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1234 Main St.
Bettendorf, IA 52722
08/20/2019 9:00AM

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Agency Name

SCOPE OF THE INSPECTION:

                Thank you for choosing Vital Property Inspections LLC to inspect your new home! Please read the entire inspection report carefully. If you have any questions throughout the inspection process don't hesitate to ask. This report is based on an inspection of the visible portion of the structure at the time of the inspection with a focus on safety and function, not on current building or municipality codes.

            Home Inspectors are generalists who report on readily visible concerns with the home.  It is our duty to recommend evaluation or repair by specific trades and not by specific person.  It is our recommendation to contact your Real Estate Professional or the Contractor of your choice for further advise on any repairs you feel are needed in the home.

            The furnishings, personal items, and/or systems of the home are not dismantled or moved. A 2 - 4 hour inspection is not equal to "live-in exposure" and may not discover all concerns with the home. Unless stated in writing, we will only inspect/comment on the following systems: Electrical, Heating/cooling, Appliances, Plumbing, Roof and Attic, Exterior, Grounds, and the Foundation. NOTE: This inspection is not a warranty or insurance policy. The limit of liability of Vital Property Inspections and its employees does not extend beyond the day the inspection was performed.

            This inspection report and all information contained within is the sole property of the client/s named in this report and is not to be shared/passed on without the owners consent. Doing so may result in legal action.

 

INSPECTION CATEGORIES

This report contains three different categories of concern noted during the inspection. 

Minor Defects and Maintenance Items: These items are generally small DIY repairs or maintenance recommendations.

Marginal Defects and Recommendations:  These items are defects that should be repaired sooner than later.  Marginal defects left unrepaired usually progress into the next category of major defects.

Major Defects and Safety Concerns: These items are cause for immediate concern.  Major defects could play a role on structural integrity and your safety in the home. 

                This home inspection was performed in accordance with the Standard of Practice and Code of Ethics of the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI).  These standards are included in the report under each section summary. An honest effort was made on your behalf to discover all visible defects, however, in the event of an oversight, maximum liability must be limited to three times the price of the home inspection. This inspection is an evaluation of the condition of the home, in my professional opinion, on the day of the inspection. Any areas that are not safe, readily accessible and/or visible to the inspector will not be included in the home inspection report. The home inspection is not intended as a substitute for a Seller’s Disclosure. This home inspection is not a compliance inspection or certification of any kind. It simply is my professional opinion of the condition of the home at the time of the inspection. This inspection does not cover items or conditions that may be only discovered by invasive methods. No removal of materials or dismantling of systems shall be performed under this inspection. This is not a technically exhaustive inspection. The inspection report lists the systems and components inspected by Vital Property Inspections LLC. Items not found in this report are considered beyond the scope of the inspection and should not be considered inspected at this time. This report contains technical information that may not be readily understandable to the lay person. Therefore, a verbal consultation with the inspector is recommended after the inspection. If you choose not to consult with the inspector, Vital Property Inspections LLC cannot be held liable for your understanding or misunderstanding of this report’s contents. If you were not present during this inspection, please call the inspector at (563-271-4100) to arrange for your verbal consultation.

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Temperature (approximate)
75 Fahrenheit (F)
Style
Ranch
Occupancy
Occupied
Type of Building
Single Family
Weather Conditions
Clear

2 - Utility Locations and Shut Offs

General: Gas Meter and Shut Off

This is the location of your gas meter.  This if for your information. 

General: Electrical Disconnect

This is the location of you electrical disconnect.  This is for your information

General: Water Shut Off

This is the location of your main water shut off.  By closing this, it will shut the water to the residence off.  This is for your information.

3 - Roof

Inspection Method
Roof
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Coverings: Material
Asphalt
Gutters and Downspouts : Gutter Material
Seamless Aluminum
Flashings: Material
Aluminum
Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job as the homeowner is to monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak. To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters.

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant. Roofs are not designed to be waterproof. Eventually, the roof system will leak. No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 

Every roof should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.


Roof Views
Coverings: Roof Coverings: OK

The shingles were inspected at visible portions for excessive granule loss, signs of curling or delamination, loss of adhesion between the shingles, and any other signs of damage or excessive age. The shingles appeared to be in satisfactory condition, allowing for normal wear and tear, at the time of inspection. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Plumbing Vent Pipes: Homeowner's Responsibility

As the home owner you should monitor the flashing around the plumbing vent pipes that pass through the roof surface.  Sometimes they deteriorate and cause a roof leak.  

Be sure that the plumbing vent pipes do not get covered, either by debris, a toy, or snow.

Plumbing Vent Pipes: Plumbing Vent Pipes Inspected: OK

I looked at DWV (drain, waste and vent) pipes that pass through the roof covering.  There should be watertight flashing (often black rubber material) installed around the vent pipes.  These plumbing vent pipes should extend far enough above the roof surface.    No defects were found unless otherwise noted in this report.

Gutters and Downspouts : Gutters: OK

The gutters were inspected looking for proper securement, debris in the channel, standing water, damage, etc. Leaking gutters can not be diagnosed if an active rain was not occurring at the time of inspection, and if leaks are noticed after taking ownership of the home, sealing may be needed at seams or endcaps. No deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Gutters and Downspouts : Downspouts: OK

The downspouts were inspected to ensure they were diverting rainwater away from the foundation walls. Testing for blockages in downspouts or drainpipes is beyond the scope of a home inspection, as is locating their termination point. No deficiencies were present at visible portions at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.





Flashings: Flashing: OK

Visible portions of the flashings were inspected looking for installation related deficiencies or damage (drip edge, sidewall, headwall, counter, etc - if applicable). Typically most areas of flashings are not visible as they are covered by the roof covering material, and therefore functionality has to be determined by looking for moisture intrusion on the sheathing in the attic, or ceilings where the flashing was presumed to be in place. No deficiencies were observed at visible portions, at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.





Roof Limitations

The inspection of the roof and its covering material is limited to the conditions on the day of the inspection only. The roof covering material, visible portions of the roof structure from within the attic (if applicable), and interior ceilings, were inspected looking for indications of current or past leaks. Future conditions and inclement weather may reveal leaks that were not present at the time of inspection. Any deficiencies noted in this report with the roof covering or indications of past or present leaks should be evaluated and repaired as needed by a licensed roofing contractor.


Coverings: Unable to See Everything

This is a visual-only inspection of the roof-covering materials. It does not include an inspection of the entire system. There are components of the roof that are not visible or accessible at all, including the underlayment, decking, fastening, flashing, age, shingle quality, manufacturer installation recommendations, etc. 

Flashings: Difficult to See Every Flashing

I attempted to inspect the flashing related to the vent pipes, wall intersections, eaves and gables, and the roof-covering materials.  In general, there should be flashing installed in certain areas where the roof covering meets something else, like a vent pipe or siding.  Most flashing is not observable, because the flashing material itself is covered and hidden by the roof covering or other materials.  So, it's impossible to see everything.  A home inspection is a limited visual-only inspection.  

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Coverings

Object penetrating shingle

There is a metal object protruding through a shingle. This should be repaired to prevent water leakage.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Gutters and Downspouts

Gutter Improperly Sloped

I observed that the gutter showed indications of improper slope.  Gutters are supposed to be sloped down toward the downspout of the gutter.  This will facilitate water flow and drainage.  Recommend a gutter contractor correct the slope.

Gutter Gutter Contractor

4 - Exterior

General: Inspection Method
Visual
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Brick Veneer, Vinyl
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Style
Panels
Exterior Doors and Windows: Exterior Entry Door
Steel
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway Material
Concrete
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Deck with Steps
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Wood
General: Homeowner's Responsibility

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging. The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it. Your job is to monitor the buildings exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

During a heavy rainstorm (without lightning), grab an umbrella and go outside. Walk around your house and look around at the roof and property. A rainstorm is the perfect time to see how the roof, downspouts and grading are performing. Observe the drainage patterns of your entire property, as well as the property of your neighbor. The ground around your house should slope away from all sides. Downspouts, surface gutters and drains should be directing water away from the foundation. 

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Walls/Cladding: Mostly OK

The walls and wall cladding (siding) were inspected looking for significant damage, presence of proper flashings, and potential water entry points, etc. No reportable deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Views
Exterior Doors and Windows: Exterior side of the windows and doors: OK

The exterior components of the windows and doors (trim, flashing, etc.) were inspected looking for damage, lack of proper flashing, clearance from grade, etc. No reportable deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.


Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway and Walkways: Deficiencies Found

The driveways and walkways (if applicable) were inspected to determine their affect on the structure of the home only. I will also report on any visible deficiencies that may be present such as; cracking, displacement, or other damage. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

GFCIs & Electrical: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible.

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Soffit, Eaves and Fascia: OK

The soffit and fascia was inspected at visible portions looking for any water damage or other significant defects. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.





Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Lot grading and drainage overview: OK

The grading around the home was inspected to determine that it was designed to allow rainwater to adequately drain away from the structure. The soil is recommended to slope away from the home, with a 6 inch drop in elevation, in the first 10 feet away from the structure (5% grade). When the 5% grade can not be achieved, swales or drains should be used as needed to properly divert rainwater runoff. Any flat or low areas around the home should be backfilled and sloped away from the foundation, to prevent potential moisture infiltration into areas below grade. No reportable deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.


Siding, Flashing & Trim: Inspection Was Restricted

I did not inspect all of the exterior wall-covering material.  A home inspection is not an exhaustive evaluation.  My inspection of the exterior was limited.  I did not reach and access closely every part of the exterior wall-covering. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Cracking - Minor

Siding showed cracking in one or more places. Recommend replacement of cracked siding panel to prevent water intrusion.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Patio Cracking - Major

Significant settling & cracking observed. Further deterioration could result. This could also be a trip hazard. Recommend concrete contractor evaluate & repair.

Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Loose Handrail

I observed a loose handrail. This is a safety hazard that could result in a fall from the deck.  Recommend repair by a licensed decking contractor

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.5.2 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Ledger Board Improperly Installed

The ledger board is not properly attached to the building. This can cause the deck to pull away from the structure and possibly collapse. Recommend that the deck and/or ledger board be properly attached with the correct bolts by licensed decking contractor.

House front 1 Deck Contractor

5 - Heating and Cooling

Normal Operating Controls: Location of the thermostat
Cooling Equipment: Brand
Tempstar
Cooling Equipment: Location
Exterior West
Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Cooling Equipment: Exterior Unit Manufacture Year:

05-2002

The typical life expectancy of an exterior unit is 12-15 years.

Heating Equipment: Brand
Ruud
Heating Equipment: Energy Source
Gas
Heating Equipment: Heat Type
Forced Air
Homeowner's Responsibility

Most HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. They consist of four components: controls, fuel supply, heating or cooling unit, and distribution system. The adequacy of heating and cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

As the homeowner, make sure to get the HVAC system inspected and serviced every year. And make sure to change the air filter regularly. 

General HVAC testing information

The inspection of the HVAC system is limited to the response of the system at the thermostat in both heating and cooling modes; a visual observation of the exterior and interior equipment, and the removal of any access panels made for removal by a homeowner (not requiring ANY tools). If a more thorough inspection is desired, an HVAC contractor should be consulted.

AFUE Rating
94.2

AFUE (Annual fuel utilization efficiency) is a metric used to measure furnace efficiency in converting fuel to energy. A higher AFUE rating means greater energy efficiency. 90% or higher meets the Department of Energy's Energy Star program standard.

Carbon Monoxide Alarms

Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors are recommended to be installed outside of each sleeping area, in the area(s) of any gas appliances, and any fireplace(s). CO alarms are recommended if any gas appliances are present in the home or if the home contains a garage. More information about CO detectors and there requirements can be found here:

https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Fire-and-life-safety-equipment/Carbon-monoxide





Cooling Equipment: Homeowner's Responsibility

Most air-conditioning systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. The adequacy of the cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

As the homeowner, make sure to get the air conditioning system inspected and serviced every year.  

Cooling Equipment: Service Disconnect Inspected

I observed a service disconnect within sight of the cooling system. No deficiencies were found unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Cooling Equipment: Exterior Unit: Nearing it life expectancy.

The exterior unit(s) were inspected visually and tested by ensuring they respond to normal operating controls in cooling mode (at the thermostat), and that cool air was produced. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.


Heating Equipment: Interior Unit Information: OK

The interior unit(s) were inspected visually and tested by ensuring they responded to normal operating controls in heating mode (at the thermostat), and that heated air was produced. The unit(s) responded to normal operating controls and no indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.


Heating Equipment: Interior Unit Manufactured Year

2006


The typical life expectancy of electric units is approximately 13-15 years, and 15-17 years for gas units. 






Filter size and Location

This is the HVAC filter size and location.  I recommend monitoring this and changing it every 3 months or sooner if needed.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

6 - Kitchen

Dishwasher: Brand
Maytag
Refrigerator: Brand
Maytag
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Electric
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
Maytag
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Anti-Tip Bracket Present: No

Recommend adding an anti tip bracket to prevent accidental tipping.

Dishwasher: Dishwasher: OK

The dishwasher was operated by running a wash cycle, and was functional at the time of inspection. No leaks or water was present at the base of the unit at the completion of the cycle. The unit's efficiency of cleaning dishes is not tested for. No deficiencies were observed with the unit unless otherwise noted in this report.

Refrigerator: Refrigerator: OK

The refrigerator was cool and operational at the time of the inspection. No further testing was performed. No deficiencies were noted.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Heating Elements: OK

All of the heating elements on the range were turned to "High", and were functional at the time of inspection. No indications of deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Oven Information: OK

The oven was operated by placing into "Bake" mode, and heat was produced from the element(s). Temperature calibration, "clean" options, and other functions are not tested for. You are recommended to seek further evaluation of additional functions if desired/needed. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Kitchen Sink: Kitchen Sink: OK

The kitchen sink was inspected by operating the faucet valves and faucet looking for any leaks or signs of significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.


Visible Plumbing: Visible Plumbing: OK

The supply and drain pipes were inspected looking for leaks, improper installation, and other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

GFCI Protection: GFCI Protection:

GFCI Protection: GFCI Information

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) is a protection feature that allows a circuit or receptacle to "trip" or "shut off" if as little as a 5 milliamp differential is detected between the "hot" and "neutral" conductors. This protection is required at locations near a water source or where something plugged into the receptacle could come into contact with water, including: bathrooms, kitchens, on the exterior, in garages, and basements. Although GFCI protection may not have been required in some or all of these areas when the home was built, their installation is highly recommended and is typically inexpensive. This protection, if present, was tested and was in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report. 

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

7 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

Inspection Method
Visual
Foundation: Material
Concrete
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Concrete
Floor Structure: Material
Engineered Floor Trusses
Floor Structure: Sub-floor
OSB
Homeowner's Responsibility

One of the most common problems in a house is a wet basement or foundation. You should monitor the walls and floors for signs of water penetration, such as dampness, water stains, peeling paint, efflorescence, and rust on exposed metal parts. In a finished basement, look for rotted or warped wood paneling and doors, loose floor tiles, and mildew stains. It may come through the walls or cracks in the floor, or from backed-up floor drains, leaky plumbing lines, or a clogged air-conditioner condensate line. 

Basements & Crawlspaces: Basement moisture and water intrusion: OK

The basement area was inspected looking for signs of past or present water intrusion by inspecting visible portions of the foundation walls and floors looking for moisture stains and/or other signs of prior water intrusion. No signs of water / moisture intrusion was present at visible portions at the time of inspection in the basement area unless otherwise noted in this report. I can only report on the conditions as they existed at the time of inspection, and can not guarantee that water will not infiltrate this area at a future time due to a heavy rain or changes in conditions. I have inspected homes where no water or indications of water intrusion was present at the time of inspection, but days later standing water was present due to a rainfall event, and for this reason, I highly recommend consulting with the sellers as to prior moisture infiltration into this area, and reading the sellers disclosure which should list such a condition.

Floor Structure: Floor Structure: OK

Visible portions of the framing and floor structure were inspected looking for damage or other significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Wall Structure: Foundation Walls: OK

Visible portions of the foundation walls were inspected looking for significant cracking, moisture intrusion, or any other indications of damage or significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Foundation: Visual Limitations

The referenced visual obstructions listed above may block or hinder visual accessibility of the floor structure and other areas. The inspection of the foundation area and floor structure is limited to visual portions only. Any items or areas not visible are excluded from this inspection. Insulation or any other item is not moved or disturbed for visual accessibility.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Foundation

Foundation Cracks - Minor

Minor cracking was noted at the foundation. This is common as concrete ages and shrinkage surface cracks are normal. Recommend monitoring for more serious shifting/displacement. 

Here is an informational article on foundation cracks.

Mag glass Monitor

8 - Plumbing

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Location of Main Shut-Off Valve
Basement
Hot Water Source: Water Heater Manufacture Year:

04/2014

The typical life expectancy of a water heater is 10-12 years

Hot Water Source: Water Heater Capacity
40 Gallons
Water Supply : Water Pressure:

There is approximately 75 PSI water pressure 

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Homeowner's Responsibility

As the homeowner you should know where the main water and fuel shutoff valves are located. And be sure to keep an eye out for any water and plumbing leaks. 

Water Supply : Water Supply Is Private

The water supply to the house appeared to be from a private water supply source based upon the observed indications at the time of the inspection.  To confirm and be certain, I recommend asking the homeowner for details. 

Hot Water Source: Type of Hot Water Source: OK
Gas-Fired Hot Water Tank

I inspected for the main source of the distributed hot water to the plumbing fixtures (sinks, tubs, showers).  I recommend asking the homeowner for details about the hot water equipment and past performance. 

Hot Water Source: Inspected Hot Water Source: OK

The water heater was inspected looking for signs of leakage and corrosion.  No defects found unless noted in this report.

Hot Water Source: TPR Valve: OK

 A TPR valve was in place, and appeared functional. These are not tested due to the fact that once they are tested, they tend to form a drip leak. These valves allow the water heater to expel water and pressure if the tank reaches a pressure over 150psi, or the water temperature exceeds 210 degrees. No deficiencies were observed with the valve unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Hot Water Source: Maintenance Recommendations:

WATER HEATER: We recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding.

Here's a helpful article from Lowes on maintaining you water heater.


Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Inspected Drain, Waste, Vent Pipes:

I attempted to inspect the drain, waste, and vent pipes.  Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about water and sewer leaks or blockages in the past.  

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Inspected Water Supply & Distribution Pipes:

I attempted to inspect the water supply and distribution pipes (plumbing pipes). Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed. Inspection restriction. Ask the homeowner about water supply, problems with water supply, and water leaks in the past.  No defects were seen unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the drainage pipes were hidden within the walls.  

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the water supply pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the water distribution pipes, valves and connections were hidden within the walls.  

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the main water supply shut-off valve;
  2. the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  3. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  4. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  5. all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  6. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  7. the drain, waste and vent system; and
  8. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  2. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  3. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  4. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
  5. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  2. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  3. active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; and  
  4. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate.


9 - Electrical

Electrical Wiring: Type of Wiring, If Visible
NM-B (Romex)
Main Service Amperage: Homeowner's Responsibility

It's your job to know where the main electrical panel is located, including the main service disconnect that turns everything off. 

Be sure to test your GFCIs, AFCIs, and smoke detectors regularly. You can replace light bulbs, but more than that, you ought to hire an electrician. Electrical work is hazardous and mistakes can be fatal. Hire a professional whenever there's an electrical problem in your house. 

Main Service Amperage: Inspected Main Service Disconnect: OK

I inspected the electrical main service disconnect.  No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Main Service Amperage: Main Service Rating, If Labeled
200

I observed indications of the main service disconnect's amperage rating. It was labeled. 

Panelboards & Breakers: Main Panelboard & Breakers: OK


The breakers were inspected looking for any visible signs of damage due to arcing, heat, etc. Corresponding conductors were inspected looking for multiple lugging, sizing, damage, etc. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 





Service Grounding & Bonding: Service Grounding & Bonding: OK

I inspected the electrical service grounding and bonding.  No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Receptacles: OK

A representative number of receptacles were tested with a polarity tester to confirm proper wiring. No wiring deficiencies were reported by the tester unless otherwise noted in this report.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Switches: OK

A representative number of switches and lights were tested throughout the home and were found to be in good working order. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

GFCIs: Inspected GFCIs: OK

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) is a protection feature that allows a circuit or receptacle to "trip" or "shut off" if as little as a 5 milliamp differential is detected between the "hot" and "neutral" conductors. This protection is required at locations near a water source or where something plugged into the receptacle could come into contact with water, including: bathrooms, kitchens, on the exterior, in garages, and basements. Although GFCI protection may not have been required in some or all of these areas when the home was built, their installation is highly recommended and is typically inexpensive. This protection, if present, was tested and was in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Electrical Wiring: Unable to Inspect All of the Wiring

I was unable to inspect all of the electrical wiring. Obviously, most of the wiring is hidden from view within walls. Beyond the scope of a visual home inspection. 

GFCIs: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the GFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the service drop;
  2. the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  3. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  4. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  5. the electric meter and base;
  6. service-entrance conductors;
  7. the main service disconnect;
  8. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  9. service grounding and bonding;
  10. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  11. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  12. for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  2. the type of wiring observed.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  2. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  3. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  4. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and
  5. the absence of smoke and/or carbon monoxide detectors. 


10 - Bathrooms

Bathroom Toilets: Toilets: OK

The toilets were inspected by flushing them to ensure they were flushing adequately and to determine no leaks were present at the water supply line or tank location. Toilets will also be checked for an adequate connection at the floor. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.


Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers: OK


Water was ran through the drains of tubs and showers for an extended period of time, and the areas under these drains (if applicable) were then inspected looking for indications of leaks. No leaks were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

What I can't replicate is the affects of weight applied to these drains. When showering or bathing the forces from weight can put strain on gaskets or joints on the drain pipes that can possibly result in leaking, this can be even more likely if the home has been vacant for an extended period of time. 





Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans: OK

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: GFCI-Protection Tested: OK

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. 

Cabinetry, Ceiling, Walls & Floor: Cabinets and Counter Tops: OK

The cabinets and countertops were inspected looking for significant damage and by testing a representative number of doors and drawers evaluating their operation. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing; and 
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.

11 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Doors: Doors Inspected

I inspected a representative number of doors according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate door locks and door stops, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 


Windows: Windows Inspected:

The windows were inspected by operating a representative number (I will try and operate every window in the home, but personal belongings may block accessibility to some). Their operation was tested, along with looking for damage, broken glass, failed seals, etc. No reportable deficiencies were present unless otherwise noted in this report.


Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. No deficiencies were found unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected:

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for cracks and signs of settlement.  I looked for signs of water damage and leakage. No deficiencies were found unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Railings, Guards & Handrails Were Inspected

I inspected a representative number railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Inspected for Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

I inspected for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. 

There should be a smoke detector in every sleeping room, outside of every sleeping room, and one every level of a house. 


Heres a helpful article from the NFPA on carbon monoxide.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Unable to Test Every Detector

I was unable to test every detector. We recommend testing all of the detectors.  Ask the seller about the performance of the detectors and of any issues regarding them.  We recommend replacing all of the detectors (smoke and carbon monoxide) with new ones just for peace of mind and for safety concerns.  

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; 
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 
  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. 

The inspector shall describe: 

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; 
  • photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and 
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. 

12 - Attic

Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Cellulose
Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Ridge Vents
Attic Insulation: Attic Views
Attic Insulation: Insulation Estimated R Value
21

Insulation Recommendations:

Attic | R38 - R60

Cathedral Ceiling | R30 - R38

Wall Cavity Insulation | R13 - R15

Wall Sheathing | R2.5 - R6

Floor | R25 - R30

-Information from energy.gov

Blown cellulose is R-3.2 to 3.8 per inch - Blown fiberglass is R-2.2 to 2.7 per inch


I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.