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1234 Sample Condo
Puyallup WA 98373
06/25/2019 8:00 am

19
Minor/fyi
31
Marginal-moderate
1
Major

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Temperature (at start time)
63 °F
Weather Conditions
Cloudy
Building Type
Condominium / Townhouse
Year Built
1992
Occupancy
Vacant
Utility Status
Water: On, Power: On
Home Inspection and Report

The Home Inspection

The home inspection performed was a limited visual inspection to identify systems and components in need of immediate repair. The inspection followed the Washington State Standards of Practice which can be viewed here. The evaluation of the home was based on observations that were primarily visual and non-invasive. The inspection and report are not meant to be technically exhaustive. The inspection was not intended to be considered as a guarantee or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding the conditions of the property, including the items and systems inspected, and it should not be relied on as such.

Reading Your Inspection Report

The inspection report from Common Concerns Home Inspections is interactive and uses HTML, allowing for simple sharing of the report and easy navigation through different sections. PDF versions of both the summary and full report can be viewed by clicking the corresponding navigation button.

Tabs: Clickable tabs are present in various sections of the report so items like deficiencies can be separated from other informational details.

  • Overview: Deficiencies and other observations
  • Information: General information
  • Limitations: Limitations we encountered during the inspection
  • Standards: The Washington State Standards of Practice

Narratives: These are the color-coded "boxes" below the grid sections that detail the particular observation/defect and recommendations. 

Internet Links: Blue writing within narratives and/or report are clickable links.

Pictures/Videos: These are included (as applicable) to help you understand and see what was seen at the time of the Inspection. They can be clicked on within the report to enlarge/show more detail. Pictures and videos are intended to show an example, graphic, or illustration of an area of concern, but may not show every occurrence and may not accurately depict its severity. Please do not rely on pictures or videos alone.

Summary: This generally sums up the attention issues in the report, but should not be used solely as a reference on the condition of the property. Please be sure to read and understand the entire report to aid you in making an educated decision on the home's condition. 

Categories and Definitions 

This report divides deficiencies into three categories; Major (in red), Marginal-Moderate (in orange), and Minor/FYI (colored in blue). Safety Hazards or concerns will be listed in the Red or Orange categories depending on their perceived danger, but should always be addressed promptly. 

  • Major: Items or components that may require a significant expense to correct or are considerably impacting the home in a negative way. Items categorized in this manner require further evaluation and repairs or replacement by a qualified Contractor. 
  • Marginal-Moderate: Items or components that were found to include a deficiency. These items may have been functional at the time of inspection, but this functionality may be impaired, not ideal, or the defect may lead to further problems. Repairs or replacement is recommended to items categorized in this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a qualified Handyman or qualified Contractor and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs for most. 
  • Minor/FYI: Items or components that were found to be in need of general maintenance and/or minor repairs which may improve their functionality. FYI (for your information) items or components are often nearing the end of their typical service life but were functional at the time of inspection. Repairing or replacing these items can sometimes be costly (furnace, water heater, roof covering). 

Professional judgment was used to categorize the observed defects; this categorization should not be construed as to mean that deficiencies designated as "Minor/FYI" or "Marginal-Moderate" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendations in each comment are more important than its categorization. 

Defect Locations

Locations listed in this report are positioned oriented from standing in front of the home and looking towards it. The cover photo will be of what we consider to be the front. Areas inside the home are inspected in a counter-clockwise rotation and are listed as such.

Example: "Front-Left" refers to the front of the home, on the left side. "Side-Left" refers to the left side of the home.

Example: "2nd Floor: Bedroom 1" refers to the first bedroom on the right, once you've climbed the 2rd-floor stairs.

Thermal Imaging

An infrared camera may have been used as a tool during the inspection. This was not used as a definitive tool and should not be viewed as a full thermal scan of the entire home. Temperature readings displayed on thermal images in this report may be included as a courtesy but should not be wholly relied upon as a home inspection is qualitative, not quantitative. These values can vary +/- 4% or more of displayed readings.

Components Not Inspected

We inspect the main structure and attached components, as outlined by the Washington State Standards of Practice. The following are examples of components we do not/did not inspect unless otherwise agreed upon; fences/gates, pools/spas, detached structures, refrigerators, washers/dryers, storm doors/windows, screens, window AC units, central vacuum systems, water softeners, alarm and intercom systems, elevators, sewer lines, septic tanks, wells, water delivery systems, or underground fuel storage tanks.

A home inspection does not address environmental concerns such as, but not limited to: asbestos, lead, lead-based paint, radon, mold, fungus, wood destroying organisms (termites, etc), cockroaches, rodents, pesticides, treated lumber, Chinese drywall, mercury, or carbon monoxide.

2 - Roofing

IN L NP D
2.1 Coverings X X
2.2 Flashings X X
2.3 Roof Penetrations X
2.4 Roof Drainage Systems X X
2.5 Chimney X
Inspection Method
Walked
Roof Type
Gable
Coverings: Material
Asphalt Shingles
Coverings: Layer Quantity
2
Flashings: Type
Vent pipe, Step, Headwall
Flashings: Material
Rubber, Plastic
Roof Penetrations: Type
Roof Vent, Plumbing Stack, Appliance Vent, Satellite Dish Lag Screws
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Metal
Roof Drainage Systems: Downspout Discharge
Underground Drain
Coverings: Life
Estimated: First Half, Estimated: End

An inspection of the roof includes the roof covering materials; gutters and downspout systems; visible flashings; roof vents; skylights, and any other roof penetrations; and the portions of the chimneys and flues visible from the exterior. 

The inspector will; Traverse the roof to inspect it; Inspect the gutters and downspout systems, visible flashings, soffits and fascias, skylights, and other roof penetrations; Report the manner in which the roof is ventilated; Describe the type and general condition of roof coverings; Report multiple layers of roofing when visible or readily apparent; Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components. 

The inspector is not required to; Traverse a roof where, in the opinion of the inspector, doing so can damage roofing materials or be unsafe (if the roof is not traversed, the method used to inspect the roof must be reported); Remove snow, ice, debris or other material that obscures the roof surface or prevents access to the roof; Inspect gutter and downspout systems concealed within the structure; Inspect related underground drainage piping and/or antennas, lightning arresters, or similar attachments; Operate powered roof ventilators; Predict remaining life expectancy of roof coverings.

The roof of the home was inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Coverings

Exposed Fasteners

Exposed fasteners were observed on the roof covering and/or penetrations. Nail heads, bolts, staples, or other fasteners left exposed to the elements are prone to rust, which can allow for moisture penetration in the area. Water penetrating the roof covering will often result in moisture damage below. It is recommended that all exposed fasteners are sealed with roofing tar or another appropriate roofing adhesive to prolong the life of the roof.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Coverings

Moss
Mostly Rear

Moss and/or algae was observed on the shingle surface. Moss or algae growing on a roof cover is an indication of excess moisture exposure which may lead to moisture-related problems to the roof structure if not addressed. Often proximity to trees, poor roof surface drainage, the buildup of organic debris, the absence of sunlight, and inadequate surface drying are possible causes. Treatment to remove moss is often accomplished using materials containing zinc. Remove moss with push broom never power wash the roof.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
2.1.3 - Coverings

Two Layers
Over Garage

Newer asphalt shingles were installed over a layer of older asphalt shingles. This condition will likely result in the following: 

  • reduced asphalt shingle service-life compared to similar shingles installed over a proper substrate 
  • any manufacturers warranty which may have been in effect can be void
  • shingles will be more easily damaged by hail
  • proper installation of new shingles will require removal of all roof-covering materials (including disposal costs)
Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.1.4 - Coverings

End of Life
Rear

The rear roof cover section was at the end of its expected service life. The asphalt shingle roof surface displayed indicators that the protective roof covering is at the end of its service life. The average expected service life of an asphalt shingle roof that has been properly cared for is 20 years. As a result of a review of the roof covering, the overall condition is such that the roof is deemed to be at or beyond the limits of its serviceable life. Consideration should be given to replacing the roof covering; the timing to the ultimate failure of the roof covering in preventing water infiltration is unpredictable. Failing to replace the roof covering may result in damage to the structure and contents of the home.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.1.5 - Coverings

Asphalt Shingle Repairs
Rear

The asphalt shingle roof was patched. An area of roof covering was observed to have been patched as a result of a previous repair. Areas of shingle surface repair are often susceptible to future deterioration. Repairs often involve use of roofing adhesives which are exposed and are therefore prone to deterioration from ultraviolet rays from the sun. Repaired areas should be closely monitored for indications of degradation that could affect the ability of the roof surface to protect against water infiltration. Extensive repairs may be an indication that the roof is near or past its useful life expectancy, and may be due for replacement.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Flashings

Drip Edge Missing
Perimeter

Drip edge flashing was not observed at the rake and/or eaves of the home. Drip edge flashing installed on the rake and eaves of shingled roofs help prevent moisture damage at the edges of the sheathing and between the gutter and fascia. Quality building practices often include drip edge flashing to prolong the life of the roof. Adding drip edge flashing should be considered; consulting with a qualified roofing contractor may be necessary.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Discharge On Lower Roof

Upper-level gutters discharged onto a lower roof covering. Although this is common practice for home builders in our area, premature roof surface deterioration will occur in the areas near the concentrated water flow from the downspout discharge. Repairs to affected shingles can be anticipated prior to the life expectancy of the remaining areas of the roof. Best practice would be to extend the upper-level downspouts to a lower gutter so that discharge will not occur on the lower roof surfaces.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.4.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Gutter Debris
Over Front Door

A gutter was clogged or obstructed. Gutters are a key component in the controlled drainage of run-off water away from the home's exterior. Water backing up in a gutter can add sufficient weight to the gutter and could result in detachment from the structure. Gutters that do not perform as intended may result in saturation of soils near the foundation, which in turn can result in basement moisture or leakage issues. Repair should include removing debris and assuring that water freely flows and drains from the gutter.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
2.4.3 - Roof Drainage Systems

Discharge on Walkway
Front

A downspout discharged on a walking path. This is a potential slip hazard should rainwater freeze on the walkway. Making modifications so that the downspout does not discharge on the walkway is recommended.

Tools Handyman/DIY

3 - Exterior

IN L NP D
3.1 Siding / Trim X X
3.2 Eaves / Soffit / Fascia X X
3.3 Doors X X
3.4 Windows X
3.5 Driveway / Walkway X
3.6 Decks / Porches / Steps / Stoops X
3.7 Vegetation / Grading / Drainage X X
Siding / Trim: Type
Lap
Siding / Trim: Material
Vinyl
Doors: Type
Single
Doors: Material
Metal
Windows: Type
Single Hung
Windows: Material
Vinyl
Windows: Pane
Double-pane
Driveway / Walkway: Material
Concrete
Decks / Porches / Steps / Stoops: Type
Patio
Vegetation / Grading / Drainage: Drainage
Front Storm Drainage
Vegetation / Grading / Drainage: Grading
Generally Flat

An inspection of the exterior includes; the visible wall coverings, trim, protective coatings and sealants, windows and doors, attached porches, decks, steps, balconies, handrails, guardrails, carports, eaves, soffits, fascias and visible exterior portions of chimneys.

The inspector will; Describe the exterior components visible from ground level; Inspect visible wall coverings, trim, protective coatings and sealants, windows and doors, attached porches, decks, steps, balconies, handrails, guardrails, carports, eaves, soffits, fascias and visible exterior portions of chimneys; Probe exterior components where deterioration is suspected or where clear indications of possible deterioration exist (probing is not required when probing will damage any finished surface or where no deterioration is suspected); Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components.

The inspector is not required to; Inspect (a) Buildings, decks, patios, fences, retaining walls, and other structures detached from the dwelling. (b) Safety type glass or the integrity of thermal window seals. (c) Flues or verify the presence of flue liners beyond what can be safely and readily seen from the roof or the firebox of a stove or fireplace; Test or evaluate the operation of security locks, devices or systems; Enter areas beneath decks with less than five feet of clearance from the underside of joists to grade; Evaluate the function or condition of shutters, awnings, storm doors, storm windows, screens, and similar accessories.

The inspection of the site includes the building perimeter, land grade, and water drainage directly adjacent to the foundation; trees and vegetation that adversely affect the structure; walks, grade steps, driveways, patios, and retaining walls contiguous with the structure.

The inspector will: Describe the material used for driveways, walkways, patios and other flatwork around the home. Inspect; For serviceability of the driveways, steps, walkways, patios, flatwork and retaining walls contiguous with the structure. For proper grading and drainage slope. Vegetation in close proximity to the home. Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components.

The inspector is not required to: Inspect fences, privacy walls or retaining walls that are not contiguous with the structure. Report the condition of soil, trees, shrubs or vegetation unless they adversely affect the structure. Evaluate hydrological or geological conditions. Determine the adequacy of bulkheads, seawalls, break walls, and docks.

The exterior of the home and site was inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding / Trim

Paint
Rear, Front

Paint on the exterior siding/trim was observed to be deteriorated or missing in areas. Painting of the exterior wood elements is an ongoing maintenance activity to prevent damage to wood due to the effects of the sun and weather. Wood requires periodic painting to protect against rot. Failure to properly maintain exterior paint will result in deterioration of the wood components and left uncorrected, may result in water infiltration and damage to the wall structure. Adding paint is recommended.

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Siding / Trim

Trim Rot
Rear

Minor rot damage was noted to wood trim. Rot in wood is an indication of excessive moisture and insufficient drying over time. Failing to replace the affected wood will most often result in further wood deterioration over time, and can result in water damage to adjacent areas. Rotting wood provides an attractive environment for insects. The cause(s) of the wood rot should be understood and corrected as part of the remedial actions, thus preventing future recurrence of this condition. Removing and replacing any deteriorated wood is suggested.

Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Siding / Trim

Ground Clearance
Front, Rear

Exterior siding or trim components were noted to be at or below the ground level and therefore exposed to damage. Exterior wood elements that are in contact with the ground are vulnerable to rot and insect infiltration. Any moisture damaged wood should be removed and replaced. Further consideration should be given to protecting wood elements against deterioration. A good practice is to not have wood elements of the exterior of the home in contact with or near to ground level. Creating 6" or more of clearance between the siding and the ground would be prudent. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Eaves / Soffit / Fascia

Soffit/Eaves Water Staining
Rear

Water stains were noted on the exterior soffit/eaves. This is an indication that the roof has reached the end of its useful life and the eaves have experienced moisture damage. This condition may be due to a specific event or may be a condition that is likely to occur again in the future. Further investigation to determine and correct the cause of the staining is recommended. Replacing the roof covering in this area is recommended. 

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Doors

Weatherstripping Missing or Inadequate
Exterior Garage, Front

An exterior door had missing or inadequate weatherstripping. This can allow the unintended entry of pests and/or air. Weatherstripping that is damaged, missing, or deteriorated should be replaced to achieve a weathertight seal when the door is closed.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Doors

Wood Rot Frame/Sill
Rear Door, Garage Door

Wood rot damage was noted at the door frame, trim, or sill. Wood rot is an indication of deterioration of wood components of the door that have been exposed to the effects of water and weather. Failure to correct this condition increases the risk of water infiltration and damage to structural components and interior finishes. Replacing all deteriorated wood components is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.3 - Doors

Threshold Loose
Garage to Exterior, Garage to Home

A door threshold was loose and needs support. The threshold needs shims or blocks under the outside edge to provide support and prevent deterioration of the connection between the threshold and door jamb. The threshold needs to be properly supported to maintain a proper seal. Supporting the threshold is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Garage

IN L NP D
4.1 Garage Door X
4.2 Garage Door Operator X X
4.3 Ceiling / Walls / Floor X
4.4 Occupant Door (home to garage) X X
Type
Integrated
Garage Door: Material
Metal
Garage Door: Quantity
1
Garage Door Operator: Quantity
1
Garage Door Operator: Safety Features
None
Ceiling / Walls / Floor: Drywall
Full

The inspection of attached garages and carports includes their framing, siding, roof, doors, windows, and installed electrical/mechanical systems pertaining to the operation of the home.

The inspector will; Inspect the condition and function of the overhead garage doors and associated hardware; Test the function of the garage door openers, their auto-reverse systems and secondary entrapment devices (photoelectric and edge sensors) when present; Inspect the condition and installation of any pedestrian doors; Inspect exposed concrete slabs; Inspect fire separation between the house and garage when applicable; Report as a fire hazard the presence of any ignition source (gas and electric water heaters, electrical receptacles, electronic air cleaners, motors of installed appliances, etc.) that is within eighteen inches of the garage floor; Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components.

The inspector is not required to; Determine whether or not a solid core pedestrian door that is not labeled is fire rated; Verify the functionality of garage door opener remote controls; Move vehicles or personal property; Operate any equipment, unless otherwise addressed in the SOP.

The garage was inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Garage Door Operator

Photoelectric Eyes: Missing

The overhead garage door was not equipped with a photoelectric sensor. Photoelectric sensors are devices installed to prevent injury by raising the vehicle door if the sensor detects a person in a position in which they may be injured by the descending door. Installation of photoelectric sensors in new homes has been required by generally accepted safety standards since 1993. We recommend that photoelectric sensors are installed for safety reasons.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Garage Door Operator

Auto-reverse Failed

The garage door operator (for the vehicle door) failed to auto-reverse when resistance was encountered. The garage door operator should respond to resisting force by automatically causing the door to stop downward motion and reverse to the open position. This is a safety feature intended to prevent injury to persons and damage to objects that may be in the path of the closing door. This is a safety concern and should be addressed promptly. Adjustments can typically be made at the operator, although in some cases a replacement may be required.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Occupant Door (home to garage)

Weatherstripping

Weatherstripping was damaged around the perimeter of the door that separates the garage from the home. Weatherstripping is required to maintain adequate fire-separation. Adding adequate weatherstripping is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional

5 - Electrical

IN L NP D
5.1 Service Entrance Conductors X
5.2 Panels / Breakers / Grounding X X
5.3 Branch Wiring Circuits X
5.4 GFCI / AFCI Protection X X
5.5 Fixtures / Switches / Receptacles X X
5.6 Smoke Alarms / CO Detectors X X
Panels / Breakers / Grounding: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Panels / Breakers / Grounding: Panel Manufacturer
Westinghouse
Panels / Breakers / Grounding: Panel Capacity
125 AMP
Branch Wiring Circuits: Material
Copper
Branch Wiring Circuits: Type
NM Cable
GFCI / AFCI Protection: GFCI Locations
Exterior, Garage, Kitchen, Bathroom
GFCI / AFCI Protection: AFCI Locations
None
Smoke Alarms / CO Detectors: Smoke Alarm Locations
Hall Leading to Bedroom, Each Story
Smoke Alarms / CO Detectors: Carbon Monoxide Detector Locations
Hall Leading to Bedroom, Each Story, Outside Bedrooms
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Below Ground
Panels / Breakers / Grounding: Sub Panel Location
Bedroom 1
Smoke Alarms / CO Detectors: Smoke and CO: Not Tested

We check for the presence and location of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors during the inspection but do not activate their "test" buttons. It is recommended that all smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors have their batteries replaced and are tested upon moving into the home. Semi-annual testing of the alarms/detectors is recommended.

The inspection of the electrical system includes the service drop through the main panel; subpanels including feeders; branch circuits, connected devices, and lighting fixtures.

The inspector will: Describe in the report the type of primary service, whether overhead or underground, voltage, amperage, over-current protection devices (fuses or breakers) and the type of branch wiring used. Report; The existence of a connected service-grounding conductor and service-grounding electrode when it can be determined; When no connection to a service grounding electrode can be confirmed. Inspect the main and branch circuit conductors for proper over-current protection and condition by visual observation after removal of the readily accessible main and sub-electric panel cover(s). Report, if present, solid conductor aluminum branch circuits. Include a statement in the report that solid conductor aluminum wiring may be hazardous and a licensed electrician should inspect the system to ensure it's safe. Verify; The operation of a representative number of accessible switches, receptacles, and light fixtures; The grounding and polarity of a representative number of receptacles (particularly in close proximity to plumbing fixtures or at the exterior); Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection and arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection where required; Report the location of any inoperative or missing GFCI and/or AFCI devices when they are recommended by industry standards; Advise clients that homes without ground fault protection should have GFCI devices installed where recommended by industry standards; Report on any circuit breaker panel or subpanel known within the home inspection profession to have safety concerns. Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components.

The inspector is not required to; Insert any tool, probe or testing device into the main or subpanels. Activate electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. Operate circuit breakers, service disconnects or remove fuses. Inspect ancillary systems, including but not limited to: Timers, Security systems, Low voltage relays, Smoke/heat detectors, Antennas, Intercoms, Electrical deicing tapes, Lawn sprinkler wiring, Swimming pool or spa wiring, Central vacuum systems, Electrical equipment that's not readily accessible. Dismantle any electrical device or control, except for the removal of the dead front covers from the main service panel and subpanels. Move any objects, furniture, or appliances to gain access to any electrical component. Test every switch, receptacle, and fixture. Remove switch and receptacle cover plates. Verify the continuity of connected service ground(s).

The electrical system of this home was inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Panels / Breakers / Grounding

White as Hot

A white wire (neutral) was being used as a hot (energized) conductor without being properly labeled. This poses a risk to somebody working in the panel. The hot wire must be re-identified on each end to show it is energized. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - GFCI / AFCI Protection

GFCI Insufficient
Kitchen

Ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection was not observed in locations where modern safety standards require them. Current requirements call for all 120 volt 15 amp and 20 amp receptacles to be GFCI protected at the following areas; exterior, garage, kitchen, bathrooms, and other wet locations. Upgrading to current standards is recommended for improved safety.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.4.2 - GFCI / AFCI Protection

AFCI None

No AFCI protection was observed. AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters) are a current safety requirement for all 120-volt outlets in bedrooms. This requirement includes receptacle circuits and lighting circuits. We recommend having a licensed electrical contractor install "Combination Type" AFCI breakers on the circuits to these rooms, for improved safety.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.5.1 - Fixtures / Switches / Receptacles

Damp vs Wet
Rear

An exterior outlet had a "damp" protective cover in a location that should have a "wet" protective cover. Electrical outlets installed in outdoor locations require protection from water entry and contaminants. An outlet that is outside and exposed to direct rain should have a weathertight outlet cover. Damp protective covers are meant for locations that will not have direct rain exposure. Upgrading the damp outlet cover to a wet one is recommended for added safety.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.5.2 - Fixtures / Switches / Receptacles

Fixture Loose
Rear

An exterior light fixture was loose. Light fixtures should be secured to the home or attached to an outlet box. The observed fixture was noted to be loose and not installed securely to its outlet box, which does not meet the manufacturers intent of installation. Securing the light fixture is recommended.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.5.3 - Fixtures / Switches / Receptacles

Loose Outlets
Throughout

Some electrical receptacles were observed to be loose in their outlet boxes. Receptacles become loose over time and after continued use; often the most utilized receptacles are observed to be loose. Regular home maintenance should include checking for and correcting loose receptacles when discovered. Loose receptacles should be adjusted to ensure they are properly positioned and secured in their outlet boxes. Example location(s) are listed in this report but other areas may exist throughout the home.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
5.5.4 - Fixtures / Switches / Receptacles

Cover missing
Living Room

An outlet cover was missing for a receptacle. Outlet covers are required to prevent accidental contact with live wires and for aesthetics. Adding an outlet cover is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.5.5 - Fixtures / Switches / Receptacles

Non-working Fixture
Dining Room

A light fixture in the dining room was not operational. Further investigation will be required to determine a specific cause. Replacing the lightbulb should first be attempted. If new light bulbs do not solve the issue then consulting with a qualified electrical contractor may be required. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Smoke Alarms / CO Detectors

Battery Replacement

It is recommended that all smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors have their batteries replaced and are tested upon moving into the home. We check for the presence and location of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors during the inspection but do not activate their "test" buttons. Semi-annual testing of the alarms/detectors is recommended.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
5.6.2 - Smoke Alarms / CO Detectors

Smoke Alarms: Insufficient
Inside Bedrooms

Insufficient smoke alarms were observed to be installed. Current safety standards require smoke alarms be installed in the following locations: inside of all bedrooms or other rooms used for sleeping, in the immediate vicinity of all bedrooms, on each story of the dwelling (including basements and cellars, but not including crawl spaces and uninhabitable attics). Upgrading to the current safety standards is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional

6 - Heating / Cooling / Fireplace

IN L NP D
6.1 Heating System X X
6.2 HVAC Distribution System X
6.3 Fireplace / Wood Stove / Pellet Stove X
Thermostat Location
Each Heated Room
Heating System: Type
Electric Wall Heater
Heating System: Quantity
4
Heating System: Furnace Location
N/A

The inspection of the heating system includes the fuel source; heating equipment; heating distribution; operating controls; flue pipes, chimneys and venting; auxiliary heating units.

The inspector will: Describe; the type of fuel, heating equipment, and heating distribution systems; Operate the system using normal readily accessible control devices; Open readily accessible access panels or covers provided by the manufacturer or installer, if readily detachable. Inspect; The condition of normally operated controls and components of systems; The condition and operation of furnaces, boilers, heat pumps, electrical central heating units and distribution systems; Visible flue pipes and related components to ensure the functional operation and proper clearance from combustibles; Each habitable space in the home to determine whether or not there is a functioning heat source present; Spaces where fossil fuel burning heating devices are located to ensure there is air for combustion; Electric baseboard and in-wall heaters to ensure they are functional. Report: any evidence that indicates the possible presence of an underground storage tank; Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components.

The inspector is not required to; Ignite pilot lights; Operate: Heating devices or systems that do not respond to normal controls or have been shut down, any heating system when circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or when doing so will damage the equipment. Inspect or evaluate; Heat exchangers concealed inside furnaces and boilers; Any heating equipment that is not readily accessible; The interior of chimneys and flues; Installed heating system accessories, such as humidifiers, air purifiers, motorized dampers, heat reclaimers; solar heating systems; or concealed distribution systems; Remove covers or panels that are not readily accessible or removable; Dismantle any equipment, controls, or gauges except readily identifiable access covers designed to be removed by users; Evaluate whether the type of material used to insulate pipes, ducts, jackets and boilers is a health hazard. Determine: The capacity, adequacy, or efficiency of a heating system; Determine adequacy of combustion air. Evaluate: thermostats or controls other than to confirm that they actually turn a system on or off.

The inspection of the air conditioning system includes the cooling equipment; cooling distribution equipment and the operating controls.

The inspector will: Describe the central air conditioning system and energy sources. Operate the system using normal control devices and measure and record temperature differential. Open readily accessible access panels or covers provided by the manufacturer or installer. Inspect the condition of controls and operative components of the complete system; conditions permitting. Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components in the inspection report.

The inspector is not required to: Activate cooling systems that have been shut down. Inspect; Gas-fired refrigeration systems. Evaporative coolers. Wall or window-mounted air-conditioning units. The system for refrigerant leaks. Check the coolant pressure/charge. Determine the efficiency or adequacy of the system. Operate cooling system components if the exterior temperature is below sixty degrees Fahrenheit or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or when doing so might damage the equipment. Remove covers or panels that are not readily accessible. Dismantle any equipment, controls, or gauges except readily identifiable access covers designed to be removed by users. Determine how much current the unit is drawing. Evaluate digital-type thermostats or controls.

The fireplace inspection includes solid fuel and gas fireplaces, stoves, dampers, fireboxes, and hearths.

The inspector will: Describe fireplaces and stoves. Inspect dampers, fireboxes and hearths. Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components.

The inspector is not required to: Inspect flues and verify the presence of flue liners beyond what can be safely and readily seen from the roof or the firebox of a stove or fireplace. Ignite fires in a fireplace or stove. Determine the adequacy of draft. Perform a chimney smoke test. Inspect any solid fuel device being operated at the time of the inspection. Evaluate the installation or adequacy of fireplace inserts. Evaluate modifications to a fireplace, stove, or chimney. Dismantle fireplaces or stoves to inspect fireboxes or remove rain caps to inspect chimney flues.

The heating/cooling/fireplace systems of the home were inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Heating System

Cadet Recall

The Cadet wall heaters installed were part of a voluntary recall of the heaters in the years between 2000 and 2002. We recommend that these heaters not be used and that they be properly replaced by a licensed electrical contractor. More information about this recall can be found here.

Contractor Qualified Professional

7 - Attic

IN L NP D
7.1 Structure X X
7.2 Insulation X X
7.3 Ventilation X X
Inspection Method
Walked
Access Point: Location
Ceiling Hatch
Access Point: Quantity
2
Structure: Roof Framing: Type
Engineered Wood Truss
Structure: Roof Framing: Bracing
Lateral Bracing
Structure: Roof Covering Support
OSB Sheathing
Structure: Ceiling Structure
Engineered Wood Trusses
Insulation: Type
Blown, Fiberglass
Ventilation: Type
Passive Vents
Soffit Vents, Gable Vents, Passive Vents, Ridge Vents

An inspection of the attic structure includes; roof framing and decking; other support and superstructure components; stairs; the type and condition of the insulation and ventilation; and installed mechanical ventilation systems.

The inspector will; Describe the type of building materials comprising the major structural components; Describe the type of insulation in viewable and accessible unconditioned attic spaces; Enter and traverse attics; Inspect the condition and serviceability of visible trusses and the visible roof structure and attic components where readily and safely accessible; Inspect the insulation, ventilation and installed mechanical systems in viewable and accessible attics; Probe a representative number of structural components where deterioration is suspected or where clear indications of possible deterioration exist (probing is not required when probing will damage any finished surface or where no deterioration is suspected); Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components; Report all wood rot and pest-conducive conditions discovered; Report the absence of insulation at the interface between conditioned and unconditioned spaces where visible; Report the absence of insulation on heating system ductwork and supply plumbing in unconditioned spaces; Refer all issues that are suspected to be insect related to a licensed structural pest inspector (SPI) or pest control operator (PCO) for follow up.

The inspector is not required to; Enter an opening less than eighteen inches by twenty-four inches; Enter any areas that are not readily accessible due to obstructions, inadequate clearances or have conditions which, in the inspector's opinion, are hazardous to the health and safety of the inspector or will cause damage to components of the home; Move stored items or debris or perform excavation to gain access; Determine the presence, extent, and type of insulation and vapor barriers concealed in the exterior walls; Determine the thickness or R-value of insulation above the ceiling, in the walls or below the floors.

The attic of the home was inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Structure

Storage
Over Garage

Storage was observed in the attic space. Storage in the attic can become a problem should engineered trusses not be able to adequately support the weight of the stored items. Stored items also provide an attractive environment for insects and other pest and are often considered conducive materials. Removing any stored items in the attic spaces is recommended. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.2.1 - Insulation

Attic Hatch: Weatherstripping
Upstairs Attic

The attic hatch had insufficient weatherstripping. This condition allows warm air from the interior to migrate through the attic hatch and condense on the roof's sheathing. Missing weatherstripping will result in greater than intended heat loss or gain, and possibly result in condensation/microbial growth issues at the affected area. Installing additional weatherstripping around the perimeter of the attic hatch is recommended.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Ventilation

Microbial Growth
Rear

Microbial growth was noted on the underside of the roof's sheathing in the attic. Microbial growth is often attributed to frequent wetting of the sheathing and its inability to fully dry out. This can be caused by moisture ingress through the roof assembly, inadequate ventilation of the attic space, and condensation associated with airborne moisture (conditioned air leakage, duct leakage, re-entrainment of humid exhaust air). This is common to see when the roof covering is no longer working as intended and is need of replacement. Consulting with a roofing contractor is recommended. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

8 - Interior

IN L NP D
8.1 Ceilings / Walls X
8.2 Doors / Windows X X
8.3 Floors X X
8.4 Countertops / Cabinets X
8.5 Steps / Stairways / Railings X X
8.6 Ventilation X X
Ceilings / Walls: Material
Drywall
Doors / Windows: Door Material
Wood
Doors / Windows: Door Type
Single, Bi-fold
Floors: Material
Carpet, Laminate, Vinyl
Countertops / Cabinets: Countertop Material
Laminate
Ventilation: Exhaust Fans
Kitchen, Hall Bath, Laundry
Ventilation: Dryer Vent Material
Flexible Metal
Ventilation: Dryer Exhaust Location
Rear

The inspection of the interior includes; the walls, ceilings, floors, windows, and doors; steps, stairways, balconies, and railings.

The inspector will: Verify that steps, handrails, guardrails, stairways, and landings are installed wherever necessary and report when they are missing or in need of repair and report when baluster spacing exceeds four inches. Inspect; The overall general condition of cabinets and countertops; Caulking and grout at kitchen and bathroom counters; The interior walls, ceilings, and floors for indicators of concealed structural deficiencies, water infiltration or major damage; The condition and operation of a representative number of windows and doors. Comment on the presence or absence of smoke detectors. Describe any non-cosmetic deficiencies of these systems or components.

The inspector is not required to; Report on cosmetic conditions related to the condition of interior components. Verify whether all walls, floors, ceilings, doorways, cabinets, and window openings are square, straight, level or plumb.

The interior of the home was inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Doors / Windows

Thermal Seal
Bedroom 1, Bedroom 2

A thermal window unit has lost its seal between the two panes. The window unit exhibits loss-of-seal, with condensation or fogginess noted between the glass panes. The functional characteristics of a window displaying loss of seal between panes are generally limited to some reduction in the ability to see through the window; the primary impact is the effect to the aesthetic qualities of the window unit. The amount of moisture within the window can vary between a slight fog to full condensation. Repair or replacement of the window panes is most often discretionary.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.2.2 - Doors / Windows

Door Hardware
Laundry Room

A doorknob was loose. Doorknobs that are not secured will make operating the knob more difficult and more limited. Securing the doorknob is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Floors

Deteriorated
Laundry Room

The floor covering was noted to be generally deteriorated, such that consideration should be given to replacing the covering. Should the condition present a trip hazard, corrective action should be taken to remove the hazard, either by a repair at the location of the hazard or by replacing the floor cover. The decision to change the floor cover due to deterioration is generally discretionary, based on aesthetic and use factors.

Flooring Flooring Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - Steps / Stairways / Railings

Handrail Loose

A loose handrail was noted. The handrail at a staircase did not appear to have attachment hardware that adequately secured the handrail to the wall/guardrail. Securing the handrail is recommended. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
8.6.1 - Ventilation

Vent Cover Damage
Rear

An exterior vent cover was damaged. Vent covers are required to prevent the entry of water and pests, and to achieve its intended use as an air intake or exhaust. A suitable vent cover should be installed to prevent damage due to water, air, or pest infiltration.

Contractor Qualified Professional

9 - Plumbing

IN L NP D
9.1 Water Supply / Distribution Systems X X
9.2 Hot Water System X X
9.3 Drain / Waste / Vent Systems X
9.4 Fixtures X X
9.5 Shower / Bath Enclosures X X
9.6 Fuel Distribution System / Storage X
Water Source
Public
Water Pressure (tested at hose bib)
60 psi
Water Supply / Distribution Systems: Water Supply Material
Copper
Water Supply / Distribution Systems: Water Distribution Material
Copper
Hot Water System: Location
Laundry Room
Hot Water System: Energy Source
Electric
Hot Water System: Capacity
50 gallon
Hot Water System: Date of Manufacture
2003
Hot Water System: Temperature (tested at faucet)
115.3 °F
Drain / Waste / Vent Systems: Material
ABS, PVC
Drain / Waste / Vent Systems: Washer Drain Size
2"
Shower / Bath Enclosures: Shower / Bath Enclosure Material
Fiberglass
Water Supply / Distribution Systems: Main Water Shut-off Location
Laundry Room
Hot Water System: Manufacturer
GE

We recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance.

Here is a maintenance guide from Lowe's to help.

Hot Water System: Water Heaters and Mixing Valves

For safe operation, water heaters require a high enough temperature to kill potential bacteria in the tank, but must also deliver that hot water to the fixtures without scalding. To accomplish this task, a temperature mixing valve is often installed. These mixing valves allow the water heater to be operated at or above 140F (to kill bacteria such as Legionella), while simultaneously allowing for a water temperature lower than 120F at fixtures (to prevent scalding). Considering the installation of a temperature mixing valve would be prudent.

An inspection of the plumbing system includes visible water supply lines; visible waste/soil and vent lines; fixtures and faucets; domestic hot water system and fuel source.

The inspector will; (a) Describe the visible water supply and distribution piping materials; drain, waste and vent materials; water-heating equipment. (b) Report (i) The presence and functionality of sump pumps/waste ejector pumps when visible or confirm the float switch activates the pump when the sump is dry. (ii) The presence and location of a main water shutoff valve and/or fuel shutoff valve(s), or report that they were not found. (iii) The presence of the temperature and pressure relief (TPR) valve and associated piping. (iv) Whether or not the water temperature was tested and state that the generally accepted safe water temperature is one hundred twenty degrees Fahrenheit. (c) Inspect the condition of accessible and visible water supply pipes, drain/waste plumbing and the domestic hot water system when possible. (d) Operate fixtures in order to observe functional flow. (e) Check for functional drainage from fixtures. (f) Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components in the inspection report.

The inspector is not required to; (a) Operate any valves, including faucets of freestanding or built-in appliances or fixtures, if the outlet end of the valve or faucet is connected or intended to be connected to an appliance. (b) Inspect (i) Any system that is shut down or winterized. (ii) Any plumbing components not readily accessible. (iii) Floor drains and exterior drain systems, including but not limited to, exterior stairwell drains and driveway drains. (iv) Fire sprinkler systems. (v) Water-conditioning equipment, including softeners and filter systems. (vi) Private water supply systems. (vii) Gas supply systems. (viii) Interior components of exterior pumps or sealed sanitary waste lift systems. (ix) Ancillary systems or components such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. (c) Test (i) Pressure or temperature/pressure relief valve. (ii) Shower pans for leaks or use special equipment to test/scan shower or tub surrounds for moisture in surrounding substrate materials. (d) Determine (i) The potability of any water supply whether public or private. (ii) The condition and operation of water wells and related pressure tanks and pumps. (iii) The quantity of water from on-site water supplies. (iv) The quality or the condition and operation of on-site sewage disposal systems such as waste ejector pumps, cesspools, septic tanks, drain fields, related underground piping, conduit, cisterns, and related equipment. (e) Ignite pilot lights.

The plumbing system in this home was inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Hot Water System

Drip Pan/Drain Missing

A drip pan/drain was missing from under the water heater. A drip pan and drain should be located under the hot water tank when installed in living spaces or on the subfloor of the structure. A drip pan with a suitable drain will catch water and drain to the exterior to limit damage to areas below and adjacent to the hot water tank should a leak occur. Installing a drip pan with a suitable drain to the exterior is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.2.2 - Hot Water System

TPRV Missing or Improper
Water Heater

The water heater's TPRV discharge tube was missing or improperly installed. The discharge tube cannot be kinked and cannot use a flexible material such as the black one. Water heaters are provided with temperature and pressure relief valves (TPRV) designed to open and release hot water and steam should the water temperature or pressure exceeds set limits. The discharge tube for the valve directs the hot water and steam towards the floor to reduce the risk of scalding to anyone in the area of the tank when the valve opens. The TPRV discharge tube does not meet the current safety standards which could pose a hazard to occupants. Consulting with a qualified plumbing contractor for repair is recommended.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.2.3 - Hot Water System

End of Life

The water heater was at the end of its expected service life. Water heaters can be expected to last at least as long as their warranty, or from five to eight years, but they will generally last longer. However, it is rare for them to last longer than fifteen or twenty years. This water heater did not show any signs of being at the end of its life besides its age. Since failure cannot be accurately predicted, planning for replacement would be prudent.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.2.4 - Hot Water System

Expansion Tank Missing

The water heater did not have a "Thermal Expansion Tank" installed. A Thermal Expansion Tank is typically installed on the water supply line to prevent a possible leak at the TPRV (temperature pressure relief valve), faucets dripping, water hammer within the pipes, and potential damage to the water heater. Most water heater manufacturers require the Thermal Expansion Tank to be installed or they may decline the warranty of the water heater. Installing a thermal expansion tank is recommended. Consulting with a licensed plumbing contractor would be prudent.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Fixtures

Toilet Base Loose
Downstairs Bath

A toilet was noted to be loose and not secured to the floor. A toilet that is not securely attached may rock or move and result in damage to the seal between the toilet and its drainage flange. Properly securing the toilet is advised to prevent water leakage and damage to the areas around and beneath the fixture. Repair should include reinstalling the toilet on a new wax seal.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
9.4.2 - Fixtures

Toilet Leaking

A toilet was observed to leak between its base and the floor. This can cause damage to the floor and surrounding components. Active leaks should be immediately repaired. Moisture damaged components that are deteriorated or no longer sound should be removed and replaced. Consulting with a plumbing professional is recommended. 

Credit
Comment
9.4.3 - Fixtures

Hose Bib Leaking
Rear

A hose bib was noted to be leaking. Leaks at the handle, spout, or body of a hose bib is an indication of a defective seal or component. Repair is often possible although replacement of the hose bib may be required.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
9.4.4 - Fixtures

Sink Stopper
Upstairs Bathroom, Downstairs Bathroom

A sink stopper mechanism was missing or ineffective. A drain stopper mechanism is observed to be either missing or ineffective, preventing the filling of the sink with the manufacturers intended device.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.4.5 - Fixtures

Water Hammer
Throughout

Water hammer was noted during the operation of fixtures. Water hammer is a knocking noise in a water pipe that occurs when a tap is quickly turned off. It is often considered an annoyance and in certain cases can cause pipes to loosen, resulting in damage to pipe connections and valves. Correction either to the valve or piping is required to eliminate the condition. Changing a valve, adding air chamber pipe sections, installing an expansion tank at the water heater or installing water hammer suppressors are common corrective actions. A plumber may be required to implement corrective efforts.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.4.6 - Fixtures

Hose Bib Thread Damage
Front

A hose bib appeared to have thread damage, making it difficult to screw on a hose or another device. Repairs to the hose bib are often possible although sometimes replacement may be required.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
9.5.1 - Shower / Bath Enclosures

Fixture Caulking
Upstairs Bath

Caulking was incomplete around fixtures, spouts, or taps. Caulking joints between various materials is a preventative action to keep water from seeping into walls or floors and causing damage associated with leaks. Failure to provide effective sealing can result in damage and costly repairs. Adding caulking is recommended.

Tools Handyman/DIY

10 - Built-in Appliances

IN L NP D
10.1 Refrigerator X
10.2 Range / Oven / Cooktop X X
10.3 Range Hood / Microwave Oven X
10.4 Dishwasher X X
10.5 Garbage Disposal X
Clothes Dryer Energy Source
Electric
Refrigerator: Manufacturer
Kenmore
Range / Oven / Cooktop: Manufacturer
Hotpoint
Range / Oven / Cooktop: Energy Source
Electric
Range Hood / Microwave Oven: Manufacturer
Kenmore
Range Hood / Microwave Oven: Exhaust Type
Vented
Dishwasher: Manufacturer
Whirlpool

The inspection of the built-in kitchen appliances (range/oven, refrigerator, dishwasher, garbage disposal, microwave oven, trash compactor, cook-top) is limited to the documentation of the observed appliance and its manufacturer's name. 

The home inspector is not required to operate any appliance or observe and report on: clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven function, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation or other non-built-in appliances.

The appliances in this home were inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency
Credit
Comment
10.2.1 - Range / Oven / Cooktop

Anti-tip Device: Missing

An anti-tip device was not observed at the range. The range should be equipped with an anti-tip device, which prevents the range from tipping, or its contents from spilling, should a child attempt to climb on it or its open door. This is a recommended safety feature that should be installed, particularly if small children occupy or visit the residence.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Dishwasher

Drain Loop

The dishwasher's drain line was not looped to prevent back siphonage. The dishwasher discharges without an anti-siphon valve or high-drain loop, which is contrary to most manufacturer's installation instructions. This creates a potential drainage problem and a health hazard. Adding an anti-siphon valve or high-drain loop is recommended.

Tools Handyman/DIY

11 - Crawl Space / Basement

IN L NP D
11.1 Foundation X X
Inspection Method
Exterior
Access Point: Location
Slab (no crawl space)
Access Point: Quantity
N/A
Foundation: Material
Slab on Grade
No Crawl Space or Unfinished Basement

This home did not have a crawl space or unfinished basement, which restricted the inspection of the floor system. Floor structural elements, support, and insulation could not be viewed and were not inspected.

An inspection of the crawl space/basement structure includes the visible foundation; floor framing; other support and substructure components; stairs; ventilation (when applicable); insulation and ventilation type and condition; installed mechanical ventilation systems; ground vapor barrier.

The inspector will: Describe the type of building materials comprising the major structural components. Enter and traverse subfloor crawl spaces. Inspect; the condition and serviceability of visible, exposed foundations and grade slabs, walls, posts, piers, beams, joists, trusses, subfloors, chimney foundations, and stairs where readily and safely accessible; Subfloor crawl spaces and basements for indications of flooding and moisture penetration. Inspect the insulation, ventilation and installed mechanical systems in viewable and accessible unfinished subfloor areas. Probe a representative number of structural components where deterioration is suspected or where clear indications of possible deterioration exist. Probing is not required when probing will damage any finished surface or where no deterioration is suspected. Describe the type of insulation in viewable and accessible unconditioned spaces. Describe any deficiencies of these systems or components. Report missing or inadequate vapor barriers in subfloor crawl spaces with earth floors; The absence of insulation at the interface between conditioned and unconditioned spaces where visible; The absence of insulation on heating system ductwork and supply plumbing in unconditioned spaces; All wood rot and pest-conducive conditions discovered. Refer all issues that are suspected to be insect related to a licensed structural pest inspector (SPI) or pest control operator (PCO) for follow up.

The inspector is not required to: Enter subfloor crawl spaces that require excavation or have an access opening less than eighteen inches by twenty-four inches or headroom less than eighteen inches beneath floor joists and twelve inches beneath girders (beams); Any areas that are not readily accessible due to obstructions, inadequate clearances or have conditions which, in the inspector's opinion, are hazardous to the health and safety of the inspector or will cause damage to components of the home. Move stored items or debris or perform excavation to gain access. Determine the presence, extent, and type of insulation and vapor barriers concealed in the exterior walls; The thickness or R-value of insulation above the ceiling, in the walls or below the floors.

The crawl space/basement of the home was inspected and reported on following the standards listed above. While we make every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind; any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used for further inspections or repairs.

  • IN = Inspected
  • L = Limitation
  • NP = Not Present
  • D = Deficiency