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1234 Main St.
Lawson, MO 64062
02/19/2020 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
15
Maintenance item
29
Prioritized observation
3
Immediate concern

The inspection was essentially visual, not technically exhaustive, and did not imply that every defect would be discovered. The project was based upon conditions that existed at the time of the inspection. This inspection excluded and did not intend to cover any and all components, items, and conditions by nature of their location were concealed or otherwise difficult to inspect. There was no dismantling, destructive analysis, or technical testing of any component. Excluded were all cosmetic conditions, such as carpeting, vinyl floors, wallpapering, and painting. The inspection covered only the listed items and was evaluated for function and safety, not code compliance. This was not intended to reflect the value of the premises and did not make any representation as to the advisability or inadvisability of purchase. Hypothetical repair costs may have been discussed but must be confirmed by qualified contractor estimates.

THE INSPECTION DID NOT INCLUDE ANALYSIS OR TESTING OF ANY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARDS. No tests were conducted to determine the presence of airborne particles such as asbestos, noxious gases such as radon, formaldehyde, toxic, carcinogenic or malodorous substances or other conditions of air quality that may have been present; nor conditions which may cause the above. Unless purchased separate or in the Bundle Agreement. No representations were made as to the existence or possible condition of the lead paint, abandoned wells, private sewage systems, or underground fuel storage tanks. There were no representations as to any above or below ground pollutants, contaminants, or hazardous wastes. The quality of drinking water was excluded from this inspection.

THE INSPECTION DID NOT INCLUDE ANALYSIS OR TESTING FOR CONCEALED WOOD DECAY, MOLD, MILDEW OR FUNGI GROWTH (UNLESS OTHERWISE PURCHASED SEPARATE FROM HOME INSPECTION).

THE INSPECTION DID NOT INCLUDE ANALYSIS OR TESTING FOR INSECTS AND VERMIN.

THE INSPECTION AND REPORT ARE NOT A GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, OF THIS BUILDING OR ANY OF ITS COMPONENTS. The inspection and report are furnished on ‘opinion only’ basis. This company assumes no liability and shall not be liable for any mistakes, omissions, or errors in judgment beyond the cost of this report. We assume no responsibility for the cost of repairing or replacing any unreported defects or conditions. This report is for the sole use of our client and no third party liability is assumed.

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client's Agent, Inspector, Client


Occupancy
Occupied, Furnished
Style
Gable with Hip and Valley
Type of Building
Single Family
Weather Conditions
Clear, Dry, Windy
Temperature (approximate)
38 Fahrenheit (F)
Orientation: We'll Buy Your Home Back

If your home inspector misses anything, InterNACHI will buy your home back.  

And now for the fine print:

  • It's valid for home inspections performed for home buyers or sellers by participating InterNACHI members.
  • The home must be listed for sale with a licensed real estate agent.
  • The Guarantee excludes homes with material defects not present at the time of the inspection, or not required to be inspected, per InterNACHI's Residential Standards of Practice.
  • The Guarantee will be honored for 90 days after closing.
  • We'll pay you whatever price you paid for the home.



For more information, please visit www.nachi.org/buy.


Orientation: Honor Guarantee

InterNACHI is so certain of the integrity of our members that we back them up with our $10,000 Honor Guarantee. 

InterNACHI will pay up to $10,000 USD for the cost of replacement of personal property lost during an inspection and stolen by an InterNACHI-certified member who was convicted of or pleaded guilty to any criminal charge resulting from the member's taking of the client's personal property.  

For details, please visit www.nachi.org/honor


Orientation: Inspection Categories-Appreviated
Explained

All comments by the inspector should be considered before purchasing this home. Any findings / comments that are listed under "Immediate Concern" by the inspector suggests a second opinion or further inspection by a qualified contractor. All costs associated with further inspection fees and repair or replacement of item, component or unit should be considered before you purchase the property.

Explanation of Ratings (How to Read Report)

I= Inspected. This means the system or component was inspected and found to be functioning properly or may need correction, but it could also be in acceptable condition at the time of the inspection. Depending on the above no further comment may necessary but whenever possible additional information about materials used in the construction and how to care for or maintain the home.

L = Limitations. This indicates that at least part of a system or component could not be inspected or inspected thoroughly.

NP = Not Present. This indicates that a system or component was not present at the time of inspection. If the system or component should have been present, a comment will follow.

O = Observation. Observations are color-coded to indicate the importance of the observation.

MAINTENANCE ITEMS

  • Maintenance items, DIY items, or recommended upgrades will fall into this category. These concerns will ultimately lead to Prioritized Observations or Immediate Concerns if left neglected for extended periods of time. These items are generally more straightforward to remedy.

PRIORITIZED OBSERVATIONS

  • A functional component that is not operating as intended or defective to some degree. Items that inevitably lead to, or directly cause (if not addressed in a timely manner) adverse impact on the value of the home, or unreasonable risk (unsafe) to people or property. These concerns typically require further evaluation or may be more complicated to remedy.

IMMEDIATE CONCERN

  • A specific issue with a system or component that may have a significant, adverse impact on the condition of the property, or that poses an immediate risk to people or property. These immediate items are often imminent or in some cases could be very difficult or expensive to remedy.
Orientation: What Really Matters in a Home Inspection

Now that you've had your inspection, you may still have some questions about your the house and the items revealed in your report. 

Home maintenance is a primary responsibility for every homeowner, whether you've lived in several homes of your own or are just purchasing your first one. Staying on top of a seasonal home maintenance schedule is important, and your InterNACHI Certified Professional Inspector can help you figure this out so that you never fall behind. Don't let minor maintenance and routine repairs turn into expensive disasters later due to neglect or simply because you aren't sure what needs to be done and when. 

Your home inspection report is a great place to start. In addition to the written report, checklists, photos, and what the inspector said during the inspection not to mention the sellers disclosure and what you noticed yourself it's easy to become overwhelmed. However, it's likely that your inspection report included mostly maintenance recommendations, the life expectancy for the home's various systems and components, and minor imperfections. These are useful to know about. 

But the issues that really matter fall into four categories: 

  1. major defects, such as a structural failure; 
  2. things that can lead to major defects, such as a small leak due to a defective roof flashing; 
  3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home if not rectified immediately; and 
  4. safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel. 

Anything in these categories should be addressed as soon as possible. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property. 

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. It's important to realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in your inspection report. No house is perfect. Keep things in perspective as you move into your new home.

And remember that home ownership is both a joyful experience and an important responsibility, so be sure to call on + Home Inspections Certified Professionals to help you devise an annual maintenance plan that will keep your family safe and your home in good condition for years to come.

Orientation: A Lot Of Information-But It Will Be Helpful To You!

For the sake of this inspection the front of the home will be considered as the portion pictured in the cover photo. References to the left or right of the home should be construed as standing in the front yard, viewing the front of the home. This will assist in picture orientation.

+ Home Inspections strives to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the Standards of Practice as set forth by interNACHI. As such, We inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of the home as designated in these Standards of Practice. When systems or components designated in the Standards of Practice were present but were not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected will be stated. This inspection is neither technically exhaustive or quantitative.

This report contains observations of those systems and components that, in our professional judgement, were not functioning properly, significantly deficient, or unsafe. All items in this report that were designated for repair, replacement, maintenance, or further evaluation should be investigated by qualified tradespeople within the clients contingency period or prior to closing, which is contract applicable, to determine a total cost of said repairs and to learn of any additional problems that may be present during these evaluations that were not visible during a "visual only" home inspection. 

This inspection will not reveal every concern or issue that may be present, but only those significant defects that were visible at the time of inspection. This inspection can not predict future conditions, or determine if latent or concealed defects are present. The statements made in this report reflect the conditions as existing at the time of Inspection only, and expire at the completion of the inspection. Weather conditions and other changes in conditions may reveal problems that were not present at the time of inspection; including roof leaks, or water infiltration into crawl spaces or basements. This report is only supplemental to the Sellers Disclosure and Pest (WDI) Inspection Report. Refer to the Inspection agreement regarding the scope and limitations of this inspection.

This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, REGARDING THE CONDITIONS OF THE PROPERTY, INCLUDING THE ITEMS AND SYSTEMS INSPECTED, AND IT SHOULD NOT BE RELIED ON AS SUCH. This inspection report should be used alongside the sellers disclosure, pest inspection (WDI) report, and quotes and advice from the tradespeople recommended in this report to gain a better understanding of the condition of the home. Some risk is always involved when purchasing a property and unexpected repairs should be anticipated, as this is unfortunately, a part of home ownership. One Year Home Warranties are sometimes provided by the sellers, and are highly recommended as they will cover future repairs on major items and components of the home. If a warranty is not being provided by the seller(s), your Realtor can advise you of companies who offer them. This report incorporates by reference the "Inspection Agreement" previously entered into by the parties on the date the parties signed said agreement. 

Notice to Third Parties

Notice to Third Parties: This report is the property of + Home Inspections The Client(s) and their Direct Real Estate Representative named herein have been named as licensee(s) of this document. This document is non-transferrable, in whole or in part, to any and all third-parties, including; subsequent buyers, sellers, and listing agents. Copying and pasting deficiencies to prepare the repair request is permitted. THE INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT SHALL NOT BE RELIED UPON BY ANY ONE OTHER THAN THE CLIENT NAMED HEREIN. This report is governed by an Inspection agreement that contained the scope of the inspection, including limitations, exclusions, and conditions of the copyright. Unauthorized recipients are advised to contact a qualified Home Inspector of their choosing to provide them with their own Inspection and Report.  

Items Not Inspected and Other Limitations

ITEMS NOT INSPECTED - There are items that are not inspected in a home inspection such as, but not limited to; fences and gates, pools and spas, outbuildings or any other detached structure, refrigerators, washers/dryers, storm doors and storm windows, screens, window AC units, central vacuum systems, water softeners, alarm and intercom systems, and any item that is not a permanent attached component of the home. Also drop ceiling tiles are not removed, as they are easily damaged, and this is a non-invasive inspection. Subterranean systems are also excluded, such as but not limited to: sewer lines, septic tanks, water delivery systems, and underground fuel storage tanks. Unless a separate agreement is made for a sewer inspection.

Water and gas shut off valves are not operated under any circumstances. As well, any component or appliance that is unplugged or "shut off" is not turned on or connected for the sake of evaluation. I don't have knowledge of why a component may be shut down, and can't be liable for damages that may result from activating said components / appliances. 

Also not reported on are the causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; Any component or system that was not observed; Calculate the strength, adequacy, design or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility. 

Lastly a home inspection does not address environmental concerns such as, but not limited to: Asbestos, lead, lead based paint, radon, mold, wood destroying organisms (termites, etc), cockroaches, rodents, pesticides, fungus, treated lumber, Chinese drywall, mercury, or carbon monoxide. Under separate agreement we do provide radon, mold, and WDO and sewer inspections.

Recommended Contractors Information

CONTRACTORS / FURTHER EVALUATION: It is recommended that licensed professionals be used for repair issues as it relates to the comments in this report, and copies of receipts are kept for warranty purposes. The use of the term "Qualified Person" in this report relates to an individual, company, or contractor whom is either licensed or certified in the field of concern. If I recommend evaluation or repairs by contractors or other licensed professionals, it is possible that they will discover additional problems since they will be invasive with their evaluation and repairs. Any listed items in this report concerning areas reserved for such experts should not be construed as a detailed, comprehensive, and / or exhaustive list of problems, or areas of concern. A listing of Recommended Contractors can be found here: http://homeadvisor.com

CAUSES of DAMAGE / METHODS OF REPAIR: Any suggested causes of damage or defects, and methods of repair mentioned in this report are considered a professional courtesy to assist you in better understanding the condition of the home, and in our opinion only from the standpoint of a visual inspection, and should not be wholly relied upon. Contractors or other licensed professionals will have the final determination on the causes of damage/deficiencies, and the best methods of repairs, due to being invasive with their evaluation. Their evaluation will supersede the information found in this report.

Thermal Imaging Information

THERMAL IMAGING: An infrared camera may be used for specific areas or visual problems, and should not be viewed as a full thermal scan of the entire home. Additional services are available at additional costs and would be supplemented by an additional agreement/addendum. Temperature readings displayed on thermal images in this report are included as a courtesy and should not be wholly relied upon as a home inspection is qualitative, not quantitative. These values can vary +/- 4% or more of displayed readings, and these values will display surface temperatures when air temperature readings would actually need to be conducted on some items which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. If a full thermal scan of the home is desired, please reach out to schedule this service. 

Other Notes - Important Info

INACCESSIBLE AREAS: In the report, there may be specific references to areas and items that were inaccessible or only partly accessible. We can make no representations regarding conditions that may be present in these areas but were concealed or inaccessible for review. With access and an opportunity for inspection, reportable conditions or hidden damage may be found in these areas.

COMPONENT LIFE EXPECTANCY - Components may be listed as having no deficiencies at the time of inspection, but may fail at any time due to their age or lack of maintenance, that couldn't be determined by the inspector. A life expectancy chart can be viewed by visiting our website at www.plushomeinspections.com

PHOTOGRAPHS: Several photos are included in your inspection report. These photos are for informational purposes only and do not attempt to show every instance or occurrence of a defect.

TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS: This report is proofread before sending it out, but typographical errors may be present. If any errors are noticed, please feel free to contact me for clarification.

After reading the report we will be happy to answer any questions you may have, or provide clarification.

Detached Item(s) Present

Only items and components directly and permanently attached to the structure are inspected according to the Standards of Practice. And most of these items are only required to be reported on with their respected affect on the structure. This home may contain detached patios, stairs, retaining walls, outbuildings, decks, pools, fireplaces, etc. If comments are made with regard to these items, any comments should be viewed as a courtesy only, and not be construed as an all-inclusive listing of deficiencies. If any detached items or structures are of concern, evaluation of these items should be conducted by qualified individuals prior to the end of your inspection period.

Comment Key - Definitions

This report divides deficiencies into three categories; Immediate concern which are also Major Defects (in red), Prioritized Observations which are Marginal Defects (in orange), and Maintenance Items which are Minor Defects or FYI (colored in blue). Safety Hazards or concerns will be listed in the Red or Orange categories depending on their perceived danger, but should always be addressed ASAP. 

  • Major Defects/Immediate Concern - Items or components that may require a major expense to correct. Items categorized in this manner require further evaluation and repairs or replacement as needed by a Qualified Contractor prior to then end of your contingency period. 
  • Marginal Defects/Prioritized Observation - Items or components that were found to include a deficiency. These items may have been functional at the time of inspection, but this functionality may be impaired, not ideal, or the defect may lead to further problems. Repairs or replacement is recommended to items categorized in this manner for optimal performance and/or to avoid future problems or adverse conditions that may occur due to the defect, prior to the end of your contingency period. Items categorized in this manner typically require repairs from a Handyman or Qualified Contractor and are not considered routine maintenance or DIY repairs. 
  • Minor Defects/Maintenance Items/FYI - Items or components that were found to be in need of recurring or basic general maintenance and/or may need minor repairs which may improve their functionality. Also included in this section are items that were at the end of their typical service life or beginning to show signs of wear, but were in the opinion of the inspector, still functional at the time of inspection. Major repairs or replacement should be anticipated, and planned for, on any items that are designated as being past, or at the end of their typical life. These repairs or replacement costs can sometimes represent a major expense; i.e. HVAC systems, Water Heaters, etc. 

These categorizations are in professional judgement and based on what are observed at the time of inspection. This categorization should not be construed as to mean that items designated as "Minor defects" or "Marginal Defects" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendations in each comment is more important than its categorization. Due to your perception, opinions, or personal experience you may feel defects belong in a different category, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once again it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining to each defect that is paramount, not its categorical placement. 

Thank you!


Orientation: Some Things To Keep In Mind/Contractors

Not all minor problems reported: There are some things we'd like you to keep in mind about your home inspection. We may not comment on some minor things. The intent of the home inspection is to identify major structural and or mechanical deficiencies. Minor problems may have been noted in the report that was discovered while looking for more significant problems. We sometimes note these items as a courtesy but not every minor repair or problem. 

Intermittent Or Concealed Problems: Some problems can only be discovered by living in a house. They cannot be discovered during the few hours of a home inspection. For example, some shower stalls leak when people are in the shower, but do not leak when you simply turn on the tap. Some roofs and basements only leak when specific conditions exist. Some problems will only be discovered when carpets are lifted, furniture is moved or finishes are removed. Sometimes problems may have existed at the time of the inspection, but there were no clues or visible evidence as to their existence. Our inspections are based on the past performance of the house. If there are no clues / visible evidence of a past problem at the time of inspection, the inspector would not be able to foresee a future problem. If a problem manifests itself, it is very easy to have 20/20 hindsight. 

Contractor's Advice: Contractor's opinions often differ from ours. Don't be surprised when three roofers all say the roof needs replacement, when we said that the roof would last a few more years with some minor repairs. While our advice represents the most prudent thing to do, sometimes contractors may be reluctant to undertake these repairs. This is because of the last man theory. In other words the contractor fears that if he is the last person to work on the roof, he will get blamed if the roof leaks, regardless of whether or not the roof leak is his fault. Consequently, he won't want to do a minor repair with high liability, when he could re-roof the entire house for more money and reduce the likelihood of a callback. This is understandable. It is a good idea to seek advice from multiple sources when differing opinions are present. Keep in mind contractors earn money by performing work; the more work they perform the more money they make. 

Contractors sometimes may say "Why didn't the inspector find this problem?" There are several reasons. Most contractors have no clue what's inside or outside the scope of a home inspection.  All of our inspections are conducted in accordance with the Standards of Practice of The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors. The Standards of Practice specifically state what's included and excluded from the standard home inspection. Most contractors have no clue this document exists. We are generalists; we are not specialists. The heating contractor may indeed have more heating expertise than we do. This is because we are not expected to have heating expertise and plumbing expertise, structural expertise, electrical expertise, etc. A home inspection is a visual examination and appliances, equipment, etc  is tested and operated using normal operating controls. We do not perform invasive or destructive tests and or dismantle equipment / appliances. Problems can become apparent when carpets or plaster are removed, when fixtures or cabinets are pulled out, Furnace or A/C is dismantled or tested using specialty equipment and so on. It is important for homeowners to remember the circumstances in the house at the time of the inspection. The fact that it was snowing, there was storage everywhere or that the air conditioning could not be turned on because of cool temperatures outside, etc. It's impossible for contractors to know what the circumstances were when the inspection was performed. 

Lastly please keep in mind as you move into your new house it is just general good practice to replace ALL door locks to the outside and if you have an interior door leading to a garage it's a good idea to replace those locks too. You just don't know who all has keys to the house you just bought!

Homeowner Responsibilities: Read Your Book

I have provided you a home maintenance book.  It includes information on how your home works, how to maintain it, and how to save energy.  Our contact information is within the book's inside cover, so that you can always contact me. 

We're neighbors! So, feel free to reach out whenever you have a house question or issue.  

Homeowner Responsibilities: Schedule a Yearly Home Maintenance Inspection

Even the most vigilant homeowner can, from time to time, miss small problems or forget about performing some routine home repairs and seasonal maintenance. That's why an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection will help you keep your home in good condition and prevent it from suffering serious, long-term and expensive damage from minor issues that should be addressed now. 

The most important thing to understand as a new homeowner is that your house requires care and regular maintenance. As time goes on, parts of your house will wear out, break down, deteriorate, leak, or simply stop working. But none of these issues means that you will have a costly disaster on your hands if you're on top of home maintenance, and that includes hiring an expert once a year. 

Just as you regularly maintain your vehicle, consider getting an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection as part of the cost of upkeep for your most valuable investment your home. 

+ Home Inspections can show you what you should look for so that you can be an informed homeowner. Protect your family's health and safety, and enjoy your home for years to come by having an Annual Home Maintenance Inspection performed every year. 

Schedule next year's maintenance inspection with your home inspector today!

Furniture Limits: Furniture restriction - other household goods restriction.

The property was occupied at the time of the inspection. you had furniture, personal belongings, boxes, and other miscellaneous items throughout the house. In some cases stacked up. This resulted in a limitation of the inspection.

Furniture Limits: Stored or Furnished Items

Many wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by large amounts of furniture and/or stored items. Certain areas could not be evaluated.

2 - Roof

IN NI NP O
2.1 General X
2.2 Coverings X X
2.3 Flue Gas Vent Pipes X X
2.4 Plumbing Vent Pipes X X
2.5 Roof Drainage Systems X X
2.6 Flashings X
General: Roof Type/Style
Hip and Valley, Combination, Gable

Coverings: Estimated Age
First 1/3

 

Roof Drainage Systems: Downspout Material
Aluminum
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Aluminum, Gutter Guards
General: Homeowner's Responsibility

As a homeowner it is important to monitor the roof. Because any roof can leak. To monitor a roof that is inaccessible use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters.

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant. Roofs are not designed to be waterproof. Eventually, the roof system will leak. No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 

Every roof should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.


General: Inspection Method
Ladder, Binoculars

We attempted to inspect the roof from various locations and methods, including from the ground and a ladder. According to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice, a home inspector is not required to walk upon any roof surface.  However, as courtesy only I walked the roof to ascertain all I could. 

The inspection was not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes.  It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection.  We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roof, and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy.  

General: Roof-Covering
Asphalt

I observed the roof-covering material and attempted to identify its type.  

This inspection is not a guarantee that a roof leak in the future will not happen. Roofs leak.  Even a roof that appears to be in good, functional condition will leak under certain circumstances. We will not take responsibility for a roof leak that happens in the future.  This is not a warranty or guarantee of the roof system.

Coverings: Number of Layers
1 layer

This asphalt or fiberglass composition roof surface appeared to have two or more layers of shingles. Additional layers of composition shingles typically last only 80% of their rated life, and the shingle manufacturer's warranty may be voided. The client should be aware that all layers of roofing will need to be removed when this roof surface needs replacing.

Coverings: Satellite Dish Penetration
Roof Northwest

Satellite dish mounts have penetrated roof coverings which could allow moisture intrusion if not kept sealed. Recommend periodic monitoring to ensure sealant used is in good condition and reapply as needed.

Flue Gas Vent Pipes: Homeowner's Responsibility

It is important as a homeowner to monitor the flashing around the flue gas vent pipes that pass through the roof surface.  Sometimes they deteriorate and cause a roof leak.  

Flue Gas Vent Pipes: Flue Gas Vent Pipe Inspected

I looked at flue gas vent pipes that pass through the roof covering. 

All gas-fired appliances must be connected to venting systems. There should be watertight metal flashing installed around the flue gas vent pipes.  The vent pipes should extend far enough above the roof surface.  

Plumbing Vent Pipes: Homeowner's Responsibility

As a homeowner it is important to monitor the flashing around the plumbing vent pipes that pass through the roof surface.  Sometimes they deteriorate and cause a roof leak.  

Be sure that the plumbing vent pipes do not get covered, either by debris, a toy, or snow.

Roof Drainage Systems: Homeowner's Responsibility

It is important as a homeowner to monitor the gutters and be sure that they function during and after a rainstorm. Look for loose parts, sagging gutter ends, and water leaks. The rain water should be diverted far away from the house foundation. 

Roof Drainage Systems: Gutters Were Inspected

I inspected the gutters.  I wasn't able to inspect every inch of every gutter.  But I attempted to check the overall general condition of the gutters during the inspection and look for indications of major defects.  

Monitoring the gutters during a heavy rain (without lightening) is recommended.  In general, the gutters should catch rain water and direct the water towards downspouts that discharge the water away from the house foundation. 

Flashings: Eaves and Gables

I looked for flashing installed at the eaves (near the gutter edge) and at the gables (the diagonal edge of the roof).  There should be metal drip flashing material installed in these locations.  The flashing helps the surface water on the roof to discharge into the gutter.  Flashing also helps to prevent water intrusion under the roof-covering. 

Flashings: Wall Intersections

I looked for flashing where the roof covering meets a wall or siding material.  There should be step and counter flashing installed in these locations.  

General: Unable to See Everything

This is a visual-only inspection of the roof-covering materials. It does not include an inspection of the entire system. There are components of the roof that are not visible or accessible at all, including the underlayment, decking, fastening, flashing, age, shingle quality, manufacturer installation recommendations, etc. 

Flashings: Difficult to See Every Flashing
Roof

I attempted to inspect the flashing related to the vent pipes, wall intersections, eaves and gables, and the roof-covering materials.  In general, there should be flashing installed in certain areas where the roof covering meets something else, like a vent pipe or siding.  Most flashing is not observable, because the flashing material itself is covered and hidden by the roof covering or other materials.  So, it's impossible to see everything.  A home inspection is a limited visual-only inspection.  We will note all that we see in need of correction. 

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice related to inspecting the roof of the house.  

Monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak.  To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters. 

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant.  Roofs are not designed to be waterproof.  Eventually, the roof system will leak.  No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 


I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves:

  1. the roof-covering materials;
  2. the gutters;
  3. the downspouts;
  4. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and 
  5. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of roof-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. observed indications of active roof leaks.

What's not inspected? Antennae, interiors of flues or chimneys which are not readily accessible, and other installed accessories.

This is not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes. It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection.


  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Coverings

Fasteners Exposed - Ridge Cap

 Last ridge cap shingle should have fasteners sealed. Degradation could lead to leakage. Recommend Monitoring. 

Roof Roofing Professional
$
Credit
Comment
2.2.2 - Coverings

Granule Loss

Asphalt shingles had suffered uniform granule loss across the roof; not all areas may be shown. This is not considered by insurance companies or manufacturer's to be a defective condition, but a natural result of the aging process. The bond between asphalt and granules deteriorates over time as asphalt loses volatile compounds, dries and shrinks. It does not affect the ability of the shingles to shed water but does allow underlying shingle to degrade faster.

Mag glass Monitor
$
Credit
Comment
2.3.1 - Flue Gas Vent Pipes

Sealant over exposed fasteners

it was noted sealant was applied to fasteners holding flashing. Over time this can degrade and allow water intrusion. Recommend monitoring for correction if needed in the future.

$
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Plumbing Vent Pipes

Boot Seal Degraded
Roof West

One or more vent boots was degraded at the time of the inspection. Degraded boots can allow moisture/water intrusion. Recommend repair or replace.

Wrenches Handyman
$
Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Diverter Trays Missing
Roof Front Garage

I observed indications that the water diverter tray or splash block at the downspout end needed improvement. Easy to do. 

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
2.5.2 - Roof Drainage Systems

Downspout Extensions
North

Recommend downspout extensions installed to move water further away from the building foundation.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
2.5.3 - Roof Drainage Systems

Gutter Damaged

I observed damage to the gutter.  This is a defect that should be corrected by a professional contractor.  

Gutter cleaning icon Gutter Contractor

3 - Exterior

Exterior Doors: Exterior Doors Inspected

I inspected the exterior doors. Any concerns will be noted in the report. 

General: Homeowner's Responsibility

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging. The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it. It is important as a homeowner to monitor the buildings exterior for its condition and weather tightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

During a heavy rainstorm (without lightning), grab an umbrella and go outside. Walk around your house and look around at the roof and property. A rainstorm is the perfect time to see how the roof, downspouts and grading are performing. Observe the drainage patterns of your entire property, as well as the property of your neighbor. The ground around your house should slope away from all sides. Downspouts, surface gutters and drains should be directing water away from the foundation. 

Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim: Type of Wall-Covering Material Described
Brick, Vinyl

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging.  The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it.  Your job is to monitor the house's exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior wall-covering materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading: Vegetation, Drainage, Walls & Grading Were Inspected

I inspected the vegetation, surface drainage, and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.

Walkways & Driveways: Walkways & Driveways Were Inspected

I inspected the walkways and driveways that were adjacent to the house.  The walkways, driveways, and parking areas that were far away from the house foundation were not inspected. 

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 

Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports: Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports Were Inspected

I inspected the porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports at the house that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Railings, Guards & Handrails Were Inspected

I inspected the railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. 

Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim: Inspection Was Restricted

I did not inspect all of the exterior wall-covering material,eaves, soffit, and fascia.  A home inspection is not an exhaustive evaluation.  My inspection of the exterior was limited.  I did not reach and access closely every part of the exterior wall-covering. 

GFCI's, Lighting Fixtures-Outside: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the GFCI/AFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

Please refer to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice related to inspecting the exterior of the house. 


I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the exterior wall-covering materials; 
  2. the eaves, soffits and fascia;
  3. a representative number of windows;
  4. all exterior doors;
  5. flashing and trim;
  6. adjacent walkways and driveways;
  7. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
  8. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
  9. railings, guards and handrails; and 
  10. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of exterior wall-covering materials.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails.

$
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim

Damaged Wall-Covering Material

I observed indications of a damage at the exterior wall-covering material.

Recommend sealant apply to avoid water intrusion.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Wall-Covering, Flashing & Trim

Discolored Vinyl Siding/Mildew/Algae
Exterior

There are signs of algae and/or mildew on the siding. This is a cosmetic issue and is not uncommon especially on shaded portions of the home. Recommend that said areas be washed or cleaned on a regular basis.

Article on Algae on homes

https://www.silive.com/homegarden/2013/05/the_dirty_truth_about_vinyl_si.html

DIY Video on removal

https://youtu.be/aZ9w13xrRMc

Wrench DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Damage Observed at Eaves
Roof North Front

I observed indications that one or more areas of the eaves were damaged. 

Correction and further evaluation is recommended.

Hardhat General Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Paint Surface in Poor Condition
South East Roof

I observed indications of paint or staining in poor condition.  Flaking, cracking, and worn areas. 

Correction and further evaluation is recommended. 

Paint roller Painting Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Vegetation, Surface Drainage, Retaining Walls & Grading

Vegetation Growth

I observed vegetation around the house in areas.  This condition limited and restricted my visual inspection.  Vegetation and landscaping up against or near the house foundation and exterior walls may be prone to water penetration and insect infestation.  

Trimming, pruning and some landscaping is recommended.  12 inch is the generally accepted minimum clearance between the plant and house. 

Wrench DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - GFCI's, Lighting Fixtures-Outside

GFCI Defect
Rear West

I observed indications of a defect at a GFCI. When installing tester into upper receptacle which would automatically trip the GFCI.

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.5.2 - GFCI's, Lighting Fixtures-Outside

Lighting Fixture Loose (Exterior)
Rear North South

Light fixture was loose in noted locations which could allow for moisture intrusion behind fixture. Wind could also continue to degrade fixture stability. Recommend light fixture is properly secured to the wall. Then caulking applied around the top and sides to protect from water intrusion.

$
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Walkways & Driveways

Minor Cracking at Driveway

I observed indications of minor cracking at the driveway.

Monitoring is recommended.

$
Credit
Comment
3.6.2 - Walkways & Driveways

Trip Hazard
Along the seam of the driveway down the middle

I observed a trip hazard.  This condition is a safety concern. 

Correction and further evaluation is recommended. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.6.3 - Walkways & Driveways

Caulking Degraded

Noted caulking at joints was degraded it can allow water penetration near the foundation and or wash out underneath slab. Recommend correction by caulking and sealing.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps

Riser Height Too Tall (Greater Than 7 3/4")

I observed a defect at the stair riser height.  

The riser height maximum is 7 3/4 inches measured vertically between the stair treads. This poses a trip hazard. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
$
Credit
Comment
3.7.2 - Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps

Paint Peel

Paint was noted peeling or degraded. Recommend further monitoring.

Wrench DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.8.1 - Porches, Patios, Decks, Balconies & Carports

Worn Out Surfaces
Rear West

I observed indications of worn out surfaces at the deck.  Mostly surface covering as in paint.

Wrench DIY
$
Credit
Comment
3.9.1 - Railings, Guards & Handrails

Guard Opening Was Too Large (4")

I observed improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails at a required guard.  This is a safety hazard, especially for small children.

Guards may not allow the passage of a sphere 4 inches in diameter. 

Correction and further evaluation is recommended. 

Hardhat General Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
3.10.1 - Exterior Doors

Door Hardware Damaged

I observed damage at the exterior door hardware.

Correction and further evaluation is recommended.

Wrench DIY

4 - Attic

IN NI NP O
4.1 Attic Structure & Sheathing X X
4.2 Exhaust Systems X
4.3 Insulation in Attic X
4.4 Ventilation in Attic X
Attic Structure & Sheathing: Access Type
Ceiling hatch
Attic Structure & Sheathing: Structure Type
Rafters
Attic Structure & Sheathing: Attic Inspection
Inspection from hatch
Insulation in Attic: Type of Insulation Observed
Fiberglass
Attic Structure & Sheathing: Sheathing Material
OSB, Purlins
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fan/Flue
Kitchen Vent, Bathroom Fan
Attic Structure & Sheathing: Attic Photos
Attic Structure & Sheathing: Structural Components Were Inspected

Structural components were inspected from the attic space according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice

Insulation in Attic: Approximate Average Depth of Insulation
9-12 inches

Determining how much insulation should be installed in a house depends upon where a home is located. The amount of insulation that should be installed at a particular area of a house is dependent upon which climate zone the house is located and the local building codes.  It is not uncommon in this area to have a minimum of 10-14 inches of insulation depending on it's type. 

Insulation in Attic: Insulation Was Inspected
Attic

During the home inspection, I inspected for insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas.  I inspected for ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas.  And I inspected mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.

I attempted to describe the type of insulation observed and the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure.

I report as in need of correction the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces.


Ventilation in Attic: Ventilation Inspected

During the home inspection, I inspected for ventilation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas. And I inspected for mechanical exhaust systems. 

I report as in need of correction the general absence of ventilation in unfinished spaces.

Attic Structure & Sheathing: Could Not See Everything in Attic
Attic

I could not see and inspect everything in the attic space. The access is restricted and my inspection is limited. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Attic Structure & Sheathing

Hatch Damage

Noted hatch damage in access to attic.

Wrenches Handyman

5 - Interior, Doors, Windows, Walls, Ceilings, Bathrooms,Etc

IN NI NP O
5.1 Bathrooms X X
5.2 Bathroom Toilets X
5.3 Shower, Tubs & Sinks X X
5.4 Doors X X
5.5 Floors/Walls/Ceilings X X
5.6 Stairs X X
5.7 Windows X X
Floors/Walls/Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Ceiling Tiles, Drywall
Floors/Walls/Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Floors/Walls/Ceilings: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Vinyl, Hardwood
Windows: Window Manufacturer
Unknown
Windows: Window Type
Single-hung, Casement, Double-hung
Bathroom Toilets: Toilets Inspected

I flushed all of the toilets. No defects observed at the time of the inspection. 

Shower, Tubs & Sinks: Functional flow/drainage

The tub/shower had functional flow and functional drainage at the time of the inspection.

Shower, Tubs & Sinks: Jacuzzi Tub Tested

Jacuzzi tub was tested during inspection for functional flow and drainage. Jets were also tested for proper function. 

Floors/Walls/Ceilings: Cracks in Walls & Ceilings

Minor cracks in the walls and ceilings are very common and are normally the result of long-term settling. Some settling is not uncommon especially in homes over 5 years old. Generally minor cracks are not a structural concern, though can be corrected for aesthetic purposes. More serious cracks or large amounts of cracks will be called out in the report.

Stairs: Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps Were Inspected

Inspection of staircases typically includes visual examination of the following: treads and risers; landings; angle of staircase; handrails; guardrails; lighting; headroom; windows; and walls and ceilings. I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches. 


Stairs: Mechanical Chair Lift Not Tested
Mechanical chairlifts are not part of a general home inspection. If unit remains in home recommend an inspection. 

What is inspected? A representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; railings, guards and handrails; garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls.The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Bathrooms

Window (Glazing) Inside Shower
2nd Floor Bathroom

I observed that the window inside the shower/ and or bathtub area is a safety defect. The window glass does not appear to be safety glass. Potentially hazardous. 

Windows (or glazing) in walls of bathtubs and showers where the bottom edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches measured vertically above any standing or walking surface:

  • is considered a hazardous location; and
  • must be safety glazing (or safety glass); and
  • must be identified by the manufacturer's designation as safety glass. 
Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Shower, Tubs & Sinks

Drain Stop Damaged/Degraded
1st Floor Bathroom

One or more of the bathroom sink drain stops were damaged or missing. Recommend repair or replace.

$
Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - Shower, Tubs & Sinks

Grout/Sealant Degraded

Grout and/or sealant was degraded in noted location which could allow moisture and water intrusion behind to the wall/mount structure. Recommend grout is repaired and/or sealant is applied.

Tools Handyman/DIY
$
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Doors

Door Doesn't Latch
2nd Floor West Bedroom

Door doesn't latch properly. Recommend handyman repair latch and/or strike plate.
$
Credit
Comment
5.5.1 - Floors/Walls/Ceilings

Recent Roof Leak Damage
2nd Floor Bathroom

Stains on the ceiling appear to be the result of roof leaks near the skylight in the bathroom. It appears repaired. Recommend monitoring.

$
Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Stairs

Handrail Loose

Handrail was loose at the time of the inspection. Recommend tightening.

$
Credit
Comment
5.7.1 - Windows

Aging Windows - Mostly Functional

Though mostly functional at the time of the inspection the windows are older and starting to display signs of age. Degraded paint/stain, difficult to open and close, will not stay open or closed, not smooth operation.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor

6 - Kitchen

IN NI NP O
6.1 Built-in Microwave X
6.2 Countertops & Cabinets X
6.3 Kitchen Sink X
6.4 Refrigerator X
6.5 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Corian
Countertops & Cabinets: Inspected Cabinets & Countertops

I inspected a representative number of cabinets and countertop surfaces. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Electric
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Cooktop/Range/Oven Brand
Kenmore
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range Photos
Built-in Microwave: Microwave Operated

Microwave was operated and found to be functional. Operation does NOT guarantee heating and/or cooking results.

Kitchen Sink: Ran Water at Kitchen Sink

I ran water at the kitchen sink.  No issues seen at the time of the inspection. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Induction Cooktop

Induction burners only operate when a pan or pot is seated. Once seated induction burners will pulse to reach temperature. *Ensure cookware is rated for induction cooktops.

The kitchen appliances are not included in the scope of a home inspection according to the Standards of Practice. 

The inspector will out of courtesy only check:

  • the stove, 
  • oven, 
  • microwave, and 
  • garbage disposer. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations

7 - Laundry Room

IN NI NP O
7.1 General X
7.2 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
7.3 Washer Connections / Drain Pipe X
General: Dryer Power Source
220 Electric, 110 Volt
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material
PVC
General: Dryer Vent
Metal (Flex)
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Drain Size
1 1/2"
Washer Connections / Drain Pipe: Washer Connections - Satisfactory

Water input nozzles and drain pipe appeared functional at time of inspection. This does not guarantee future use as neither was tested. Recommend using hoses with seals and properly looped drain line from washer. Always monitor both items for both leaks and proper draining when using a washer.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations

8 - Plumbing

IN NI NP O
8.1 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
8.2 Fixtures, Faucets and Spickets X X
8.3 Hot Water System X
8.4 Water Supply, Distribution Systems X
8.5 Main Water Shut-Off Valve X
8.6 Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems X
Hot Water System: Power Source/Type
Gas
Water Supply, Distribution Systems: Water Source
Front East near curb
Public
Water Supply, Distribution Systems: Distribution Material
Copper
Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Location of Main Shut-Off Valve
Closet
Basement

Located on North wall at the bottom. 

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Sewage Cleanout
Mechanical Room

Sewage clean outs are access points used to clear clogged drain lines.

Hot Water System: Capacity
50 gallons
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Inspected Drain, Waste, Vent Pipes

I attempted to inspect the drain, waste, and vent pipes.  Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about water and sewer leaks or blockages in the past.  None were noted at the time of this inspection. 

Hot Water System: Manufacturer
Whirlpool, US Craftmaster

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding.

Here is a maintenance guide.

Hot Water System: Estimated Water Heater Age
Mechanical Room
Jan 2013 Manufactured date. 6.5 years old

Water heater built in 2014. Unit is early service life of a standard industry recognized 8-12 years lifespan.

Water Supply, Distribution Systems: Filters
None

Filter and filtration systems are not tested during the inspection. Recommend qualified plumber further evaluate proper function if needed.

Water Supply, Distribution Systems: Water Pressure

@ exterior valve, 60 psi. Within acceptable limits. Pressure tested with tub and sink running.

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Homeowner's Responsibility

It's important to know where the main water and fuel shutoff valves are located. And be sure to keep an eye out for any water and plumbing leaks. 

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the drainage pipes were hidden within the walls.  

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Unable to Locate

I was unable to determine the location of the main water shut-off valve.  Ask the homeowner. However location of shut off from outside the property is noted in the report as being in the front yard near the curb.

Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems not present.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
$
Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Fixtures, Faucets and Spickets

Hose Bibb Not Frost Free

Recommend installation of a frost-free faucet with backflow preventer.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
$
Credit
Comment
8.2.2 - Fixtures, Faucets and Spickets

Hose Bibb Anti-Siphon Missing

Outdoor hose bibb does not have an anti-siphon (vacuum breaker) which prevents unsanitary water from being pulled back through a garden hose and contaminating your water system; this is known as a cross-connection. Recommend installation of a anti-siphon equipped hose bibb.
$
Credit
Comment
8.2.3 - Fixtures, Faucets and Spickets

Hose Bibb Leaking
Rear

Hose bibb valve was noted as leaking when turned on. Recommend correction by repair or replacement.

9 - Electrical

IN NI NP O
9.1 Service Entrance Conductors/Electric Meter and Base X X
9.2 Service Grounding & Bonding X X
9.3 Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc X X
9.4 Switches, Fixtures, Receptacles, Ceiling Fans X X
9.5 Smoke and CO2 Detectors X X
9.6 GFCI's and AFCI's X X
Service Entrance Conductors/Electric Meter and Base: Inspected the Electric Meter & Base

I inspected the electrical electric meter and base. 

Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc: Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc: Wiring Method
Non-metallic Sheathed Cable
Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc: Branch Wire 15/20 AMP
Copper
Service Entrance Conductors/Electric Meter and Base: Electrical Service Conductors
Underground, 120-240 Voltage, Aluminum, 200 Amp Service
Service Grounding & Bonding: Inspected the Service Grounding & Bonding

I inspected the electrical service grounding and bonding.

Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc: Main Disconnect
Main Service Panel
Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc: Differences Between AFCI Circuit Breakers and Normal Circuit Breakers

The AFCI should not be confused with the GFCI. The AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter) protects against fires caused by arcing faults. Arcing faults often occur in damaged or deteriorated wires and cords. The GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) is designed to protect people from severe or fatal electric shocks.

Please view the video to learn more.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6ouo9He1QY

Switches, Fixtures, Receptacles, Ceiling Fans: Inspected a Switches, Fixtures & Receptacles

I inspected a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles. All operable unless noted in this report.

Switches, Fixtures, Receptacles, Ceiling Fans: Ceiling Fans Tested

All ceiling fans were tested for normal operation and stability. Any discrepancies will be noted.

Smoke and CO2 Detectors: Inspected for Presence of Smoke and CO Detectors

I inspected for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. 

There should be a smoke detector in every sleeping room, outside of every sleeping room, and one every level of a house. 

Smoke and CO2 Detectors: Smoke Detectors

Smoke detectors are visually identified as installed, yet not tested. Recommend changing the batteries when you take possession of the property and every 6 months afterwards. You will want to test them monthly. Detectors older than 10 years should be replaced.

GFCI's and AFCI's: Inspected GFCIs

I inspected ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible.

Switches, Fixtures, Receptacles, Ceiling Fans: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

Smoke and CO2 Detectors: Unable to Test Every Detector

I was unable to test every detector. We recommend testing all of the detectors.  Ask the seller about the performance of the detectors and of any issues regarding them.  We recommend replacing all of the detectors (smoke and carbon monoxide) with new ones just for peace of mind and for safety concerns.  

GFCI's and AFCI's: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the AFCI/GFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

What's Inspected? Service drop; overhead service conductors and attachment point; service head, gooseneck and drip loops; service mast, service conduit and raceway; electric meter and base; service-entrance conductors; main service disconnect; panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); service grounding and bonding; representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.

What's Not Inspected or Required? Insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures; operate electrical systems that are shut down; remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead frontsope; rate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices; operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms; inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems; measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled; inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices; activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized; inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any time-controlled devices; verify the service ground; inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility; inspect spark or lightning arrestors; inspect or test de-icing equipment; conduct voltage-drop calculations; determine the accuracy of labeling; inspect exterior lighting.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
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Comment
9.3.1 - Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc

AFCI Breakers Not Present

An arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) also known as an arc-fault detection device (AFDD) is a circuit breaker that breaks the circuit when it detects an electric arc in the circuit it protects to prevent electrical fires. An AFCI selectively distinguishes between a harmless arc (incidental to normal operation of switches, plugs, and brushed motors), and a potentially dangerous arc (that can occur, for example, in a lamp cord which has a broken conductor). AFCI breakers have been required for circuits feeding electrical outlets in residential bedrooms by the electrical codes of Canada and the United States since the beginning of the 21st century; the U.S. National Electrical Code has required them to protect most residential outlets since 2014.

Please click the link below to learn more.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arc-fault_circuit_interrupter

Also please view this 2 minute video explaining what an AFCI does. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-SBly_2bPQ

Electric Electrical Contractor
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9.3.2 - Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc

Dirty / Dusty Panel/Box

A heavily dusty or dirty main service panel can become hazardous. Recommend correction by having panel and box cleaned. 

*Warning: all components in a panel are electrically charged and all precautions should be taken.*

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9.3.3 - Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc

Missing Screws

Screws were missing from main service panel (panel is barely seated properly) and could be come dislodged.

Recommend: install proper service panel screws.

Here is an example of the type of screws. *Ensure proper fit for your brand panel before purchase.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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9.3.4 - Main Service Panel/Branch Wiring, Etc

Opening, Missing Breakers

*Safety* One or more openings in the dead front cover of this service panel where circuit breakers were not installed were not properly covered. This condition may allow a person to come into contact with energized electrical components and is a potential shock/electrocution hazard. Recommend correction by installing filler plates made for this purpose.

Click here to purchase filler plates. (Ensure proper ones for you panel brand) Generally power to house is turned off and filler plate snapped in. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
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9.4.1 - Switches, Fixtures, Receptacles, Ceiling Fans

Cover Plate Missing

*Safety* One or more receptacles or switches are missing a cover plate which can lead to a short and is a shock risk. Recommend installation of plates.

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
9.4.2 - Switches, Fixtures, Receptacles, Ceiling Fans

Power Not Present at Receptacle

I observed indications that power was not present at a receptacle. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
9.5.1 - Smoke and CO2 Detectors

Not Enough Smoke Detectors

*Safety* Inspector recommends installing additional smoke detectors to provide improved fire protection for home. Generally-accepted current safety standards recommend smoke detectors be installed at the following locations:

- In the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms
- In all bedrooms
- In each story of a dwelling unit, including basements and cellars, but not including crawl spaces and uninhabitable attics.
- In residential units of 1,200 square feet or more, automatic fire detectors, in the form of smoke detectors shall be provided for each 1,200 square feet of area or part thereof.
- Any smoke detector located within 20 feet of a kitchen or bedroom containing a tub or shower must be a photoelectric type.

Wrench DIY
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9.5.2 - Smoke and CO2 Detectors

Old Detectors, New Detectors Recommended

I observed indications of old smoke detectors in the house. Detectors should be replaced every 5-10 years. They can be hard-wired with electricity and have a battery backup feature in case the electricity turns off-this is preferable. However constraint often require battery only smoke detectors. New smoke detectors are recommended in this home. 

Smoke detectors are visually identified as installed. Recommend changing the batteries when you take possession of the property and every 6 months afterwards upon installation of new units. You will want to test them monthly. Detectors older than 10 years should always be replaced

Additionally since house has gas supplied water heater AND furnace, recommend the installation of CO2 detectors as well.

Tools Handyman/DIY

10 - Heating/ Cooling

IN NI NP O
10.1 Equipment X
10.2 Distribution System X
10.3 Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls X
10.4 Condensate X
10.5 Vents, Flues & Chimneys X
Equipment: Energy Source
Electric, Gas
Equipment: Heat Type
Forced Air
Equipment: Air Handler-Brand
Lennox
Distribution System : Configuration
Central
Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Brand
Nest
Thermostat and Normal Operating Controls: Thermostat Location
1st Floor Hallway
First floor, Hallway
Vents, Flues & Chimneys: Flue - Satisfactory
Mechanical Room

No venting flue system deficiencies noted at the time of the inspection.

Equipment: Condenser Unit Brand
South
Trane

Unit is approximately 11 1/2 years old

Homeowner's Responsibility
Mechanical Room

Most HVAC systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. The adequacy of the cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

It's smart to get the HVAC system inspected and serviced every year. And if you're system has an air filter, be sure to keep that filter cleaned. 

Equipment: Age-Estimated Air Handler Equipment
10-15 yrs.

Furnace / Air Handler built in 1998. Unit is late service life of a standard industry recognized 12-15 years lifespan.

Distribution System : Flex Duct
Attic

Flex ducting was installed which degrade at a faster rate than rigid ducting. Additionally, strapping used to support flex duct can restrict air flow producing uneven heating and cooling results. Recommend monitoring for proper operation.

Distribution System : Ducts

Metal Duct-work was the distribution system thru-out except small portion of attic. 

Equipment: AC Not Tested - Low Temperature
Mechanical Room, North Side Outside

The A/C unit was not tested due to low outdoor temperature. This may cause damage the unit, due to temperature below 65 degrees. Recommend full test by qualified HVAC technician before summer.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

The heating & cooling system, using normal operating controls; depending on outside temperature. Under 65 degrees, cooling function is not tested; over 65 degrees, heat pump heating function is not tested. Furnace heating will be tested as long as outside temp is not higher than 80 degrees.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
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Comment
10.1.1 - Equipment

Blower Panel Safety Switch Did Not Work

The safety switch located at the panel of the circulating blower fan for the furnace did not operate or function when I inspected it/and or was not present. Safety issue.  Correction and further evaluation is recommended. 

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor
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Comment
10.1.2 - Equipment

Insulation Missing or Damaged

Missing or damaged insulation can cause energy loss and condensation. Recommend reattachment.

11 - Garage

IN NI NP O
11.1 General X
11.2 Electric X X
11.3 Garage Door Opener X X
11.4 Moisture Intrusion in Garage X
11.5 Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home) X
11.6 Vehicle Door X
Garage Door Opener: Number of Openers
Two
Garage Door Opener: Opener Brand
Liftmaster, Overhead Door
Vehicle Door: Type
Up-and-Over
Vehicle Door: Material
Wood
Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home): No Fire Rated Door
General: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job as the homeowner is to monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak. To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters.

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant. Roofs are not designed to be waterproof. Eventually, the roof system will leak. No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 

General: Roof Was Inspected
Ground

We attempted to inspect the roof from various locations and methods, including from the ground and a ladder. 

The inspection was not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roof system according to the manufacturer's specifications or construction codes.  It is virtually impossible to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our inspection.  We recommend that you ask the sellers to disclose information about the roof, and that you include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy.  

General: Type of Roof-Covering Described
Asphalt

I observed the roof-covering material and attempted to identify its type.  

This inspection is not a guarantee that a roof leak in the future will not happen. Roofs leak.  Even a roof that appears to be in good, functional condition will leak under certain circumstances. We will not take responsibility for a roof leak that happens in the future.  This is not a warranty or guarantee of the roof system.

Vehicle Door: Overhead Garage Door

Inspection of overhead garage doors typically includes examination for presence, serviceable condition and proper operation of the following components: door condition; mounting brackets; automatic opener; automatic reverse; photo sensor; switch placement; track & rollers; manual disconnect.

Inspection of the garage typically includes examination of the following: 

- general structure; 
- floor, wall and ceiling surfaces; 
- operation of all accessible conventional doors and door hardware; 
- overhead door condition and operation including manual and automatic safety component operation and switch placement; 
- proper electrical condition including Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) protection; 
- interior and exterior lighting; 
- stairs and stairways;
- proper firewall separation from living space; 
- proper floor drainage

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
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Comment
11.2.1 - Electric

Missing Receptacle for Each Car Space in Garage

I observed that there is a missing receptacle for each car space in the attached garage. 

One receptacle outlet must be installed for each car space in the garage. 2014 NEC 210.52(G)

Electric Electrical Contractor
$
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Comment
11.2.2 - Electric

No GFCI Protection Installed - Garage

Although GFCI protection of exterior circuits may not have been required at the time in which this home was built, as general knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time, building standards have changed to reflect current understanding. Recommend installation in noted areas and can be achieved by any one of the methods below:

1. Replacing an individual standard receptacle with a GFCI receptacle. 
2. Replacing the electrical circuit receptacle located closest to the overcurrent protection device (usually a breaker) with a GFCI receptacle. 
3. Replacing the breaker currently protecting the electrical circuit that contains the receptacles of concern with a GFCI breaker.

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. 

$
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Comment
11.3.1 - Garage Door Opener

Photo Sensor Not Installed
Left garage door from inside garage.

*Safety* The overhead garage door was not equipped with a photoelectric sensor. Photoelectric sensors are devices installed to prevent injury by raising the vehicle door if the sensor detects a person on a position in which they may be injured by the descending door. Installation of photo sensors in new homes has been required by generally-accepted safety standards since 1993. The Inspector recommends installation of a photo sensor by a qualified contractor or technician for safety reasons.

Garage Garage Door Contractor
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Comment
11.3.2 - Garage Door Opener

Pressure Test Failed

*Saftey* Modern automatic garage door openers are installed with a pressure sensitive function which will reverse garage door if an object obstructs the path. Door failed to auto-reverse or too much pressure was needed to reverse which can result in harm to pets or persons. Recommend pressure sensitivity is adjusted.

Wrenches Handyman

12 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

IN NI NP O
12.1 Floor Structure from above/Ceiling X
12.2 Foundation/ Wall Structure X X
12.3 Crawlspaces X
12.4 Vapor Retarders (Crawlspace or Basement) X
Foundation/ Wall Structure: Material
Concrete, Wood, Slab on Grade
Foundation/ Wall Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
None
Floor Structure from above/Ceiling: Material
Inaccessible, Wood Beams
Foundation/ Wall Structure: Foundation Repairs

Previous foundation repairs were noted which likely shored up foundation and settling issues. Inspector assesses repairs are sufficient. Recommend if concerned, seek further information from a foundation expert.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  • the foundation;
  • the basement;
  • the crawlspace; and
  • structural components.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  • the type of foundation; and
  • the location of the access to the under-floor space.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  • observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil;
  • observed indications of active water penetration;
  • observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and
  • any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations