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1234 Main St.
Pearisburg, VA 24134
06/16/2019 9:00AM

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agent

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Sample Report

Everything following this blue paragraph is an example of what your Inspection Report from That Place Home Inspections might look like. This Sample Report is a compilation from several past inspections and the photos included were taken from many different homes. The observations contained in this report have been specifically chosen because these stand out as some of the most common observations across all reports. We created this Sample Report as a preview for our Clients and their Agents, but also as a potential tool for home sellers. If you have any specific questions about our reports or services, don't hesitate to give us a call at 540-922-9663.

Report Basics

Categories

The Report contains categorizations of Major Concerns (red), Moderate Concerns (orange), and Minor issues (blue). The colors and classifications are done for illustrative purposes and convenience. There are also many general recommendations given throughout the Information tabs for each section. All issues should be considered and evaluated equally.

The Red category is for a specific issue with a system or component that may have an immediate adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses a potential safety risk to people or property. The Orange category is for items that are not functional or will lead to further defects if not addressed. The Blue category is mostly routine maintenance that is due now and that new owners should do periodically. The Blue category also represents observations that may be corrected as a DIY project or a relatively low cost fix by a qualified contractor.

The categorization is not intended to determine which items may need to be addressed per the contractual requirements of the agreement of sale of the property. All items should be addressed as you deem necessary.

Most observations within the report will give a recommendation of the type of contractor that may work with evaluating and/or repairing that system. These recommendations are merely given as a helpful suggestion for the client. The client may choose which, if any observations will be addressed and have complete say in the choice of contractor.


Navigation

Here are a few quick tips on navigating your report. Be sure to click on photos to enlarge and to see any additional photos. Some photos will have further descriptions and markers that will not be seen until you click to enlarge. Also, be sure to click on the "Full Report" button to see all available information.  This button is at the bottom left on the photo of your home. When looking at the "Full Report", be sure to click on the "Overview", "Information", and "Limitations" buttons that are at the top of each numbered section to fully assess the findings of the inspection. And, for a quick overview of the orange and red categories, click on the "Summary" button at the bottom left on the photo of your home.

The report is best if viewed in the original html format. This allows you to utilize embedded videos and attached links provided as informational resources (if applicable). Additionally, there is a link to a "Life Expectancy Chart" on the main menu bar.   The report can be printed using the PDF tab if a hard copy is desired.



Report Rights

Inspector reserves the right to update inspection reports within 72 hours after initial release. This is to accommodate clarifications or additional information that might have come forward subsequent to the inspection.

Photos included in this report are for illustrative purposes only. The photos are used to show a representation of the observation, information, or limitation being noted and are not meant to be construed as a comprehensive list of all instances of any particular comment.

The inspection and report are based upon visual observations of existing conditions of the inspected property at the time of the inspection, and are not intended to be, or to be construed as, a guarantee, warranty, or any form of insurance.  The report is in no way a guarantee or warranty, express or implied, regarding the future use, operability, habitability or suitability of the home/building or its components.

1 - Inspection Details

House Orientation (House Faces)
North

This is not meant to be an accurate representation of the orientation of the home. This description is based on cardinal direction. It is to give an orientation for descriptive purposes on observations made during the inspection. 

Home / Address Numbering
On Home, On Mail Box

Inspector suggests that the home's address should be clearly marked. This is mostly a convenience factor for visiting friends and family and for deliveries. We hope this is never an issue, but it can also be important in helping emergency services to find your home in a time of need. Numbering (and/or lettering) should be a minimum of 4 inches high and a minimum of 1/2 inch wide.

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Style
Custom Built
Type of Building
Single Family
Occupancy
Furnished, Occupied
Temperature (approximate)
52 Fahrenheit (F)
Weather Conditions
Clear

2 - Roof

IN NI NP
2.1 Coverings X
2.2 Roof Drainage Systems X
2.3 Flashings X
2.4 Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations X
Inspection Method
Binoculars, Ground, Ladder, At Eaves

The roof inspection portion of the General Home Inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified roofing contractor. Because of variations in installation requirements of the huge number of different roof-covering materials installed over the years, the General Home Inspection does not include confirmation of proper installation. Home Inspectors are trained to identify common deficiencies and to recognize conditions that require evaluation by a specialist. Inspection of the roof typically includes visual evaluation of the roof structure, roof-covering materials, flashing, and roof penetrations like chimneys, mounting hardware for roof-mounted equipment, attic ventilation devices, ducts for evaporative coolers, and combustion and plumbing vents. The roof inspection does not include leak-testing and will not certify or warranty the roof against future leakage. Other limitations may apply and will be included in the comments as necessary.

Roof Type/Style
Gable
Coverings: Material
Asphalt, Architectural
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Aluminum
Flashings: Material
Metal, Plastic
Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Roof Penetrations
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
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2.2.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Debris

Debris has accumulated in the gutters. Recommend cleaning to facilitate water flow.

Here is a DIY resource for cleaning your gutters. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
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2.2.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Downspouts Drain Near Home

One or more downspouts drain too close to the home's foundation. This can result in excessive moisture in the soil at the foundation, which can lead to foundation/structural movement. Recommend adjusting downspout extensions to drain at least 6 feet from the foundation. 

Here is a quick video I made to show how you can fix your Gutter Drainage 

Tools Handyman/DIY

3 - Exterior

IN NI NP
3.1 Siding, Flashing & Trim X
3.2 Walkways, Patios & Driveways X
3.3 Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps X
3.4 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X
3.5 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls X
Inspection Method
Visual

Inspection of the home exterior typically includes: exterior wall covering materials, window and door exteriors, adequate surface drainage, driveway and walkways, window wells, exterior electrical components, exterior plumbing components, potential tree problems, and retaining wall conditions that may affect the home structure. Note: The General Home Inspection does not include inspection of landscape irrigation systems, fencing or swimming pools/spas unless pre-arranged as ancillary inspections.

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Brick, Vinyl
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway
Exposed Aggregate Concrete
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Walkway
Exposed Aggregate Concrete
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Deck with Steps
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Composite, Wood
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
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Comment
3.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

J-Block / Mounting Block Not Installed

J-block/mounting block was not installed on one or more fixture penetrations. This can lead to water penetration and may not allow for proper expansion and contraction of the siding. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor and repair or replace as needed.

To give you a quick idea of what this might look like, here is a quick video that shows the installation of a few options of mounting blocks

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
3.1.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Paint

The paint in some areas was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture. Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint the building exterior where necessary and per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
3.1.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Missing or damaged caulk

Caulk was missing, damaged, or showing signs of deterioration in one or more areas around the doors and windows of the home. Caulking should be regularly monitored and should be removed and reapplied as needed.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
3.1.4 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Wall Penetrations

Exterior wall penetrations had gaps that should be sealed with an appropriate sealant to prevent moisture and insect entry. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
3.2.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Driveway Cracking

The asphalt driveway surface was worn and is prone to developing cracks from water penetration. Recommend that a qualified person reseal the driveway.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
3.2.2 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Patio Cracking

Normal settling & cracking observed. Recommend monitor and/or patch/seal as needed.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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3.2.3 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Craking at Edge of Concrete and Home

The concrete of the patio or drive has cracked and separated where it meets the home/garage. This is common due to uneven settling between poured concrete and the foundation of the home. Recommend to fill/seal this crack line to avoid future water/moisture intrusion to the foundation of the home/garage. Continue to monitor this area as future regular maintenance.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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3.3.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Railing Missing

No railing was present with four or more steps or there is a walking surfaces greater than 30 inches above grade that were not protected by a guardrail. Safe building practices dictate that any walking surface 30 inches or more above grade should have a guardrail. All corrections should be made by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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3.3.2 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Deck - Water Sealant Required

Deck was showing signs of weathering and/or water damage. Recommend water sealant/weatherproofing be applied.

Here is a helpful article on staining & sealing your deck. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
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3.3.3 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Railing Loose

Based on the inspector's past experience, the handrail assembly did not appear to be of adequate strength to safely protect the deck/stairs. Physical testing for compliance with any building standards or building codes lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. The Inspector recommends that additional support be installed by a qualified contractor.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
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Comment
3.5.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Flower Bed, Mulch, Soil on Home

A flower bed, mulch or soil was observed to be in contact or close proximity to the home. This can lead to moisture intrusion in one or more of the components of the home. Recommend removing or addressing this landscaping feature to reduce the probability of moisture intrusion on the home and its components.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
3.5.2 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Negative Grading

Grading is sloping towards the home in some areas. This could lead to water intrusion and foundation issues. Recommend qualified landscaper or foundation contractor regrade so water flows away from home.

Here is a helpful article discussing negative grading. 

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
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Comment
3.5.3 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Vegetation on Home

Vegetation was observed to be in contact or close proximity to the home. This can lead to moisture intrusion in one or more of the components of the home. Recommend removing or cutting back vegetation.

Tools Handyman/DIY

4 - Appliances

IN NI NP
4.1 Refrigerator X
4.2 Dishwasher X
4.3 Garbage Disposal X
4.4 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
4.5 Washer / Dryer X
Refrigerator: Brand
Electrolux
Dishwasher: Brand
Samsung
Garbage Disposal: Garbage Disposal
Installed


For homes on a private onsite wastewater system:

Garbage disposals can be a problem when used in homes on septic systems. You should learn the limitations of your septic system and use the garbage disposal appropriately. Long-term, inappropriate use can cause expensive-to-repair damage to septic systems.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Electric

Inspection of range/oven is limited to basic functions, such as testing of the range-top burners, and bake/broil features of the oven. Self-cleaning & convection function isnot inspected

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
Samsung
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate, Over Range Microwave
Washer / Dryer: Dryer Brand
LG
Washer / Dryer: Washer Brand
LG
Washer / Dryer: Dryer Power Source
240 Electric
Washer / Dryer: Dryer Vent
Metal Flex

Vent visual inspection

A dryer vent connection was installed.  The dryer vent was examined visually only. A visual examination will not detect the presence of lint accumulated inside the vent, which is a potential fire hazard.  The Inspector recommends that you have the dryer vent cleaned at the time of purchase and annually in the future to help ensure that safe conditions exist. Inspector also recommends that flexible type dryer vents should not be used.Lint accumulation can occur even in approved, properly installed vents. Here is a quick video showing proper Dryer Vent Installation 

Washer / Dryer: Washer Connections

Inspector recommends using appropriate steel braided hoses for washing machine connections.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
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4.2.1 - Dishwasher

No High Loop

Dishwasher drain does not have a "high loop". Recommend checking the installation recommendations from the manufacturer for this dishwasher and adding a high loop to dishwasher drain tube as needed.

Here is a quick video I made to help you to understand and/or fix your High Loop


Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Range/Oven/Cooktop

Anti-Tip

Range was not fastened to the floor. This poses a safety hazard to children. Recommend installing an anti-tip bracket. 

Here is a quick video I made to better explain and to give you an idea of how to install an Anti-Tip Bracket

Tools Handyman/DIY

5 - Plumbing

IN NI NP
5.1 Main Water Shut-off Device X
5.2 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
5.3 Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures X
5.4 Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents X
5.5 Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems X
Filters and other Components
None
Sewage system type
Public
Water Source
Public
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
Basement, Utility room / closet

Water main shut off and back flow prevention device.

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: DWV Material
PVC, Plastic
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Distribution Material
CPVC

Inspector recommends that plumbing distribution material running through unconditioned spaces should be insulated. Insulating plumbing pipes might aid in the prevention of freezing pipes and helps to limit condensation forming on the pipes which might lead to other moisture issues in the home.

Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Kitchen and Bathroom Fixtures
Sink, Toilet, Shower, Tub
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Basement
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Power Source/Type
Electric
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
Richmond

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to and not higher than 120 degrees F to kill microbes and to prevent scalding.

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help. 

Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Capacity
50 gallons
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Fuel System
None
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Main Gas Shut-off Location
None
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
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5.2.1 - Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems

Obsolete trap

A trap beneath the sink was of a type that is no longer allowed to be installed in new construction for safety reasons.  Although this type of trap may have been commonly considered safe at the time the home was originally constructed, as general knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time, building standards have changed to reflect current understanding. Unless otherwise noted, there was no leak and no odor detected at the time of the inpsection. The Inspector recommends that you consider updating the existing traps to meet generally-accepted current standards by installing P-traps. All work should be performed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Here is a quick video I made to help show you what it means to have an Obsolete Trap

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
5.3.1 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Sink - Poor / Slow Drainage

Sink had slow/poor drainage. Recommend a qualified plumber repair.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
5.3.2 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Caulking

Loose or missing caulking around fixture. Recommend re-caulking.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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5.3.3 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Toilet Loose

In this bathroom, the toilet was loose at the floor and should be re-attached by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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5.4.1 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

TPR Discharge Pipe

The TPR discharge pipe was missing or had an improper installation. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. 

Here is a quick video to show how you might add a TPR Discharge Pipe

Tools Handyman/DIY
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5.4.2 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

Near End of Life

The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater was functional at the time of inspection but appears to be approaching or is beyond this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

6 - Electrical

IN NI NP
6.1 Service Entrance Conductors X
6.2 Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device X
6.3 Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses X
6.4 Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles X
6.5 Protected Receptacles / Circuits X
6.6 Smoke, Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detectors X
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
240 Volts, Service Lateral / "Under Ground"
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Basement
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Manufacturer
Square D
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Capacity
400 AMP
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Location
None Observed
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Electrical Disconnect Location
At Service Meter, Exterior
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Branch Wiring
Copper

Home branch circuit wiring consists of wiring distributing electricity to devices such as switches, receptacles, and appliances. Most conductors are hidden behind floor, wall and ceiling coverings and cannot be evaluated by the inspector. The Inspector does not remove cover plates and inspection of branch wiring is limited to proper response to testing of switches and a representative number of electrical receptacles.

Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Non-Metallic
Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Doorbell
Doorbell
Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Lighting Fixtures and Ceiling Fans
Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Receptacles
Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Switches

Disclaimer

Switches are sometimes connected to fixtures that require specialized conditions, such as darkness or movement, to respond. Switches sometimes are connected to electrical receptacles (and sometimes only the top or bottom half of an receptacle). Because outlets are often inaccessible and because including the checking of both halves of every electrical outlet in the home exceeds the Standards of Practice and are not included in a typical General Home Inspection price structure. Functionality of all switches in the home may not be confirmed by the inspector.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Recessed / Can Lighting

In homes that contain can/recessed lighting that is in contact with insulation, Inspector recommends that client ensure this lighting is IC (Insulation Contact) Rated. Lights that are IC rated usually have a tag/stamp that is located on the inside of the can where the lamp sits. You may have to remove the trim ring to see it well enough to read. If lighting is not IC Rated or client is unable to determine the rating, Inspector recommends further evaluation by a qualified electrician to determine if this/these fixture(s) are IC Rated and replace lighting or correct surrounding insulation as needed.

Protected Receptacles / Circuits: AFCI
None

In modern building practices, AFCI protection is currently required for all 15 and 20 amp branch circuits providing power to outlets in residential family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sun rooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, and similar rooms or areas. Many older homes and even many recently built or remodeled homes do not have this protection. If your home does not have AFCI protection in all of these locations, Inspector recommends that you consider consulting with a qualified electrician and making these upgrades. Here is a link where you can learn more about AFCI Protection

AFCIs should be tested once a month to make sure they are working properly and providing protection from fires initiated by arcing faults. A test button is located on the front of the device. The user should follow the instructions accompanying the device. If the device does not trip when tested or does not reset after testing, the AFCI is defective and should be replaced.

Protected Receptacles / Circuits: GFCI
At Receptacle

In modern building practices, GFCI protection is required for outlets serving bathrooms, kitchens, garages, laundry rooms, utility sinks, crawlspaces, unfinished basements, and exterior locations. Many older homes and even many recently built or remodeled homes do not have this protection. Here is a link to give you some more information on GFCI Protection. If your home does not have GFCI protection in all of these locations, Inspector recommends that you consider consulting with a qualified electrician and making these upgrades. 

GFCIs should be tested once a month to make sure they are working properly. A test button is located on the front of the device. The user should follow the instructions accompanying the device. If the device does not trip when tested or does not reset after testing, the GFCI is defective and should be replaced.

Protected Receptacles / Circuits: TRR
No TRR Present

In modern building practices, Tamper Resistant Receptacles have been installed in new homes and renovations since 2008. Here is an article with a video from the Electrical Safety Foundation International that gives more information on Tamper Resistant Receptacles If your home does not have TR Receptacles, Inspector recommends that you consider consulting with a qualified electrician and making these upgrades. 

Smoke, Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detectors: CO Detectors
Not Present

Since CO is colorless, tasteless and odorless (unlike smoke from a fire), detection and prevention of carbon monoxide poisoning in a home environment is impossible without a warning device. In North America, some state, provincial and municipal governments require installation of CO detectors in new units - among them, the U.S. states of Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Vermont, the Canadian province of Ontario, and New York City.

According to the 2005 edition of the carbon monoxide guidelines, NFPA 720, published by the National Fire Protection Association, sections 5.1.1.1 and 5.1.1.2, all CO detectors 'shall be centrally located outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms,' and each detector 'shall be located on the wall, ceiling or other location as specified in the installation instructions that accompany the unit.'

In additon:

- CO alarms should not be installed directly above or beside fuel-burning appliances, as appliances may emit a small amount of carbon monoxide upon start-up, creating false alarms.

- A detector should not be placed within fifteen feet of heating or cooking appliances or in or near very humid areas such as bathrooms.

 - Installation locations vary by manufacturer. Manufacturers' recommendations differ to a certain degree based on research conducted with each one's specific detector. Inspectors will typically have no way of knowing the Manufacturers' recommendations and should limit comments to the (educated) obvious.

Smoke, Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detectors: Smoke Detectors
Not Tested

Generally-accepted current safety standards recommend smoke detectors be installed in the following locations:

-  In the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms

-  In all bedrooms

-  In each story of a dwelling unit, including basements and cellars, but not including crawl spaces and uninhabitable attics.

-  In residential units of 1,200 square feet or more, automatic fire detectors, in the form of smoke detectors shall be provided for each 1,200 square feet of area or part thereof.

-  Any smoke detector located within 20 feet of a kitchen or bedroom containing a tub or shower must be a photoelectric type.

The 1996 edition of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 72 gives further guidance on the placement of smoke detectors, when required. Here are some examples from Chapter 2 of NFPA 72:

-  Smoke detectors in a bedroom with a ceiling sloped greater than one foot in eight feet horizontally should be located on the high side of the ceiling.

-  Smoke detectors should not be located within three (3) feet of a door to a bedroom containing a tub or a shower or the supply registers of a forced air HVAC system.

-  Smoke detectors can be located on the ceiling with the side of the detector greater than four (4) inches from the wall or on the wall of a bedroom with the top of the detector located four (4) to twelve (12) inches down from the ceiling.

All smoke detectors should be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendation and be UL listed.

Here is a link to the National Fire Protection Association that offers more information on smoke alarms. And here is a video of a test that demonstrates the difference in response between ionization vs photoelectric alarms/detectors.

Low Voltage System

This home has a low voltage system. These systems include things such as phone, communication, TV and entertainment, computer and networking, alarms and more. Inspection of a low voltage system is beyond the scope of a home inspection. Recommend communicating with the home owner to learn more about this system.

Smoke, Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detectors: Central Alarm System

Smoke detectors not checked due to the presence of a central alarm system. Testing may lead to a call to emergency response agencies. Check with the alarm monitoring company for instructions on proper testing.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
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Comment
6.2.1 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Double Lugged

In the service panel, two wires (including one or more neutral wires) were connected under a single screw on a bus bar being used for the neutral/grounded conductor wires. This is known as a "double lug" and is a defective condition that should be corrected by a qualified electrical contractor.

Here is a quick video I made with some more information on what it means when your panel is Double Lugged

Electric Electrical Contractor
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6.2.2 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Double-Tap

In the service panel, two wires were connected to a breaker designed for only one wire. This is known as a "double-tap" and is a defective condition that should be corrected by a qualified electrical contractor.

Here is a quick video I made with some more information on what it means when your panel has a Double Tap

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
6.2.3 - Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device

Neutral Wires Not Marked as Hot

One or more white, neutral wires was being used as a hot wire. This is common practice in some instances such as a 240v connection. Inspector recommends that neutral wires being used as hot wires to be marked accordingly. All work should be completed by a qualified professional.

Here is a quick video I made with some more information on what it means when your panel has Neutral Wires Not Marked as Hot

Electric Electrical Contractor
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6.3.1 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Exposed splices

Electrical wires had splices exposed to touch. Splices should be contained within an approved junction box with a listed cover installed. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified electrical contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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6.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Cover Plates Missing

One or more outlets was/were missing a cover plate. This causes short and shock risk. Recommend installation of plates.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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6.4.2 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Light Inoperable

One or more light fixture(s) did not respond to the switch.  The bulb(s) may need to be replaced or there may be a problem with the switch, wiring or light fixture(s).  If after the bulb(s) is/are replaced this/these light(s) still fail(s) to respond to the switch, this condition may represent a potential fire hazard and the Inspector recommends that an evaluation and any necessary repairs be performed by a qualified electrical contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
6.5.1 - Protected Receptacles / Circuits

No GFCI Protection Installed

No GFCI protection was observed in all locations.

For safety reasons, the Inspector recommends that receptacles located within 6 feet of a plumbing fixture, in garages, in crawlspaces, in unfinished basements, in laundry/utility rooms/closest, and on the exterior of the home to be provided with ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection in good working order to avoid potential electric shock or electrocution hazards.

 This can be achieved relatively inexpensively by:

1. Replacing an individual standard receptacle with a GFCI receptacle.

2. Replacing the electrical circuit receptacle located closest to the overcurrent protection device (usually a breaker) with a GFCI receptacle.

3. Replacing the breaker currently protecting the electrical circuit that contains the receptacles of concern with a GFCI breaker.

Adding equipment grounding and a service grounding system will also increase home safety.

Recommend licensed electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles in all locations.

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
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6.6.1 - Smoke, Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detectors

Smoke Detectors - Not Present

Inspector observed no or too few smoke detectors. Recommend adding smoke detectors following manufacturer and National Fire Protection Association direction. A link has been provided to the NFPA in the information section, above.

Wrench DIY

7 - HVAC

IN NI NP
7.1 Equipment X
7.2 Normal Operating Controls X
7.3 Distribution Systems X
7.4 Vents & Flues X
Equipment: Brand
Ruud
Equipment: AC Type
Electric, Heat Pump
Equipment: Heat Type
Forced Air
Equipment: Energy Source for Heat
Electric
Equipment: Temperature Differential
22 Degrees Fahrenheit

This is the number of degrees the system is cooling (or heating) the house air. Normal range for this number is 14-24 degrees. As with all mechanical equipment, the unit may fail at any time without warning. The inspector cannot determine future failures.

Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Hall
Distribution Systems: Ductwork - Distribution
Insulated, Flex Duct

Inspector recommends that ductwork distribution material running through unconditioned spaces should be insulated. Insulating ductwork might aid in energy and cost savings and helps to limit condensation forming on the ductwork which might lead to other moisture issues in the home.

Distribution Systems: Vents
Distribution Systems: Return Air
Distribution Systems: Filter Advice

Recommend that home buyers replace or clean HVAC filters upon taking occupancy depending on the type of filters installed. Regardless of the type, recommend checking filters monthly in the future and replacing or cleaning them as necessary. How frequently they need replacing or cleaning depends on the type and quality of the filter, how the system is configured (e.g. always on vs. "Auto"), and on environmental factors (e.g. pets, smoking, frequency of house cleaning, number of occupants, the season.

Disclaimer - Cooling System

Inspection of home cooling systems typically includes visual examination of readily observable components for adequate condition, and system testing for proper operation using normal controls. Cooling system inspection will not be as comprehensive as that performed by a qualified heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system contractor. Report comments are limited to identification of common requirements and deficiencies. Observed indications that further evaluation is needed will result in referral to a qualified HVAC contractor.

Disclaimer - Heat Exchanger

The Inspector specifically disclaims furnace heat exchangers because proper evaluation requires invasive, technically exhaustive measures that exceed the scope of the General Home Inspection. The Inspector recommends that you have it certified by a qualified HVAC contractor.

Low Temperature

The outdoor air temperature was below 65 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Equipment

Service, Clean, and Certify

The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, service and certify this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.


Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
7.1.2 - Equipment

Insulation Missing or Damaged

Missing or damaged insulation was observed on the refrigerant line. This can cause energy loss and condensation. Recommend replacing.

Tools Handyman/DIY

8 - Doors, Windows & Interior

IN NI NP
8.1 Interior Doors X
8.2 Exterior Doors X
8.3 Windows X
8.4 Floors / Walls / Ceilings X
8.5 Steps, Stairways & Railings X
8.6 Countertops & Cabinets X
Disclaimer - Ancillary Inspections

Inspection of the home interior does not include testing for radon, mold, asbestos, lead paint, or other environmental hazards unless specifically requested as an ancillary inspection.

Interior Doors: Doors
Exterior Doors: Exterior Door
Steel, Sliding Glass
Windows: Window Type
Double-hung, Fixed/Picture
Floors / Walls / Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Hardwood, Vinyl
Floors / Walls / Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors / Walls / Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Textured
Steps, Stairways & Railings: Stairs and Railing
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Granite
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Interior Doors

Door Doesn't Latch

This door did not latch properly. Recommend handyman repair latch and/or strike plate.

Tools Handyman/DIY

9 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

IN NI NP
9.1 General X
9.2 Attic Insulation X
9.3 Ventilation X
9.4 Exhaust Systems X
General: Attic Access Location
Ceiling Hatch
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Fiberglass, Loose-fill

Here is a link to Energy Star with recommended home insulation R-Values

Attic Insulation: Approximate Average Insulation Depth
12 inches

Right click and "Open image in new tab" for better view.



Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Gable Vents, Ridge Vents, Soffit Vents
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans
Through Attic Venting
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Exhaust Systems

Bathroom Vents Into Attic

Bathroom fan vented into the attic, which can cause moisture and mold. Recommend a qualified contractor property install exhaust to terminate to the exterior.

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

IN NI NP
10.1 Foundation X X
10.2 Floor Structure X X
10.3 Wall Structure X X
Inspection Method
Basement, Finished Basement

The General Home Inspection includes inspection of the home structural elements that were readily visible at the time of the inspection. This typically includes the foundation, exterior walls, floor structures and roof structure. Much of the home structure is hidden behind exterior and interior roof, floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, or is buried underground. Because the General Home Inspection is limited to visual and non-invasive methods, this report may not identify all structural deficiencies. Upon observing indications that structural problems may exist that are not readily visible, the inspector may recommend inspection, testing, or evaluation by a specialist that may include invasive measures.

Foundation: Material
Masonry Block
Floor Structure: Material - House Flooring Support System
Wood I-Joists
Floor Structure: Sub-floor
OSB
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Concrete
Floor Structure: Flooring Insulation
Not Visible
Wall Structure: Not Visible
Finished Basement

This house has a basement that is finished. Many of the components of the house could not be inspected due to being hidden behind walls, ceilings, and finished flooring.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present