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1234 Main St.
Anamosa, IA 52205
06/17/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
82
Items Inspected
7
Maintenance item
61
Recommendation
3
Safety hazard

1 - Inspection Details

Home Faces
North
Significant precipitation in last 3 days
Yes
Temperature during inspection
Below 65(F)=18(C)
Type of building
Single Family (2 story)
Weather during inspection
Clear

2 - Roof Systems

1 Method of Inspection
Walked roof
2 Drainage system description:
Gutters and downspouts installed
3 Gutters/downspout material:
Aluminum
4 Primary roof-covering type:
3-tab Fiberglass Asphalt Shingle
5 The roof style was:
Gable, Hip
Plumbing and Combustion Vent Flashing: No deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Roof Flashing: No deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.

3.1. Roof

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the

eaves:

  A. the roof-covering materials;

  B. the gutters;

  C. the downspouts;

  D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other

  roof penetrations; and

  E. the general structure of the roof from the readily

  accessible panels, doors or stairs.

II. The inspector shall describe:

  A. the type of roof-covering materials.

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  A. observed indications of active roof leaks.

IV. The inspector is not required to:

  A. walk on any roof surface.

  B. predict the service life expectancy.

  C. inspect underground downspout diverter

  drainage pipes.

  D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that

  prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces.

  E. move insulation.

  F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning

  arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar

  attachments.

  G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the

  inspectors opinion, to be unsafe.

  H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the

  inspectors opinion, cause damage.

  I. perform a water test.
  J. warrant or certify the roof.
  K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any
  roof-covering material.


Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Roof Structure/Covering

Asphalt Shingle, Moderate granule loss

Moderate granule loss commensurate with the age of the roof was observed at the time of inspection.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Roof Structure/Covering

Asphalt Shingle, Tree Overhang

Tree limbs overhanging the roof of the home can shorten the life of your roof covering by up to 50%. The increase in debri can also cause increased gutter daming which slows or stops water drainage away from home. Recommend contacting a tree service to cut back branches to alleviate these possible issues.

Yard scissors Tree Service
Credit
Comment
2.1.3 - Roof Structure/Covering

Missing shingle.

Missing shingles observed at the time inspection. Recommend repair or replacement as a missing shingle could allow water penetration into structure

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
2.4.1 - Roof Drainage System

Gutters, discharge to foundation or slab

One or more downspouts discharged roof drainage next to the foundation or slab. This condition can effect the ability of the soil to support the weight of the structure above and can cause damage related to soil/foundation movement. The Inspector recommends the installation of downspout extensions to discharge roof drainage 4 to 6 feet from the foundation.

Gutter Gutter Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - Chimney at Roof

Add spark arrestor

The chimney(s) had no spark arrestor. The Inspector recommends that all chimneys have an approved spark arrestor installed by a qualified contractor to prevent pest entry and to help protect the roof-covering materials from potential chimney-source ignition.
Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.5.2 - Chimney at Roof

Severely deteriorated brick/mortar

The brick chimney had severely deteriorated brick and mortar. The Inspector recommends that an evaluation and any necessary work be performed by a qualified masonry contractor.
Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.5.3 - Chimney at Roof

Spalling brick

The brick chimney exhibited brick spalling, crumbling, or delamination of the brick face. This is typically caused by a combination of moisture absorption and improper mortar mix design. This deterioration will probably continue unless the problem is identified and corrected. The inspector recommends that an evaluation and any necessary work be performed by a qualified masonry contractor.
Fireplace Chimney Repair Contractor

3 - Building Exterior

Exterior Doors:
Metal
Exterior wall-covering Material
Vinyl Siding
2 Door Exteriors: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
5 Exterior Foundation : No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
6 Exterior Wall Penetrations: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
8 Exterior Plumbing: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
4 Soffits Facia and Trim: Soffits and Fascia
10 Central Air Conditioner: Photo documentation

3.2. Exterior
I. The inspector shall inspect:
  A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and
  trim;
  B. all exterior doors;
  C. adjacent walkways and driveways;
  D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
  E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
  F. railings, guards and handrails;
  G. the eaves, soffits and fascia;
  H. a representative number of windows; and
I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and
grading of the property, where they may
adversely affect the structure due to moisture
intrusion.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  A. any improper spacing between intermediate
  balusters, spindles and rails.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
  A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows,
  shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or
  exterior accent lighting.
  B. inspect items that are not visible or readily
  accessible from the ground, including window
  and door flashing.
  C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical,
  hydrological or soil conditions.
  D. inspect recreational facilities or playground
  equipment.
  E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks.
  F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization
  measures.
  G. inspect for safety-type glass.
  H. inspect underground utilities.
  I. inspect underground items.
  J. inspect wells or springs.
  K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems.
  L. inspect swimming pools or spas.
  M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic
  systems or cesspools.
  N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems.
  O. inspect drainfields or dry wells.
  P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window
  glazing or thermal window seals.

Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - 3 Window Exteriors

Window framing, Moisture damage peeling paint.

Moisture damage/peeling paint. shown on window framing at the time of inspection. Moderate deterioration of wooden components. Recommend replacement of damaged areas and sealed to prevent future damage.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - 4 Soffits Facia and Trim

Peeling paint, bare wood

Trim had peeling paint and bare wood exposed to weather. Dry, cracked wood was visible in areas. To avoid the need for replacement, repair and paint this trim soon. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - 4 Soffits Facia and Trim

Facia deterioration

Facia deterioration Was observed at the time inspection. This deterioration can allow for waters, or birds/pest to enter the home. Recommend sealing exposed and Bare wood. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - 9 Electrical Service to property

Clearance <10' above walking surface

The overhead service-drop conductors have inadequate height clearance above a walking surface. Safe building practices require 10 feet (3m) clearance above walking surfaces (including decks , stairs, and balconies). The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline, you consult with your electrical service provider to discuss options and costs for correction. Any work on the service conductors should be performed by a qualified personnel only.
Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.7.2 - 9 Electrical Service to property

Clearance from trees

The overhead service-drop conductors had inadequate clearance from tree branches. This condition should be corrected by a qualified contractor or the utility service provider to avoid abrasion and damage to the conductors. Work around the service conductors should be performed by a qualified personnel only. Injury or death may result from attempts at correction by those without proper qualifications.
Yard scissors Tree Service
Credit
Comment
3.7.3 - 9 Electrical Service to property

Meter loose

The electric meter was loose and should be securely fastened. The Inspector recommends correction by the electric utility provider.
Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.8.1 - 10 Central Air Conditioner

A/C pad out of level

The pad supporting the air-conditioner compressor housing was not level. Over time, this may result in damage to the fan bearings and a shortened fan lifespan, or it may result in movement of the compressor housing which can stress the refrigerant lines resulting in e, damage and expensive service. The Inspector recommends that the compressor housing be leveled by a qualified HVAC contractor.
Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
3.9.1 - Vinyl Siding

5-year Maintenance required

You should be aware that vinyl siding requires that window and door openings be re-sealed with a high-quality sealant every 3 to 5 years to prevent moisture intrusion.
Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.9.2 - Vinyl Siding

Loose or sagging vinyl

Areas of loose or sagging vinyl siding covering exterior walls indicated failure of the fastening method. Vinyl siding in these areas should be re-fastened or replaced to prevent damage to the siding and to prevent potential damage from moisture intrusion to the home materials, the exterior wall structure and to prevent development of microbial growth such as mold. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.
Siding Siding Contractor

4 - Exterior Grounds

1 Driveway Material:
Gravel
2 Walkway Materials:
Concrete
4 Additional Structures:
Garage
Driveway: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
General Grounds: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Walkways

Cracking has caused tripping hazzard

One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards. 

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Walkways

Moderate settling

At the time of the inspection, the walkways had areas of areas of moderate settling visible. This condition is typically the result of poor compaction practices during original construction. As time passes, settling continues until soil beneath the affected area reaches equal density with the surrounding soil and the affected portions of the walkway become stable. Chances that settling will continue are low.
Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.2.3 - Walkways

Significant cracks

Significant cracks visible in the walkways at the time of the inspection should be patched with an appropriate sealant to avoid continued damage from freezing moisture.
Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Deck, Balcony, Bridge and Porch,

Guardrail, modern standards

Although the deck guardrails may have complied with the building safety standards in effect at the time of original construction, they do not meet generally-accepted current standards and may be hazardous to small children. Current standards include the following:

  1. A 4 inch sphere may not pass through the guardrail at any point
  2. The guardrail should not be climbable (especially by children).
  3. Minimum guardrail height is 36 inches
  4. Any walking surface 30 inches or more above grade should have a guardrail.

The deck failed to meet safety standard number *Safety Numbers*. The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline you consult with a qualified contractor to gain an idea of options and costs for updating this condition to comply with modern safety standards.

Credit
Comment
4.4.2 - Deck, Balcony, Bridge and Porch,

Sealant, failing

The finish coating was protecting the porch in places where it was protected from weather and wear but had failed where exposed to weather and wear. Failure to maintain the finish coating will allow Ultra Violet (UV) radiation from sunlight, heat, moisture and freezing moisture to reduce the lifespan of bare wood exposed to weather. The Inspector recommends maintenance of the finish coating as necessary by a qualified contractor.

House front 1 Deck Contractor

5 - Garage

Garage Vehicle Door Type:
Single
Number of Automatic Openers:
1
Number of Vehicle Doors:
1
Vehicle Door Automatic Reverse:
Failure to reverse, Photosensor installed correctly
Occupant Doors: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Ceiling: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Garage Electrical: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Walls: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Garage Electrical: Photo documentation
Garage HVAC: No power turned on or gas on.

No power or gas turned on to HVAC units at the time of inspection. Royal home inspection does not turn on gas to any appliance this is a A liability. Recommend it for regular use having an HVAC professional service unit prior to use.

Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Vehicle Doors

Bottom seal missing

The majority of the seal at the bottom of the garage door is missing or damaged. Recommend replacement to ensure moisture entry cannot make it in.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.1.2 - Vehicle Doors

Failed ANSI 2x4 reverse requirements

With testing it damaged the door. It appeared to have some alignment issues prior. As the bottom track is tight. Also Bolts were not installed correctly.  


ANSI UL Standard 325 states that garage door opener must stop and re-open the vehicle door within two seconds of the door striking an 1 1/2-inch thick object placed under the center of the door. An automatic opener in this home did not meet these requirements.

Garage Garage Door Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.1.3 - Vehicle Doors

Tracks need service/repair

Prior to the damage incurred at inspection. The supporting tracks for one or more overhead garage doors needed service or repair at the time of the inspection. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

Garage Garage Door Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Occupant Doors

Door jamb, moisture entry

Door jamb showed signs of moisture entry due to unsealed joint between jamb and threshold. Recommend repair by licensed general contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Floors

Heaving- expansive soils

The garage floor showed signs of heaving. It was not level or flat and had raised areas. This condition appeared to be the result of expansive soil beneath the slab. Expansive soils are those that expand to many times their original volume with increases in soil content. If expansive soils are the cause of this heaving, it may continue in the future.

Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - Floors

Random cracking- no control joints

Random shrinkage cracking was visible in the garage floor slab. No control joints were installed in the concrete floor. Control joints are grooves or cuts in the floor designed to control the location of cracking taking place as part of the curing process.
Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.3.3 - Floors

Staining- moisture intrusion- moisture visible

Staining of the garage floor appeared to be the result of moisture intrusion. Moisture was visible in this area at the time of the inspection.
Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Walls

Damage siding

Damage siding was observed at the time inspection on the exterior of the garage. Recommend repair or replacement has these holes could allow for moisture intrusion. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.5.1 - Exterior Walls

Paint, missing or peeling

Areas of wood trim are missing or have peeling paint which should be corrected to alleviate moisture entry into the structure.

Contractor Qualified Professional

6 - Kitchen and Built-in Appliances

Kitchen Floor: No Deficiencies

No observable deficiencies at the time of inspection.

Range Hood: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Range: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Cabinets: No Mechanical Deficiencies

Cupboards and drawers showed no signs of mechanical damage at the time of inspection.

Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Cabinets

Under sink moisture damage

There was moisture damage and staining under the kitchen sink at the time of inspection This damage is from a leaking drain pipe that was observed at the time of inspection.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Kitchen Plumbing / Sink

Leaking connections

Leaking connections at the drain assembly beneath the kitchen sink should be repaired to avoid future/additional damage to the cabinet floor and possibly the wall/floor structures below. The Inspector recommends repair by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - Receptacles and Switches

GFCI, none installed

Electrical receptacles in the kitchen had no Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) protection. Although this condition may have been considered acceptable at the time the home was originally constructed, as knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time, building standards have changed to reflect current understanding. Consider having GFCI protection installed as a safety precaution for receptacles within 6 feet of a plumbing fixture. This can be achieved by: 1. Replacing the current standard electrical receptacles with GFCI outlets; 2. Replacing the electrical receptacle nearest the overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) protecting laundry room circuits with a GFCI receptacle; or 3. Replacing the breakers currently protecting the electrical circuits in the Laundry room with GFCI breakers.
Electric Electrical Contractor

7 - Attic

1 Attic inspected from:
Inside the attic
2 Approximate attic thermal insulation depth:
6-8 inches, Spray foam
3 Attic thermal insulation material:
Blown-in Fiberglass, Blown-in Cellulose, Spray foam
Roof Framing Type:
Conventional Framing
Roof Sheathing Material:
Unable to view do to spray foam
Roof structure ventilation device type:
Ridge vent
Attic Electrical: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Roof Framing (from attic): Gable Roof Framing
Attic Access: Location
Hallway
Roof Framing (from attic): No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Roof Structure Ventilation: Attic ventilation disclaimer
The Inspector disclaims confirmation of adequate attic ventilation year-round performance, but will comment on the apparent adequacy of the system as experienced by the inspector on the day of the inspection. Attic ventilation is not an exact science and a standard ventilation approach that works well in one type of climate zone may not work well in another. The performance of a standard attic ventilation design system can vary even with different homesite locations and conditions or weather conditions within a single climate zone. The typical approach is to thermally isolate the attic space from the living space by installing some type of thermal insulation on the attic floor. Heat that is radiated into the attic from sunlight shining on the roof is then removed using devices that allow natural air movement to carry hot air to the home exterior. This reduces summer cooling costs and increases comfort levels, and can help prevent roof problems that can develop during the winter such as the forming of ice dams along the roof eves. Natural air movement is introduced by providing air intake vents low in the attic space and exhaust vents high in the attic space. Thermal buoyancy (the tendency of hot air to rise) causes cool air to flow into the attic to replace hot air flowing out the exhaust vents. Conditions that block ventilation devices, or systems and devices devices that are poorly designed or installed can reduce the system performance.
Roof Sheathing: Unable to view

Unable to view due to spray foam insulation applied.

3.9. Attic, Insulation & Ventilation
I. The inspector shall inspect:
  A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics,
  crawlspaces and foundation areas;
  B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics,
  crawlspaces and foundation areas; and
  C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen,
  bathrooms and laundry area.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  A. the type of insulation observed; and
  B. the approximate average depth of insulation
  observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof
  structure.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation
  in unfinished spaces.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
  A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are
  not readily accessible, or where entry could
  cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion,
  pose a safety hazard.
  B. move, touch or disturb insulation.
  C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders.
  D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or
  weather seal on or around access panels or
  covers.
  E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation
  material.
  F. activate thermostatically operated fans.
  G. determine the types of materials used in
  insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets,
  boilers or wiring.
  H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

Credit
Comment
7.4.1 - Roof Structure Ventilation

Non-vented design
Addition Appeared to have no vents. Main roof had vents and sprayed over with spray foam

The attic was not ventilated. A design was used in which insulation is applied to the underside of the roof and the attic space contains conditioned air, just like the living space. These designs can out-perform ventilated attics when used in an appropriate climate and properly designed and constructed.

8 - Interior

1 Floor Covering Materials:
Carpet, Tile, Modern Hardwood Flooring
2 Interior Doors:
Solid, Wood Hollow Core
3 Walls and Ceilings:
Lath and Plaster
4 Window Glazing:
Single-pane, Double-pane
5 Window Material:
Vinyl, Wood
6 Window Operation:
Double-hung, Single-hung
Lighting throughout home: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Floors throughout home: Interior Introduction

Inspection of the home interior does not include testing for mold, radon, asbestos, lead paint, or other environmental hazards unless specifically requested as an ancillary inspection. Inspection of the home interior typically includes:

  • interior wall, floor and ceiling coverings and surfaces;
  • doors and windows: condition, hardware, and operation;
  • interior trim: baseboard, casing, molding, etc.;
  • permanently-installed furniture, countertops, shelving, and cabinets; and
  • ceiling and whole-house fans. 
Laundry Room: Visual inspection only

Royal Home Inspections only tests appliances that are hardwired to the home. This can include dishwashers, garbage disposals, vent fans, garbage compactors, ovens, water heater and HVAC systems. We will perform a visual ONLY inspection on Washer and Dryer connections when accessable. We recommend having all other appliances tested by a qualified technician  prior to use.

3.10. Doors, Windows & Interior
I. The inspector shall inspect:
  A. a representative number of doors and windows
  by opening and closing them;
  B. floors, walls and ceilings;
  C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps;
  D. railings, guards and handrails; and
  E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of
  garage vehicle door openers, using normal
  operating controls.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or
  installed with a garage door opener.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  A. improper spacing between intermediate
  balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways,
  guards and railings;
  B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not
  operate properly; and
  C. any window that was obviously fogged or
  displayed other evidence of broken seals.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
  A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or
  finish treatments.
  B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting.
  C. inspect central vacuum systems.
  D. inspect for safety glazing.
  E. inspect security systems or components.
  F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops,
  cabinets, sink tops or fixtures.
  G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings,
  such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the
  concealed floor structure.
  H. move suspended-ceiling tiles.
  I. inspect or move any household appliances.
  J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the
  garage, except as otherwise noted.
  K. verify or certify the proper operation of any
  pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety
  feature of a garage door.
  L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and
  opening mechanisms, whether interior or
  exterior, including their compliance with local,
  state or federal standards.
  M. operate any system, appliance or component
  that requires the use of special keys, codes,
  combinations or devices.
  N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt
  guards/latches, or signal lights.
  O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from
  microwave ovens.
  P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker,
  coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer,
  blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other
  small, ancillary appliances or devices.
  Q. inspect elevators.
  R. inspect remote controls.
  S. inspect appliances.
  T. inspect items not permanently installed.
  U. discover firewall compromises.
  V. inspect pools, spas or fountains.
  W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets,
  water force, or bubble effects.
  X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of
  pools or spas.

Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Floors throughout home

Floor has uneven slope

Moderate areas of unlevel floor observed in the home at the time of inspection. Older homes settle and can cause this defect. Recommend structural engineer if progression continues to cause more slope.

House construction Structural Engineer
Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Walls throughout home

General minor deterioration

Walls in the home showed general minor deterioration commensurate with the age of the home.
Credit
Comment
8.2.2 - Walls throughout home

Trim, Missing

Section of trim missing from wall section. Recommend replacement 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Ceilings throughout home

Plaster cracking

Plaster cracking on ceiling observed at the time of inspection. This can be caused by many different issues. Recommend contacting a general contractor to verify sagging will not continue or if plaster should be replaced.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Doors throughout home

Interior door, binds

Interior door binds and will not operate correctly. Recommend repairs by licensed general contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - Electrical throughtout house

Receptacle, loose in wall

An electrical receptacle was improperly secured and moved when a plug were inserted. Receptacles should be securely installed to prevent fire, shock and/or electrocution hazard. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified electrical contractor.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.5.2 - Electrical throughtout house

Receptacle, open grounds

One or more electrical receptacles had an open ground. 

What is an open ground?

The ground in an electrical circuit is a safe way for electricity to return to the panel if the hot/neutral circuit is compromised.  If a failure occurs within the circuit then the ground carries the current back to the panel and causes the fuse or breaker to blow, disconnecting the circuit.  An open ground means that the additional path does not exist.  It could mean that there is no wire running to that outlet, or that the wire is broken or disconnected somewhere in the circuit. Open grounds are especially dangerous if grounded (3-prong) outlets are installed.  If an open ground is present and a failure in the circuit occurs then the current has nowhere to go and could potentially use your body to ground out and complete the circuit, resulting in electrocution.

We always recommend consulting with an electrician when open grounds are present.  Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) outlets or GFCI breakers can be installed for ungrounded systems.  GFCI monitor the flow of current between the hot and neutral.  If the flow from the hot is not the same as the flow of current in the neutral side of the circuit then the system will trip, cutting power in that circuit.  GFCI protected circuits are not foolproof, but they are much safer then un-grounded circuits with grounded outlets.

In conclusion, reverse polarity and open grounds can be dangerous and are considered safety hazards when inspecting the home.  We recommend that these problems be fixed immediately as they can result in a fire or electrocution is an electrical system fails.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.1 - Windows throughout home

Difficult to operate, maintenance
Wood windows in home

A window(s) was difficult to operate and needed maintenance. The Inspector recommends service by a qualified contractor.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.2 - Windows throughout home

Failed seals, condensation, replace

A window had double-pane glazing in which condensation and staining was visible at the time of the inspection. This is an indication that the skylight has lost its thermal integrity. The glass was was damaged beyond repair. The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline you consult with a qualified contractor to discuss options and costs for replacement.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.3 - Windows throughout home

Glazing compound maintenance

Glazing compound at window sashes in the home needed maintenance at the time of the inspection. The Inspector recommends maintenance by a qualified painting contractor.
Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.4 - Windows throughout home

Inoperable window

Window(s) was inoperable at the time of the inspection. The Inspector recommends service by a qualified contractor.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.5 - Windows throughout home

Lower windows would not stay up

Some double-hung windows in the home had lower sashes that would not stay in place when raised. The Inspector recommends service by a qualified contractor.
Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.6 - Windows throughout home

Peeling paint, general

Windows in the home had peeling paint. The Inspector recommends that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline you consult with a qualified contractor to discuss options and costs for repair.
Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.7 - Windows throughout home

Sill not attached

The sash was not attached correctly to the window framing at the time of inspection. Recommend correction by licensed general contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.6.8 - Windows throughout home

Sealant interior

Sealant around interior side of windows was weathered or missing. Recommend sealant maintenance to ensure moisture and air mitigation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.8.1 - Doorbells/Detectors/Fans & general observations

Smoke detector Install more

The Inspector recommends installing a smoke detector to provide improved fire protection for sleeping areas. Generally-accepted current safety standards recommend smoke detectors be installed in the following locations: 1. In the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms 2. In all bedrooms 3. In each story of a dwelling unit, including basements and cellars, but not including crawl spaces and uninhabitable attics. 4. In residential units of 1,200 square feet or more, automatic fire detectors, in the form of smoke detectors shall be provided for each 1,200 square feet of area or part thereof. Any smoke detector located within 20 feet of a kitchen or bathroom containing a tub or shower must be a photoelectric type. The 1996 edition of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 72 gives further guidance on the placement of smoke detectors, when required. Here are some examples from Chapter 2 of NFPA 72: 5. Smoke detectors in a bedroom with a ceiling sloped greater than one foot in eight feet horizontally should be located on the high side of the ceiling. 6. Smoke detectors should not be located within three (3) feet of a door to a bathroom containing a tub or a shower or the supply registers of a forced air HVAC system. Smoke detectors can be located on the ceiling with the side of the detector greater than four (4) inches from the wall or on the wall of a bedroom with the top of the detector located four (4) to twelve (12) inches down from the ceiling. All smoke detectors should be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendation and be UL listed.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.9.1 - Stairs

No handrail
Basement

Although it had 4 or more risers, this staircase had no handrail installed. This condition is a potential fall hazard. In order to comply with generally-accepted current standards which require a handrail at stairways with 4 or more risers, this stairway would need a handrail installed. The Inspector recommends that a handrail be installed that complies with modern safety standards. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.
Hardhat General Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.9.2 - Stairs

Tread depth excessive difference

At the interior staircase, the greatest tread depth exceeded the shallowest tread depth by more than the 3/8 of an inch recommended by generally-accepted current standards. This condition is a potential trip hazard. All corrections should be made by a qualified contractor.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.9.3 - Stairs

Tread, loose

Tread section of step was loose at the time of inspection. Recommend repairs to ensure safe use of interior stairs. All work should be performed by a licensed general contractor.

Hardhat General Contractor

9 - Bathrooms

1 Cabinets:
Veneer on MDF
2 Sink:
Sink in a cabinet
3 Toilet Type:
Standard flush (more than 1.6 gal. [6 litres])
4 Bathub:
Bathtub with shower
5 Shower:
Fiberglass enclosure
6 Exhaust Fans
Fan only
Bathroom Ceiling: No Deficiencies

No observable deficiencies observed at the time of inspection.

Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - 2 Sink

Slow drain

Bathroom sink was slow to drain. Recommend drain cleaning by license plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.1.2 - 2 Sink

S-Trap Obsolete

A trap beneath a sink in the kitchen was of a type called an "S-trap". S-traps are no longer allowed to be installed in new construction for safety reasons. A siphon can develop which empties the trap of water; a condition with the potential to allow toxic sewer gas to enter the living space. Although this type of trap may have been commonly considered safe at the time the home was originally constructed, as general knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time, building standards have changed to reflect current understanding. The Inspector recommends replacement of all such traps in the home by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Bathroom Ventilation

Ventalation inoperable

Ventilation was inoperable at the time of inspection.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - 3 Bathroom Electrical Receptacle

GFCI, none installed

Electrical receptacles had no Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) protection. Although this condition may have been considered acceptable at the time the home was originally constructed, as knowledge of safe building practices has improved with the passage of time, building standards have changed to reflect current understanding. Consider having GFCI protection installed as a safety precaution for receptacles within 6 feet of a plumbing fixture. This can be achieved by: 1. Replacing the current standard electrical receptacles with GFCI outlets; 2. Replacing the electrical receptacle nearest the overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) protecting laundry room circuits with a GFCI receptacle; or 3. Replacing the breakers currently protecting the electrical circuits in the Laundry room with GFCI breakers.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.5.1 - 4 Toilet

Toilet loose at floor

The toilet was loose at the floor and should be re-attached and new wax ring installed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - 7 Tub/Shower

Tub/Floor, Caulk line failed

The sealant where the tub in the meets the floor was old and had sections of sealant were missing. Which may allow damage from moisture intrusion of the floor assembly. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified contractor.

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
9.6.2 - 7 Tub/Shower

Tub/Wall, Caulk line failed

The sealant where the tub in the meets the wall was old and had sections of sealant were missing. Which may allow damage from moisture intrusion of the wall assembly. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified contractor.

Wrench DIY

10 - Structure

1 Exterior Wall Structures:
Conventional 2x4 Wood Frame
2 Foundation Configuration:
Unfinished basement
3 Foundation Method/Materials:
Brick foundation walls, CMU foundation.
4 Main Floor Structure:
Wooden boards over wood joists
5 Main Floor Structure- Intermediate Support:
Mortared-brick columns
Framed Floor Structure and supports: Whats inspected?
Inspection of the floor structure typically includes examination of the condition and proper installation of the following:
  • Joist condition;;
  • Joists supporting structures and members;;
  • Connections and fasteners; and
  • Floor sheathing

3.3. Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure
I. The inspector shall inspect:
  A. the foundation;
  B. the basement;
  C. the crawlspace; and
  D. structural components.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  A. the type of foundation; and
  B. the location of the access to the under-floor
  space.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  A. observed indications of wood in contact with or
  near soil;
  B. observed indications of active water
  penetration;
  C. observed indications of possible foundation
  movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick
  cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel
  floors; and
  D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of
  framing members that may, in the inspector's
  opinion, present a structural or safety concern.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
  A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily
  accessible, or where entry could cause damage
  or pose a hazard to him/herself.
  B. move stored items or debris.
  C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats.
  D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or
  determine the adequacy of foundation bolting,
  bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems.
  E. provide any engineering or architectural service.
  F. report on the adequacy of any structural system
  or component.

Credit
Comment
10.2.1 - Foundation

Foundation interior bilogical growth present

Biological growth signs are indicated on interior of foundation wall. Recommend mold testing to verify if mold is present and if it could be toxic.

Hardhat Mold Inspector
Credit
Comment
10.2.2 - Foundation

Foundation wall, efflorescence, heavy deposits

In the basement, heavy deposits of efflorescence were visible at some of the interior surfaces of the foundation walls. Efflorescence is a white, powdery residue left by moisture seeping through the foundation wall and its presence indicates high moisture levels in soil near the foundation. Excessively high moisture levels in soil supporting the foundation can cause various structural problems related to soil movement. Long-term exposure to this condition can cause foundation damage.The Inspector recommends that the source of moisture be identified and the condition corrected.


Recommend tuck pointing done by licensed masonry contractor to help prevent moisture deterioration an entry into home.

Water Waterproofing Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.2.3 - Foundation

Spray foam used to seal against moisture

Open cell spray foam is not designed to prohibit moisture or pest entry. These locations in the foundation should have correct sealant installed.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Slab

Basement floor, stains, elevated moisture level indicated with meter

Stains visible on the interior surfaces of the brick floor slab appear to be the result of active moisture intrusion. The moisture meter showed elevated levels of moisture present in the slab at the time of the inspection. Moisture intrusion can damage materials and encourage the growth of microbes such as mold. The source of moisture should be located and corrected to avoid future moisture intrusion.

Water Waterproofing Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.3.2 - Slab

Exterior entrance, moisture entry

Moisture entry from pre-existing exterior entry into basement. This has been crudely sealed off and is allowing moisture entry into basement.

Contractor Qualified Professional

11 - Electrical

Electrical Service Conductors:
Overhead service
Service Disconnect Location:
At Service Panel
Service Disconnect Type:
Breaker
Service Panel Ampacity:
100 amps
Service Panel Manufacturer:
Square D
Service Panel Type:
Load Center
Type of Branch Wiring:
Vinyl-coated, Unable to open, Cloth-coated
Service Panel Cabinet, Ampacity, and Cover (Pics of Panel Cover, Main Breaker, Internal of Cabinet): No Deficiencies

No observable deficiencies at the time of inspection.

Overcurrent items: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Service Grounding Electrode System & amp; Service Bond: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Equipment Grounding & amp; Bonding: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Visible Branch Wiring: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Service Panel Cabinet, Ampacity, and Cover (Pics of Panel Cover, Main Breaker, Internal of Cabinet): Photo documentation

3.7. Electrical
I. The inspector shall inspect:
  A. the service drop;
  B. the overhead service conductors and
  attachment point;
  C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  E. the electric meter and base;
  F. service-entrance conductors;
  G. the main service disconnect;
  H. panelboards and over-current protection devices
  (circuit breakers and fuses);
  I. service grounding and bonding;
  J. a representative number of switches, lighting
  fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles
  observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit
  interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test
  button, where possible;
  K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles
  and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be
  GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating,
  if labeled; and
  B. the type of wiring observed.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and
  vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that
  was not filled;
  C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum
  branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  D. any tested receptacle in which power was not
  present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was
  not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly
  installed or did not operate properly, evidence of
  arcing or excessive heat, and where the
  receptacle was not grounded or was not secured
  to the wall; and
  E. the absence of smoke detectors.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
  A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main
  panelboard, sub-panels, distribution
  panelboards, or electrical fixtures.
  B. operate electrical systems that are shut down.
  C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead
  fronts.
  D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices
  or overload devices.
  E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide
  detectors or alarms
  F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or
  alarms systems or components, or other
  warning or signaling systems.
  G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage
  of the main service equipment, if not visibly
  labeled.
  H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control
  devices.
  I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits
  that are not energized.
  J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing
  tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices.
  K. verify the service ground.
  L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply
  sources, including, but not limited to: generators,
  windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or
  battery or electrical storage facility.
  M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors.
  N. inspect or test de-icing equipment.
  O. conduct voltage-drop calculations.
  P. determine the accuracy of labeling.
  Q. inspect exterior lighting.

12 - Plumbing

Drain Waste and Vent Pipe Materials:
Cast Iron, Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)
Functional Drainage:
All plumbing fixtures had functional drainage
Functional Flow
All plumbing fixtures had functional flow
Gas Pipe Material:
Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST), Black Steel
Main Water Supply Pipe:
1-inch
Sewage System Type:
Public
Sump Pump:
Sump pump inoperable
Type of Gas:
Natural Gas
Water Distribution Pipes:
Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) Improper, Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride (CPVC)
Water Heater Fuel Type
Gas
Water Heater Manufacturer
Richmond
Water Heater Manufacturer Date
2002
Water Heater Tank Capacity
30 gallons
Water Heater Type
Tank (conventional)
Visable Gas Piping System: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Water Supply and Distribution: Main water shut off
Basement
Water Heater: Photo documentation

3.6. Plumbing
I. The inspector shall inspect:
  A. the main water supply shut-off valve;
  B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  C. the water heating equipment, including the
  energy source, venting connections,
  temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts
  210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and
  faucets, by running the water;
  E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional
  drainage;
  G. the drain, waste and vent system; and
  H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  A. whether the water supply is public or private
  based upon observed evidence;
  B. the location of the main water supply shut-off
  valve;
  C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off
  valve;
  D. the location of any observed fuel-storage
  system; and
  E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if
  labeled.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the
  functional flow in two fixtures operated
  simultaneously;
  B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold
  water faucets;
  C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did
  not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and
  tubs; and
  D. toilets that were damaged, had loose
  connections to the floor, were leaking, or had
  tank components that did not operate.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
  A. light or ignite pilot flames.
  B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life
  expectancy or adequacy of the water heater.
  C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys,
  combustion air systems, water softener or
  filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety
  or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler
  systems, or fire sprinkler systems.
  D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure,
  temperature or adequacy of the water supply.
  E. determine the water quality, potability or
  reliability of the water supply or source.
  F. open sealed plumbing access panels.
  G. inspect clothes washing machines or their
  connections.
  H. operate any valve.
  I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or
  enclosures for leakage or functional overflow
  protection.
  J. evaluate the compliance with conservation,
  energy or building standards, or the proper
  design or sizing of any water, waste or venting
  components, fixtures or piping.
  K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices.
  L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts
  for effective cleaning of drains.
  M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems.
  N. inspect wastewater treatment systems.
  O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters.
  P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or
  bladder tanks.
  Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures,
  or perform testing of any kind to water heater
  elements.
  R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of
  combustion air.
  S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls,
  manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief
  valves, control valves, or check valves.
  T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or
  components, such as, but not limited to, those
  related to solar water heating and hot water
  circulation.
  U. determine the existence or condition of
  polybutylene plumbing.
  V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or
  indications thereof.

Credit
Comment
12.1.1 - Water Supply and Distribution

Active leak, heavily corroded

Actively leaking, heavily-corroded water distribution pipes visible. Should be repaired by a qualified plumbing contractor to avoid damage to home materials or the development of conditions which encourage the growth of microbes such as mold.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.1.2 - Water Supply and Distribution

Main water supply pipe heavy corrosion (shortened lifespan)

The main water supply pipe exhibited heavy corrosion that will shorten the expected long-term service life of the pipe. The source of moisture should be identified and corrected by a qualified plumbing contractor.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.2.1 - Sewage and DWV Systems

Active leake
1st Floor Bathroom shower

Active leak present off bathroom drain in basement. Recommend repair by licensed plumbing contractor.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
12.4.1 - Water Heater

Flame color - Needs service

The color of the water heater burner flame indicated that the water heater should be serviced by a qualified plumbing contractor.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.4.2 - Water Heater

TPR dishcharge pipe not installed correctly

Incorrect discharge pipe was installed at the temperature/pressure relief (TPR) valve. The TPR valve is designed to open and release extremely hot water when water temperature or pressure inside the tank exceeds safe levels. With no discharge pipe installed, persons near the tank might be badly burned by hot water released by the TPR valve. The Inspector recommends that a properly-configured discharge pipe be installed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Credit
Comment
12.5.1 - Sump Pump

Sump no response

The sump pump did not respond to the controls and should be serviced by a qualified plumbing contractor.

13 - HVAC

Air Filter:
Disposable
Air Filter Size
14x20
Cooling System Brand:
Weather King
Cooling System Date
2009
Heating System Brand:
Weather King
Heating System Date
2009
HVAC Type
Fuel fired furnace
Number of Heat Systems (excluding wood):
One
Ductwork: No Deficencies

No observable deficiencies at the time of inspection.

Furnace (Pics of Model/Serial, Cabinet, Internals, testing temps): No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Thermostat: No Deficiencies
No observed deficiencies at the time of the inspection.
Air Filter Location:
Behind sliding panel at furnace
Furnace (Pics of Model/Serial, Cabinet, Internals, testing temps): HVAC running video
Ductwork: Cleaning

Normal accumulations of dust and dirt found in all homes with air ducts, there are several other factors that can increase the need for regular HVAC system cleaning:

  •     pets
  •     occupants with allergies or asthma
  •     cigarette or cigar smoke
  •     water contamination or damage to the home or HVAC system
  •     home renovation or remodeling projects

Some occupants are more sensitive to these contaminants than others. Allergy and asthma sufferers, as well as young children and the elderly tend to be more susceptible to the types of poor indoor air quality that air duct cleaning can help address.

NADCAs rule of thumb for consumers is that if your air ducts look dirty, they probably are, and that dirty HVAC systems should be inspected by a reputable, certified HVAC professional. Below are some other reasons homeowners choose to have their air ducts cleaned.

Recommend that all new home owners contact a qualified HVAC duct cleaning service be contacted.

Furnace (Pics of Model/Serial, Cabinet, Internals, testing temps): 1 Disclaim heat exchanger, certify
The Inspector specifically disclaims furnace heat exchangers because proper evaluation requires invasive, technically exhaustive measures that exceed the scope of the General Home Inspection. Because of the age of the furnace, The Inspector recommends that you have it certified by a qualified HVAC contractor.
Furnace (Pics of Model/Serial, Cabinet, Internals, testing temps): Photo documentation

3.4. Heating
I. The inspector shall inspect:
   A. the heating system, using normal operating
  controls.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  A. the location of the thermostat for the heating
  system;
  B. the energy source; and
  C. the heating method.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  A. any heating system that did not operate; and
  B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
  A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or
  chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers,
  combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes,
  humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters,
  geothermal systems, or solar heating systems.
  B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or
  concealed fuel supply systems.
  C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow,
  balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or
  supply adequacy of the heating system.
  D. light or ignite pilot flames.
  E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other
  heating systems when ambient temperatures or
  other circumstances are not conducive to safe
  operation or may damage the equipment.
  F. override electronic thermostats.
  G. evaluate fuel quality.
  H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or
  automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.
3.5. Cooling
I. The inspector shall inspect:
  A. the cooling system, using normal operating
  controls.
II. The inspector shall describe:
  A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling
  system; and
  B. the cooling method.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
  A. any cooling system that did not operate; and
  B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
  A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow,
  balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or
  supply adequacy of the cooling system.
  B. inspect portable window units, through-wall
  units, or electronic air filters.
  C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior
  temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when
  other circumstances are not conducive to safe
  operation or may damage the equipment.
  D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration,
  cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or
  clocks.
  E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or
  gases, or coolant leakage.