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1234 Main St.
Wheeling, WV 26003
11/16/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
9
Maintenance item/fyi
26
Recommendations
5
Major & safety concerns








To Our Client, 

Thank you very much for choosing us to perform your home inspection. We hope the experience met your expectations. The report is setup for easy navigation. The report begins with an overview and then has one section for every major home system (Roofing, Exterior, Structure, etc.). The blue text in a comment indicates a hyperlink to more information throughout the report. Please feel free to contact us with any questions about the report or the home itself, for as long as you own your home. Our telephone and email consulting services are available at no cost to you. Please watch for your follow-up email. We hope that you will complete our client questionnaire. Thanks again for choosing Mountain State Inspections LLC.






Sincerely, Mark Bonar, 

Certified Master Inspector

Founder of Mountain State Inspections LLC

WV#HI8303354-1013








Examination Overview: Mountain State Inspections LLC strives to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the Standards of Practice as set forth by the InterNACHI's Home Inspection Standards of Practice (International Association of Certified Home Inspectors) and or any State required standards. As such, we inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of the home as designated in the noted Standards of Practice. When systems or components designated in the Standards of Practice were present but were not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected will be stated. This inspection is neither technically exhaustive or quantitative. This report contains observations of those systems and components that, in the professional judgement, were not functioning properly, significantly deficient, or unsafe. All items in this report that were designated under additional information should be investigated by qualified tradespeople within the clients contingency period or prior to closing, which is contract applicable, to determine a total cost of said repairs and to learn of any additional problems that may be present during these evaluations that were not visible during a "visual only" Home Inspection. This inspection will not reveal every concern or issue that may be present, but only those significant defects that were visible at the time of inspection. This inspection cannot predict future conditions or determine if latent or concealed defects are present. The statements made in this report reflect the conditions as existing at the time of Inspection only and expire at the completion of the inspection. Weather conditions and other changes in conditions may reveal problems that were not present at the time of inspection; including roof leaks, or water infiltration into crawl spaces or basements. This report is only supplemental to the Sellers Disclosure and any Wood Destroying Insects (WDI) Reports. Refer to the Standards of Practice (linked to above), and your Inspection Agreement regarding the scope and limitations of this inspection. This inspection is NOT intended to be considered as a GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, REGARDING THE CONDITIONS OF THE PROPERTY, INCLUDING THE ITEMS AND SYSTEMS INSPECTED, AND IT SHOULD NOT BE RELIED ON AS SUCH. This inspection report should be used alongside the sellers disclosure, Wood Destroying Insects (WDI) Report, and quotes and advice from the tradespeople recommended in this report to gain a better understanding of the condition of the home. Some risk is always involved when purchasing a property and unexpected repairs should be anticipated, as this is unfortunately, a part of home ownership. One Year Home Warranties are sometimes provided by the sellers and are highly recommended as they will help cover future repairs on major items and components of the home. If a warranty is not being provided by the seller(s), your Realtor can advise you of companies who offer them. It is advisable to recheck this structure and all mechanical systems two to three days prior to closing to determine if any changes or malfunctions have occurred.

Notice to Third Parties: This report is the property of Mountain State Inspections LLC and is Copyrighted as of the date on the inspection. The Client(s) and their Direct Real Estate Representative named on the cover page have been named as licensee(s) of this document. This document is non-transferrable, in whole or in part, to any and all third-parties, including; subsequent buyers, sellers, and listing agents. Copying and pasting deficiencies to prepare the repair request is permitted. THE INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT SHALL NOT BE RELIED UPON BY ANYONE OTHER THAN THE CLIENT(S) NAMED HEREIN. This report is governed by an Inspection agreement that contained the scope of the inspection, including limitations, exclusions, and conditions of the copyright. Unauthorized recipients are advised to contact a qualified Home Inspector of their choosing to provide them with their own Inspection and Report.

Items Not Inspected: There are items that are not inspected in a home inspection such as, but not limited to; fences and gates, pools and spas, outbuildings or any other detached structure, mobile appliances, washers / dryers, storm doors and storm windows, screens, window AC units, central vacuum systems, water softeners, alarm and intercom systems, and any item that is not a permanent attached component of the home. Also drop ceiling tiles are not removed, as they are easily damaged, and this is a non-invasive inspection. Subterranean systems are also excluded, such as but not limited to: sewer lines, septic tanks and private water systems, water delivery systems, and underground fuel storage tanks. Water and gas shut off valves are not operated under any circumstances. As well, any component or appliance that is unplugged or "shut off" is not turned on or connected for the sake of evaluation. I don't have knowledge of why a component may be shut down and can't be liable for damages that may result from activating said components / appliances. Also, not reported on are the causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and total costs of corrections. The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; Any component or system that was not observed; Calculate the strength, adequacy, design or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility. Lastly a home inspection does not address environmental concerns such as, but not limited to: Asbestos, lead, lead based paint, radon, mold, wood destroying organisms (termites, etc.), cockroaches, rodents, pesticides, fungus, treated lumber, Chinese drywall, mercury, or carbon monoxide. 

Cost Figures: Any cost figures should be from your contractor. You can go to HomeAdvisor or another web source for some average cost-to-cure prices for your area. It is recommended that a budget of roughly one percent of the value of the home be set aside annually to cover unexpected repairs and annual maintenance. It is further recommended that qualified, reputable contractors be consulted for specific quotations. You may find that contractor estimates vary dramatically from these figures, and from each other.  Contractors may also uncover defects not apparent at the time of the inspection, resulting in additional costs.  Please proceed cautiously. Should you have any questions regarding contractor opinions or quotations, please contact our office. Any work performed by a qualified homeowner or handyman will dramatically reduce costs. Please consult your inspector before you engage a contractor to correct a possible defect. Unless prior consultation occurs, this company cannot assist you further. No representation is made regarding any enclosed areas and/or possible concealed damage.

Inaccessible Areas: In the report, there may be specific references to areas and items that were inaccessible or only partly accessible. I can make no representations regarding conditions that may be present in these areas but were concealed or inaccessible for review. With access and an opportunity for inspection, reportable conditions or hidden damage may be found in these areas. 

Component Life Expectancy: Components may be listed as having no deficiencies at the time of inspection but may fail at any time due to their age or lack of maintenance, that couldn't be determined by the inspector. A general guild to life expectancy chart for the US can be viewed by visiting https://www.nachi.org/lifeexpectancy.htm 

Photographs: Several photos are included in your inspection report. These photos are for informational purposes only and do not attempt to show every instance or occurrence of a defect. 

Typographical Errors: This report is proofread before sending it out, but typographical errors may be present. If any errors are noticed, please feel free to contact the office for clarification. Please acknowledge to me once you have completed reading the report. At that time, I will be happy to answer any questions you may have or provide clarification. Anticipate ongoing maintenance as part of normal home ownership.

Contractors / Further Evaluations: It is recommended that licensed professionals be used for repair issues as it relates to the comments in this report, and copies of receipts are kept for warranty purposes. The use of the general term "qualified professional" in this report relates to an individual, company, or contractor whom is either licensed or certified in the field of concern. If warranted, we may recommend a "specialist" and/or evaluation or repairs by contractors or other licensed professionals, it is possible that they will discover additional problems since they will be invasive with their evaluation and repairs. Any listed items in this report concerning areas reserved for such experts should not be construed as a detailed, comprehensive, and / or exhaustive list of problems, or areas of concern. 

Causes of Damage / Methods of Repair: Any suggested causes of damage or defects, and methods of repair mentioned in this report are considered a professional courtesy to assist you in better understanding the condition of the home, and in my opinion only from the standpoint of a visual inspection and should not be wholly relied upon. Contractors or other licensed professionals will have the final determination on the causes of damage/deficiencies, and the best methods of repairs, due to being invasive with their evaluation. Their evaluation will supersede the information found in this report. All mechanical equipment should be maintained under contract and/or on a regular basis as prescribed by manufacturer.

Report Key: This report divides deficiencies into three categories; Major & Safety Concerns (in red), Recommendation (in orange), and Maintenance Items/FYI (colored in blue)

Major & Safety Concerns - Denotes a major improvement/recommendation that is significantly deficient or is unsafe and is uncommon for a home of this age or location and should be addressed as soon as possible. This is a potential or major structural, mechanical, safety, and/or health concern that can affect the home or occupants in the short term. These significant deficiencies need to be corrected and, except for some safety items, may involve significant expense.

Recommendation - Denotes a system or component which is missing or which needs corrective action to assure proper and reliable function. Repairs and/or improvements may or may not be necessary as desired by the client. These improvements normally do not represent a major or significant structural, mechanical, safety, and/or health concern and would not represent a significant problem and/or a real and present danger.

Maintenance Items/FYI - Denotes a system or component which was found in need recurring or basic general maintenance and/or may need simple repairs which may improve their functionality. Also included in this section are items that were at the end of their typical service life or beginning to show signs of wear, but were in the opinion of the inspector, still functional at the time of inspection. These repairs or replacement costs can sometimes represent a major expense; i.e. HVAC systems, Water Heaters, etc.

These categorizations are in my professional judgement and based on what I observed at the time of inspection. This categorization should not be construed as to mean that items designated as "Maintenance Item" do not need repairs or replacement. The recommendations in each comment is more important than its categorization. Due to "your perception", opinions, or personal experience you may feel that "Additional Information" comments belong in a different categories, and you should feel free to consider the importance you believe they hold during your purchasing decision. Once again, it's the "Recommendations" in the text of the comment pertaining to each comment that is paramount, not its categorical placement.

The Standards: The Standards of Practice are abbreviated with your report in a summary form. The complete Standard's of Practice along with our Code of Ethics is attached as a booklet for your further review. It is our recommendation your read this booklet in its entirety and call if you should have a question. There is no representation made in this report as to the conclusion of environmental analysis, if performed, such as air quality (radon gas levels, pollution or noxious gases); or the quality of water and/or soil.  A full spectrum of environmental testing is available and includes:  radon, mold, etc.  With exception to those mentioned as performed in this report, the remaining tests were not performed.

Detached Item(s): Appurtenance Not Inspected. Only items and components directly and permanently attached to the structure are inspected according to the Standards of Practice. Most of these items are only required to be reported on with their respected effect on the structure. This home may contain detached patios, stairs, retaining walls, outbuildings, decks, pools, fireplaces, etc. Some components inside the home or not inspected for example, sauna's and hot tub's. If comments are made about these items, any comments should be viewed as a courtesy only, and not be construed as an all-inclusive listing of deficiencies. If any detached items or structures are of concern, evaluation of these items should be conducted by qualified individuals prior to the end of your inspection period. The garage closest to the home will be inspected. Separate, secondary garages and other buildings are not inspected if present. Pool and/or spa areas are not inspected if present. These are NOT included within the scope of this inspection. If a pool/spa is present, complete re-evaluation of pool/spa areas will be necessary to determine its structural and operational conditions. This will require opening and starting of pool/spa if winterized. Consider contacting qualified pool/spa company to evaluate pool/spa as necessary.

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client
Style
Colonial, Two Story
Temperature (approximate)
81 Fahrenheit (F)
Type of Building
Detached, Single Family
Weather Conditions
Cloudy, Humid, Light Rain
Occupancy
Vacant

If the home vacant, it was not the primary residence of the owner and had not been used regularly for an extended time period. Plumbing fixtures have not been operated recently, so some conditions such as plumbing system leakage may not be apparent during the inspection. Recommend you have your agent inquire with the listing agent on any possible disclosures of water leaks or water damage when normal plumbing operations exist. We will inspect the property in its "as is" condition on the day of inspection.

Not Regularly Occupied

The home was not the primary residence of the owner and had not been used regularly for an extended time period. Plumbing fixtures have not been operated recently, so some conditions such as plumbing system leakage may not be apparent during the inspection.

Orientation - Cover Photo - Front of Home

For the sake of this inspection the front of the home will be considered as the portion pictured in the cover photo. References to the left, right and rear of the home should be construed as standing in the front yard, viewing the front of the home.

Average Construction, Needs Repairs & Maintenance

This is a home of average-quality construction. The home requires many repairs and maintenance. The repairs, maintenance, and improvements recommended in this report are common for a home of this age and type. All homes require maintenance, occasional repairs, and occasional system improvements.

2 - Roof

IN NI NP AI
2.1 Coverings X X
2.2 Roof Drainage Systems X X
2.3 Flashings X
2.4 Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations X X
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Flashings: Material
Not Visible
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Aluminum, Built In At Eave (Box)
Roof Section Introduction

The primary purpose of a roof is to protect the building from rain, snow, sun and wind. Roofs also affect the appearance of a building. Roofs provide some mechanical protection against falling objects, although hail damage for example, can be an issue. Roof coverings are not intended to keep out the cold. Most roofs are very poor insulators.

Inspection Method
Binoculars, Ground, Window
General Comment Roof Limitations

The roof inspection portion of the General Home Inspection will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified roofing contractor. Because of variations in installation requirements of the huge number of different roof-covering materials installed over the years, the General Home Inspection does not include confirmation of proper installation. Home Inspectors are trained to identify common deficiencies and to recognize conditions that require evaluation by a specialist. Inspection of the roof typically includes visual evaluation of the roof structure, roof-covering materials, flashing, and roof penetrations when assemble. The roof inspection does not include leak-testing and will not certify or warranty the roof against future leakage. Other limitations may apply and will be included in the comments as necessary.

Coverings: Material
Asphalt Shingles -, 3-tab Shingle, Rolled Roofing
Coverings: Roof - 16-20 Years Old

The roofing is in fair condition for its age in need of repair. We did see evidence of active leaks and the need for immediate repair. Based on the visual evidence, this main roof appears to be in late mid life, about 16-20 years old. The life expectancy of roof like this is about 20-25+ years. Prediction of when, how or where a leak will develop anywhere is beyond the scope of a visual home.

Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations: Chimney(s)

Masonary

Roof Not Walked

The roof was not safe to walk due to height, steepness, or slippery conditions. The inspector will not endanger himself for any reason. We only walk roofs when it is safe to do so.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Coverings

Shingles Missing
Exterior Left Side

Observed areas that appeared to be missing sufficient coverings. Recommend qualified roofing contractor evaluate & repair. 

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Box Gutter Issue
Exterior Left Side, Right Side

Box gutters require yearly maintenance to be cleaned and inspected by roof contractor. Box gutters are in failure and need further evaluated and repaired or replaced. Active leaks noted.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Skylights, Chimneys & Other Roof Penetrations

Chimney Cap Missing

Chimney Cap
Example
No chimney cap was observed. This is important to protect from moisture intrusion and protect the chimney. Recommend a qualified roofer or chimney expert install. Repair any loose mortar and bricks at that time.

Contractor Qualified Professional

3 - Exterior

IN NI NP AI
3.1 Siding, Flashing & Trim X X
3.2 Exterior Doors X X
3.3 Walkways, Patios & Driveways X X
3.4 Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps X X
3.5 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X
3.6 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls X X
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Aluminum
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Style
Batten
Exterior Doors: Exterior Entry Door
Hinged
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Concrete, Wood
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Type
Closed
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Surface Drainage
Level Grade, Graded Towards House
Exterior Section Introduction

Inspection of the home exterior typically includes visual inspection from the ground: exterior wall covering materials, window and door exteriors, adequate surface drainage, driveway and walkways, window wells, exterior electrical components, exterior plumbing component, and retaining wall conditions that may affect the home structure. The exterior components of a building work together to provide a weather-tight skin, if all the parts are doing their job. Protection against intruders, both animal and human, is also offered by the building skin. Good exteriors are attractive, durable and require little maintenance. Exterior components are often the most neglected parts of a home. It should be noted that the exterior of this structure and common areas including any and all mechanical equipment will require continual maintenance.

Inspection Method
Visual
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway Material
Gravel, Concrete
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Front Porch, Deck with Steps

Only items and components directly and permanently attached to the structure are inspected according to the Standards of Practice. Most of these items are only required to be reported on with their respected effect on the structure. This home may contain detached patios, stairs, retaining walls, outbuildings, decks, pools, fireplaces, etc. Some components inside the home or not inspected for example, saunas and hot tubs. If comments are made about these items, any comments should be viewed as a courtesy only, and not be construed as an all-inclusive listing of deficiencies. If any detached items or structures are of concern, evaluation of these items should be conducted by qualified individuals prior to the end of your inspection period. The garage closest to the home will be inspected. Separate, secondary garages and other buildings are not inspected if present. Pool and/or spa areas are not inspected if present. These are NOT included within the scope of this inspection. If a pool/spa is present, complete re-evaluation of pool/spa areas will be necessary to determine its structural and operational conditions. This will require opening and starting of pool/spa if winterized. Consider contacting qualified pool/spa company to evaluate pool/spa as necessary.

Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenances NOT Inspected
Pool

Detached Item(s): Appurtenances Not Inspected. Any items noted above, are in our option, are an appurtenance. Only items and components directly and permanently attached to the structure are inspected according to the Standards of Practice. Most of these items are only required to be reported on with their respected effect on the structure. This home may contain detached patios, stairs, retaining walls, outbuildings, decks, pools, fireplaces, etc. Some components inside the home or not inspected for example, sauna and hot tubs. If comments are made about these items, any comments should be viewed as a courtesy only, and not be construed as an all-inclusive listing of deficiencies. If any detached items or structures are of concern, evaluation of these items should be conducted by qualified individuals prior to the end of your inspection period. The garage closest to the home will be inspected. Separate, secondary garages and other buildings are not inspected if present. Pool and/or spa areas are not inspected if present. These are NOT included within the scope of this inspection. If a pool/spa is present, complete re-evaluation of pool/spa areas will be necessary to determine its structural and operational conditions. This will require opening and starting of pool/spa if winterized. Consider contacting qualified pool/spa company to evaluate pool/spa as necessary.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Ground Clearance
Exterior Front

Inadequate clearance between siding and ground. Recommend a minimum ground clearance between bottom of siding and ground of 6". Siding in contact with the ground or soil is a serious concern because that condition can provide direct access for wood destroying insects. Recommend this be corrected by a qualified professional.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Loose Siding Panels
Front

One or more siding panels were loose, which could result in moisture intrusion. Recommend a qualified siding contractor secure and fasten.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Wood Rot Trim
Exterior Front

Localized rot was observed. Improvement is not necessary at present, although this condition should be repaired when exterior painting or maintenance are planned.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Exterior Doors

Wood Rot
Exterior Rear Basement

Rotten wood around exterior door. Door needs repaired or replaced.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Possible Trip Hazard
Front Exterior

Possible trip hazards observed. Patch or repair recommended.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.4.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Porch - Rotted Boards
Front/Rear Exterior Porch

One or more boards are showing signs of rot. Recommend a qualified professional replace all damaged boards.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.2 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Stairs - Deteriorated
Exterior Rear

The exterior stairs are deteriorated. Recommend qualified contractor evaluate & repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.3 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Handrail Loose
Exterior Front

Loose handrail needs repaired or replaced. Recommend qualified contractor evaluate & repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.4 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Handrail Spaces
Exterior Rear

Spaces between handrail assembly balusters exceeded 4 3/8 inches at the open side of this exterior staircase and 6 inches at the steps. Generally-accepted modern safety standards dictate that a sphere may not pass through the handrail at any point. This condition may be hazardous to small children. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.4.5 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Porch Support Posts
Front Exterior

Foundation posts supports for the porch roof appeared to be damaged at the time of the inspection at base of posts. Consult with a qualified contractor to discuss options and costs for correction.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Negative or Flat Grading
Various Location

Grading is flat or sloping towards the home in some areas. This could lead to water intrusion and over the long term, foundation issues. Recommend qualified landscaper or grading contractor regrade so water flows away from home.

Here is a helpful article discussing negative grading. 

Triangle Grading Contractor

4 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

IN NI NP AI
4.1 Foundation X X
4.2 Basements & Crawlspaces X X
4.3 Floor Structure X
4.4 Wall Structure X
4.5 Ceiling Structure X
4.6 Roof Structure & Attic X
Inspection Method
Attic Access, Visual, Basement Access
Foundation: Material
Masonry Block
Basements & Crawlspaces: Inspection Method
Visual
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Concrete
Ceiling Structure: Type

Wood

Roof Structure & Attic: Material
Dimensional Lumber
Roof Structure & Attic: Type
Gable
Floor Structure: Material
Steel Post, Wood Beams
Floor Structure: Sub-floor
Plank
Structural Section Introduction

The structure of a home is the skeleton, which includes the foundations and footings as well as the floors, walls, and roof. Structures are judged by how well they are able to stand still. Successful structures do not move; unsuccessful ones do, sometimes dramatically. Consult with a licensed water proofing contractor before closing to further address any potential water issue what may be hidden from the inspector at time of inspection.

Wall Structure: No Access

This area was not inspect. No access observed at time of the inspection.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
Credit
Comment
4.1.1 - Foundation

Water Intrusion
Unfinished Basement Front

Past water intrusion was evident on the surface of the floor slab or in the basement/crawlspace. Recommend a qualified contractor identify the source of moisture and remedy. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Basements & Crawlspaces

Efflorescence
Unfinished Basement

Efflorescence noted on the surface. This a white, powdery deposit that is consistent with moisture intrusion. This can compromise the soil's ability to support the home structure and/or lead to possibly moisture issues in the right circumstances over time. Review exterior section for more information. Recommend a qualified contractor identify source or moisture and correct. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Basements & Crawlspaces

Poor Ventilation

This area has generally poorly ventilated. Increased ventilation (introduction and movement of fresh air) is recommended. Mold can be an issue anytime there is poor ventilation. This is not a mold inspection. This can be best accomplished by installing a dehumidifier to decrease moisture. Consider a high capacity unit (75+ gallons daily) by a contractor trained in dehumidification. Web based information.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.3 - Basements & Crawlspaces

Debris Removal

Debris accumulated in the basement should be removed before the final walk-through.

Wrenches Handyman

5 - Heating

IN NI NP AI
5.1 Equipment X X
5.2 Normal Operating Controls X
5.3 Distribution Systems X
5.4 Presence of Installed Heat Source in Each Room X
Equipment: Brand
Lennox
Equipment: Energy Source
Natural Gas
Equipment: Heat Type
Forced Air
Normal Operating Controls: Type

Thermostat

Distribution Systems: Ductwork
Non-insulated
Equipment: Approx. Age Of Heating Unit
21

That type of heating unit has a typical life expectancy of 20 to 25 years.

Heating Section Introduction

The purpose of a heating system is obvious. How well a heating system performs is not so obvious. A well-designed heating system is large enough to provide adequate heat on the coldest day, is reliable, is inexpensive to install and operate (efficient), is quick to respond to its controls, can heat all parts of the home equally or deferentially, and is safe. There is no one heating system that performs all of these functions perfectly. The general home inspection does not include any type of heating system warranty or guarantee. Inspection of heating systems is limited to basic evaluation based on visual examination and operation using normal controls. Report comments are limited to identification of common requirements and deficiencies. Observed indications that further evaluation is needed will result in referral to a qualified heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) contractor. The Inspector specifically disclaims furnace heat exchanges because proper evaluation requires invasive, technically exhaustive measures that exceed the scope of the General Home Inspection. Recommend placing all heating unit(s) under a service contract to receive regularly scheduled maintenance.

AFUE Rating
90+

AFUE (Annual fuel utilization efficiency) is a metric used to measure furnace efficiency in converting fuel to energy. A higher AFUE rating means greater energy efficiency. 90% or higher meets the Department of Energy's Energy Star program standard.

Balance Not Determined

While we do check for the presence of a heat source in habitable areas, the adequacy of heat level and heat distribution balance are not determined during a home inspection. (This work requires heat loss calculations and an extensive building survey that is normally performed when the initial heating capacity is selected.)

Off Season Test

Although the heating system was operated, there are significant testing limitations at this time of year.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Equipment

Heating System Aging
21 Years Old

As is not uncommon for homes of this age and location, the heating system is older. It may require a slightly higher level of maintenance and may be more prone to major component breakdown. Have unit serviced now and yearly thereafter is advised. Predicting the frequency or time frame for repairs on any mechanical device is virtually impossible. This type of heating system generally has a lifespan of 20 to 25 years of useful life.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Distribution Systems

Duct Damaged
Unfinished Basement

Air supply duct was noticeably rusting. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor repair.

Fire HVAC Professional

6 - Cooling

IN NI NP AI
6.1 Cooling Equipment X X
6.2 Normal Operating Controls X
6.3 Distribution System X
6.4 Presence of Installed Cooling Source in Each Room X
Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric, Central Air Conditioner
Cooling Equipment: Location
Exterior, Part of HVAC Unit
Cooling Equipment: Approx. Age Of Cooling Unit
21

That type of cooling unit has a typical life expectancy of 18 to 25 years.

Normal Operating Controls: Type

Thermostat

Cooling Equipment: Brand
Lennox
Cooling Section Introduction

There are many types of air conditioning and heat pump systems; however, they all work on the same principle. They move heat from a relatively cool space to a relatively warm space. In the summer, they take heat from the house air and transfer it to the exterior. This heat may be transferred to the outside air, a body of water, or into the ground. In the heating season, heat pumps reverse the process, moving heat from the outside air, ground, or water, into the air inside the home. Inspection of home cooling systems typically includes visual examination of readily observable permanent components for adequate condition, and system testing for proper operation using normal controls. Cooling system inspection will not be as comprehensive as that performed by a qualified heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system contractor. The general home inspection does not include any type of cooling system warranty or guarantee. Report comments are limited to identification of common requirements and deficiencies. The General Home Inspection does not include confirming uniform temperature distribution throughout the home by the cooling system. In multiple-story homes a temperature gradient will often exist, with upper floors being warmer than lower floors. You should ask the seller about this condition, keeping in mind that individuals often have their own perceptions of what constitutes adequate performance of the cooling system. Observed indications that further evaluation is needed will result in referral to a qualified HVAC contractor.

Balance Not Determined

While we do check for the presence of a cooling source in habitable areas when not blocked by storage, the adequacy of cooling level and heat distribution balance are not determined during a home inspection. (This work requires heat loss calculations and an extensive building survey that is normally performed when the initial cooling capacity is selected.)

Temperature Gradients

The General Home Inspection does not include confirming uniform temperature distribution throughout the home by the cooling system. In multiple-story homes a temperature gradient will often exist, with upper floors being warmer than lower floors. You should ask the seller about this condition, keeping in mind that individuals often have their own perceptions of what constitutes adequate performance of the cooling system.

Disclaimer

Short limited testing of the cooling was  performed. This was a limited inspection of home cooling systems and typically includes visual examination of readily observable components for adequate condition, and system testing for proper operation using normal controls. Cooling system inspection will not be as comprehensive as that performed by a qualified heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system contractor. Report comments are limited to identification of common requirements and deficiencies. Observed indications that further evaluation is needed will result in referral to a qualified HVAC contractor.

Cooling Equipment: SEER Rating
10

Modern standards call for at least 13 SEER rating for new install. 

Read more on energy efficient air conditioning at Energy.gov.

Cooling Equipment: Normal Temperature Drop

Upon testing in the air conditioning mode, a normal temperature drop across the venting system was observed. This suggests that the system is operating properly.

Distribution System: Configuration
Split

The air conditioning system was a split system in which the cabinet housing the compressor, cooling fan and condensing coils was located physically apart from the evaporator coils. As is typical with split systems, the compressor/condenser cabinet was located at the home's exterior so that the heat collected inside the home could be released to the outside air. Evaporator coils designed to collect heat from the home interior were located inside a duct at the furnace and were not directly visible.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Cooling Equipment

AC System Aging
20 Years Old

As is not uncommon for homes of this age and location, the air-conditioning system is older. It may require a slightly higher level of maintenance and may be more prone to major component breakdown. Have unit serviced now and yearly service thereafter is advised. Predicting the frequency or time frame for repairs on any mechanical device is virtually impossible. Air-conditioning systems in our area have an average lifespan of about 18 to 25 years of usefulness.

Fire HVAC Professional

7 - Plumbing

IN NI NP AI
7.1 Main Water Shut-off Device X
7.2 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X X
7.3 Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures X
7.4 Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents X X
7.5 Gas Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems X X
7.6 Sump Pump X
Water Source
Visual Inspection, Public
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Supply Material
Copper
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Power Source/Type
Gas
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Capacity
40 gal
Sump Pump: Location
N/A
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
Basement
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material
Iron, PVC
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Location
Basement
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Approx. Age Of Hot Water Tank
9

Water heaters have a typical life expectancy of 7 to 12 years.

Plumbing Section Introduction

The purpose of a house plumbing system is twofold. On the supply side, the idea is to get water for drinking, washing and cooking to the appropriate areas of the house. The waste side of the plumbing system gets rid of liquid and solid waste. The supply water is under pressure and the waste water flows by gravity. Serviced communities provide the fresh supply water and carry away the waste. In rural properties, wells, rivers or lakes supply fresh water and septic systems typically handle the waste. The majority of the piping in a home, both supply and waste, is concealed in walls, ceilings and underground. Leakage, obstructions, or other problems may not be identified during an inspection. The plumbing system is inspected visually and by operating fixtures. Private water and waste systems are beyond the scope of a home inspection. Much of the plumbing system is hidden behind the walls of the home. The home inspector performs a visual inspection of the exposed supply and waste distribution piping and fixtures, reporting any defects found in the system. Label all plumbing valves for identification purposes.

Sinks toilets and tubs
2nd Floor Bath Rm/ Kitchen
Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents: Manufacturer
Bradford & White

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding. 

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help. 

Gas Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Main Gas Shut-off Location
Gas Meter, Exterior

Since gas was utilized as a fuel in structure, and this type of equipment/fuel presents certain hazards, it is advised to have equipment periodically serviced and checked for proper operation. Our service does not include a representative regarding absence or presence of underground storage tanks. Advise obtaining written representation from present owner regarding this matter.

Water Off
2nd Floor Toilet

The water was turned off at the time of the inspection. This condition will limit inspection of the plumbing system and may affect portions of other systems. Due to the potential for damage from leaking pipes, the inspector does not open main water shut-off valves whether outside or inside.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
Credit
Comment
7.2.1 - Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems

Drain Stop
2nd Floor Bath Rm

A drain stop was not operational or missing. Recommend a qualified professional install a working drain stop. All stops should have a strainer, a pop-up stopper, a crossbar, or other mechanism to prevent items such as rings and cosmetic items from dropping into the drain.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.4.1 - Hot Water Systems, Controls, Flues & Vents

Water Tank Older - Aged 7-12
9 Years Old

Water heaters have a typical life expectancy of 7 to 12 years. The existing unit is in this age range. One cannot predict with certainty when replacement will become necessary.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Gas Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems

Gas Meter Leaning
Exterior Rear

Gas meter is not fully supported. Recommend contacting utility company for details to see if additional support is necessary.

Contractor Qualified Professional

8 - Electrical

IN NI NP AI
8.1 Service Entrance Conductors X
8.2 Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device X X
8.3 Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses X X
8.4 Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles X
8.5 GFCI X
8.6 AFCI X
8.7 Smoke Detectors X
8.8 Carbon Monoxide Detectors X
8.9 Natural Gas Detector X
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Manufacturer
Crouse-Hinds
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Sub Panel Location
N/A
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Material
Copper, Not All Visible
Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses: Wiring Method
Knob & Tube, Romex, Not Visible
AFCI: Not Present Panel
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Overhead

Electrical Section Introduction

Electricity has become an important element of every home. It provides lighting, heating and power for electric motors and electronics such as controls and computers. Our homes would not be nearly as comfortable or as convenient without electricity. On the other hand, electricity is dangerous. It has to be installed and used properly to be safe. Electricity is tricky because it is invisible, it is complicated and it can kill. The inspector can't inspect hidden wiring or verify if the number of outlets is per a code inspection. A representative number of outlets, switches and fixtures are tested for operation. Many areas can be in use or blocked by homeowners belongings. Exterior accent wiring is not part of a home inspection. Switches are sometimes connected to fixtures that require specialized conditions, such as darkness or movement, to respond. Switches sometimes are connected to electrical receptacles (and sometimes only the top or bottom half of an receptacle). Because outlets are often inaccessible and because including the checking of both halves of every electrical outlet in the home exceeds the Standards of Practice and are not included in a typical General Home Inspection price structure, and functionality of all switches in the home may not be confirmed by the inspector.

Important Safety Notice

Important Safety Notice: 

  • Your inspector does not remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts to look for issues.
  • Any and all electrical concerns listed in this report should be considered an important item as they can present a risk of fire or shock. If noted these items should receive high priority for action by a licensed electrician.
  • Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST) is a type of stainless steel piping used to supply gas to some appliances. If noted in your report, or if you are thinking about using CSST, you should be aware of some necessary safety precautions, including the importance of ensuring that CSST is properly bonded and grounded. A licensed electrician should inspect the CSST to confirm proper bonding and grounding. Web source information.
General Age - Visual Inspection
Pre 1940's, 1980 up to 2005, Combination

You probably don't think about the lifespan of the various components of your home's electrical system until the power goes out. If the rest of the neighborhood hasn't blacked out, it might cross your mind something in your house has failed.

The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) has expanded on a report by the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and compiled a list of the life expectancies for key components of residential electrical systems. 

WIRING - Electrical system is the wiring. Both NACHI and NAHB agree that copper wiring can last 100 years or more. But the real life expectancy of your wiring is not in the copper; it's dependent on the wiring's insulation, and that lifetime can vary.

SERVICE PANELS - According to the NACHI chart, service panels have an average life expectancy of 60 years, though the lifetime of a panel can vary. Corrosion from a humid location or excessive dust can shorten its life. Some insurance company's will only insure a modern style panel.

BREAKERS - United States Consumer Product Safety Commission says circuit breakers, have a lifetime of about 40 years.


Updated Electrical Panel 200

The main panel has upgraded. Most older homes only used enough electricity to need 100 amps, but modern equipment often requires as many as 200 amps. Homeowners who upgrade can install new devices and appliances without the fear of running out of juice or breaking their system. This is a 200 amp main panel.

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Main Panel Location
Basement

Your inspector does not remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. This is a visual inspection only. If your inspector makes ANY noted concerns about ANYTHING involving the panel(s), have a licensed electrician further evaluate your system within your inspection contract time period for a full system inspection for latent and/or hidden defects.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Daylight Hours Inspection

As this inspection was conducted during daylight hours, the effectiveness of exterior lighting could not be determined. Repair existing or add where necessary for safety.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Grounding
Not Grounded (generally before 1965), Most if Not All Appear to Have Been Updated

The purpose of grounding is to give electricity a safe place to go if it gets out of control. When people touch live electrical things, they get an electrical shock. Grounding helps prevent that. Until roughly the mid 1960, grounding was only found at the service panel. Since then, it has been used on all branch circuits, including lights and electrical outlets. A ground wire is a wire that provides a safe path for stray electricity. Generally speaking, the grounding wires are connected to metallic parts of an electrical system that are not supposed to carry electricity. These metal components (panels, switch boxes, light boxes, etc.), are close to electricity, and if something goes wrong, the metal cabinet could become live. A person touching the cabinet would get a shock. Connecting the ground wire to the metal cabinet ensures that if someone touches the cabinet, he or she will not get a shock, even if a live wire inside is touching the cabinet. This is not a code inspection, homes built before the mid 1960's aren't general required to be upgraded to the latest electrical technology.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: # of Conductors
Both 2 & 3

The home's branch circuit wiring consists of wiring distributing electricity to devices such as switches, receptacles, and appliances. Most conductors are hidden behind floor, wall and ceiling coverings and cannot be evaluated by the inspector. The Inspector does not remove cover plates and inspection of branch wiring is limited to proper response to testing of switches and a representative number of electrical receptacles.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Types
Romex/Vinyl, Knob-and-tube wiring

Conduit - Electrical conduit is durable tubing or other type of enclosure used to protect and provide a route for electrical wiring. Conduit is typically required where wiring would be exposed or where it might be subject to damage. Conduit can be made of metal or plastic and may be rigid or flexible.

Romex/Cloth - Electricity in the home was distributed through older wiring insulated with cloth.

Romex/Vinyl - The visible branch circuit wiring was modern vinyl-insulated copper wire.

Armored Cables (BX) - AC wiring has a flexible metallic sheathing that allows for extra protection.

Knob-and-tube Wiring - Most houses constructed prior to World War II were wired using the knob-and-tube method. Knob-and-tube wiring is supported with ceramic knobs and runs intermittently though ceramic tubes beneath framing and at locations where the wires intersect. Any knob-and-tube wiring that is exposed during renovations should be replaced.

Solid Aluminum - Conductor branch circuit wiring is a potential hazard. The Inspector recommends that you have the entire electrical system evaluated.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Most Outlets OK

At the time of the inspection, the Inspector observed some deficiencies in the condition of electrical receptacles. Notable exceptions will be listed in this report. In accordance with the Standards of Practice, the inspector tested a representative number of accessible outlets and switches.

GFCI: Information

The ground-fault circuit interrupter, or GFCI, is a modern type of outlet or breaker and is a fast-acting and designed to shut off electric power in the event of a ground-fault within as little as 1/40 of a second. It works by comparing the amount of current going to and returning from equipment along the circuit conductors. This protection was required in new construction in the 1970's. Link here to learn more.

GFCI: Some GFCI - Home <1971

Some areas did have ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection on recommended electrical receptacles. Other areas would benefit if upgrading to provide GFCI protection for safety reasons, the Inspector suggest that electrical receptacles located in unfinished basements, crawlspaces, garages, the home exterior, and interior receptacles located within 6 feet of a plumbing fixture be provided with ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection in good working order to avoid potential electric shock or electrocution hazards. Refer to link for additional information. Link here to learn more.

AFCI: Information

AFCI or "Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters" are the latest in electrical safety devices for dwellings. AFCI standards were introduced in the 1999 NEC (National Electrical Code) and may have been required in new dwelling construction and when installing, extending or updating new circuits in an existing dwelling after 2002. AFCI and GFCI protection devices may look similar, but perform very different functions to protect against different dangers. An arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) is an advanced circuit breaker or outlet that, as a way to reduce electrical fire threats, breaks the circuit when it detects a dangerous electric arc in the circuit that it protects. The first National Electrical Code (NEC) requirement for AFCIs was released in 1999, requiring them to be installed to protect the circuits feeding bedrooms in new homes in 2002. In 2008, and again in 2014, the NEC was expanded to require AFCIs to be installed on circuits to more and more rooms in homes, now covering virtually all rooms; bedrooms, family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, sunrooms, kitchens, dens, home offices, hallways, recreation rooms, laundry rooms, and even closets. We do NOT perform a code inspection. Difference areas of the Country have different rules on what is required and what is suggested. It is never a bad idea to update to the safest, newest breaker/outlet system. Consult a electrical contractor if upgrading your home to the most currant modern breakers/outlets is important to you. Web source of information.

Smoke Detectors: Information
Present

(Safety note: Smoke detectors and similar warning devices were not tested for proper operation. You should do this on first occupancy and monthly thereafter)

Smoke alarms are recommended for each sleeping room and (1) outside of each sleeping room(s), and one per level including habitable attics and basements. I recommend testing the smoke alarms before spending your first night in the home, and monthly thereafter. Several other recommendations relating to smoke alarms and fire safety are recommended by the NFPA, and can be found here: http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/by-topic/smoke-alarms/installing-and-maintaining-smoke-alarms

Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Information
Absent

(Safety note: Smoke detectors and similar warning devices were not tested for proper operation. You should do this on first occupancy and monthly thereafter)

Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors are recommended to be installed outside of each sleeping area, in the area(s) of any gas appliances, and any fireplace(s). CO alarms are recommended if any gas appliances are present in the home or if the home contains a garage. More information about CO detectors and there requirements can be found here:

https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Fire-and-life-safety-equipment/Carbon-monoxide

Natural Gas Detector: Information
Absent

(Safety note: Natural gas detectors and similar warning devices were not tested for proper operation. You should do this on first occupancy and monthly thereafter)

Natural gas alarms are recommended if any gas appliances are present in the home.

Natural gas detectors can be purchased that are specific for natural gas detection only or there are multi-gas units available on the market that detect natural gas, carbon monoxide (CO) and propane. Units that detect CO only are not eligible for the rebate. Install your natural gas detectors in locations close to sources of natural gas -- like any room with windows or a gas appliance, your kitchen and your basement. Honeywell, a leading gas detector manufacturer, recommends placing your detector higher than all doors and windows and about 6 inches from the ceiling and within about 10 feet of the appliance. Natural gas detectors are recommended on each floor of the home. More information about detectors and there requirements can be found here:

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/place-put-natural-gas-detector-86604.html

Electrical Covers Not Removed
Electrical Panels - Various Location

Your inspector does not remove electrical panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. This is a visual inspection only. Their may be latent and/or hidden defects hidden.

Main & Subpanels, Service & Grounding, Main Overcurrent Device: Breakers Off
Main panel

One breaker is in off position. The circuit were not inspected. Inquiring with the seller or have an electrician Identify the circuit and what it does.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

K & T: Poor Connections
Attic

Poor connections between newer wiring and the old knob-and-tube wiring were observed. All connections of this type should be performed within junction boxes fitted with cover plates. A qualified, licensed electrician should be consulted to undertake the repairs recommended.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.3.2 - Branch Wiring Circuits, Breakers & Fuses

Exposed Electrical Splices
Attic

Exposed wire splices visible and are a hazard and should be enclosed within an approved junction box with a proper cover by a qualified electrical contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Older 2 Prong Outlet(s)
Exterior Front, Laundry Rm

The old 2 prong outlet(s) are generally considered older and should be upgraded due to their age. Reproduction outlets of this type are now approved and available for purchase. Of course upgrading to new wiring with a ground fault circuit interrupter outlet in wet areas would be the most prudent course of action. Consult your electrical contractor for addional information. Web source information here.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.4.2 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Outlets Few
Various Location

The number of electrical receptacles in the home was inadequate by modern standards. Depending on your planned use of the home, you may wish to consult with a qualified electrical contractor to discuss options and costs for the installation of additional receptacles.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - GFCI

GFCI Suggested <1971
Unfinished Basement/ Exterior/ Laundry Rm

Safety standards have changed over the years. The installation of a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) is suggested at all locations that have a water source, i.e., kitchen, bathrooms, exterior, basement, and garages etc.. A GFCI offers increased protection from shock or electrocution.

Contractor Qualified Professional

9 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

IN NI NP AI
9.1 Attic Insulation X X
9.2 Vapor Retarders (Attic) X
9.3 Ventilation X X
9.4 Exhaust Systems X X
Dryer Vent
Missing
Flooring Insulation (from basement and/or crawl)
Batt, Loose Fill
Vapor Retarders (Attic): Observed
Not Inspected
Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Gable Vents, Roof Vents

Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans
Bathroom
Dryer Power Source
220 Electric
Attic Insulation: Type
Loose-fill, Batt
Attic, Insulation & Ventilation Section Introduction

The importance of insulation depends on where you live. Homes in WV, OH, PA, benefit more from insulation than homes in the south. Different regions have different strategies to deal with moisture movement and ventilation. Poorly insulated homes are expensive to heat but may be comfortable. Almost any house can be warm if the thermostat is set high enough. Some attics are hard to navigated; levels of insulation, HVAC ductwork, framing, lack of walking boards, and other factors can prevent physical and visual accessibility of some areas and items. The amount of the attic that was able to be safely and visually inspected will be listed as an approximate percentage. Insulation is not moved or disturbed for visual accessibility of items. The inspection of this area is limited to visual portions only. Any areas that were not visible are excluded from this inspection. The Inspector disclaims confirmation of adequate attic ventilation year-round performance but will comment on the apparent adequacy of the system as experienced by the inspector on the day of the inspection. Attic ventilation is not an exact science and a standard ventilation approach that works well in one area but may not work well in another. The performance of a standard attic ventilation design system can vary even with different homesite locations and conditions or weather conditions within a single area. The biggest issue is moisture build-up from the "Stack Effect". Consult a pro if addional information is desired. The closet trained pro is Home Environment Solutions in Weirton WV.

Inspection Method
Attic Access
Approximate Percentage Inspected
80%
Limited Inspection

The Inspector disclaims confirmation of adequate attic ventilation year-round performance, but will comment on the apparent adequacy of the system as experienced by the inspector on the day of the inspection. Attic ventilation is not an exact science and a standard ventilation approach that works well in one type of climate zone may not work well in another. The performance of a standard attic ventilation design system can vary even with different homesite locations and conditions or weather conditions within a single climate zone. 

The typical approach is to thermally isolate the attic space from the living space by installing some type of thermal insulation on the attic floor. Heat that is radiated into the attic from sunlight shining on the roof is then removed using devices that allow natural air movement to carry hot air to the home exterior. This reduces summer cooling costs and increases comfort levels, and can help prevent roof problems that can develop during the winter such as the forming of ice dams along the roof eves.

Natural air movement is introduced by providing air intake vents low in the attic space and exhaust vents high in the attic space.  Thermal buoyancy (the tendency of hot air to rise) causes cool air to flow into the attic to replace hot air and flowing out the exhaust vents. Conditions that block ventilation devices, or systems and devices that are poorly designed or installed can reduce the system performance.

Attic Insulation: Approx. R Value and Thickness
R11 - 4-6 Inches

Install additional insulation if you have less than R-38 in your attic is suggested. Installing additional insulation to bring ceiling insulation levels in the home current with modern recommendations will help save on heating and cooling costs. The modern recommended minimum value for ceilings is R-38.

If your home has R-38 or more noted above, your are good shape. Mostly older homes build before 1975 can have insulation levels are relatively modest. Upgrading insulation levels in a home is an improvement rather than a necessary repair. Most old homes have relatively low levels of insulation. If you are in this camp, you are not alone, heating and/or cooling costs are higher. Improving insulation levels will reduce energy costs; however, the potential benefit should be carefully weighed against the cost of improvements. 

If your insulation is compromised, or you would like more information from a local pro who is trained on insulation issues, check out this link. The closest pro in our area is Home Environment Solutions of Weirton WV.

During any planned re-roofing, overhead insulation and ventilation levels should be investigated and improved where necessary. 

Caulking and weather-stripping around doors, windows and other exterior wall openings will help to maintain weather tightness and reduce energy costs. Rooms above garages tend to be cooler during winter months. 

Performing laboratory analysis on any substances is beyond the scope of this inspection. More sophisticated inspections and testing are available if you have special concerns regarding your Insulation type.

Attic Floored

Attic floor was covered and plywood which limited some of the inspections.

Vapor Retarders (Attic): Vapor barriers not Inspected

Vapor barriers could not be inspected.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Attic Insulation

Bypass Sealing Seggested
Attic Access Stairs

Bypasses are hidden air passageways that lead from the heated space into the attic. Because warm air rises, it continuously moves up the bypasses and escapes into the attic.

Common attic bypasses are located around chimneys, ceiling light fixtures, heating ducts, kitchen and bath exhaust fans, plumbing, electrical wires, dropped ceilings attic access ladder or hatch and soffits.

In addition to being a source of heat loss, bypasses also cause indoor moisture problems. Warm air leaking into the attic causes moisture to condense onto cool surfaces. This moisture can rot wood joists and reduce the effectiveness of your insulation. Moisture problems can become so bad it can even "rain" in your attic. Mold can develop when moisture is present. Consider thermal bypass ceiling when any improvements are done in the attic.

House construction Insulation Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Ventilation

Gable Vent Damaged
Attic Front/Rear

Gable vent was damaged, which could allow pests to enter. Recommend a qualified attic or ventilation contractor repair.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Exhaust Systems

Bathroom Vents Into Attic
Attic

Bathroom fan vents into the attic, which can cause moisture and mold issues. Recommend a qualified attic contractor property install exhaust fan to terminate to the exterior.

10 - Doors, Windows & Interior

IN NI NP AI
10.1 Doors X X
10.2 Windows X X
10.3 Floors X
10.4 Walls X X
10.5 Ceilings X X
10.6 Steps, Stairways & Railings X X
10.7 Countertops & Cabinets X
10.8 Environmental Issues - Interior X
10.9 Radon Gas Test X
Walls: Wall Material
Plaster, Gypsum Board, Wallpaper
Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Ceiling Tiles, Plaster
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Windows: Window Type
Thermal, Double-hung
Floors: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Linoleum, Hardwood
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Laminate
Doors, Windows & Interior Section Introduction

The interior of a home provides clues to structural issues and is often the area where water leakage is first noted. The interior finishes themselves reflect the overall building quality, and their condition indicates the level of maintenance. Each room should have an heat supply and electrical outlets. Doors and windows should operate properly. Home inspectors focus on function rather than appearance, and emphasis is placed on whether the room will work as it was intended. The home inspector does not comment on cosmetics. The interior of the home was inspected. A representative number of interior doors were inspected by operating them ensuring that they opened and closed properly, as well as latched properly without binding on jambs or the floor. The windows were inspected by operating a representative number (personal belongings may block accessibility to some). Their operation was tested, along with looking for damage, broken glass, failed seals, etc. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. The inspection did not involve moving furniture and inspecting behind furniture, area rugs or areas obstructed from view. We do not move carpets. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. It may not be possible to identify a failed seal during a home inspection. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report. Cosmetic deficiencies my be present and are typically not reported on. If these cosmetic deficiencies are a concern, evaluation and repairs as needed should be conducted by qualified trades people.

Windows: Window Manufacturer
Unknown, Old and Newer

Not every window is inspected during a general home inspection. There will be some windows not inspected. We inspect a representative number of windows within the home.

Environmental Issues - Interior: Asbestos Common Untill The 1970'S Note

Homes built before the 1970s, had many types of building products and insulation materials used that may contained asbestos. This can only be verified by laboratory analysis. The Environmental Protection Agency (E.P.A.) reports that asbestos represents a health hazard if friable (damaged, crumbling, or in any state that allows the release of fibers). If replacement of the suspected areas necessitates the removal of the asbestos containing insulation, a specialist should be engaged. If any sections of this insulation are indeed friable, or become friable over time, a specialist should be engaged. Further guidance is available from the E.P.A. Due to the age of construction, there may be other materials within the home that contain asbestos but are not identified by this inspection report. THE BEST THING TO DO WITH ASBESTOS MATERIAL IN GOOD CONDITION IS TO LEAVE IT ALONE!

Web source link.

Environmental Issues - Interior: Lead In Water(1988)/Paint(1978) Note

There is the potential for lead content in the drinking water within the home. Lead in water may have two sources; the piping system of the utility delivering water to the house and/or the solder used on copper pipes prior to 1988. This can only be confirmed by laboratory analysis. An evaluation of lead in water is beyond the scope of this inspection. For more information, consult the Environmental Protection Agency (E.P.A.) for further guidance and a list of testing labs in your area.

Lead based paint was in use until approximately 1978. According to the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, a lead hazard can be present in a house of this age. This can only be confirmed by laboratory analysis. An evaluation of lead in paint is beyond the scope of this inspection. For more information, consult the Environmental Protection Agency (E.P.A.) for further guidance and a list of testing labs in your area.

Environmental Issues - Interior: Radon Gas Note

Radon gas is a naturally occurring gas that is invisible, odorless and tasteless. A danger exists when the gas percolates through the ground and enters a tightly enclosed structure (such as a home). Long-term exposure to high levels of radon gas can cause cancer. The Environmental Protection Agency (E.P.A.) states that a radon reading of more than 4.0 picocuries per liter of air represents a health hazard. A radon evaluation is beyond the scope of this inspection (unless specifically requested). For more information, In WV and OH, call your inspector for testing information. (304) 830-3354. It is recommended that you test for radon every 2 years.

Environmental Issues - Interior: Carbon Monoxide Note

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that can result from a faulty fuel burning furnace, range, water heater, space heater, gas logs, attached garage or wood stove. Proper maintenance of these appliances is the best way to reduce the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. For more information, consult the Consumer Product Safety Commission at 1-800-638-2772 (C.P.S.C.) for further guidance. It would be wise to install carbon monoxide detectors within the home.

Radon Gas Test: Radon Gas Section Introduction

We, Mountain State Inspections LLC, DBA: Radon Solutions of WV, will not disclose to any other person, except to the appropriate State Departments, the address or owner of a nonpublic building that was tested for the presence of radon gas, unless the owner of the building waives, in writing, this right of confidentiality. Any test results disclosed shall be results of a test performed within the five years prior to the date of the disclosure.

If radon testing is performed for the purpose of a real estate transaction, permission is granted for Mountain State Inspections LLC, DBA: Radon Solutions of WV to disclose test results if asked, to both parties involved, regardless of the outcome of the real estate transaction and the appropriate State Departments.

This Report has General Limitations, as does any test:

There is an uncertainty with any measurement result due to statistical variations and other factors such as daily and seasonal variations in radon concentrations due to changes in the weather and operation of the dwelling as well as possible interference with the necessary test conditions that may or may not influence the results.

We recommend that the dwelling be retested in each of the following cases whether or not the dwelling has been mitigated:

Occupancy by a new owner

Two years since the previous test

A new addition is added

An alteration is made that could change the ventilation pattern

Major cracks or penetrations occur in the foundation walls or slab

Significant nearby construction blasting, or earthquakes occur

Changes are made or happen to an installed mitigation system

Occupation of a ground contact area that was not previously tested


Radon Risk Information

Your State, the US EPA and Surgeon General strongly recommend taking further action when a homes radon test results are 4.0 pCi/l or greater. 

The average indoor radon level is estimated to be about 1.3 pCi/L; roughly 0.4 pCi/L of radon is normally found in the outside air. The U.S. Congress has set a long-term goal that indoor radon levels be no more than outdoor levels. While this goal is not yet technologically achievable for all homes, radon levels in many homes can be reduced to 2 pCi/L or less. A radon level below 4 pCi/L still poses a risk. Consider fixing when the radon level is between 2 and 4 pCi/L. EPA 402/K-13/002 | March 2018 (revised)


Understanding Time-Sensitive Testing Protocols (buying or selling a home)

Fix the home if the average radon level is 4 pCi/L or more.

EPA 402/K-13/002 | March 2018 (revised)

Radon Gas Test: Indoor Test Location
Un-finished Basement
Radon Gas Test: Test Below 4.0 pCi/l - No Action

For time sensitive (real estate) tests:  When the test results are 4.0 pCi/l or greater, radon mitigation is recommended.  If the radon test result is less than 4.0 pCi/l the recommendation is to retest in two years or if any renovations or additions are made to the building.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - Doors

Door Doesn't Latch

Door doesn't latch properly. Recommend handyman repair latch and/or strike plate.
Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
10.2.1 - Windows

Failed Seal
2nd Floor Throughout

Observed condensation between the window panes, which indicates a failed seal. Recommend qualified window contractor further evaluate & replace. Windows also had broken springs damage components and some do not lock.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
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Comment
10.2.2 - Windows

Basement Windows Neglected
Exterior

As is very typical, the basement windows have been neglected. They should be repaired or replaced as desired. Wood/soil contact should be avoided to reduce insect and rot-damage risk.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Walls

Moisture Damage Shower
2nd Floor Bath Rm

Stains and damage on the walls visible at the time of the inspection appeared to be the result of moisture intrusion from shower. Recommend further examination and Repairs.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
10.4.2 - Walls

Water Stains Window
1st Floor Living Rm Right Side Rear

Stains and damage on the walls visible at the time of the inspection appeared to be the result of moisture intrusion from box gutters. Recommend further examination and Repairs.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
10.5.1 - Ceilings

Roof/Box Gutter Leaking Damage?
2nd Floor Bath Rm/ Kitchen

Stains on the ceiling appear to be the result of a possible leak and were dry at time of inspection. The insulation behind the ceiling tile in the kitchen showing signs of an active leak (elevated moisture meter readings). It is possible this stain could be from another moisture source besides the box gutters which were not draining properly and running down the side of the house. Damaged insulation needs removed. The source of leakage should be identified and corrected by a qualified professional, this will mean further investigation and the ceiling re-painted and monitored.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.6.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

No Handrail

Staircase had no handrails. This is a safety issue. Recommend a qualified carpenter repair and bring up to modern safety standards.

Hammer Carpentry Contractor

11 - Built-in Appliances

IN NI NP AI
11.1 Dishwasher X
11.2 Refrigerator X
11.3 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
11.4 Garbage Disposal X
11.5 Built-in Microwave X
Dishwasher: Brand
Whirlpool
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Vented
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
Whirlpool
Refrigerator: Brand
N/A
Older kitchen Appliances

The appliances are old units that are approaching the end of their serviceable life. While replacement is not needed right away, it would be wise to budget for new appliances. In the interim, a higher level of maintenance can be expected.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Electric

We spot check the temperature inside the oven only we do not inspect components such as fans, temperature set-points, etc. If you have a concern about the exact operation of your oven please have it serviced by an appliance technician.

Thermostats, timers and other specialized features and controls are not tested.

The effectiveness, efficiency and overall performance of appliances is outside the scope of this inspection.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information
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Comment
11.3.1 - Range/Oven/Cooktop

Range Old

The oven is an old unit. While replacement is not needed right away, it would be wise to budget for a new oven. In the interim, a higher level of maintenance can be expected.

Contractor Qualified Professional

12 - Wood Destroying Insects (WDI) Summary

IN NI NP AI
12.1 General X
12.2 Concerns X
12.3 Insects X
12.4 Past Treatment X
12.5 Damage X
12.6 Inspection Findings X
General: Scope of Work

This summary is a courtesy for our clients. Please read the attached NPMA-33 Form (report) on the wood destroying insect inspection in it entirety. This Is a visual non invasive inspection of the structure(s) and unobstructed areas, including attic(s) and Crawlspace(s) access permitted for visual evidence of wood destroying insects. If there are detached/multiple structures these can be added for an additional fee. If visual evidence is found, this will be noted and include photographic evidence, as well if necessary a recommendation for treatment options will need to be made to be executed by a certified pest management professional.
We (Mountain State Inspections LLC) do not provide estimates on the cost of such services, or for costs associated with damage from the wood destroying insects. We are however licensed to inspect properties for wood destroying insects.

Company License Numbers: WV C1656   OH 106322

Inspector License Numbers: Mark Bonar, WV C06754   OH 138698

Attached to this report will be the required NPMA-33 form.

Concerns: Areas (Exterior)
Under Front Porch

Conditions that are attractive to wood boring insects should be avoided since they can damage the property. These conditions include the storage of wood in damp environments, wood/soil contact around the perimeter of the home (decking, siding, etc.), damp soils, leaky roofs or downspouts, and uncontrolled ventilation spaces (roofs, garages, basements, crawl spaces, etc.). These areas should be addressed to prevent/ eliminate potential insect intrusion.

Insects: Evidence
No live visible evidence of active wood destroying insects observed. There are signs of past issues which are not current at this time., Old Damage

These areas should be addressed to prevent/ eliminate potential insect intrusion.

Past Treatment: Previous Treatment
No

If It appears that the residence and/or structures may have been previously treated, we will answer yes.

Damage: Visible Damage
Yes, There was cosmetic termite damage observed at time of inspection. Cosmetic repairs are suggested. Structural repair should not be need at this time.

This is not a structural damage report. There may be hidden damage present which was not visible at the time of inspection.

Inspection Findings: No Live Activity Observed

There was no active WDI activity observed in visible, accessible areas. Annual inspections are recommended as a preventative maintenance measure. We cannot represent the absence or presence of termites, other wood destroying insects or resulting damage within closed walls or sealed floors.

Form NPMA-33 - National Pest Management Association  -  Important Consumer Information Regarding the Scope and Limitations of the Inspection. Please read this entire page as it is part of this report. This report is not a guarantee or warranty as to the absence of wood destroying insects nor is it a structural integrity report. The inspectors training and experience do not qualify the inspector in damage evaluation or any other building construction technology and/or repair.

1. About the Inspection: A visual inspection was conducted in the readily accessible areas of the structure(s) indicated (see Page 1) including attics and crawlspaces which permitted entry during the inspection. The inspection included probing and/or sounding of unobstructed and accessible areas to determine the presence or absence of visual evidence of wood destroying insects. The WDI inspection firm is not responsible to repair any damage or treat any infestation at the structure(s) inspected, except as may be provided by separate contract. Also, wood destroying insect infestation and/or damage may exist in concealed or inaccessible areas. The inspection firm cannot guarantee that any wood destroying insect infestation and/or damage disclosed by this inspection represents all of the wood destroying insect infestation and/or damage which may exist as of the date of the inspection. For purposes of this inspection, wood destroying insects include: termites, carpenter ants, carpenter bees, and reinfesting wood boring beetles. This inspection does not include mold, mildew or noninsect wood destroying organisms. This report shall be considered invalid for purposes of securing a mortgage and/or settlement of property transfer if not used within ninety (90) days from the date of inspection. This shall not be construed as a 90-day warranty. There is no warranty, express or implied, related to this report unless disclosed as required by state regulations or a written warranty or service agreement is attached.
2. Treatment Recommendation Guidelines Regarding Subterranean Termites: FHA and VA require treatment when any active infestation of subterranean termites is found. If signs of subterranean termites but no activity are found in a structure that shows no evidence of having been treated for subterranean termites in the past, then a treatment should be recommended. A treatment may also be recommended for a previously treated structure showing evidence of subterranean termites but no activity if there is no documentation of a liquid treatment by a licensed pest control company within the previous five years unless the structure is presently under warranty or covered by a service agreement with a licensed pest control company.
3. Obstructions and Inaccessible Areas: No inspection was made in areas which required the breaking apart or into, dismantling, removal of any object, including but not limited to: moldings, floor coverings, wall coverings, siding, fixed ceilings, insulation, furniture, appliances, and/or personal possessions; nor were areas inspected which were obstructed or inaccessible for physical access on the date of inspection. Your inspector may write out inaccessible areas or use the key in Section IV. Crawl spaces, attics, and/or other areas may be deemed inaccessible if the opening to the area is not large enough to provide physical access for the inspector or if a ladder was required for access. Crawl spaces (or portions thereof) may also be deemed inaccessible if there is less than 24 inches of clearance from the bottom of the floor joists to the surface below. If any area which has been reported as inaccessible is made accessible, the inspection company may be contacted for another inspection. An additional fee may apply.
4. Consumer Maintenance Advisory Regarding Integrated Pest Management for Prevention of Wood Destroying Insects. Any structure can be attacked by wood destroying insects. Homeowners should be aware of and try to eliminate conditions which promote insect infestation in and around their structure(s). Factors which may lead to wood destroying insect infestation include: earth to wood contact, foam insulation at foundation in contact with soil, faulty grade, improper drainage, firewood against structure(s), insufficient ventilation, moisture, wood debris in crawlspace, wood mulch or ground cover in contact with the structure, tree branches touching structure(s), landscape timbers and wood decay. Should these or other conditions exist, corrective measures should be taken in order to reduce the chances of infestation of wood destroying insects and the need for treatment.
5. Neither the inspecting company nor the inspector has had, presently has, or contemplates having any interest in the property inspected.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • AI = Additional Information