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1234 Main St.
Longmont, CO 80501
04/08/2020 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
122
Items Inspected
11
Minor defect/maintenance item
1
Marginal defect

www.ChooseTHI.com

1 - Inspection Detail

General Inspection Info: Occupancy
Occupied
General Inspection Info: Weather Conditions
Sunny, Cold
General Inspection Info: Type of Building
Single Family
General Inspection Info: In Attendance
Client

I prefer to have my client with me during my inspection so that we can discuss concerns, and I can answer all questions. 

General Inspection Info: Overview

Professional Home Inspections strives to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the Standards of Practice as set forth by InterNACHI. As such, I inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of the home as designated in these Standards of Practice. When systems or components designated in the Standards of Practice were present but were not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected will be stated. This inspection is neither technically exhaustive or quantitative.

There may be comments made in this report that exceed the required reporting of the InterNACHI Standards of Practice, these comments (if present) were made as a courtesy to give you as much information as possible about the home. Exceeding the Standards of Practice will only happen when I feel I have the experience, knowledge, or evidence to do so. There should be no expectation that the Standards of Practice will be exceeded throughout the inspection, and any comments made that do exceed the standards will be followed by a recommendation for further evaluation and repairs by applicable tradespeople. 

This report contains observations of those systems and components that, in my professional judgment, were not functioning properly, significantly deficient, or unsafe. All items in this report that were designated for repair, replacement, maintenance, or further evaluation should be investigated by qualified tradespeople within the clients contingency period, to determine a total cost of said repairs and to learn of any additional problems that may be present during these evaluations that were not visible during a "visual only" Home Inspection. 

This inspection will not reveal every concern or issue that may be present, but only those significant defects that were accessible and visible at the time of inspection. This inspection can not predict future conditions or determine if latent or concealed defects are present. The statements made in this report reflect the conditions as existing at the time of the inspection only and expire at the completion of the inspection, as conditions can change. Weather conditions and other changes in conditions may reveal problems that were not present at the time of inspection; including but not limited to: roof leaks, or water infiltration into crawl spaces or basements. This report is only supplemental to the Sellers Disclosure and Pest (WDI) Inspection Report. Refer to the State of Tennessee Standards of Practice (linked to above), and the Inspection agreement regarding the scope and limitations of this inspection.

This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, regarding the operation, function, or future reliability of the home and its components. AND IT SHOULD NOT BE RELIED ON AS SUCH. This inspection report should be used alongside the seller's disclosure, pest inspection (WDI) report, and quotes and advice from the tradespeople recommended in this report to gain a better understanding of the condition of the home. Some risk is always involved when purchasing a property and unexpected repairs should be anticipated, as this is, unfortunately, a part of homeownership. One Year Home Warranties are sometimes provided by the sellers and are highly recommended as they may cover future repairs on major items and components of the home. If a warranty is not being provided by the seller(s), your Realtor can advise you of companies who offer them. 

General Inspection Info: Notice to Third Parties

Notice to Third Parties: This report is the property of Total Home Inspection Services LLC and is Copyrighted as of 2019. The Client(s) and their Direct Real Estate Representative named herein have been named as licensee(s) of this document. This document is non-transferrable, in whole or in part, to any and all third-parties, including; subsequent buyers, sellers, and listing agents. Copying and pasting deficiencies to prepare the repair request is permitted. THE INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT SHALL NOT BE RELIED UPON BY ANYONE OTHER THAN THE CLIENT NAMED HEREIN. This report is governed by an Inspection agreement that contained the scope of the inspection, including limitations, exclusions, and conditions of the copyright. Unauthorized recipients are advised to contact a qualified Home Inspector of their choosing to provide them with their own Inspection and Report.

General Inspection Info: Important Info

INACCESSIBLE AREAS: In the report, there may be specific references to areas and items that were inaccessible or only partly accessible. I can make no representations regarding conditions that may be present in these areas that were concealed or inaccessible for review. With access and an opportunity for inspection, reportable conditions or hidden damage may be found in these areas.

QUALITATIVE vs QUANTITATIVE - A home inspection is not quantitative, when multiple or similar parts of a system, item, or component are found to have a deficiency, the deficiency will be noted in a qualitative manner such as "multiple present" etc. A quantitative number of deficient parts, pieces, or items will not be given as the repairing contractor will need to evaluate and ascertain the full amount or extent of the deficiency or damage. This is not a technically exhaustive inspection. 

REPAIRS VERSUS UPGRADES - I inspect homes to today's safety and building standards. Therefore some recommendations made in this report may have not been required when the home was constructed. Building standards change and are improved for the safety and benefit of the occupants of the home and any repairs and/or upgrades mentioned should be considered for safety, performance, and the longevity of the home's items and components. Although I will address some recommended upgrades in the report, this should not be construed as a full listing of items that could potentially be upgraded. To learn of ALL the ways the home could be brought up to today's building and safety standards, full and exhaustive evaluations should be conducted by qualified tradespeople. 

COMPONENT LIFE EXPECTANCY - Components may be listed as having no deficiencies at the time of inspection, but may fail at any time due to their age or lack of maintenance, that couldn't be determined by the inspector. A life expectancy chart is provided as an attachment to this inspection report.

PHOTOGRAPHS: Several photos are included in your inspection report. These photos are for informational purposes only and do not attempt to show every instance or occurrence of a defect.

TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS: This report is proofread before sending it out, but typographical errors may be present. If any errors are noticed, please feel free to contact me for clarification.

Please acknowledge to me once you have completed reading this report. At that time I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, or provide clarification. Non-acknowledgement implies that you understood all the information contained in this report.


General Inspection Info: Thermal Imaging

THERMAL IMAGING: An infrared camera may be used for specific areas or visual problems, and should not be viewed as a full thermal scan of the entire home. Additional services are available at additional costs and would be supplemented by an additional agreement/addendum. Temperature readings displayed on thermal images in this report are included as a courtesy and should not be wholly relied upon as a home inspection is qualitative, not quantitative. These values can vary +/- 4% or more of displayed readings, and these values will display surface temperatures when air temperature readings would actually need to be conducted on some items which are beyond the scope of a home inspection. If a full thermal scan of the home is desired, please reach out to me schedule this service.

General Inspection Info: Definitions

This report divides deficiencies into three categories; Major Defects (in red), Marginal Defects (in orange), and Minor Defects/Maintenance Items/FYI (colored in blue). Safety Hazards or Concerns will be listed in the Red or Orange categories depending on their perceived danger, but should always be addressed ASAP. 

  • Major Defects - Items or components that may require a major expense to correct. Items categorized in this manner require further evaluation and repairs or replacement as needed by a Qualified Contractor prior to the end of your contingency period. 
  • Marginal Defects - Items or components that were found to include a deficiency. These items may have been functional at the time of inspection, but this functionality may be impaired, not ideal, or the defect may lead to further problems (most defects will fall into this categorization). Repairs or replacement is recommended to items categorized in this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect, prior to the end of your contingency period. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a Handyman or Qualified Contractor and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs. 
  • Minor Defects/Maintenance Items/FYI - This categorization will include items or components that were found to be in need of recurring or basic general maintenance and/or may need minor repairs which may improve their functionality. This categorization will also include FYI items that could include observations, important information, recommended upgrades to items, areas, or components, as well as items that were nearing, at, or past the end of their typical service life, but were in the opinion of the inspector, still functional at the time of inspection. Major repairs or replacement should be anticipated, and planned for, on any items that are designated as being past, or at the end of their typical life. These repairs or replacement costs can sometimes represent a major expense; i.e. HVAC Systems, Water Heaters, Plumbing pipes, etc. 

These categorizations are in my professional judgment and based on what I observed at the time of inspection. This categorization should not be construed as to mean that items designated as "Minor defects" or "Marginal Defects" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendations in each comment is more important than its categorization. Due to your perception, opinions, or personal experience, you may feel defects belong in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once again it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining to each defect that is paramount, not its categorical placement. 

Your Job As a Homeowner: Ask me questions!

As you walk through the home today write down any questions or concerns you may have, and I will fully address them before we're finished.  If you come up with any more questions regarding the inspection in the following days, weeks or months, don't hesitate to email or call and I will continue to provide you with the exceptional service that you should expect as my client.

Your Job As a Homeowner: What Really Matters in a Home Inspection

Now that you've bought your home and had your inspection, you may still have some questions about your new house and the items revealed in your report. 

Home maintenance is a primary responsibility for every homeowner, whether you've lived in several homes of your own or have just purchased your first one. Staying on top of a seasonal home maintenance schedule is important, and your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector can help you figure this out so that you never fall behind. Don't let minor maintenance and routine repairs turn into expensive disasters later due to neglect or simply because you aren't sure what needs to be done and when. 

Your home inspection report is a great place to start. In addition to the written report, checklists, photos, and what the inspector said during the inspection not to mention the sellers disclosure and what you noticed yourself it's easy to become overwhelmed. However, it's likely that your inspection report included mostly maintenance recommendations, the life expectancy for the home's various systems and components, and minor imperfections. These are useful to know about. 

But the issues that really matter fall into four categories: 

  1. major defects, such as a structural failure; 
  2. things that can lead to major defects, such as a small leak due to a defective roof flashing; 
  3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home if not rectified immediately; and 
  4. safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel. 

Anything in these categories should be addressed as soon as possible. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4). 

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. It's important to realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in your inspection report. No house is perfect. Keep things in perspective as you move into your new home. 

And remember that homeownership is both a joyful experience and an important responsibility, so be sure to call on your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector to help you devise an annual maintenance plan that will keep your family safe and your home in good condition for years to come.

Details

InterNACHI is so certain of the integrity of their members that they back them up with a $10,000 Honor Guarantee. 

For details, please visit www.nachi.org/honor


General Inspection Info: Items Not Inspected and Other Limitations

ITEMS NOT INSPECTED - There are items that are not inspected in a home inspection such as, but not limited to; fences and gates, pools and spas, outbuildings or any other detached structure, refrigerators, washers / dryers, storm doors and storm windows, screens, window AC units, gas furnace heat exchangers, central vacuum systems, water softeners, alarm and intercom systems, and any item that is not a permanent attached component of the home. Also, drop ceiling tiles are not removed, as they are easily damaged, and this is a non-invasive inspection. Subterranean systems are also excluded, such as but not limited to: sewer lines, septic tanks, water delivery systems, and underground fuel storage tanks. 

Water and gas shut off valves are not operated under any circumstances. As well, any component or appliance that is unplugged or "shut off" is not turned on or connected for the sake of evaluation. I don't have knowledge of why a component may be shut down, and can't be liable for damages that may result from activating said components/appliances. 

Also not reported on are the causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; The insurability of the structure or any of its items or components, Any component or system that was not observed; Calculate the strength, adequacy, design, or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility. 

Lastly, a home inspection does not address environmental concerns such as, but not limited to: Asbestos, lead, lead-based paint, radon, mold, wood-destroying insects or organisms (termites, etc), cockroaches, rodents, pesticides, fungus, treated lumber, Chinese drywall, mercury, or carbon monoxide.

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice while reading this inspection report.  I performed the home inspection according to the standards and my clients wishes and expectations.  Please refer to the inspection contract or agreement between the inspector and the inspector's client.  

2 - Chimney, Fireplace, or Stove

Factory-Built Chimney: Factory-Built Chimney Exterior Was Inspected
Roof

The chimney exterior was inspected during my home inspection.

Factory-Built Chimney: Factory-Built Chimney Hood or Cap Installed

A hood or cap was installed at the factory built chimney.  Good.  

Factory-Built Chimney: Factory-Built Chimney Flashing Was Inspected

I inspected for flashing installed at the chimney. 

Flashing is installed in areas where the chimney stack meets another system or component of the house.  And the flashing is supposed to divert water away from those areas to prevent water intrusion.

Fireplace: Type of Fireplace
Living Room
Factory-Built, Gas Fireplace Insert

The fireplace operated properly using normal controls.

Factory-Built Chimney: Chimney Interior is Beyond the Scope

Inspecting the chimney interior and flue is beyond the scope of a home inspection.  An inspector is not required to inspect the flue or vent system, and is not required to inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.  Out of courtesy only, the inspector may take a look at readily accessible and visible parts of the chimney flue.  

Fireplace: Fireplace and Stack Inspection Limitations

Not everything of the fireplace and chimney stack system and components are inspected because they are not part of the Home Inspection Standards of Practice. I inspected only what I am required to inspect and only what was visible during the home inspection. I recommend hiring a certified chimney sweep to inspect, sweep, and further evaluate the interior of the fireplace system immediately and every year as part of a homeowner's routine maintenance plan. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;
  • lintels above the fireplace openings;
  • damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and
  • cleanout doors and frames.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of fireplace.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;
  • manually operated dampers that did not open and close;
  • the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;
  • the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; 
  • cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

3 - Roof

Inspection Method: Roof inspection method
walked the roof

The inspector viewed the roof using this method.

Flashing : Flashing Material
Galvanized steel
Apshalt Shingles: Type of Shingle
Dimensional
Apshalt Shingles: Substrate
1 layer, 15/32-inch oriented strand board (OSB)
Apshalt Shingles: Type of Valley
Traditional cut valley
Roof Structure Ext. : What's inspected?

Inspection of the roof structure from the exterior typically includes: 

  • The general roof structure appearance; 
  • Roof-covering material condition; 
  • Flashing protecting roof-covering material penetrations, changes in roof-covering materials, and transitions where roof slopes change; 
  • Condition of combustion, plumbing and attic ventilation vents and devices; 
  • Chimney conditions; and 
  • Roof drainage systems and components.
Roof Drainage System: What is inspected?

Inspection of the roof drainage system typically includes examination of any of the following: 

  • Gutters (condition and configuration); 
  • Downspouts & extensions (condition and configuration);
  • Scuppers; and 
  • Overflow drains.
Roof Drainage System: Drainage system materials
steel
Roof Drainage System: Gutters & downspouts
The roof drainage system consisted of conventional gutters hung from the roof edges feeding downspouts.
Roof Drainage System: Gutters: granules, uniform loss
The gutters exhibited a general accumulation of granules. This appeared to be the result of uniform granule loss as shingles age. Uniform granule loss is not considered by manufacturers or insurance companies to reduce the ability of the roof to shed water or shorten its long-term service life.
Underlayment: Type: #15 Felt paper
The roof had #15 felt paper installed as water-resistant underlayment beneath roof-covering materials. The underlayment was inspected in representative areas only. Most of this membrane was hidden beneath roof-covering materials and was not inspected.
Flashing : General description

Flashing is a general term used to describe (typically) sheet metal fabricated into shapes and used to protect areas of the roof from moisture intrusion. Inspection typically includes inspection for condition and proper installation of flashing in the following locations: 

  • Roof penetrations such as vents;
  • Electrical masts;
  • Chimneys;
  • Mechanical equipment;
  • Patio cover attachment points; 
  • Around skylights; 
  • Junctions at which roofs meet walls; 
  • Roof edges; 
  • Areas at which roofs change slope; 
  • Areas at which roof-covering materials change; and 
  • Areas at which different roof planes meet (such as valleys).
Skylight: Skylight Mount Type
Self-flashing

Skylights appeared to be in good condition.  One skylight had a slight amount of condensation present between the outer and inner surfaces.

Apshalt Shingles: Substrate: 1 layer
The roof had one layer of asphalt shingles installed at the time of the inspection.
Apshalt Shingles: Type: Dimensional
The roof was covered with dimensional fiberglass asphalt shingles, also called "architectural" or "laminated" shingles. Fiberglass shingles are composed of a fiberglass mat embedded in asphalt and covered with ceramic-coated mineral granules. Dimensional shingles are composed of multiple layers bonded together. Shingles with multiple layers bonded together are usually more durable than shingles composed of a single layer. Dimensional shingles usually have a 20-30 year warranty. The actual useful lifespan varies with shingle quality. Determining shingle quality or remaining shingle roof lifespan lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection.
Underlayment: Disclaimer: completely hidden
The underlayment was hidden beneath the roof-covering material. It was not inspected and the Inspector disclaims responsibility for evaluating its condition or confirming its presence.
Underlayment: Disclaimer: edges visible only
The underlayment was hidden beneath the roof-covering material. The inspector was able to view edges only at representative areas around the perimeter of the roof. It was not inspected and the Inspector disclaims responsibility for evaluating its condition.
Apshalt Shingles: Fastening: disclaimer
The Inspector did not directly view the fasteners and disclaims responsibility for confirming proper fastening of the asphalt shingles. Fasteners used to asphalt connect asphalt shingles to the roof were not visible. At the time of the inspection the shingle sealant strips were fully bonded. Because a fully bonded roof is the most important factor in the wind resistance of the shingles, breaking shingle bonds to view fasteners would constitute damage to the roof. Destructive testing lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. The Inspector observed no outward indication of fastener deficiencies.
Apshalt Shingles: Installation: disclaimer
Many different types, brands and models of asphalt shingles have been installed over the years, each with specific manufacturers installation recommendations that may or may not apply to similar-looking shingles. In addition, shingles have underlayment and fastening requirements that cannot be visually confirmed once the shingles have been installed without invasive measures that lie beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. For this reason, the Inspector disclaims all responsibility for accurate confirmation of proper shingle roof installation. The Inspectors comments will be based on- and limited to- installation requirements common to many shingle types, brands and models, but accurate confirmation of a particular shingle roof installation, which requires research that exceeds the scope of the General Home Inspection, will require the services of a qualified roofing contractor.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves:

  • the roof-covering materials;
  • the gutters;
  • the downspouts;
  • the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and 
  • the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of roof-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • observed indications of active roof leaks; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Roof Drainage System

Downspouts: perimeter drain tie

Downspouts at the home were connected to (underground) perimeter drains. Any blockage in the perimeter drain pipes may cause roof drainage to be diverted to soil around and beneath the home foundation. In the spring, underground drains may remain frozen after ice in gutters and downspouts has melted, causing roof drainage to overflow the gutters and spill onto soil near the foundation. This condition can result in excessively high moisture levels in soil at the foundation and can cause damage related to soil/foundation movement. Excessive moisture levels in soil near the foundation can effect the ability of the soil to support the weight of the structure above and can cause damage related to soil/foundation movement. If this condition is a problem, you may wish to have roof drainage re-routed so that it drains into soil away from the foundation.

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Flashing

Roof edge: none installed

No roof edge flashing was installed at the time of the inspection. Lack of roof edge flashing leaves the edges of roof sheathing and underlayment exposed to potential moisture damage from wood decay and/or delamination.
$
Credit
Comment
3.8.1 - Apshalt Shingles

Blisters: small, localized

Localized portions of the asphalt shingle roof had small blisters visible. Blisters are a cosmetic issue and do not cause premature failure of the shingles or affect their performance. They typically appear during the first 5 years after shingle installation, and are often related to inadequate roof structure ventilation.
$
Credit
Comment
3.8.2 - Apshalt Shingles

Granules: uniform loss, natural aging

Asphalt shingles were old and had suffered noticeable uniform granule loss across the roof. According to shingle manufacturers and insurance companies, this is not a defective condition, but is a natural result of the aging process. The bond between asphalt and granules deteriorates over time as asphalt loses volatile compounds, dries and shrinks. It does not affect the ability of the shingles to shed water.

Roof Roofing Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.8.3 - Apshalt Shingles

Hail damage

Asphalt shingles on this roof exhibited damage consistent with damage caused by hail. Confirming the source of damage lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection.
$
Credit
Comment
3.8.4 - Apshalt Shingles

Shingles: loose/missing- QC

The roof had loose and/or missing asphalt shingles. The Inspector recommends replacement of any loose or missing shingles by a qualified roofing contractor to avoid damage from moisture intrusion.
Roof Roofing Professional

4 - Exterior

Grounds: Fence Material
Vinyl
Patio: Patio Materials
Poured concrete
Patio: Patio Materials: poured concrete
This patio was constructed of poured concrete.
Driveway: Driveway Surface
Concrete
Porch: Porch Location
Front
Grounds: Building lot: expansive soil: potential

The home was located in an area that is known to have deposits of expansive soils. Expansive soils are soils that increase to many times their original volume in response to increases in soil moisture levels, creating forces that can easily damage home foundations. The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline you ask to see any existing soils reports, or that you have soils testing performed by a soils (geotechnical) engineer, in order to determine the level of potential risk.


Grounds: Landscape irrigation: control panel, garage
The landscape irrigation (sprinkler) system was operated with a control panel located in the garage.
Grounds: Landscape irrigation: operation, beyond the scope
The home was equipped with a landscape irrigation system. Inspection of irrigation systems lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection and the Inspector did not inspect the system. You may wish to have this system inspected by a qualified irrigation or landscape contractor before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline. Remember to have the irrigation system winterized before weather cold enough to cause freeze damage arrives.
Door/Window Exteriors: Exterior Doors and Windows Inspected
Exterior Trim: Trim Material
Same as siding
Plumbing: Exterior Freeze-Proof Hose Bibs

The exterior hose bibs were observed to be freeze-proof.

Siding, Composite (Cellulose): Composite siding: embossed

Exterior walls were covered with a composite siding composed of man-made boards  manufactured from various combinations of wood fibers, fillers, binders and glue. These components are heated and compressed. An embossed overlay is often added to simulate the look of wood.

Patio: Patio Location
Rear of home
Patio: Cover: gable roof

The patio was covered with a gable roof.

Patio: General condition: OK
The Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of this patio. Inspection of the patio typically includes examination of the following: - surface damage; - installation deficiencies; - level and flat; - deterioration; - heaving or settling; and - roof or cover and its supporting structure.
Patio: Surface OK
The Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of the patio slab surface.
Porch: What's inspected
Inspection of the porch typically includes visual evaluation of the: - foundation; - structure; - floor surfaces; - guardrails; and - stair assembly
Siding, Artificial Stone Veneer: Artificial stone veneer installed
Exterior walls of the home were covered with artificial stone veneer.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the exterior wall-covering materials; 
  • the eaves, soffits and fascia;
  • a representative number of windows;
  • all exterior doors;
  • flashing and trim;
  • adjacent walkways and driveways;
  • stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
  • porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 
  • vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of exterior wall-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Driveway

Cracks: common cracks < 1/4"

Common cracks (1/4-inch or less) were visible in the driveway. Cracks exceeding 1/4 inch should be filled with an appropriate material to avoid continued damage to the driveway surface from freezing moisture.

5 - Structure

Foundation: Foundation Type
Basement
Foundation: Foundation Wall Material
Concrete
Floor Structure: OSB over engineered joists

The floor structure consisted of oriented strand board (OSB) subfloor sheathing installed over engineered lumber joists.

Foundation: Footing: not visible
The footings were not visible.

I. The inspector shall inspect:


  • the foundation;
  • the basement;
  • the crawlspace; and
  • structural components.


II. The inspector shall describe:


  • the type of foundation; and
  • the location of the access to the under-floor space.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:


  • observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil;
  • observed indications of active water penetration; 
  • observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and
  • any observed cutting, notching, and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern.


IV. The inspector is not required to:


  • enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself.
  • move stored items or debris. 
  • operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. 
  • identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. 
  • provide any engineering or architectural service. 
  • report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

6 - Finished Basement

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet
Windows: Window Type
Sliders
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: A representative number of switches, receptacles and lighting fixtures were operated and/or tested.

Switches and lighting fixtures were operated and checked for function.

Receptacles were inspected for proper installation and wiring.

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; and
  • floors, walls and ceilings.

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

7 - Basement Bedroom

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet
Windows: Window Type
Sliders
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Suspended Ceiling Panels
Heat Source in Bedroom: Heat Source in Bedroom Was Inspected

I inspected the heat source in the bedroom (register/baseboard). 

Smoke Detectors: Smoke Detector Present
Doors: I inspected the bedroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Paneling
Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them.

Windows: Egress Window

I inspected for the presence of an egress window.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; and
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible.

The inspector shall describe:

  • any limitation to inspection

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • any signs of active or past moisture intrusion;
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.



8 - Electrical

Service Drop: Service Type
Underground
Service Drop: Type of Attachment
Side of structure
Service Drop: Service Lateral: underground
Conductors supplying electricity to the home were buried underground.
Electric Meter: Electric Meter Location
Right side
Service Panel: Service Panel Location
Garage
Service Panel: Service Panel Brand
Square D
Branch Circuits: Branch Circuit Conductor Type
Copper
Branch Circuits: Overcurrent Protection Type
Circuit breakers
Service Drop: Service Conductors
Aluminum, 3-wire (240V)
Electric Meter: Electric Meter Type
Electromechanical (conventional)
Service Panel: Service Panel Ampacity
200 amps
Service Panel: Service Panel Type
Flush mount, Load center
Service Panel: Main Disconnect Type
Breaker
Service Panel: Main Disconnect Ampacity
125 amps
Branch Circuits: Exterior receptacles: GFCI response, OK
At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the response of exterior Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI)-protected electrical receptacles.
Branch Circuits: Exterior receptacles: weather-protected
Exterior electrical receptacles were Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI)-protected, and enclosed in weather-resistant covers.
Service Grounding & Bonding: Electrode Disclaimer

The Inspector disclaims responsibility for positive identification of the service grounding electrode, its proper installation, and adequate performance for the following reasons:

1. The electrode is often hidden from view;

2. Electrode performance can vary with installation practice and soil conditions,

3. Measuring electrode performance requires specialized instruments and skills that lie beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection.

For an accurate evaluation of the electrical grounding electrode system you would need to hire a qualified electrical contractor.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the service drop;
  • the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  • the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  • the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  • the electric meter and base;
  • service-entrance conductors;
  • the main service disconnect;
  • panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  • service grounding and bonding;
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  • all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  • for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  • the type of wiring observed.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  • any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  • the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; 
  • the absence of smoke and/or carbon monoxide detectors; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

9 - HVAC

Furnace: Furnace Location
Basement
Furnace: Energy Source
Natural gas
Furnace: Furnace Efficiency
High
Furnace: Type of Air Filter
Pleated
Furnace: Duct Type
Sheet metal, Sealed
Furnace: Date of manufacture

The date of furnace manufacture appeared to be the 23rd week of 2006.

Furnace: Serial number

The serial number of the furnace was GE5D302F230603898.

Furnace: Data plate: original furnace
The furnace appeared to be the original installed when the home was built.
Cooling: AC compressor data plate: date of manufacture

The AC compressor date of manufacture was May 2017.

Cooling: AC compressor data plate: serial number

The AC compressor serial number was 5817E03010.

Cooling: A/C Evaporator Date of Manufacture

The serial number indicates that the date of manufacture was July 2017.

Cooling: A/C Evaporator Serial Number

The serial number of the A/C evaporator was 6017G04772.

Furnace: Furnace Brand
Rheem
Furnace: Air Filter Location
Furnace blower compartment
Cooling: A/C Evaporator Data Plate
Furnace: Combustion air: OK, changes may create problems
Combustion air supply for the furnace in the unfinished basement appeared to be sufficient at the time of the inspection. If in the future you should decide to make changes which include enclosing the furnace or reducing the space from which it draws combustion air, you should consult with a qualified heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) contractor to ensure that the furnace has sufficient combustion air. Insufficient combustion air can cause the furnace to produce unacceptably high levels of toxic carbon monoxide.
Furnace: Data plate: photo

The photo shows the furnace data pate or manufacturer's label

Furnace: Furnace shut-offs: gas and electrical photo
The furnace electrical and gas shut-offs are shown in the photo.
Furnace: Furnace type: what is inspected?

Inspection of gas-fired furnaces typically includes visual examination of the following: 

  • Cabinet exterior;
  • Fuel supply and shut-off (not tested); 
  • Electrical shut-off; 
  • Adequate combustion air; 
  • Proper ignition; 
  • Burn chamber conditions (when visible); 
  • Combustion exhaust venting; 
  • Air filter and blower; 
  • Plenum and ducts; 
  • Response to the thermostat; 
  • Return air system; and 
  • Condensate drain components (where applicable).
Furnace: Thermostat: programmable, heating/cooling
Living Room

The furnace and the air-conditioning were controlled by a programmable thermostat. Heating and cooling costs can be reduced by programming the thermostat to raise and lower home temperatures at key times.


Cooling: AC Brand
Lennox
Cooling: AC: compressor data plate, photo
Information from the air-conditioner compressor unit data plate is shown in the photo.
Cooling: AC compressor unit: disconnect OK
Although it was not operated, the electrical disconnect for the condensing unit appeared to be properly located and installed and in serviceable condition at the time of the inspection.
Cooling: AC evap. coils: condensate disposal OK
Condensate produced by the operation of the air-conditioning system evaporator coils was properly routed and discharged at the time of the inspection.
Cooling: AC: temperature is too low for test- QC
The air-conditioning system was not tested because the outside temperature was below 67 degrees F. and to test it would risk damaging the coils. The Inspector recommends having the system inspected by a specialist before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the heating system, using normal operating controls.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the location of the thermostat for the heating system;
  • the energy source; and
  • the heating method.

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • any heating system that did not operate; and
  • if the heating system was deemed inaccessible.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  • inspect, measure, or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, makeup air, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems.
  • inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. 
  • determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. 
  • light or ignite pilot flames. 
  • activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. 
  • override electronic thermostats. 
  • evaluate fuel quality.
  • verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.
  • measure or calculate the air for combustion, ventilation, or dilution of flue gases for appliances.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the cooling system, using normal operating controls.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and
  • the cooling method.

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • any cooling system that did not operate; and
  • if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  • determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system.
  • inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. 
  • operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65° Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. 
  • inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. 
  • examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

10 - Plumbing

Water Supply: Water Source
Public
Water Supply: Water Service Pipe Material
¾-inch, Copper
Gas System: Type of Gas
Natural gas
Gas System: Gas pipe material (interior installation)
Black steel
Water Heater: Water Heater Type
Gas-fired
Water Heater: Water Heater Brand
Bradford-White
Water Heater: Water Heater Tank Capacity
40 gallons
Water Heater: Gas Water Heater Efficiency
Medium
Water Heater: Date of manufacture
Basement

The date of manufacture for this water heater appeared to be April 2006.

Water Heater: Serial number
Basement

This water heater serial number was CD7618353.

Water Heater: Gas: water heaters (2)
The home was equipped with two gas-fired water heaters.
Water Heater: Water heater location: basement
The water heater was located in the basement.
2nd Water Heater: Water Heater Type
Gas-fired
2nd Water Heater: Water Heater Brand
Bradford-White
2nd Water Heater: Water Heater Tank Capacity
40 gallons
2nd Water Heater: Gas Water Heater Efficiency
Medium
2nd Water Heater: Date of manufacture
Basement

The date of manufacture for this water heater appeared to be August 2006.

2nd Water Heater: Serial number
Basement

This water heater serial number was CH8170642.

2nd Water Heater: Gas: water heaters (2)
The home was equipped with two gas-fired water heaters.
Water Supply: Distribution Pipe Material
¾-inch rigid copper, Crosslinked polyethylene (PEX)
Water Supply: Distribution Pipe Bonding
Cold only bonded
Gas System: Main Gas Shut-off Location
Northeast Corner
At the gas meter, At the exterior wall
Water Heater: Data plate: photo

The photo shows the data plate of this water heater.

2nd Water Heater: Water heater location
basement
2nd Water Heater: Data plate: photo
Basement

The photo shows the data plate of this water heater.

Water Supply: Main water shut-off: location
Basement

The main water supply shut-off was located in the basement, to the right of the furnace.

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Inspected Drain, Waste, Vent Pipes

I attempted to inspect the drain, waste, and vent pipes.  Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about water and sewer leaks or blockages in the past.  

Water Heater: Water heater location
basement
Water Heater: About: Conventional Storage Tank Water Heaters

Storage tanks water heaters are the most common type of water heater. They consist of an insulated tank in which water is heated and stored until needed. When a hot water valve is opening somewhere in the home, hot water is pulled from a pipe at the top of the water heater. To prevent overheating resulting in the development of excessive pressure in the tank (with the potential for high-energy explosion) a temperature/pressure relief (TPR) valve is installed that is designed to open if either exceeds a preset level. Natural-gas water heaters typically use less energy and cost less to run (by about half) than electric water heaters, although gas models cost more at the time of purchase.

Water Heater: Gas: photo, shut-off valves gas/water
The photo shows the locations of shut-off valves for gas and water.
Water Heater: TPR valve: present
The water heater was equipped with a temperature/pressure relief (TPR) valve that was not operated by the Inspector. Operating the TPR valve lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. The Inspector recommends that the TPR be operated by the homeowner monthly as a maintenance measure.
2nd Water Heater: About: Conventional Storage Tank Water Heaters

Storage tanks water heaters are the most common type of water heater. They consist of an insulated tank in which water is heated and stored until needed. When a hot water valve is opening somewhere in the home, hot water is pulled from a pipe at the top of the water heater. To prevent overheating resulting in the development of excessive pressure in the tank (with the potential for high-energy explosion) a temperature/pressure relief (TPR) valve is installed that is designed to open if either exceeds a preset level. Natural-gas water heaters typically use less energy and cost less to run (by about half) than electric water heaters, although gas models cost more at the time of purchase.

2nd Water Heater: Gas: photo, shut-off valve: gas
The photo shows the location of the shut-off valve for gas at the water heater.
2nd Water Heater: TPR valve: present
The water heater was equipped with a temperature/pressure relief (TPR) valve that was not operated by the Inspector. Operating the TPR valve lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. The Inspector recommends that the TPR be operated by the homeowner monthly as a maintenance measure.
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the drainage pipes were hidden within the walls.  

Water Heater: TPR valve: valve installed
The water heater was equipped with a temperature/pressure relief (TPR) valve (not tested).

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the main water supply shut-off valve;
  • the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  • the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  • the drain, waste and vent system; and
  • drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  • whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  • the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  • the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  • the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
  • the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  • deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  • active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; 
  • toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.


11 - Master Bedroom

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet
Windows: Window Type
Master Bedroom
Sliders
Heat Source in Bedroom: Heat Source in Bedroom Was Inspected
Master Bedroom

I inspected the heat source in the bedroom (register/baseboard). 

Smoke Detectors: Smoke detector present
Master Bedroom
Carbon Monoxide Detectors: CO Present, plug-in
Master Bedroom
Doors: I inspected the bedroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Master Bedroom
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected
Master Bedroom

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Windows: Windows Inspected
Master Bedroom

I inspected the windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles
Master Bedroom

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; and
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible.

The inspector shall describe:

  • any limitation to inspection

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • any signs of active or past moisture intrusion;
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.



12 - Master Bathroom

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Tile
Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected window

Inspected and operated window

Heat Source in Bathroom: Heat Source in Bathroom Was Inspected
Master Bathroom

I inspected the heat source in the bathroom (register/baseboard). 

Door: I inspected the bathroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Master Bathroom
Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected
Master Bathroom

I flushed all of the toilets, inspected them for loose connection to the floor and the integrity of the surrounding subfloor.

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers
Master Bathroom

I ran water at all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected
Master Bathroom

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Hydromassage Bathtub: Tub Filled and Turned On
Master Bathroom

I filled the tub and turned on the bubbles. 

Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans
Master Bathroom

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection, however, this fan was properly vented through the roof. 

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: GFCI-Protection Tested
Master Bathroom

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. The control for this GFCI is in bathroom 2

Cabinetry: I inspected the cabinets for damage and proper operation.
Master Bathroom

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • walls, floors and ceiling;
  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible
  • Bathroom exhaust fans for proper operation

The home inspector shall report:

  • any receptacle not protected by a GFCI
  • deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  • deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  • active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; 
  • toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
12.3.1 - Sinks, Tubs & Showers

Slow Drain

Slow drain, partial clog.

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Bedroom 2

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet
Windows: Window Type
Sliders
Doors: I inspected the bedroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Bedroom 2
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them if possible.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

Heat Source in Bedroom: Heat Source in Bedroom Was Inspected

I inspected the heat source in the bedroom (register/baseboard). 

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; and
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible.

The inspector shall describe:

  • any limitation to inspection

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • any signs of active or past moisture intrusion;
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.



$
Credit
Comment
13.2.1 - Floors, Walls, Ceilings

Minor Damage

I observed minor damages to the walls, mostly from hanging pictures.

Contractor Qualified Professional

14 - Bathroom 2

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Tile
Heat Source in Bathroom: Heat Source in Bathroom Was Inspected
Bathroom 2

I inspected the heat source in the bathroom (register/baseboard). 

Door: I inspected the bathroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Bathroom 2
Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected
Bathroom 2

I flushed all of the toilets, inspected them for loose connection to the floor and the integrity of the surrounding subfloor.

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers
Bathroom 2

I ran water at all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected
Bathroom 2

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans
Bathroom 2

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection however, this exhaust fan was properly vented through the roof. 

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: GFCI-Protection Tested
Bathroom 2

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. 

Cabinetry: I inspected the cabinets for damage and proper operation.
Bathroom 2

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • walls, floors and ceiling;
  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible
  • Bathroom exhaust fans for proper operation

The home inspector shall report:

  • any receptacle not protected by a GFCI
  • deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  • deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  • active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; 
  • toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

15 - Living Room

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Windows: Window Type
Single-hung
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected
Living Room

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Windows: Windows Inspected
Living Room

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: A representative number of switches, receptacles and lighting fixtures were operated and/or tested.
Living Room

Switches and lighting fixtures were operated and checked for function.

Receptacles were inspected for proper installation and wiring.

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; and
  • floors, walls and ceilings.

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

$
Credit
Comment
15.1.1 - Floors, Walls, Ceilings

Carpet Stains
Living Room

Carpet had areas of staining or discoloration. Recommend a thorough steam clean by a qualified carpet cleaning company 

Mop Cleaning Service

16 - Basement Bathroom

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Tile
Cabinetry: I inspected the cabinets for damage and proper operation.
Basement Bathroom
Door: I inspected the bathroom door(s) for proper operation and damage.
Basement Bathroom
Heat Source in Bathroom: Heat Source in Bathroom Was Inspected
Basement Bathroom

I inspected the heat source in the bathroom (register/baseboard). 

Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected
Basement Bathroom

I flushed all of the toilets, inspected them for loose connection to the floor and the integrity of the surrounding subfloor.

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers
Basement Bathroom

I ran water at all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected
Basement Bathroom

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans
Basement Bathroom

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection, however, this exhaust fan appeared to be properly vented to the exterior through the side of the home. 

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: GFCI-Protection Tested
Basement Bathroom

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. The control for this GFCI was in the outlet in Bathroom 2.

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • walls, floors and ceiling;
  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible
  • Bathroom exhaust fans for proper operation

The home inspector shall report:

  • any receptacle not protected by a GFCI
  • deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  • deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  • active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; 
  • toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

17 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet
Doors: Doors Inspected

I inspected a representative number of doors according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate door locks and door stops, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 


Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected the windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them.

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Inspected for Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

I inspected for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. 

There should be a smoke detector in every sleeping room, outside of every sleeping room, and one every level of a house. 

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Unable to Test Every Detector

I was unable to test every detector. We recommend testing all of the detectors.  Ask the seller about the performance of the detectors and of any issues regarding them.  We recommend replacing all of the detectors (smoke and carbon monoxide) with new ones just for peace of mind and for safety concerns.  

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; 
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; 
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.

18 - Laundry

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Tile
Clothes Washer: Clothes Washer Water Supply and Drain
Laundry

The clothes washer was properly connected to hot and cold water supplies and drain.

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles
Laundry

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

Clothes Washer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. 

Clothes Dryer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. The location of the clothes dryer prevented me from inspecting the electrical outlet and dryer vent.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

The inspector shall inspect:

  • mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.


19 - Kitchen

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range and Oven Type
Gas, Electric
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Vinyl
Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected
Kitchen

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Countertops & Cabinets: Inspected Cabinets & Countertops
Kitchen

I inspected a representative number of cabinets and countertop surfaces. 

Kitchen Sink: Ran Water at Kitchen Sink
Kitchen

I ran water at the kitchen sink. 

Garbage Disposal: Turned On Garbage Disposal
Kitchen

I turned on the garbage disposal. 

GFCI: GFCI Tested
Kitchen

I observed ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection in the kitchen. 

Dishwasher: Inspected Dishwasher
Kitchen

I inspected the dishwasher by turning it on and letting it run a short cycle. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Turned On Stove & Oven
Kitchen

I turned on the kitchen's stove and oven. 

Exhaust Fan: Inspected Exhaust Fan
Kitchen

I inspected the exhaust fan in the kitchen. All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection, however this exhaust fan vents to the exterior through the wall. 

Refrigerator: Refrigerator Was On

I checked to see if the refrigerator was on. It was. That's all I inspected in relation to a refrigerator. Refrigerators are beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Built-in Microwave: Microwave Turned On
Kitchen

I observed that the microwave turned on. I do nothing more than that. Microwaves are beyond the scope of a home inspection. Microwave appeared to operate correctly, operation was checked by heating a glass of water.

Lighting: Kitchen Lighting
Kitchen

All lighting in the kitchen functioned properly.

The kitchen appliances are not included in the scope of a home inspection according to the Standards of Practice. 

The inspector will out of courtesy only check:

  • the stove, 
  • oven, 
  • microwave, and 
  • garbage disposer. 

$
Credit
Comment
19.6.1 - Dishwasher

Defect at Door Latch

I observed indications of a defect at the dishwasher door latch and lock. This damage appeared to be cosmetic and does not affect the operation of the dishwasher.

Wash Appliance Repair

20 - Attic

Attic Access: Access Hatch Location
Garage
Attic Access: Attic access: from access hatch
The Inspector evaluated the attic from the access hatch.
Roof Structure: Roof Sheathing Material
1/2-inch oriented strand board (OSB)
Thermal Insulation: Application Type
Attic outside the thermal envelope
Thermal Insulation: Thermal Insulation Type
Blown cellulose, Unfaced fiberglass batt
Thermal Insulation: Insulation Average Depth
7-10 inches
Attic/Roof Structure Ventilation: Roof Structure Ventilation
Soffit vents, Roof vents
Attic/Roof Structure Ventilation: Attic Ventilation Method
Attic
Soffit vents, Roof vents

These photos show daylight coming through the soffit vents.

Roof Structure: Roof Framing Method
Roof trusses
Thermal Insulation: Posted information (garage)

Written information describing the attic insulation material type and installed R-value was posted in the garage.

$
Credit
Comment
20.2.1 - Attic Electrical, Plumbing and HVAC

Electrical: light, none

The attic space was not provided with a light.
Electric Electrical Contractor

21 - Garage

Garage Electrical: Garage Receptacles Tested

The outlets in the garage were protected by a GFCI outlet on the west wall.

Garage Roof Framing: Garage Roof Framing Method
Roof trusses
Garage Roof Framing: Garage Roof Sheathing Material
1/2-inch oriented strand board (OSB)
Automatic Opener: Number of Automatic Openers
1
Conventional Doors: Door to interior
Garage
Conventional Doors: Door to Exterior
Garage
Garage Description: Garage Description
Attached, 2-car
Floors, Walls, & Ceiling: Walls and ceiling
Garage
Garage Ventilation: Roof structure ventilation: roof vents installed
Roof vents, also called turtle vents, were installed as part of the garage roof structure ventilation system.
Garage Ventilation: Roof structure ventilation: soffit vents installed
Soffit vents were installed as part of the garage roof structure ventilation system.
Overhead Doors: Automatic opener: manual disconnect, OK
Garage
At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed no deficiencies in the operation of the manual disconnect.
Overhead Doors: Door tracks: OK
Garage
The overhead garage door tracks appeared to be correctly installed and stable.
Overhead Doors: Overhead doors: OK
Garage
The Inspector observed no deficiencies in the condition of the garage overhead doors.
Overhead Doors: Overhead doors: what's inspected?
Garage
Inspection of overhead garage doors typically includes examination for presence, serviceable condition and proper operation of the following components: - door condition; - mounting brackets; - automatic opener; - automatic reverse; - photo sensor; - switch placement; - track & rollers; and - manual disconnect.
Floors, Walls, & Ceiling: Floor: limited view

The occupant's belongings significantly limited the Inspector's view of the garage floor and walls.

The inspector shall inspect:

  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls.


The inspector shall describe:

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener.

The inspector shall report:

  • photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly;
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals; and
  • any inspected component that shows signs of delayed maintenance or poses a threat to personal safety.