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1234 Main St.
Bend, Deschutes 97702
12/05/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
15
Minor concerns/maintenance items/fyi
18
Moderate concern
3
Major concern & safety hazards

www.VaultedHomeInspections.com



THIS REPORT IS INTENDED ONLY FOR THE USE OF THE PERSON PURCHASING THE HOME INSPECTION SERVICES. NO OTHER PERSON, INCLUDING A PURCHASER OF THE INSPECTED PROPERTY WHO DID NOT PURCHASE THE HOME INSPECTION SERVICES, MAY RELY UPON ANY REPRESENTATION MADE IN THE REPORT.



1 - Inspection Detail

General Inspection Info: Occupancy
Vacant
General Inspection Info: Weather Conditions
Sunny
General Inspection Info: Type of Building
Single Family
General Inspection Info: In Attendance
Just the Inspector

We prefer to have our client present during the inspection so that we can discuss concerns, and answer all questions.  The Client was unable to attend the inspection at 1234.  

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice while reading this inspection report.  I performed the home inspection according to the standards and my clients wishes and expectations.  Please refer to the inspection contract or agreement between the inspector and the inspector's client.  

2 - Roof

Roof Covering: Type of Roof-Covering Described
Asphalt
Roof Covering: Roof Was Inspected
Walked Roof
Roof Covering: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job as the homeowner is to monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak. To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters.

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant. Roofs are not designed to be waterproof. Eventually, the roof system will leak. No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 

Every roof should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.


Plumbing Vent Pipes: Plumbing Vent Pipes Inspected

I looked at DWV (drain, waste and vent) pipes that pass through the roof covering.  There should be watertight flashing (often black rubber material) installed around the vent pipes.  These plumbing vent pipes should extend far enough above the roof surface to prevent blockage by snow accumulation that is common in our region.    

Flue Gas Vent Pipes: Flue Gas Vent Pipe Inspected

I looked at flue gas vent pipes that pass through the roof covering. 

All gas-fired appliances must be connected to venting systems. There should be watertight metal flashing installed around the flue gas vent pipes.  

Gutters & Downspouts: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job is to monitor the gutters and be sure that they function during and after a rainstorm. Look for loose parts, sagging gutter ends, and water leaks. The rain water should be diverted far away from the house foundation. 

Gutters & Downspouts: Gutters Were Inspected

I inspected the gutters.  I wasn't able to inspect every inch of every gutter.  But I attempted to check the overall general condition of the gutters during the inspection and look for indications of major defects.  

Monitoring the gutters during a heavy rain (without lightening) is recommended.  In general, the gutters should catch rain water and direct the water towards downspouts that discharge the water away from the house foundation. 

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice related to inspecting the roof of the house.  

Monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak.  To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters. 

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant.  Roofs are not designed to be waterproof.  Eventually, the roof system will leak.  No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 


I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves:

  1. the roof-covering materials;
  2. the gutters;
  3. the downspouts;
  4. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and 
  5. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of roof-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. observed indications of active roof leaks.

Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Roof Covering

Cracked Roof-Covering Material

I observed cracked and damaged shingles.  This can allow moisture intrusion under the roof covering and damage building materials. 

 Further evaluation and repair by a professional roofer is recommended.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Roof Covering

Roof Condition

The asphalt shingles covering the roof of this home showed moderate general deterioration, however, they appeared to be adequately protecting the underlying home structure at the time of the inspection.  Asphalt shingles appeared to be original and had suffered noticeable uniform granule loss across the roof. 

This is not a defective condition, but is a natural result of the aging process. The bond between asphalt and granules deteriorates over time as asphalt loses volatile compounds, dries and shrinks. It does not affect the ability of the shingles to shed water.  

The remaining life expectancy of the roof covering was estimated at 5 years based on the estimated age and condition of the roof covering at the time of the inspection.

Mag glass Monitor
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Comment
2.2.1 - Flashing

Missing Kickout Flashing
Above Main Entry

I observed a defect at the flashing area above the main entry where the "kickout" flashing was missing.  A kickout flashing "kicks" the roof water away from the house structure and diverts it into a gutter. This missing flashing could lead to hidden moisture intrusion and water damage issues that I would not be able to observe during a visual-only home inspection. 

A roofing professional is needed to further evaluate and make necessary corrections. 

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.6.1 - Gutters & Downspouts

Debris in Gutters
Front and rear of home

I observed dirt and shingle granule debris in the gutter.  

Cleaning and maintenance is recommended to maintain proper drainage. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
2.6.2 - Gutters & Downspouts

Downspouts Drain Near Foundation
Throughout Exterior

Virtually all downspouts drained too close to the home's foundation and did not possess proper downspout diverters.  This can result in excessive moisture in the soil at the foundation, which can lead to foundation/structural movement or moisture intrusion into the crawlspace. 

Recommend a qualified contractor adjust downspout extensions to drain at least 6 feet from the foundation.  A handy homeowner should be able to do this project.  

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.6.3 - Gutters & Downspouts

Gutter Leakage
Multiple locations throughout gutter system

I observed indications of water leakage from the gutters at the multiple gutter joints, which could result in water not being properly collected and drained away.  This is a defect that should be corrected by a professional contractor.  

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor

3 - Exterior

Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim: Type of Wall-Covering Material Described
Engineered Wood, Lap Siding, T-111, Wood Trim
Walkways & Driveways: Walkways & Driveways Were Inspected
Front of Home

I inspected the walkways and driveways that were adjacent to the house. 

Windows: Windows Inspected

A representative number of windows from the ground surface was inspected. 

Exterior Doors: Exterior Doors Inspected

I inspected the exterior doors. 

General: Homeowner's Responsibility

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging. The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it. Your job is to monitor the buildings exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

During a heavy rainstorm (without lightning), grab an umbrella and go outside. Walk around your house and look around at the roof and property. A rainstorm is the perfect time to see how the roof, downspouts and grading are performing. Observe the drainage patterns of your entire property, as well as the property of your neighbor. The ground around your house should slope away from all sides. Downspouts, surface gutters and drains should be directing water away from the foundation. 

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Eaves, Soffits and Fascia Were Inspected

I inspected the eaves, soffits and fascia.  I was not able to inspect every detail, since a home inspection is limited in its scope. 

Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading: Vegetation, Drainage, Walls & Grading Were Inspected

I inspected the vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 


Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies, & Related Railing, Guard & Handrails: Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Gaurds/Rails Were Inspected

I inspected the porches, patios, decks, balconies and gaurds/rails at the house that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Railings, Guards & Handrails Were Inspected

I inspected the railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies, & Related Railing, Guard & Handrails: Deck Framing Not Visible

The deck was constructed very close to grade.  The rim joists at the perimeter of the deck were close to the ground and blocked the the view of the framing under the deck. This was an inspection restriction. 

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice related to inspecting the exterior of the house. 


I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the exterior wall-covering materials; 
  2. the eaves, soffits and fascia;
  3. a representative number of windows;
  4. all exterior doors;
  5. flashing and trim;
  6. adjacent walkways and driveways;
  7. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
  8. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
  9. railings, guards and handrails; and 
  10. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of exterior wall-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails.

Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim

Minor Flaking Paint and Shrinking Caulking
Multiple locations

I observed shrinking caulking at siding butt-joints mainly at the front of the home in multiple locations, as well as mild paint deterioration at multiple locations mainly at trim near the roof line.  Left unchecked, flaking paint and shrinking caulking will continue to deteriorate and leave the underlying materials vulnerable to moisture intrusion.  No damage was observed in relation to flaking paint or caulking.

Regular caulk and paint maintenance is recommended to maintain a weather resistant surface in order to protect wood building materials from the elements.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim

Open penetrations in siding

I observed open penetrations at the left side of the garage where utility wiring was entering the wall cavity.  These open penetrations allow access for pests and moisture to enter the wall cavity.  No damage was observed in relation to these penetrations.

These penetrations should be sealed with an exterior grade caulk sealant to prevent pest/moisture intrusion and subsequent damage.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.3.3 - Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim

Damaged Trim at Chimney Chase

I observed separating finger joints and missing trim pieces at the trim on the chimney chase above the roof.  Some of the missing trim left wood framing exposed as well as left the counter flashing vulnerable to moisture intrusion.  No signs of decay at wood framing was observed at the time of the inspection.

It is recommended to have the trim repaired or replaced by a qualified professional as necessary to protect wood framing and prevent moisture intrusion.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.4 - Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim

Inadequate Ground Clearance
Framed Chimney Chase

Low clearance to grade was observed at the framed chimney chase at the rear of the house. It is recommend to maintain 3-6 inches of clearance between the bottom edge of siding and the ground.  No wood decay was observed at the time of the inspection.  In addition, mild damage to the wood trim at this location was present with exposed wood.

Correction of clearance to grade and paint maintenance at the damaged trim is recommended to prevent damage to wood building materials from excessive moisture exposure.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading

Encroaching Vegetation

I observed vegetation encroaching on building materials around the house in areas.  This condition limited and restricted my visual inspection.  Dense vegetation and landscaping up against or near the house foundation and exterior walls can allow for water penetration and insect infestation.  

Trimming, pruning and some landscaping is recommended.  

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Walkways & Driveways

Typical Cracking at Driveway

I observed cracking at the driveway that appeared to be caused by settlement and was considered typical.  Edge deterioration at the cracks is likely from a lack of maintenance and proper sealing of the cracks.

It is recommended to seal these cracks with a flexible concrete crack sealant to prevent further deterioration from freeze and thaw cycles.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies, & Related Railing, Guard & Handrails

Multiple defects observed at the front deck
Front Deck

Multiple defects at the front deck included but were not limited to deck framing that was in contact with the soil, loose floor boards and guardrails, and loose fasteners.  Concrete footings were observed, although most of the deck framing was NOT visible behind the rim joist due to low clearance.  No wood decay was visible at the time of the inspection.

Further evaluation and repair by a qualified professional is recommended to prevent further damage and to maintain safety for users.  Recommend maintaining 3-6 inch clearance between non-treated wood building materials and the soil to prevent excessive moisture exposure and decay.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.9.1 - Windows

Missing Window Screen

I observed a missing screen at the sliding glass door and master bedroom window.  

Installation of a sliding screen door, and window screen is recommended to improve functionality. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.10.1 - Exterior Doors

Main Entry Door

Main entry door was dented at the interior.  This did NOT affect door operation and this was considered a cosmetic issue for your information.

Recommend replacement at buyers discretion to maintain appearances.

Credit
Comment
3.10.2 - Exterior Doors

Missing strike plate

Main entry door was missing the strike plate for the deadbolt.  This did NOT affect deadbolt operation, however, damage to the wood door frame can result from the missing strike plate.

A qualified professional should install a strike plate at the deadbolt to prevent damage to the door frame and to maintain appearances.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Attached Garage

Garage Floor: Garage Floor Inspected

I inspected the floor of the attached garage. 

Garage Vehicle Door: Type of Door Operation
Opener
Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Safety Reversal Was Inspected
Garage Door

I observed the photo-electric auto-reverse feature during a non-contact test as well as the pressure activated safety reverse.  These automatic safety reverse features were tested and appeared to be operating in a satisfactory manner at the time of the inspection. 

Garage doors are not tested by the Inspector using specialized equipment and this inspection will not confirm adherence to manufacturer's specifications. This inspection is performed according to the inspector's judgment from past experience. You should adjust your expectations accordingly. If you wish to ensure that the garage door complies with the manufacturer's specifications you should have the it inspected by a qualified contractor or technician.


Ceiling, Walls & Firewalls in Garage: Garage Ceiling & Walls Were Inspected

I inspected the ceiling and walls of the garage according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

Ceiling, Walls & Firewalls in Garage: Door Between Garage and House Was Inspected

I inspected the door between the attached garage and the house. 

The door should be a solid wood door at least 1-3/8 inches thick, a solid or honeycomb-core steel door at least 1-3/8 inches thick, or a 20-minute fire-rated door. 


The inspector shall inspect:

  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls.


The inspector shall describe:

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener.


Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Garage Floor

Cracked Concrete at Garage Floor
Garage

I observed cracks in the garage concrete floor.  These cracks appeared to be typical and were likely caused by typical settlement and shrinkage.

Recommend monitoring for signs of movement at the cracks.  If the surface of the floor becomes uneven it is recommended to have evaluated by a concrete contractor and repair as necessary.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Garage Vehicle Door

Weather Stripping at Garage Door was Torn

I observed torn weather stripping at the left side of the garage roll-up door.  This did NOT affect door closure and did NOT leave a gap at the door opening. 

Recommend monitoring for further damage and unprotected gaps.  It may be necessary to replace parts of the weather stripping if further damage occurs.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
4.5.1 - Ceiling, Walls & Firewalls in Garage

Fractured Attic Access Panel in Garage Ceiling - Safety Hazard
Garage Ceiling

I observed a fractured attic access panel in the ceiling of the garage. This created a Fire separation breach which is considered a safety hazard.   

There must be at least 1/2-inch thick gypsum board or equivalent applied to the garage side to separate the garage and the house or attic space.

Recommend replacing the fractured access panel with at least 1/2-inch thick gypsum board or equivalent to maintain the fire separation boundary between garage and house.


Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Bathrooms

Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected

All toilets were flushed and observed for proper drainage.

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Ran Water at Sinks, Tubs & Showers

I ran water at all bathroom sinks, bathtubs, and showers. I inspected for deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously. 

Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected Bath Exhaust Fans

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. 

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing; and 
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.

6 - Chimney, Fireplace, or Stove

Fireplace: Type of Fireplace
Stand Alone Vented Gas Stove

Vented Stand Alone Gas Stove

Vented Gas Fireplace/Stove: Type of Fireplace
Living Room
Stand Alone Vented Gas Stove

Free standing gas stove was tested and had satisfactory operation at the time of the inspection. Stove was operated by a wall thermostat located in the living room.

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice related to inspecting the chimney, fireplace, and stove.  

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;
  2. lintels above the fireplace openings;
  3. damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and
  4. cleanout doors and frames.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of fireplace.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;
  2. manually operated dampers that did not open and close;
  3. the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;
  4. the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and
  5. cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

7 - Heating

Heating System Information: Energy Source
Gas
Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
Hallway
Heating System Information: Air Filter
Furnace cabinet

Two air filters present at furnace cabinet. 

Heating System Information: Homeowner's Responsibility

Most HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. They consist of four components: controls, fuel supply, heating or cooling unit, and distribution system. The adequacy of heating and cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

It's your job to get the HVAC system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system has an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned. 

Heating System Information: Heating Method
Forced Air Gas Furnace

Natural Gas Furnace present in garage.  The furnace was operational at the time of the inspection and DID respond to normal operating controls.  The furnace appeared to be original with a MFG. date of 1997.  

The average life expectancy of a gas furnace is around 20 years, and can last longer if properly maintained.  This furnace was considered to be in the late stage of its life expectancy. It is recommended to budget for replacement in the future.

InterNACHI's Standard Estimate Life Expectancy Chart for Homes

Heating System Information: Heat Distribution Confirmed at Air Registers

Each room was inspected for a presence of a heat source. All air registers were checked for distribution of heated air.  Heated air distribution was confirmed at all registers at the time of the inspection.

Ductwork: Ductwork Installed
Insulated

I observed ductwork in the house.  Warm-air heating systems, including heat pump systems, use ductwork to distribute the warm air throughout the house. I will attempt to determine if the each room has a heat source, but I may not be able to find every duct register.  

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the heating system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the heating system;
  2. the energy source; and
  3. the heating method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any heating system that did not operate; and
  2. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible.

Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Heating System Information

Filter installed at return register

I observed an air filter at the air return duct.  The ideal location for air filters are at the furnace cabinet to provide optimal protection for the furnace.  Filters were present at the furnace  cabinet and this filter at the return was unnecessary.  Extra filters and excessively dirty filters put undue stress on the furnace blower motor.

This filter should be removed to maintain proper airflow and to prevent undue stress that could damage the furnace blower motor.

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
7.1.2 - Heating System Information

Delayed Maintenance

I observed indications of delayed maintenance at the heating system.  The maintenance record on the furnace had not been updated since 2009.  The system should be cleaned and inspected by a HVAC professional every year. 

Further evaluation and hvac maintenance is recommended before the close of escrow. 

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor
Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Ductwork

Duct Damaged
Crawlspace

I observed considerable damage at the ductwork throughout the crawlspace. The ducts had damaged insulation as well as holes in the interior air duct at some locations that allowed for heat loss to the crawlspace. It appeared that most damage was caused by rodent access to the ducts.  Some ducts were in contact with the ground in the crawlspace, which allows access for pests and can make the ducts vulnerable to moisture.  

An HVAC contractor should evaluate the duct system and repair or replace ducts as necessary to maintain thermal efficiency.  The ducts should be elevated and supported off of the ground to prevent rodent and moisture exposure.

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor

8 - Cooling

Cooling System Information: Cooling System Not Present

No A/C unit was present. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the cooling system, using normal operating controls.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and
  2. the cooling method.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any cooling system that did not operate; and
  2. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.


9 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Counter Tops and Cabinetry: Countertops

Countertops were a solid surface material.

Counter Tops and Cabinetry: Cabinets

Cabinet material was wood.

Doors: Doors Inspected

I inspected a representative number of doors according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate door locks and door stops, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Main entry door was Steel.

Windows: Windows Inspected

I inspected a representative number of windows according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate window locks and operation features, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Windows were thermally insulated, vinyl framed windows.

Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. 

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Floors, Walls, Ceilings Inspected

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for material defects according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Floor materials were Tile, Vinyl, Carpet, and Laminate.


Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Railings, Guards & Handrails Were Inspected

I inspected a representative number railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors: Inspected for Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

I inspected for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. 

There should be a smoke detector in every sleeping room, outside of every sleeping room, and on every level of a house.  Smoke detectors have a 10 year expiration.  CO detectors last 7-10 years and is recommended that they be replaced every 7 years.

ORS 479.260 Sale/transfer of a dwelling unit, lodging house: Dwellings may not be sold/transferred without the required smoke alarms installed in accordance with the state building code in force at the time of construction and rules of the State Fire Marshal.  Smoke and CO detectors were compliant at the time of the inspection.

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; 
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 
  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. 

The inspector shall describe: 

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; 
  • photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and 
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. 

Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Doors

Improperly Installed Door Hardware

I observed an improperly installed door latch at the master bath door.  The latch was hitting the strike plate and made the door difficult to close and latch.

Recommend repair by a qualified professional to restore operation as intended.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Windows

Fogged / Broken Seal

I observed a streaking between the glass panes at the sliding glass door indicating a broken seal that can cause condensation between the window panes. Glass seal failures can be difficult to detect, and there could be other windows that were NOT showing symptoms of seal failure.

The sliding glass door should be evaluated by a window professional and repaired or replaced as necessary.  It should be considered to have other windows in the house tested for glass seal failures at the buyers discretion.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.2.2 - Windows

Fractured Window frame edge

I observed a fracture at the operational window sash at both kitchen dining nook windows.  This fracture did NOT affect window operation and was considered cosmetic.

Recommend repair or replacement by qualified professional at buyers discretion to maintain appearances.

Credit
Comment
9.2.3 - Windows

Window Operation

I observed windows that had dislocated or damaged window balancers and the operational window had unintended movement in the window frame.  Window balancers help maintain the weight of the window to stay in the open position.  These windows struggled to stay fully open as intended. This can lead to hazardous conditions in the event that the window is needed for emergency egress. 

Recommend evaluation by a qualified window professional and repair or replace as necessary.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor

10 - Plumbing

Hot Water Source: Inspected TPR Valve

I inspected the temperature and pressure relief valve.  

Hot Water Source: Inspected Venting Connections

I inspected the venting connections. 

Fuel Storage System: Fuel-Storage System Was Observed
Not present

No fuel storage present.

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Location of Main Shut-Off Valve
At the meter, Additional Shut-off Valve Not Located
Main Fuel Supply Shut-Off Valve: Location of Main Shut-Off Valve
Left Side
Side of House, Near Electric Meter
Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Homeowner's Responsibility

It's your job to know where the main water and fuel shutoff valves are located. And be sure to keep an eye out for any water and plumbing leaks. 

Water Supply : Water Supply Is Public

The water supply to the house appeared to be from the public water supply source based upon the observed indications at the time of the inspection.  

Water Supply : Backflow Prevention device - Redmond

Backflow prevention device not observed.  Backflow prevention devices are NOT required at the meter in the City of Redmond.

Learn more about City of Redmond backflow requirements here.

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Inspected Water Supply & Distribution Pipes

I attempted to inspect the water supply and distribution pipes (plumbing pipes). Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed due to installed floor insulation or being within wall cavities. Inspection restriction.  No signs of leakage, past or present was observed at the time of the inspection.

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Inspected Drain, Waste, Vent Pipes

I attempted to inspect the drain, waste, and vent pipes.  Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about water and sewer leaks or blockages in the past.  

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material and Main Sewer Clean-out location.

Waste drain and vent system material was ABS plastic.  The main sewer clean-out was located during the inspection.

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Waste Drains Stress Tested For Leaks

All fixtures were operated and waste drains were stress tested for leaks.

Hot Water Source: Type of Hot Water Source
Garage
Gas-Fired Hot Water Tank

I inspected for the main source of the distributed hot water to the plumbing fixtures (sinks, tubs, showers).  I recommend asking the homeowner for details about the hot water equipment and past performance. 

Hot Water Source: Inspected Hot Water Source
Garage

I inspected the hot water source and equipment according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.  The water heater WAS functional at the time of the inspection.

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Unable to Locate

There is typically a main shutoff valve present in addition to the shut-off valve at the meter. I was unable to determine the location of the main water shut-off valve, and it maybe hidden by vegetation or beneath the front deck.  Recommend the homeowner disclose the location of the main shut-off valve. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the main water supply shut-off valve;
  2. the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  3. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  4. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  5. all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  6. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  7. the drain, waste and vent system; and
  8. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  2. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  3. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  4. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
  5. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  2. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  3. active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; and  
  4. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate.


Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Water Supply & Distribution Systems

Water Leak at Hose Bib Shut-Off Valve
Front and Rear Hose bibs

I observed an active water leak at the exterior hose bib water shut-off valve at the front and rear of the home.  The hoses had spray handles installed that stopped the flow of water and pressurized the hose.  The pressurized water in the hose leaked from the hose bib shut-off valve. 

Recommend repair or replacement of hose bibs as necessary to restore proper function and prevent unintended leakage.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.5.1 - Hot Water Source

Aging System

I observed during the inspection that the system appeared to be original and was likely nearing end of its service life. I was unable to view the data tag on the tank due to an insulation blanket that was blocking access, so the age of the tank and its capacity could NOT be confirmed.  

In addition, mild scorching from a condition called flame roll-out was observed.  Flame roll-out can be a symptom of several different deficiencies, but generally indicates an aging unit.

 Recommend evaluation of the water heater by a qualified professional to determine cause of the flame roll-out and repair or replace as necessary. Budgeting for repairs and future replacement is recommended.

InterNACHI's Standard Estimate Life Expectancy Chart for Homes

Contractor Qualified Professional

11 - Electrical

Main Service Disconnect: Service Amperage and Voltage
200 amps, 220/240 volts

Service rating was observed to be 200 amps and 220/240 volts.

Electrical Wiring: Type of Wiring, If Visible
NM-B (Romex)
Service Grounding & Bonding: Inspected the Service Grounding & Bonding

I inspected the electrical service grounding and bonding.

Electric Meter & Base: Inspected the Electric Meter & Base
Left Side

I inspected the electrical electric meter and base. 

Service-Entrance Conductors: Inspected Service-Entrance Conductors

I inspected the electrical service-entrance conductors.  Service type was underground service lateral.  Service entrance conductors were Aluminum.  

Main Service Disconnect: Homeowner's Responsibility
Garage

It's your job to know where the main electrical panel is located, including the main service disconnect that turns everything off. 

Be sure to test your GFCIs, AFCIs, and smoke detectors regularly. You can replace light bulbs, but more than that, you ought to hire an electrician. Electrical work is hazardous and mistakes can be fatal. Hire a professional whenever there's an electrical problem in your house. 

Main Service Disconnect: Inspected Main Service Disconnect
Garage

I inspected the electrical main service disconnect located at the main distribution panel in the garage.

Panelboards & Breakers: Inspected Main Panelboard & Breakers

I inspected the electrical panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses).  No defects observed.

GFCIs: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible. No defects observed.

Electrical Wiring: Unable to Inspect All of the Wiring

I was unable to inspect all of the electrical wiring. Obviously, most of the wiring is hidden from view within walls. Beyond the scope of a visual home inspection. 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the service drop;
  2. the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  3. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  4. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  5. the electric meter and base;
  6. service-entrance conductors;
  7. the main service disconnect;
  8. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  9. service grounding and bonding;
  10. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  11. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  12. for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  2. the type of wiring observed.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  2. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  3. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  4. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and
  5. the absence of smoke and/or carbon monoxide detectors. 


Credit
Comment
11.8.1 - Electrical Defects

Loose Junction Box at Exterior Fixture
Front of garage, left of roll-up door

I observed a light fixture at the front of the garage to the left of the garage door that had a loose connection to the wall.  It appeared that the junction box was NOT properly secured and allowed for movement.

Recommend repair by qualified professional to prevent dislocation of junction box or light fixture.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
11.8.2 - Electrical Defects

Exterior Receptacle Missing Protective Cover
Front of house at deck

I observed a damaged and/or missing protective cover at the exterior electrical receptacle.  Exterior receptacles are required to have protective weather proof covers to prevent moisture intrusion into the receptacle which can lead to electrical hazards, as electricity and moisture do NOT mix.

It is recommended to repair or replace the protective cover to prevent moisture intrusion at this electrical receptacle.

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

Insulation in Attic: Approximate Average Depth of Insulation
12 inches or more

  

Structural Components & Observations in Attic: Structural Components Were Inspected

Structural components were inspected from the attic space according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Insulation in Attic: Insulation Was Inspected

During the home inspection, I inspected for insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas.  I inspected for ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas.  And I inspected mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.

I attempted to describe the type of insulation observed and the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure.

I reported as in need of correction the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces.


Insulation in Attic: Type of Insulation Observed
Fiberglass, Blown, Batt
Ventilation in Attic: Ventilation Inspected

During the home inspection, I inspected for ventilation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas. And I inspected for mechanical exhaust systems. 

Attic space had soffit and upper roof vents for passive attic ventilation.  No defects observed.

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; 
  • ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and 
  • mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. 

The inspector shall describe: 

  • the type of insulation observed; and 
  • the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. 

13 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

Structure: Wall structure

2x6 wood studs and gypsum board wall covering.

Structure: Ceilings and ceiling structure

2x4 ceiling structure with gypsum board ceiling covering

Structure: Roof Structure

2x4, 2x6 Engineered Wood Trusses

Insulation in Crawlspace: Type of Insulation Observed
Batt, Fiberglass
Insulation in Crawlspace: Approximate Average Depth of Insulation
6-9 inches, Dislocated Insulation
Under-Floor Crawlspace: Type of Under-Floor Crawlspace Foundation Described
Concrete, Stemwall
Under-Floor Crawlspace: Under-Floor Crawl Access Location
Guest Bedroom Closet
Structure: Floor structure

Floor structure was Engineered I-Joists, concrete strip footing, and cripple wall support.

Insulation in Crawlspace: Insulation Was Inspected

During the home inspection, I inspected for insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas.  I inspected for ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas.  And I inspected mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.

Ventilation in Crawlspace: Ventilation Inspected

During the home inspection, I inspected for ventilation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas. And I inspected mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.

Crawlspace had foundation vents for passive crawlspace ventilation.


Under-Floor Crawlspace: Under-Floor Crawlspace Inspected

The under-floor crawlspace area was crawled and inspected according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice. 

The crawlspace can be a revealing area in the house and often provides a general picture of how the entire structure works. In many crawlspaces, the structure is exposed overhead, as are the HVAC distribution system, plumbing supply and DWV lines, and the electrical branch-circuit wiring. I inspected all visible systems and components that were not blocked by floor insulation.

Under-Floor Crawlspace: Structural Components Inspected

Structural components were inspected according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice, including readily observed floor joists. 


I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the foundation;
  • the basement;
  • the crawlspace; and
  • structural components.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of foundation; and
  • the location of the access to the under-floor space.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil;
  • observed indications of active water penetration;
  • observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and
  • any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern.

Credit
Comment
13.2.1 - Insulation in Crawlspace

Insulation Not Properly Supported

I observed that the insulation installed on the floor joists above the crawlspace is hanging loosely and falling out of its intended location throughout the crawlspace.  This was likely caused by poor installation of furring strips intended to hold insulation in place.  

The displaced insulation should be returned to its intended location and properly supported to maintain thermal efficiency.  Some insulation appeared to have been accessed by rodents and should be replaced due to rodent damage. 

A qualified professional should evaluate and repair insulation as necessary.

House construction Insulation Contractor
Credit
Comment
13.4.1 - Ventilation in Crawlspace

Low Clearance Foundation Vents
Multiple Locations Throughout Exterior

I observed foundation vents that had little to zero clearance from the ground or were below grade.  This can allow for moisture intrusion into the crawlspace at these low clearance vents.  Excessive moisture and moisture vapors in the crawlspace can damage building materials.  No moisture intrusion was observed at the time of the inspection.

Recommend having soil at the low clearance vents cleared away to allow for 6 inches between the ground and the bottom of the vent to reduce the possibility of moisture intrusion.  Most often, the installation of a vent well cover is the most effective solution for low clearance foundation vents. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
13.5.1 - Under-Floor Crawlspace

Foundation Crack - Minor
Multiple locations throughout exterior foundation wall

I observed multiple small cracks at the foundation. The cracks were hairline with no major displacement or movement and were considered typical.

Recommend sealing these cracks with a flexible concrete sealer to prevent moisture intrusion and further damage from freeze and thaw cycles.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
13.5.2 - Under-Floor Crawlspace

Displaced Vapor Barrier
Crawlspace

The vapor barrier was displace in multiple locations of the crawlspace mainly under the master bath and guest bedroom.  The vapor barrier purpose is to provide a barrier between your living space and the moisture that naturally occurs in the ground and works to reduce the moisture content of the crawl space.  This prevents moisture vapors from causing damage to building materials and affecting indoor air quality.  No damage was observed in relation to the displaced vapor barrier.

The vapor barrier installation should be repaired or replaced by a qualified professional as necessary to maintain coverage throughout the crawlspace.  Most of the vapor barrier appeared to be present and can likely be spread out to reach from wall to wall and improve coverage.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
13.5.3 - Under-Floor Crawlspace

Rodent Evidence

Evidence of rodents is common in areas with heating ducts present.  Damage to HVAC ducts and insulation from pests was observed. 

 A pest control technician is recommended to clean rodent debris, eliminate access points, and deploy pest management to prevent further pest damage and to maintain house health.

Pest control Pest Control Pro

14 - Laundry

Clothes Dryer: Dryer Power Source

220v connection as well as a gas stub was present at the laundry room for powering the clothes dryer.

Clothes Washer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. 

Clothes Dryer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. 

The inspector shall inspect:

  • mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.


15 - Kitchen

Garbage Disposal: Turned On Garbage Disposal

I turned on the garbage disposal.  No defects observed.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Turned On Stove & Oven

I inspected the Oven/Cooktop by setting it to 375 degrees and igniting the burners using normal controls.  It was operational at the time of the inspection.  The Oven/Cooktop had an estimated manufacture date of 2011.  Based on this manufacture date the Oven/Cooktop was considered to be in the middle stage of its life expectancy.  

InterNACHI's Standard Estimate Life Expectancy Chart for Homes

Brand: Kenmore
Type: Range/Stove/Oven
Country: USA
Model: 790.729030012
Serial: VF13055345

Dishwasher: Inspected Dishwasher

I inspected the dishwasher by letting it run a short cycle. It was operational at the time of the inspection.  The dishwasher had an estimated manufacture date of 2010.  Based on this manufacture date the dishwasher is considered to be in the late stage of its life expectancy.  Budgeting for replacement is recommended.


InterNACHI's Standard Estimate Life Expectancy Chart for Homes

Exhaust Fan: Inspected Exhaust Fan

I inspected the exhaust fan in the kitchen which terminated to the exterior through a roof vent. All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside.  

Built-in Microwave: Microwave was Tested

Microwave was in operable condition at the time of the inspection.  It had a manufacture date of 2007.

Brand: Kenmore
Type: Microwave Oven
Country: USA
Model: 721.81623600
Serial: 712TA01574

The kitchen appliances are not included in the scope of a home inspection according to the Standards of Practice. 

The inspector will out of courtesy only check:

  • the stove, 
  • oven, 
  • microwave, and 
  • garbage disposer. 

Credit
Comment
15.4.1 - Exhaust Fan

Kitchen Exhaust Duct Disconnect

The exhaust duct for the microwave kitchen exhaust was not properly connected at a duct joint inside the cabinet above the microwave.  This allowed for cooking fumes and combustion gasses to spill into the house interior instead of exhausting through the roof vent as intended.

Recommend having the kitchen exhaust duct properly connected and sealed at this joint to maintain evacuation of fumes and combustion gasses as intended.

Contractor Qualified Professional

16 - Irrigation Backflow Prevention

Home Owner Responsibility
Front of house under deck

The irrigation backflow prevention device is intended to prevent cross contamination between the irrigation system and the main water supply.  Most jurisdictions require irrigation backflow prevention devices be installed on public water systems.  

The backflow prevention device and irrigation system should be inspected for proper operation and blown out every fall by a qualified professional to prevent freezing and breakage of the irrigation pipes.

Irrigation Backflow Prevention Device: Irrigation Backflow Device Observed

The required irrigation backflow prevention device WAS located. No defects observed. 

Learn more about City of Redmond irrigation backflow requirements here.