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1234 Main St.
Longmont, CO 80501
04/08/2020 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
98
Items Inspected
7
Minor defect/maintenance item
7
Marginal defect
6
Major defect/safety hazard

www.ChooseTHI.com

1 - Inspection Detail

General Inspection Info: Occupancy
Vacant
General Inspection Info: Weather Conditions
Sunny, Cold
General Inspection Info: Type of Building
Condominium
General Inspection Info: In Attendance
Client

I prefer to have my client with me during my inspection so that we can discuss concerns, and I can answer all questions. 

General Inspection Info: Overview

Professional Home Inspections strives to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the Standards of Practice as set forth by InterNACHI. As such, I inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of the home as designated in these Standards of Practice. When systems or components designated in the Standards of Practice were present but were not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected will be stated. This inspection is neither technically exhaustive or quantitative.

There may be comments made in this report that exceed the required reporting of the InterNACHI Standards of Practice, these comments (if present) were made as a courtesy to give you as much information as possible about the home. Exceeding the Standards of Practice will only happen when I feel I have the experience, knowledge, or evidence to do so. There should be no expectation that the Standards of Practice will be exceeded throughout the inspection, and any comments made that do exceed the standards will be followed by a recommendation for further evaluation and repairs by applicable tradespeople. 

This report contains observations of those systems and components that, in my professional judgment, were not functioning properly, significantly deficient, or unsafe. All items in this report that were designated for repair, replacement, maintenance, or further evaluation should be investigated by qualified tradespeople within the clients contingency period, to determine a total cost of said repairs and to learn of any additional problems that may be present during these evaluations that were not visible during a "visual only" Home Inspection. 

This inspection will not reveal every concern or issue that may be present, but only those significant defects that were accessible and visible at the time of inspection. This inspection can not predict future conditions or determine if latent or concealed defects are present. The statements made in this report reflect the conditions as existing at the time of the inspection only and expire at the completion of the inspection, as conditions can change. Weather conditions and other changes in conditions may reveal problems that were not present at the time of inspection; including but not limited to: roof leaks, or water infiltration into crawl spaces or basements. This report is only supplemental to the Sellers Disclosure and Pest (WDI) Inspection Report. Refer to the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice (linked to above), and the Inspection agreement regarding the scope and limitations of this inspection.

This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, regarding the operation, function, or future reliability of the home and its components. AND IT SHOULD NOT BE RELIED ON AS SUCH. This inspection report should be used alongside the seller's disclosure, pest inspection (WDI) report, and quotes and advice from the tradespeople recommended in this report to gain a better understanding of the condition of the home. Some risk is always involved when purchasing a property and unexpected repairs should be anticipated, as this is, unfortunately, a part of homeownership. One Year Home Warranties are sometimes provided by the sellers and are highly recommended as they may cover future repairs on major items and components of the home. If a warranty is not being provided by the seller(s), your Realtor can advise you of companies who offer them. 

General Inspection Info: Notice to Third Parties

Notice to Third Parties: This report is the property of Total Home Inspection Services LLC and is Copyrighted as of 2019. The Client(s) and their Direct Real Estate Representative named herein have been named as licensee(s) of this document. This document is non-transferrable, in whole or in part, to any and all third-parties, including; subsequent buyers, sellers, and listing agents. Copying and pasting deficiencies to prepare the repair request is permitted. THE INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT SHALL NOT BE RELIED UPON BY ANYONE OTHER THAN THE CLIENT NAMED HEREIN. This report is governed by an Inspection agreement that contained the scope of the inspection, including limitations, exclusions, and conditions of the copyright. Unauthorized recipients are advised to contact a qualified Home Inspector of their choosing to provide them with their own Inspection and Report.

General Inspection Info: Important Info

INACCESSIBLE AREAS: In the report, there may be specific references to areas and items that were inaccessible or only partly accessible. I can make no representations regarding conditions that may be present in these areas that were concealed or inaccessible for review. With access and an opportunity for inspection, reportable conditions or hidden damage may be found in these areas.

QUALITATIVE vs QUANTITATIVE - A home inspection is not quantitative, when multiple or similar parts of a system, item, or component are found to have a deficiency, the deficiency will be noted in a qualitative manner such as "multiple present" etc. A quantitative number of deficient parts, pieces, or items will not be given as the repairing contractor will need to evaluate and ascertain the full amount or extent of the deficiency or damage. This is not a technically exhaustive inspection. 

REPAIRS VERSUS UPGRADES - I inspect homes to today's safety and building standards. Therefore some recommendations made in this report may have not been required when the home was constructed. Building standards change and are improved for the safety and benefit of the occupants of the home and any repairs and/or upgrades mentioned should be considered for safety, performance, and the longevity of the home's items and components. Although I will address some recommended upgrades in the report, this should not be construed as a full listing of items that could potentially be upgraded. To learn of ALL the ways the home could be brought up to today's building and safety standards, full and exhaustive evaluations should be conducted by qualified tradespeople. 

COMPONENT LIFE EXPECTANCY - Components may be listed as having no deficiencies at the time of inspection, but may fail at any time due to their age or lack of maintenance, that couldn't be determined by the inspector. A life expectancy chart is provided as an attachment to this inspection report.

PHOTOGRAPHS: Several photos are included in your inspection report. These photos are for informational purposes only and do not attempt to show every instance or occurrence of a defect.

TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS: This report is proofread before sending it out, but typographical errors may be present. If any errors are noticed, please feel free to contact me for clarification.

Please acknowledge to me once you have completed reading this report. At that time I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, or provide clarification. Non-acknowledgement implies that you understood all the information contained in this report.


General Inspection Info: Thermal Imaging

THERMAL IMAGING: An infrared camera may be used for specific areas or visual problems, and should not be viewed as a full thermal scan of the entire home. Additional services are available at additional costs and would be supplemented by an additional agreement/addendum. Temperature readings displayed on thermal images in this report are included as a courtesy and should not be wholly relied upon as a home inspection is qualitative, not quantitative. These values can vary +/- 4% or more of displayed readings, and these values will display surface temperatures when air temperature readings would actually need to be conducted on some items which are beyond the scope of a home inspection. If a full thermal scan of the home is desired, please reach out to me schedule this service.

General Inspection Info: Definitions

This report divides deficiencies into three categories; Major Defects (in red), Marginal Defects (in orange), and Minor Defects/Maintenance Items/FYI (colored in blue). Safety Hazards or Concerns will be listed in the Red or Orange categories depending on their perceived danger, but should always be addressed ASAP. 

  • Major Defects - Items or components that may require a major expense to correct. Items categorized in this manner require further evaluation and repairs or replacement as needed by a Qualified Contractor prior to the end of your contingency period. 
  • Marginal Defects - Items or components that were found to include a deficiency. These items may have been functional at the time of inspection, but this functionality may be impaired, not ideal, or the defect may lead to further problems (most defects will fall into this categorization). Repairs or replacement is recommended to items categorized in this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect, prior to the end of your contingency period. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a Handyman or Qualified Contractor and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs. 
  • Minor Defects/Maintenance Items/FYI - This categorization will include items or components that were found to be in need of recurring or basic general maintenance and/or may need minor repairs which may improve their functionality. This categorization will also include FYI items that could include observations, important information, recommended upgrades to items, areas, or components, as well as items that were nearing, at, or past the end of their typical service life, but were in the opinion of the inspector, still functional at the time of inspection. Major repairs or replacement should be anticipated, and planned for, on any items that are designated as being past, or at the end of their typical life. These repairs or replacement costs can sometimes represent a major expense; i.e. HVAC Systems, Water Heaters, Plumbing pipes, etc. 

These categorizations are in my professional judgment and based on what I observed at the time of inspection. This categorization should not be construed as to mean that items designated as "Minor defects" or "Marginal Defects" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendations in each comment is more important than its categorization. Due to your perception, opinions, or personal experience, you may feel defects belong in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once again it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining to each defect that is paramount, not its categorical placement. 

Your Job As a Homeowner: Ask me questions!

As you walk through the home today write down any questions or concerns you may have, and I will fully address them before we're finished.  If you come up with any more questions regarding the inspection in the following days, weeks or months, don't hesitate to email or call and I will continue to provide you with the exceptional service that you should expect as my client.

Your Job As a Homeowner: What Really Matters in a Home Inspection

Now that you've bought your home and had your inspection, you may still have some questions about your new house and the items revealed in your report. 

Home maintenance is a primary responsibility for every homeowner, whether you've lived in several homes of your own or have just purchased your first one. Staying on top of a seasonal home maintenance schedule is important, and your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector can help you figure this out so that you never fall behind. Don't let minor maintenance and routine repairs turn into expensive disasters later due to neglect or simply because you aren't sure what needs to be done and when. 

Your home inspection report is a great place to start. In addition to the written report, checklists, photos, and what the inspector said during the inspection not to mention the sellers disclosure and what you noticed yourself it's easy to become overwhelmed. However, it's likely that your inspection report included mostly maintenance recommendations, the life expectancy for the home's various systems and components, and minor imperfections. These are useful to know about. 

But the issues that really matter fall into four categories: 

  1. major defects, such as a structural failure; 
  2. things that can lead to major defects, such as a small leak due to a defective roof flashing; 
  3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home if not rectified immediately; and 
  4. safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel. 

Anything in these categories should be addressed as soon as possible. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4). 

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. It's important to realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in your inspection report. No house is perfect. Keep things in perspective as you move into your new home. 

And remember that homeownership is both a joyful experience and an important responsibility, so be sure to call on your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector to help you devise an annual maintenance plan that will keep your family safe and your home in good condition for years to come.

Your Job As a Homeowner: Schedule a Home Maintenance Inspection

Even the most vigilant homeowner can, from time to time, miss small problems or forget about performing some routine home repairs and seasonal maintenance. That's why an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection will help you keep your home in good condition and prevent it from suffering serious, long-term and expensive damage from minor issues that should be addressed now. 

The most important thing to understand as a new homeowner is that your house requires care and regular maintenance. As time goes on, parts of your house will wear out, break down, deteriorate, leak, or simply stop working. But none of these issues means that you will have a costly disaster on your hands if you're on top of home maintenance, and that includes hiring an expert once a year. 

Just as you regularly maintain your vehicle, consider getting an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection as part of the cost of upkeep for your most valuable investment your home. 

Your InterNACHI-Certified Professional Inspector can show you what you should look for so that you can be an informed homeowner. Protect your family's health and safety, and enjoy your home for years to come by having an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection performed every year. 

Schedule next year's maintenance inspection with your home inspector today!


Every house should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.

Details

InterNACHI is so certain of the integrity of their members that they back them up with a $10,000 Honor Guarantee. 

For details, please visit www.nachi.org/honor


Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice while reading this inspection report.  I performed the home inspection according to the standards and my clients wishes and expectations.  Please refer to the inspection contract or agreement between the inspector and the inspector's client.  

2 - Roof

Roof Covering: Type of Roof-Covering Described
Flat Roof Material

I observed the roof-covering material and attempted to identify its type.  

This inspection is not a guarantee that a roof leak in the future will not happen. Roofs leak.  Even a roof that appears to be in good, functional condition will leak under certain circumstances. We will not take responsibility for a roof leak that happens in the future.  This is not a warranty or guarantee of the roof system.

Roof Covering: Roof Was Inspected
Inaccessible

We attempted to inspect the roof from various locations and methods, including from the ground and a ladder. 

The inspection was not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes.  It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection.  We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roof, and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy.  

Roof Covering: Unable to Walk Upon Roof Surface

According to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice, a home inspector is not required to walk upon any roof surface.  Access to the roof was not available, no inspection of the roof was performed.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves:

  • the roof-covering materials;
  • the gutters;
  • the downspouts;
  • the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and 
  • the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of roof-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • observed indications of active roof leaks; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

3 - Chimney, Fireplace, or Stove

Factory-Built Chimney: Factory-Built Chimney Exterior Was Inspected

The chimney exterior was inspected during my home inspection.

Factory-Built Chimney: Factory-Built Chimney Hood or Cap Installed
Wall in Balcony Area

A hood or cap was installed at the factory built chimney.  Good.  

Fireplace: Type of Fireplace
Gas Fireplace Insert, Factory-Built

I tried to describe the type of fireplace. 

Factory-Built Chimney: Factory-Built Chimney Flashing Was Inspected
Wall in Balcony Area

I inspected for flashing installed at the chimney. 

Flashing is installed in areas where the chimney stack meets another system or component of the house.  And the flashing is supposed to divert water away from those areas to prevent water intrusion.

Fireplace: Fireplace Operation Inspected

Fireplace operated correctly when operated with switch above and left of the fireplace.

Factory-Built Chimney: Chimney Interior is Beyond the Scope

Inspecting the chimney interior and flue is beyond the scope of a home inspection.  An inspector is not required to inspect the flue or vent system, and is not required to inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.  Out of courtesy only, the inspector may take a look at readily accessible and visible parts of the chimney flue.  

Fireplace: Fireplace and Stack Inspection Limitations

Not everything of the fireplace and chimney stack system and components are inspected because they are not part of the Home Inspection Standards of Practice. I inspected only what I am required to inspect and only what was visible during the home inspection. I recommend hiring a certified chimney sweep to inspect, sweep, and further evaluate the interior of the fireplace system immediately and every year as part of a homeowner's routine maintenance plan. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;
  • lintels above the fireplace openings;
  • damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and
  • cleanout doors and frames.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of fireplace.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;
  • manually operated dampers that did not open and close;
  • the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;
  • the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; 
  • cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

4 - Exterior

General: Exterior Was Inspected

I inspected the exterior of the house.

Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim: Type of Wall-Covering Material Described
Engineered Wood, Brick Veneer

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging.  The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it.  Your job is to monitor the house's exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior wall-covering materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading: Vegetation, Drainage, Walls & Grading Were Inspected

I inspected the vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.

GFCIs & Electrical: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible.  The outdoor GFCI reset button is on the outlet in the master bathroom.

Walkways & Driveways: Walkways & Driveways Were Inspected

I inspected the walkways and driveways that were adjacent to the house.  The walkways, driveways, and parking areas that were far away from the house foundation were not inspected. 

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports: Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports Were Inspected

I inspected the porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports at the house that were within the scope of the home inspection. Patio was nearly level, with a slight downward slope towards the exterior.

Exterior Doors: Exterior Doors Inspected

I inspected the exterior doors for proper operation and general condition. 

Windows: Inspection Restricted

I did not inspect the windows from the exterior.  No visible evidence of moisture intrusion from the inside.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the exterior wall-covering materials; 
  • the eaves, soffits and fascia;
  • a representative number of windows;
  • all exterior doors;
  • flashing and trim;
  • adjacent walkways and driveways;
  • stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
  • porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 
  • vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of exterior wall-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Walkways & Driveways

Trip Hazard

I observed a trip hazard.  This condition is a safety concern. 

Correction and further evaluation is recommended. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Heating

Heating System Information: Energy Source
Gas
Heating System Information: Heating Method
Warm-Air Heating System
Heating System Information: Air Filter Location
Furnace blower compartment
Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Living room
Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Heating System Operated with Normal Operating Controls
Living Room
Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Service Switch Inspected

I observed a service switch. I inspected it. It worked when I used it during my inspection. 

Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Gas Shutoff Valve Location

The gas shutoff valve is located within sight of the furnace.

Ductwork: Ductwork Installed
Non-insulated

I observed ductwork in the house.  Warm-air heating systems, including heat pump systems, use ductwork to distribute the warm air throughout the house. I will attempt to determine if the each room has a heat source, but I may not be able to find every duct register.  

Ductwork: Unable to see majority of ducts.

The ductwork is only exposed in the mechanical room.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the heating system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the location of the thermostat for the heating system;
  • the energy source; and
  • the heating method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • any heating system that did not operate; 
  • if the heating system was deemed inaccessible; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

6 - Plumbing

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Water Distribution Pipe Composition
Copper
Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Location of Main Shut-Off Valve
Mechanical Closet
Hot Water Source: Inspected Venting Connections

I inspected the venting connections. 

Water Supply : Water Supply Is Public

The water supply to the house appeared to be from the public water supply source based upon the observed indications at the time of the inspection.  To confirm and be certain, I recommend asking the homeowner for details. 

Hot Water Source: Type of Hot Water Source
Gas-Fired Hot Water Tank

I inspected for the main source of the distributed hot water to the plumbing fixtures (sinks, tubs, showers).  I recommend asking the homeowner for details about the hot water equipment and past performance. 

Hot Water Source: Inspected Hot Water Source

I inspected the hot water source and equipment according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice. Water heater was manufactured in the 22nd week of 2016.  The capacity is 40 gallons.

Hot Water Source: Inspected TPR Valve

I inspected the temperature and pressure relief valve.  

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Inspected Drain, Waste, Vent Pipes

I attempted to inspect the drain, waste, and vent pipes.  Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about water and sewer leaks or blockages in the past.  

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Inspected Water Supply & Distribution Pipes

I attempted to inspect the water supply and distribution pipes (plumbing pipes). Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed. Inspection restriction. Ask the homeowner about water supply, problems with water supply, and water leaks in the past.  

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the drainage pipes were hidden within the walls.  

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the water supply pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the water distribution pipes, valves and connections were hidden within the walls.  

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the main water supply shut-off valve;
  • the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  • the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  • the drain, waste and vent system; and
  • drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  • whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  • the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  • the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  • the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
  • the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  • deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  • active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; 
  • toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.


7 - Electrical

AFCIs: Inspected AFCIs

AFCI protection was not required at the time of construction of the unit.

Electrical Wiring: Type of Wiring, If Visible
NM-B (Romex)
Panelboards & Breakers: Inspected Main Panelboard & Breakers

I inspected the electrical panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses). 

Panelboards & Breakers: Inspected Subpanel & Breakers

I inspected the electrical subpanel and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses). 

Service Grounding & Bonding: Inspected the Service Grounding & Bonding

I inspected the electrical service grounding and bonding.

GFCIs: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible, with the noted exception in the kitchen.

Main Service Disconnect: Unable to Inspect Service Disconnect

Access to the main service disconnect was restricted/not in unit

Electrical Wiring: Unable to Inspect All of the Wiring

I was unable to inspect all of the electrical wiring. Obviously, most of the wiring is hidden from view within walls. Beyond the scope of a visual home inspection. 

GFCIs: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the GFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the service drop;
  • the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  • the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  • the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  • the electric meter and base;
  • service-entrance conductors;
  • the main service disconnect;
  • panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  • service grounding and bonding;
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  • all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  • for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  • the type of wiring observed.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  • any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  • the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; 
  • the absence of smoke and/or carbon monoxide detectors; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
7.4.1 - Service Grounding & Bonding

Bonding Not Present at Water Heater

Bonding was not installed at the hot water heater at the time of inspection.

Contractor Qualified Professional

8 - Master Bedroom

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet
Windows: Window Type
Sliders
Heat Source in Bedroom: Heat Source in Bedroom Was Inspected

I inspected the heat source in the bedroom (register/baseboard). 

Doors: I inspected the bedroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them if possible.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; and
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible.

The inspector shall describe:

  • any limitation to inspection

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • any signs of active or past moisture intrusion;
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.



$
Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Floors, Walls, Ceilings

Poor Patching

Sub-standard drywall patching observed at time of inspection. Recommend re-patching. 

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Windows

Window Difficult to Operate and Lock

Window was difficult to open and close, bottom lock not latching.

Contractor Qualified Professional

9 - Bathroom 1

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Tile
Heat Source in Bathroom: Heat Source in Bathroom Was Inspected

I inspected the heat source in the bathroom (register/baseboard). 

Door: I inspected the bathroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Cabinetry: I inspected the cabinets for damage and proper operation.
Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected

I flushed all of the toilets, inspected them for loose connection to the floor and the integrity of the surrounding subfloor.

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers

I ran water at all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: GFCI-Protection Tested

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. 

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • walls, floors and ceiling;
  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible
  • Bathroom exhaust fans for proper operation

The home inspector shall report:

  • any receptacle not protected by a GFCI
  • deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  • deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  • active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; 
  • toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Bathroom Toilets

Moisture Detected in Subfloor

I detected elevated moisture levels in the floor around the toilet.  Possible leak from wax ring seal.

Recommend further evaluation and correction.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

10 - Bedroom 2

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet
Windows: Window Type
Sliders
Heat Source in Bedroom: Heat Source in Bedroom Was Inspected

I inspected the heat source in the bedroom (register/baseboard). 

Doors: I inspected the bedroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them if possible.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; and
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible.

The inspector shall describe:

  • any limitation to inspection

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • any signs of active or past moisture intrusion;
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.



11 - Bathroom 2

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Tile
Heat Source in Bathroom: Heat Source in Bathroom Was Inspected

I inspected the heat source in the bathroom (register/baseboard). 

Cabinetry: I inspected the cabinets for damage and proper operation.
Door: I inspected the bathroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected

I flushed all of the toilets, inspected them for loose connection to the floor and the integrity of the surrounding subfloor.

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers

I ran water at all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: GFCI-Protection Tested

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. 

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • walls, floors and ceiling;
  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible
  • Bathroom exhaust fans for proper operation

The home inspector shall report:

  • any receptacle not protected by a GFCI
  • deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  • deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  • active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; 
  • toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
11.5.1 - Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window

Loose Fan

I observed that the bathroom fan is loose.

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
11.6.1 - GFCI & Electric in Bathroom

Recepticle loose

Recepticle loose. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
11.8.1 - Cabinetry

Mirror Defect

I observed indications of a defect in the mirror in the bathroom. The mirror was broken at the bottom left corner.

Recommend further evaluation and replacement.

Failure to replace may result in personal injury.

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Cooling

Cooling System Information: Cooling System Type
Forced Air
Cooling System Information: AC Brand
Rheem

Serial number on evaporator unit indicated manufacture on the 29th week of 1993.

Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Living room
Condensate: Condensate Discharge Confirmed

I observed a discharge pipe apparently connected to the condensate pump installed at the cooling system. 

Cooling System Information: Cooling System Inaccessible

The condenser/compressor unit was inaccessible. The inspection was restricted and limited by restricted access to roof. 

Further evaluation recommended.

Cooling System Information: Cool Temperature Restriction

Because the outside temperature was too cool to operate the air conditioner without the possibility of damaging the system, I did not operate the cooling system.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about the system, including past performance. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the cooling system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and
  • the cooling method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • any cooling system that did not operate; 
  • if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.


$
Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Cooling System Information

Water Staining on Ceiling of Mechanical Closet

I observed evidence of water staining on the ceiling of the mechanical closet where the A/C lines penetrated the drywall.  Followup measurements with a moisture meter indicated that this was not an active leak.

Seller's disclosure reported that a leak in the cooling system was repaired in 2015.

Further evaluation of roof flashing and correction recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Living Room

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Bamboo
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: A representative number of switches, receptacles and lighting fixtures were operated and/or tested.

Switches and lighting fixtures were operated and checked for function.

Receptacles were inspected for proper installation and wiring.

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; and
  • floors, walls and ceilings.

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
13.1.1 - Floors, Walls, Ceilings

Trim Pieces Loose

The bamboo trim pieces surrounding the fireplace hearth extension were loose and raising up.

Recommend further evaluation and correction.

Tools Handyman/DIY

14 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Bamboo
Doors: Doors Inspected

I inspected a representative number of doors according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate door locks and door stops, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 


Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them if possible.

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Inspected for Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

I inspected for the presence of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. 

There should be a smoke detector in every sleeping room, outside of every sleeping room, and one every level of a house. 

The detector in the hallway was a combination CO/smoke detector.  

Recommend installation of plug-in CO detector in hall outlet, closer to floor level.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; 
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; 
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
14.1.1 - Doors

Loose Jamb at Sliding Door

Door jamb is loose at latching side of sliding door. 

Recommend additional fasteners and recaulk.

Contractor Qualified Professional

15 - Laundry

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Tile
Clothes Washer: Clothes Washer Water Supply and Drain

The clothes washer was properly connected to hot and cold water supplies and drain.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

Clothes Washer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. 

Clothes Dryer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. 

I was unable to confirm that the dryer vents to outside. Dryer vent tires into mechanical chase.

The inspector shall inspect:

  • mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.


16 - Kitchen

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Countertops & Cabinets: Inspected Cabinets & Countertops

I inspected a representative number of cabinets and countertop surfaces. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range and Oven Type
Electric
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Bamboo

Some separation between planks was observed.

Kitchen Sink: Ran Water at Kitchen Sink

I ran water at the kitchen sink. 

Garbage Disposal: Turned On Garbage Disposal

I turned on the garbage disposal. 

GFCI: GFCI Tested

I observed ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection in the kitchen. 

Dishwasher: Inspected Dishwasher

I inspected the dishwasher by turning it on and letting it run a short cycle. The soap compartment opened automatically during a cycle.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Turned On Stove & Oven

I turned on the kitchen's stove and oven. The heating elements on the cooktop and ovens quickly came up to temperature.

Exhaust Fan: Inspected Exhaust Fan

I inspected the exhaust fan in the kitchen. Exhaust is recirculating type on microwave.

Refrigerator: Refrigerator Was On

I checked to see if the refrigerator was on. It was, however the temperature settings were set to off.  When controls were moved to the "cool" position the refrigerator was heard to begin operating. That's all I inspected in relation to a refrigerator. Refrigerators are beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Built-in Microwave: Microwave Turned On

I observed that the microwave turned on. I do nothing more than that. Microwaves are beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

The kitchen appliances are not included in the scope of a home inspection according to the Standards of Practice. 

The inspector will out of courtesy only check:

  • the stove, 
  • oven, 
  • microwave, and 
  • garbage disposer. 

$
Credit
Comment
16.3.1 - Kitchen Sink

Defect at Sink Fixture

I observed a defect at the kitchen sink fixture. The faucet was broken at the base of the arc.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
16.5.1 - GFCI

Missing GFCI Protection

I observed indications of missing GFCI protection in the kitchen on the two receptacles to the right of the cooktop/stove. All kitchen counter receptacles are required to be GFCI protected. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
16.11.1 - Lighting

Defect at Kitchen Lighting

I observed a defect at the kitchen lighting. The under-cabinet lighting was missing a cover and the bulb was burnt out.

Electric Electrical Contractor

17 - Detached Garage

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Garage Door Panels Were Inspected

I inspected the garage door panels. 

Exterior Door: Exterior Doors Inspected

I inspected the exterior doors of the detached garage.

Garage Vehicle Door: Type of Door Operation
Opener
Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Wall Control Button Label Was Inspected

I observed a warning label near the wall control button. Good. 

Roof Covering: Roof Was Inspected
Ladder

We attempted to inspect the roof from various locations and methods, including from the ground and a ladder. 

The inspection was not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes.  It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection.  We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roof, and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy.  

Roof Covering: Type of Roof-Covering Described
Asphalt

I observed the roof-covering material and attempted to identify its type.  

This inspection is not a guarantee that a roof leak in the future will not happen. Roofs leak.  Even a roof that appears to be in good, functional condition will leak under certain circumstances. We will not take responsibility for a roof leak that happens in the future.  This is not a warranty or guarantee of the roof system.

Roof Flashing: Wall Intersections

I looked for flashing where the roof covering meets a wall or siding material.  There should be step and counter flashing installed in these locations.  This is not an exhaustive inspection of all flashing areas.

Roof Flashing: Eaves and Gables

I looked for flashing installed at the eaves (near the gutter edge) and at the gables (the diagonal edge of the roof).  There should be metal drip flashing material installed in these locations.  The flashing helps the surface water on the roof to discharge into the gutter.  Flashing also helps to prevent water intrusion under the roof-covering. 

Gutters & Downspouts: Gutters Were Inspected

I inspected the gutters.  I wasn't able to inspect every inch of every gutter.  But I attempted to check the overall general condition of the gutters during the inspection and look for indications of major defects.  

Monitoring the gutters during a heavy rain (without lightening) is recommended.  In general, the gutters should catch rain water and direct the water towards downspouts that discharge the water away from the house foundation. 

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Eaves, Soffits and Fascia Were Inspected

I inspected the eaves, soffits and fascia.  I was not able to inspect every detail, since a home inspection is limited in its scope. 

Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading: Vegetation, Drainage, Walls & Grading Were Inspected

I inspected the vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.

Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim: Type of Wall-Covering Material Described
Engineered Wood

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging.  The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it.  Your job is to monitor the house's exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior wall-covering materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

Electric/GFCI Outside Garage: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible.

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Railings, Guards & Handrails Were Inspected

I inspected the railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Ceiling & Walls in Garage: Garage Ceiling & Walls Were Inspected

I inspected the ceiling and walls of the detached garage according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

Garage Floor: Garage Floor Inspected

I inspected the floor of the attached garage. The floor was properly graded to the exterior.

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Manual Release

I checked for a manual release handle--a means of manually detaching the door from the door opener. 

The handle should be colored red so that it can be seen easily. The handle should be easily accessible and no more than 6 feet above the garage floor. The handle should not be in contact with the top of a vehicles.

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: General Warning Label Was Inspected

I observed a general warning label attached to the back of the door panel. Good. 

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Springs, Bracket & Hardware Were Inspected

I closed the door and checked the springs for damage. If a spring was broken, operating the door can cause serious injury or death. I would not operate the door if there was damage. 

I visually checked the doors hinges, brackets and fasteners. If the door had an opener, the door must have an opener-reinforcement bracket that is securely attached to the doors top section. The header bracket of the opener rail must be securely attached to the wall or header using lag bolts or concrete anchors. 

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Door Was Manually Opened and Closed

I closed the door. If the door had an opener, I pulled the manual release to disconnect the door from the opener. I lifted and operated the door. If the door was hard to lift, then it is out of balance. This is an unsafe condition. 

I raised the door to the fully-open position, then closed the door. The door should move freely, and it should open and close without difficulty. As the door operates, I make sure that the rollers stay in the track. The door should stay in the fully open position. The door should also stay in a partially opened position about three to four above the garage floor level. 

I reconnected the door to the opener, if present. 

I checked the door handles or gripping points.  

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Spring Containment Was Inspected

If the door has extension springs, I inspect for spring containment. Extension springs should be contained by a cable that runs through the center of the springs. If a spring breaks, containment helps to prevent broken parts from flying around dangerously in the garage. 

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Wall Push Button Was Inspected

I inspected the wall button. The wall button should be at least 5 feet above the standing surface, and high enough to be out of reach of small children. I pressed the push button to see if it successfully operated the door.

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Non-Contact Reversal Was Inspected

I observed the auto-reverse feature during a non-contact test. 

Standing inside the garage but safely away from the path of the door, I used the remote control or wall button to close the door. As the door was closing, I waved an object in the path of the photoelectric eye beam. The door should automatically reverse.

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Photo-Electric Eyes Were Inspected

I inspected the photo-electric eyes. 

Federal law states that residential garage door openers manufactured after 1992 must be equipped with photo-electric eyes or some other safety-reverse feature that meets UL 325 standards.

I checked to see if photo-electric eyes are installed. The vertical distance between the photo-eye beam and the floor should be no more than 6 inches.

Roof Covering: Unable to See Everything

This is a visual-only inspection of the roof-covering materials. It does not include an inspection of the entire system. There are components of the roof that are not visible or accessible at all, including the underlayment, decking, fastening, flashing, age, shingle quality, manufacturer installation recommendations, etc. 

Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim: Inspection Was Restricted

I did not inspect all of the exterior wall-covering material.  A home inspection is not an exhaustive evaluation.  My inspection of the exterior was limited.  I did not reach and access closely every part of the exterior wall-covering. 

Electric/GFCI Outside Garage: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the GFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

The inspector shall inspect:

  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls.


The inspector shall describe:

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener.


$
Credit
Comment
17.3.1 - Gutters & Downspouts

Gutter Damaged

I observed damage to the gutter.  This is a defect that should be corrected by a professional contractor.  

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
17.11.1 - Garage Floor

Cracked Concrete at Garage Floor

I observed indications of cracks in the garage concrete floor. 

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
17.12.1 - Garage Vehicle Door

Weather Stripping at Garage Door in Poor Condition

I observed indications that the weather stripping at the garage door is in poor condition. 

Garage Garage Door Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
17.13.1 - Garage Vehicle Door Opener

Manual Release Not Red

I observed that the manual release handle of the garage door opener was not colored red so that it can be seen easily. Defect. 

Garage Garage Door Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
17.13.2 - Garage Vehicle Door Opener

Spring Containment Not Present

A spring containment device was not installed. If a spring breaks, damage to personal property or bodily injury may occur.

Garage Garage Door Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
17.13.3 - Garage Vehicle Door Opener

Spring Pulley Not Connected

I observed that the spring pulley cable was not properly installed. Improper installation may result in difficulty opening door.

Garage Garage Door Contractor