.

G. Doors (Interior and Exterior): Limitations:

Doors which are obstructed by furnishings or stored items may not be accessible to inspection The inspector does not move furniture or stored items to inspect behind them. Interior doors which are locked and exterior doors which have no readily available key may not be opened.

H. Windows: Seal Limitation

Signs of lost seals in the thermal pane windows may appear and disappear as temperature and humidity changes. Some windows with lost seals may not be evident at the time of this inspection, some that are noted in the inspection may not be evident later.  Windows are checked in a non-exhaustive manner for obvious fogging.  When lost thermal pane window seals were noted, we recommend all windows be rechecked by a window specialist for further evaluation prior to the expiration of any time limitations such as option or warranty periods.

Our ability to visually detect failed thermal pane window sections in the early stages of seal failure is greatly influenced by outside lighting conditions, cleanliness of the windows, and the presence of screens.

NOTE: The absence of labeled safety glass does not necessarily mean the installed glass is not rated as safety glass. In accordance with the TREC standards we do look for identifying labels where required, but do not definitively test glass surfaces for proper certification when no obvious labels are visible.



J. Fireplaces and Chimneys: General

Special equipment and methods are needed to thoroughly inspect the interior of a chimney or fireplace vent. Typically only a small portion of the interior is visible to the home inspector. Thorough inspection of chimneys, flues, liners and vents can only be carried out by a qualified chimney sweep.

J. Fireplaces and Chimneys: Gas Logs

There are gas logs installed in the firebox at the time of this inspection. I was unable to view the floor of the firebox at the time of this inspection.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - A. Foundations

CORNER WEDGE CRACK
Various

Corner cracks are extremely common and are almost always cosmetic in nature. This is typical and easily correctable condition that should be remedied.

Brick in the Texas summers, expands due to thermal expansion and water absorption. A slab foundation is less porous than brick, is mostly underground and has much less exposure. The stress that develops is between the brick mortar below the bottom bricks and the top of the concrete. This puts the bricks in compression and the concrete foundation in tension. Concrete is weak in tension but brick is very strong in compression, the concrete loses and the corner cracks.

Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - B. Grading and Drainage

Standing Water
Left side of house in front of gate.

Standing water observed, which could indicate poor drainage and/or grading. Recommend monitor and/or have landscaper correct.

Here is a resource on dealing with standing water in your yard. Heavy rain was noted the day of inspection. 

Credit
Comment
2.3.1 - C. Roof Covering Materials

Impact Damage

Re-inspection of roof covering material conducted on 09/23/2018 as limitations of a wet roof were observed on date of original inspection. On Re-inspection performed on 09/23/2018 there were visible indications of impact damage on the roof covering. Impact damaged roof covering shingles may allow further deterioration of the roof covering, deterioration of the roof structure, water penetration or other damage. You are strongly encouraged to have your insurance company and a certified, licensed roofing contractor to physically inspect the roof to fully evaluate the insurability and condition of the roofing material.

Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - D. Roof Structure & Attic

Attic latter access not fire rated

The attic access stair or attic access port cover installed in the vehicle storage area (garage) was not fire rated and may allow vehicle storage area vapors to penetrate the attic and/or living area. ( SAFETY HAZARD )

Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Garage Trim

The garage door trim has some deterioration and/or damage at the bottom.

Credit
Comment
2.5.2 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Seal Penetrations
Exterior wall behind AC unit

The area between the exterior veneer and any wall penetration needs to be properly sealed.  Windows, Doors, and all other wall penetrations should be sealed.

 It is recommended to use elastomeric caulking.

Credit
Comment
2.5.3 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Seal Transition

The transition from garage door siding to brick veneer needs to be better sealed.

Credit
Comment
2.5.4 - E. Walls (Interior and Exterior)

Interior Wall Joint Crack
Bathroom

Interior wall joint cracks were observed

Credit
Comment
2.7.1 - G. Doors (Interior and Exterior)

Door Sticks
Rear patio door

Exterior doors that rub, stick or hit door frames were observed. The cause should be determined and repaired as needed.

Credit
Comment
2.7.2 - G. Doors (Interior and Exterior)

Garage Entry Door Auto / Self Closing
Garage

Garage entry doors should have installed self closing hinges according to today's Texas Standards of Practice - This may be an "as-built" condition and was an accepted building practice at the time this home was constructed. Per Texas Standards of Practice, we are required to report this condition as a deficiency because it is no longer an excepted building standard.

Credit
Comment
2.8.1 - H. Windows

Missing / Damaged Screen

One or more of the window screens were observed to be missing or damaged. Per home owner all screens are stored in the attic.

Credit
Comment
2.8.2 - H. Windows

Exterior caulking needed.
Various locations

Exterior caulking improvements needed on window seal. 

Credit
Comment
2.10.1 - J. Fireplaces and Chimneys

Damper Clamp

When artificial gas logs are installed in a firebox with a damper; the damper should be permanently blocked open with a damper clamp to prevent accidental spillage of carbon monoxide into the living space.

Credit
Comment
2.11.1 - K. Porches, Balconies, Decks, and Carports

Patio Cracks

Some cracking of the patio concrete flatwork was observed.

3 - II. Electrical Systems

IN NI NP D
3.1 A. Service Entrance and Panels X
3.2 B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures X
Overview

A typical electrical system consists of three distinct components: (1) the electric service entrance, (2) the service/distribution panels and over-current protection, (3) the branch circuits. The service entrance brings power from the utility, to the meter and into the main panel. The feeders and main disconnect determine the capacity of the electric power available to the home. The distribution panel(s) divide the capacity among the various branch circuits and provides over-current protection to them. The branch electric circuits distribute the power throughout the home.

Method of Inspection:

The electrical service entrance and panels are visually inspected for discernible defects with the various components of the system including the service drop and entrance, grounding electrode system, feeders, panels, over-current devices, bonding, etc. Where possible, the cover of the service/distribution panel covers are removed to inspect the conditions within it.

A. Service Entrance and Panels: Comments
A. Service Entrance and Panels: Electric Panel Rating
200
A. Service Entrance and Panels: Electric Panel location
Garage
Garage
A. Service Entrance and Panels: Panel Box Manufacture
Square D
A. Service Entrance and Panels: Main Disconnect Rating
200 Amps
A. Service Entrance and Panels: AFCI Protection

An arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) is a circuit breaker designed to prevent fires by detecting non-working electrical arcs and disconnect power before the arc starts a fire. The AFCI should distinguish between a working arc that may occur in the brushes of a vacuum sweeper, light switch, or other household devices and non-working arc that can occur, for instance, in a lamp cord that has a broken conductor in the cord from over use. Arc faults in a home are one of the leading causes for household fires. AFCI's resemble a GFCI (Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupter) in that they both have a test button, though it is important to distinguish between the two. GFCI's are designed to protect against electrical shock, while AFCI's are primarily designed to protect against fire.

B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures: Comments

Inspected and appeared to be performing at the time of the inspection.

B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures: Type of Wiring
Copper, 3 Wire (grounded)
General

Inspection of the electrical service system is limited to visible and accessible components of the entrance cable, meter box, service panel and the visible portions of the wiring. A large portion of the electrical system is hidden behind walls and ceilings and not all the conditions relating to these inaccessible areas can be known. While some deficiencies in an electrical system are readily discernible, not all conditions that can lead to the interruption of electrical service, or that may be hazardous, can be identified though a visual inspection. Auxiliary electrical systems such as generators and transfer switches are not inspected. No assessment as to the adequacy of the service capacity relative to current or future consumption is performed. Length of embedded or buried equipment grounding electrodes cannot be determined by visual observation. No resistance measurement of equipment grounding electrodes is performed. Lightning arrestor systems and solar panels are not inspected. No assertion as to the insurability of the property is made.

A. Service Entrance and Panels: General

Not all electrical components are visible to the inspector. The inspector will report deficiencies that are visible at the time of the inspection.  If deficiencies are noted, or if there are any questions or concerns you are advised to have a licensed electrician fully evaluate the homes electrical system prior to the expiration of any warranty or option period.   

B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures: General

Electrical devices in a home typically use either 120 or 240 volt electricity. General purpose circuits (lighting, receptacles, fans, etc.) require 120 volts. The major appliances such as clothes dryers, kitchen ranges, electric water heaters, air conditioners, and electric heating units require 240 volts. Inspection of the electrical distribution system is limited to the visible and accessible components of the distribution wiring, receptacles, switches and other connected devices. The majority of the electrical distribution system is concealed behind walls and ceilings and their conditions are not known. The lack of GFCI, protection in presently required locations regardless of the homes age are noted, as required by the Texas Real Estate Commission. Low voltage and ancillary electrical systems such as landscape lighting, generators, etc. are not inspected. Inspection of the doorbells and chimes is limited to testing the operation of the chimes and the physical condition, function, and installation of the doorbell button. Inspection and testing of Intercom systems are not included in this inspection.

In furnished homes all switches and receptacles may not be accessible for inspection or testing.  Receptacles located in garage ceilings and exterior soffits are not individually tested.


B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures: Low voltage not inspected

Inspection of low-voltage or decorative lighting lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection.
You may wish to have the functionality of any such lighting demonstrated by the seller.

B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures: Smoke Detectors

Smoke detectors are tested using the manufacturer supplied test button only. This inspection does not include testing units with actual smoke.  It is suggested that home buyers spend some time with the current owner or builder to further understand the operation of this system and, if possible, to obtain all manufacturer's literature. Also, keep in mind that most of these systems do require regular maintenance to assure proper and dependable operation.

The installation of smoke alarm(s) is required inside of all bedrooms and in any rooms designated for the purpose of sleeping, and outside within the proximity of the doors to those rooms. Test all alarms and detectors weekly or monthly per manufacture instructions. The installation of carbon monoxide (CO) detector(s) is required in homes with fuel-fired appliances at every floor elevation and any areas where fuel-fired equipment is located. The installation of Type ABC fire extinguisher(s) at the kitchen, laundry, and garage, if applicable, is also advised. Test all of these devices monthly. Install new batteries semi-annually. Initiate and practice plans of escape and protection for all occupants in case any emergencies arise. Failure to repair defective or install absent alarms, detectors, and other safety equipment immediately can result in serious injury or death. For further information about fire safety and CO poisoning, consult your local fire department and your equipment manufacture(s), and read these links: www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/464.pdf, www.carbonmonoxidekills.com, www.nfpa.org/index.asp, and www.usfa.dhs.gov/downloads/pyfff/inhome.html.

B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures: Carbon Monoxide Alarms

Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Smoke is heated and rises, thus smoke detectors are placed on the ceiling.  Carbon Monoxide, on the other hand, mixes with our air, and stays closer to the ground.  For this reason it is advised that CO detectors should be mounted at Knee Height (nose level for the average person sleeping).  The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends replacing CO alarms every 5 years.   Carbon Monoxide Alarms are tested with the manufacturer test button only. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - B. Branch Circuits, Connected Devices, and Fixtures

No CO Detector located

No Carbon Monoxide detectors were provided in the home.
It is recommended to install Carbon Monoxide detectors in appropriate locations.
Proper placement of a carbon monoxide detector is important. If you are installing only one carbon monoxide detector, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends it be located near the sleeping area where it can wake you if you are asleep and not above eye level. Additional detectors on every level and in every bedroom of a home provides extra protection.
Homeowners should remember not to install carbon monoxide detectors directly above or beside fuel-burning appliances, as appliances may emit a small amount of carbon monoxide upon start-up. A detector should not be placed within fifteen feet of heating or cooking appliances or in or near very humid areas such as bathrooms.

4 - III. Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning Systems

IN NI NP D
4.1 A. Heating Equipment X
4.2 B. Cooling Equipment X X
4.3 C. Duct System, Chases, and Vents X
HVAC Inspection

The inspector will identify the type of HVAC system present and what source(s) of energy is used.  The HVAC system will be operated and checked for proper operation. The location of the HVAC system and clearances as required will also be identified. The flue pipe (if present) will be inspected for condition and proper clearances as required. Gas lines are checked for leaks at the connections and correct installation methods.

Note: When D (D = Deficient) is checked, that indicates that the HVAC system does not appear to be performing as intended. The observations made to support the rendering of this opinion are listed in this report.  This list should not be considered an all inclusive list of deficiencies.  You are advised to have a fully qualified and licensed HVAC service provider perform a  full evaluation of  this HVAC system equipment and repair any and all deficiencies that are found prior to the expiration of any warranty or option period .  

A. Heating Equipment: Type of System
Forced Air
A. Heating Equipment: Energy Source
Natural Gas
A. Heating Equipment: Comments

Inspected and appeared to be performing at the time of the inspection.

A. Heating Equipment: Furnace Information
Attic
Furnace Id, Furnace manufacturer, Lennox, Unit Age:, 2013
B. Cooling Equipment: Type of System
Central
B. Cooling Equipment: Comments

Inspected and appeared to be performing at the time of the inspection.

B. Cooling Equipment: AC Unit Information
Right exterior
Location, Manufacturer, Lennox, Unit Age, 2014, Refrigiant Type, Unit Size, 3 Ton, Temp Differential, Temp differential 15, Filter Size, Filter size 20x25, Filter Location, Filter located at return in ceiling, Recomended Breaker Size, Max 30 amp breaker
B. Cooling Equipment: Overview

During the hot summer months, the condenser (outdoor cooling equipment) unit, in conjunction with the evaporator/air handler (indoor unit), extracts heat from the house and transfers it to the outside.  The cooling equipment is inspected for correct installation of the indoor and outdoor units and clearances as required. A Delta-T (temperature differential of supply and return air) is measured and noted.

Temperature differential readings are a fundamental standard for testing the proper operation of the cooling system. The normal acceptable range is considered approximately between 14 to 23 degrees F. total difference between the return air and supply air. Unusual conditions such as excessive humidity, low outdoor temperatures, and restricted airflow may indicate abnormal operation even through the equipment is functioning basically as designed and occasionally may indicate normal operation in spite of an equipment malfunction.

Note: When D (D = Deficient) is checked, that indicates that the HVAC system does not appear to be performing as intended. The observations made to support the rendering of this opinion are listed in this report.  This list should not be considered an all inclusive list of deficiencies.  You are advised to have a fully qualified and licensed HVAC service provider perform a  full evaluation of  this HVAC system equipment and repair any and all deficiencies that are found prior to the expiration of any warranty or option period .  


B. Cooling Equipment: Further Evaluation

This cooling system and equipment needs to be fully evaluated, cleaned and serviced by a Qualified / Licensed HVAC Company.  All recommended repairs should be made. The observations made to support the rendering of this opinion are listed in but not limited to the deficiencies noted below :

C. Duct System, Chases, and Vents: Comments
Inspection Method

This inspection is a visual observation of components present at the time of the inspection. We do not dismantle components. Current day heat exchangers are sealed units and are not visible for inspection. Heat Pumps are not operated when outdoor temperatures are above 60 degrees due to damage that may occur to the heat pump system

A. Heating Equipment: Limitations:

Some key components of heating units cannot be accessed without extensive disassembly of the unit. Heat exchangers cannot be fully visually inspected without disassembly. Disassembly beyond removing of regular service panels is beyond the scope of a home inspection.

B. Cooling Equipment: Visual observation

A visual observation of all accessible components are inspected. The cooling system will be checked for correct operation. A measurement of the Delta-T checked at the return and supply air vents only will be measured. The cooling equipment will not be operated when the outdoor temperatures fall below 60 degrees due to damage that may occur to the cooling equipment during operation.


C. Duct System, Chases, and Vents: General

Some of the duct work is in areas of the attic that are not readily accessible.  Not all of the duct work is visible.  Some duct work, by design, is hidden in the walls and ceilings.  Only visible ductwork is inspected.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - B. Cooling Equipment

Pan holding water

The axiliary/secondary drain pan under the coil housing is holding water at the time of this inspection.  The cause and remedy should be further evaluated and corrected as necessary.

5 - IV. Plumbing Systems

IN NI NP D
5.1 A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures X
5.2 B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents X
5.3 C. Water Heating Equipment X X
5.4 D. Hydro-Massage Therapy Equipment X
Location of Main Water Supply Valve
Front yard
At Water Meter

Front yard next to driveway

Location of Water Meter
Front yard
Exterior
Static Water Pressure
40-50
Comments
Meter

City water supply system. The Main Shutoff (city shut off at the meter) is located in front of property, close to the main street. Unless otherwise noted there was no movement observed at the flow dial for the water meter for a one minute period. The supply system appears to be Copper and PVC. Most pipes are concealed and unable to inspect. The static water pressure reading reported above is measured at the hose bib.

A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures: Comments
B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents: Comments
C. Water Heating Equipment: Water Heater
Unit Type /Energy Source, Energy Type: Gas, Capacity, Capacity: 50 Gallon, Manufacturer, State, Unit Age, Manufacturer year 2013, Unit Location, Located in Attic
C. Water Heating Equipment: Comments
C. Water Heating Equipment: general
Attic

Water Heaters should be flushed every year or as recommended by the manufacturer to remove sediments that collect at the bottom of the tank. This can be accomplished by attaching a garden hose to the drain valve at the bottom of the heater, directing the discharge water to a safe location and turning the valve on. Caution should be observed as the water coming out will be very hot. The flush is complete when the water comes out clear.


The T & P Valve (Temperature & Pressure Release Valve) should be tested annually for reasons of safety. Follow the manufacturers instructions for testing procedures.


It is highly recommend to use a water alarm at the water heater.  This alarm will sound at the presence of any water leaks and could help prevent major water intrusion events due to failure of the water heater.  These units are inexpensive and available online, or at major home improvement centers.

D. Hydro-Massage Therapy Equipment: Comments

Hydro-Message Therapy Equipment was not present.

General

Water softeners, treatment and filtration type equipment are not checked / inspected. This inspection excludes all underground piping. Piping concealed in chases, under insulation, inside walls, etc, cannot be directly, visually inspected. Supply and service valves are not operated.

Much of the gas delivery system is typically concealed from inspection underground, inside walls, under attic insulation, etc. This inspection is restricted to only those components that are readily visible and accessible at the time of the inspection. This inspection specifically excludes: Concealed and underground piping; Pressure testing of the gas delivery system; Verification of gas delivery pressures; Disconnecting any gas piping or connectors; Manipulation or operation of gas supply valves; any activity that requires a plumbing license to perform in the state of Texas.

Laundry connection faucets and drains are visually inspected only. The faucets are not operated due to the damage that may occur during testing. The refrigerator water supply line and valve are not inspected.  If the inspector finds the water supply valve shutoff to any appliance, no attempt is made to turn the supply on.  

NOTE: If a fire suppression system is installed, fire suppression systems are outside the permitted license of inspection for Texas home inspectors. Fire suppression systems, inspection, repair and evaluation should be performed by a certified, licensed Texas Fire Marshall or Texas certified, licensed fire suppression system specialist.

B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents: General

Clean-outs are located around the outside of the structure.  Waste lines appeared to be in satisfactory condition the time of inspection. None of the waste lines were not fully visible at the time of the inspection. The inspector is unable to determine the condition of underground drain lines. At the time of inspection, the water is run at multiple fixtures for an extended period of time. This is generally considered a "functional flow" test. This test cannot simulate the waste flow characteristic of full occupancy. There may be partial blockage of the sanitary drain lines from debris, broken pipes or tree roots that cannot be detected at the time of the inspection. This type of inspection requires specialized equipment (Fiber Optic Cameras) and requires a plumbing license to perform in the state of Texas.

B. Drains, Wastes, & Vents: Tub and washer

Tub overflow drains are not inspected or tested. Showers were run for an extended period of time. The clothes washer drain line was not inspected or tested at the time of the inspection.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - A. Plumbing Supply, Distribution Systems, and Fixtures

Seal shower spout
Master bath

The shower spout needs to be sealed to the wall to avoid water intrusion into the wall.

Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - C. Water Heating Equipment

High Water temp > 120 degrees

Heated water temperature was observed to be greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit and is a SAFETY HAZARD. Adequate safe heated water temperatures are considered to be between 100 degrees and less than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. The water heater thermostat may be turned up too high or there may be other defects in the water heating equipment.


The home owner was present for the inspection and advised of this condition. Home owner adjusted setting on water heater to reduce the temperature output.

Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - C. Water Heating Equipment

90 degree
Right exterior wall

The exterior termination point of the temperature and pressure relief (TPR) valve discharge pipe is missing its 90-degree elbow. The TPR discharge pipe should turn 90-degrees downward and terminate within 6-inches of the ground.


Credit
Comment
5.3.3 - C. Water Heating Equipment

Exterior termination 6 inches
Right exterior wall

The exterior temperature and pressure relief (TPR) discharge pipe does not terminate at the proper height over the finished grade (ground). The TPR discharge pipe should terminate within 6-inch of the ground.


6 - V. Appliances

IN NI NP D
6.1 A. Dishwashers X X
6.2 B. Food Waste Disposers X
6.3 C. Range Hood and Exhaust Systems X
6.4 D. Ranges, Cooktops, and Ovens X X
6.5 E. Microwave Ovens X
6.6 F. Mechanical Exhaust Vents and Bathroom Heaters X
6.7 G. Garage Door Operators X
6.8 H. Dryer Exhaust Systems X
A. Dishwashers: Comments

The dishwasher was performing as expected at the time of the inspection.

A. Dishwashers: Brand
Kenmore
B. Food Waste Disposers: Comments

The food waste disposer was performing as expected at the time of the inspection.

C. Range Hood and Exhaust Systems: Comments

Re-circulate, Built-in with Microwave

C. Range Hood and Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
D. Ranges, Cooktops, and Ovens: Comments

Tested at 350F degrees, No variance in temperature noted.

D. Ranges, Cooktops, and Ovens: Range, Cook Top, Oven
Range, Kenmore
E. Microwave Ovens: Comments

The microwave appeared to be performing at the time of the inspection.

E. Microwave Ovens: Brand
Kenmore
F. Mechanical Exhaust Vents and Bathroom Heaters: Comments

Mechanical exhaust vents appeared to be performing at the time of the inspection.

G. Garage Door Operators: Comments

Garage door opener was present and operated as expected at the time of the inspection.

H. Dryer Exhaust Systems: Comments

The dryer exhaust system appeared to be performing at the time of the inspection.

A. Dishwashers: Normal

The dishwasher is operated in the NORMAL mode.

C. Range Hood and Exhaust Systems: Performance

Vents are operated with the switch.  Actual performance level is not evaluated.

G. Garage Door Operators: Opener Remote

The automatic garage door opener remote controls may not be present at the time of the inspection. The automatic garage door opener(s) was/were checked using only the manual control(s). 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - A. Dishwashers

Rust

Some rusting of the dishwasher interior components was observed.

Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - D. Ranges, Cooktops, and Ovens

No Anti-Tip

The absence of an anti-tilt device on freestanding ovens/ranges was observed and is a SAFETY HAZARD.  This may be an as-built condition but Per TREC Standards of Practice we are required to report this condition as a deficiency. An anti-tilt device should be installed prior to use. 

Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - G. Garage Door Operators

Light bulb

Light bulb is out on one side.