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1234 Main St.
Horseheads, New York 14845
08/20/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
11
minor concern or maintenance item
16
prioritized observation/major concern
14
Potential safety hazard

SCOPE OF THE INSPECTION:
Northeast Home Inspections, Inc. DBA Harry Harvey Home Inspections will perform all inspections in compliance with the New York State Standards of Practice. As such, we inspect the readily accessible, visually observable, installed systems and components of a home as designated in the New York State Standards of Practice. When systems or components designated in the New York State Standards of Practice are present but are not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected is identified within the “Limitations” tab of this report. This report contains observations of those systems and components that, in the professional judgement of the inspector, are not functioning properly, significantly deficient, unsafe, or are near the end of their service lives. If the cause for the deficiency is not readily apparent, the suspected cause or reason why the system or component is at or near end of expected service life is reported, and recommendations for correction or monitoring are made as appropriate.

The inspection was essentially visual, not technically exhaustive, and did not imply that every defect would be discovered. The project was based upon conditions that existed at the time of the inspection. This inspection excluded and did not intend to cover any and all components, items, and conditions by nature of their location were concealed or otherwise difficult to inspect. There was no dismantling, destructive analysis, or technical testing of any component. Excluded were all cosmetic conditions, such as carpeting, vinyl floors, wallpapering, and painting. The inspection covered only the listed items and was evaluated for function and safety, not code compliance. This was not intended to reflect the value of the premises and did not make any representation as to the advisability or inadvisability of purchase. Hypothetical repair costs may have been discussed but must be confirmed by qualified contractor estimates.


Please review the report in its entirety. It is up to your discretion to interpret its findings and to act accordingly. This report does not offer an opinion as to whom among the parties to this transaction should take responsibility for addressing any of these concerns. As with all aspects of your transaction, you should consult with your Realtor® for further advice regarding the contents of this report. Any repairs should be performed by the applicable licensed and bonded tradesman or qualified professional who will provide copies of all receipts, warranties and applicable permits for any repairs that are carried out.


1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Home Owner, Listing Agent, Client's Father
Occupancy
Furnished
Temperature (approximate)
70 Fahrenheit (F)
Direction house is facing
West
Weather Conditions
Cloudy, Dry
Style
Ranch, Year Around Lake Home
Type of Building
Detached, Single Family

2 - Grounds

Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Grounds Status
Dry
Walkways: Walkway Material
Stone
Walkways: Condition
Trip Hazard
Driveway : Driveway Material
Gravel
Driveway : Condition
Serviceable
Porch: Material
Pressure Treated Wood
Decks: Material
Concrete, Pressure Treated Wood

The decks appear generally sound and stable at this time. 

Deck Stairs: Material
Pressure Treated Wood
Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Limitations

Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps; swimming pools and related safety equipment, spas, hot tubs or saunas; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; ponds, water features, irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; sport courts, playground, recreation or leisure equipment; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses; retractable awnings. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only.

Porch: Close to ground

The porch is built close to the ground not allowing enough room to fully inspect the framing, attachment and support system. Appeared generally sound from top view and limited view beneath. 

Decks: Deck Maintenance

It is important to keep the wood deck surfaces free of all forms of fungal growth and debris that retain moisture and will cause the deck to eventually rot.  Recommend cleaning and sealing the deck annually. 

Section 197-5.4        Site Conditions:
(a)   Home inspectors shall observe and report the following site conditions:
1.   The building perimeter for land grade and water drainage directly adjacent to the foundation;
2.   Trees and vegetation that adversely affect the residential building;
3.   Walkways, steps, driveways, patios and retaining walls.
(b)   Home inspectors are not required to observe and report on the following site conditions:
1.   Fences and privacy walls;
2.   The health and condition of trees, shrubs and other vegetation.

Credit
Comment
2.1.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Tree Debris on Roof

Tree debris observed on roof. This can cause improper drainage to gutters and downspouts. Recommend clearing debris.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
2.1.2 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Tree Overhang

Trees observed overhanging the roof. This can cause damage to the roof and prevent proper drainage. Recommend a qualified tree service trim to allow for proper drainage. 

Yard scissors Tree Service
Credit
Comment
2.1.3 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Tree Near Foundation

One or more large trees were very close to the foundation. Tree roots can cause significant structural damage to foundations, or may have already caused damage (see other comments in this report). Recommend that a qualified tree service contractor or certified arborist remove trees as necessary to prevent damage to foundations.

Yard scissors Tree Service
Credit
Comment
2.2.1 - Walkways

Trip Hazard

Loose and uneven stone. Trip hazards in need of improvement. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
2.5.1 - Decks

Gaps > 4

The deck guardrails where the deck is higher than 30 inches from the ground had gaps that were too large at more than one location. This poses a safety hazard for children (e.g. falling, getting stuck in railing). Guardrails should not have gaps or voids that allow passage of a sphere equal to or greater than 4 inches in diameter, or 6 inches in diameter at triangular spaces between stair edges and guardrails. At a minimum, the client should be aware of this hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace guardrails per standard building practices.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
Credit
Comment
2.6.1 - Deck Stairs

Open Risers

The stairs for the deck have open risers which pose a potential child safety hazard. Proper closure recommended. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

3 - Exterior

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Wood
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Trim Material
Wood
Windows: Window Type
Double Pane, Thermal
Exterior Doors: Condition
Satisfactory/Serviceable

The exterior doors appear to be of good quality and condition. 

Exterior lighting and receptacles: Exterior light fixtures
Present
Exterior lighting and receptacles: Exterior Receptacles
Operable, GFCI Protected
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Soffit Material
Vinyl, Vented
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Fascia Material
Wood
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Condition
Appears Satisfactory
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Limitations

The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Condition
Appears Serviceable

Appears to be cedar siding. The siding is in serviceable condition. This type of siding requires regular maintenance. Proper cleaning and reapplication of the protective finish will be needed to discourage water penetration and rot.  Should anticipate need for this maintenance every 5-7 years. 

There is an area at the rear South location of the building where the siding was placed over the foundation and is pulling loose. The siding should be properly secured to minimize risk of water entering behind the siding and causing damage. 


Windows: Condition
Satisfactory/Serviceable

The majority of the windows are Anderson thermal pane type. A representative number of windows were tested and operated as intended. Windows appear to be in good condition and of above average quality. 

Exterior lighting and receptacles: Lights Not Tested

One or more of the exterior light fixtures may not have been tested. 

Section 197-5.6        Exterior:
(a)       Home inspectors shall observe and report on:
1.         All exterior walls and coverings, flashing and trim;
2.         All exterior doors including garage doors and operators;
3.         All attached or adjacent decks, balconies, stoops, steps, porches and railings;
4.         All eaves, soffits and fascias where accessible from the ground level;
5.         All adjacent walkways, patios and driveways on the subject property;
6.         The condition of a representative number of windows.
(b)       Home inspectors are not required to observe and report on the following:
1.         Screening, shutters, awnings and other seasonal accessories;
2.         Fences;
3.         Geological and/or soil conditions;
4.         Recreational facilities;
5.         Out-buildings other than garages and carports;
6.         Tennis courts, jetted tubs, hot tubs, swimming pools, saunas and similar structures that would require specialized knowledge or test equipment;
7.         Erosion control and earth stabilization measures;
8.         The operation of security locks, devices or systems;
9.         The presence of safety-type glass or the integrity of thermal window seals or damaged glass.

Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Ground Clearance

Driveway surface was in contact with or less than 6 inches from siding, trim or structural wood at front areas of the garage. This is conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms and/or rot. Recommend grading or removing soil as necessary to maintain a 6-inch clearance. If not possible, then recommend replacing untreated wood with pressure-treated wood. Installation of borate-based products such as Impel rods can also reduce the likelihood of rot or infestation if soil cannot be removed. Note that damage from fungal rot and/or insects may be found when soil is removed, and repairs may be necessary.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.1.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Roof clearance

Areas where the roof surface was in contact or less than 2 inches from the siding. This increases risk of wood rotting. It is recommended to maintain at least 2 inches of clearance between the siding and roof surfaces. It is recommended that this be corrected or closely monitored for signs of rot. Siding has areas of fungal growth and worn protective finish where close to roofing. Proper cleaning and reapplication of finish needed to discourage rot. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
3.5.1 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Paint/Finish Failing

The fascia boards have areas where the protective finish is failing and/or fungal growth. This can lead to deterioration and rot of the material. Recommend that the areas be properly prepared and stained/ finished.

Paint roller Painting Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.5.2 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Pest Damage

Evidence of carpenter bee damage observed on areas of the fascia boards. Recommend a qualified pest control professional to evaluate and repair as needed.

Pest control Pest Control Pro

4 - Garage

General: Type
Attached
Vehicle Door: Condition
Required repair or replacement
Vehicle Door: Type
Sectional
Vehicle Door: # of Doors
1
Automatic Opener: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Automatic Opener: Mechanical auto-reverse operable
Yes
Floor: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Interior/Walls/Ceilings: Condition
Serviceable
Interior/Walls/Ceilings: Ventilation
Exists
Attached Garage-House Door: Condition
Required repair or replacement
Attached Garage-House Door: Type
Metal
Garage Electrical: Electrical components present
Yes, Functional
Garage Electrical: GFCI Protected receptacles
No
Garage Electrical: Handyman/Extension cord wiring
No
Garage Electrical: Receptacles Open Ground/Reverse Polarity
No
Windows: Condition
Appear Serviceable
General: Limitations
The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities. 
General: Stored items

Garage was filled with stored household items interior portions of garage are not fully visible recommend a reevaluation once items have been removed

Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Vehicle Door

Damaged, deteriorated

There is rusted and rotting metal at bottom areas of the overhead door. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace the door as necessary.  It appears that water is not properly draining away from the doors where the concrete extends beyond the doors and slopes towards the building. This should be corrected to minimize risk of on-going damage. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Vehicle Door

Guide rails rusted

There is rust-deterioration at bottom areas of the guide rails.  Replacement maybe needed to promote proper travel. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.4.1 - Floor

Slopes towards building

The concrete improperly slopes towards the building where the slab extends beyond the overhead door which is causing water to drain towards the garage and has likely contributed to the damage to the garage door and guide rails.  It is recommended that the concrete be corrected to properly slope away from the garage. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.6.1 - Attached Garage-House Door

Self Closing hinges not closing door

Door to house doesn't properly self close. Self closing hinges are not operating as intended. Repair recommended for increased safety. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
4.7.1 - Garage Electrical

Lack GFCI Protection

The garage receptacles lack GFCI protection as now required. It is recommended that a qualified electrician install GFCI protection for all garage receptacles to reduce the risk of an electrical shock/injury. 

Electric Electrical Contractor

5 - Roof

Inspection Method
Roof
Roof Pitch
Medium Slope
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Condition
Appears serviceable
Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Seamless Aluminum
Coverings: Material Approximate Age
1-5 year
Coverings: Layers of Material
1
Flashings: Material
Aluminum, Rubber
Chimney & Flues: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Coverings: Material Type
Architectural Asphalt
Limitations

The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Occupants should monitor the condition of roofing materials in the future. For older roofs, recommend that a professional inspect the roof surface, flashings, appurtenances, etc. annually and maintain/repair as might be required. If needed, the roofer should enter attic space(s). Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions perform adequately or are leak-free.

Roof Drainage Systems: Condition
Serviceable, Need Cleaning

Roof water control system consist of aluminum seamless gutters. The gutters appear intact and serviceable. 

Roof Drainage Systems: Gutter Maintenance

Be diligent in gutter maintenance and cleaning to help extend their life and prevent the run off from causing water infiltration into the basement, deteriorated foundations and other water related issues.

Coverings: Condition
Appears serviceable

Newer architectural asphalt shingles. No observable concerns. This type of roofing generally has around 30-35 years of projected life expectancy.  You should further investigate possibility of a transferable warranty. 

Flashings: Limited Visibility

All flashing is not visible for inspection.  No apparent problems or signs of leakage observed at this time.  Routinely seal/maintain all roof protrusions and flashing to reduce risk of leaks-damage.

Roof Drainage Systems: Not tested for leakage or blockage

Gutters and subsurface drains are not, tested for leakage or blockage.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Roof Drainage Systems

Debris

The gutter leaf guards have areas that are clogged with debris. Recommend cleaning to facilitate water flow and minimize risk of spillage.

Here is a DIY resource for cleaning your gutters. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Flashings

Kick-out Flashing

Multiple wall sections of the home had no kick-out flashing installed where walls extend past a roof edge. This condition may allow moisture intrusion of the exterior wall covering. Consistent moisture exposure at a point of roof discharge will degrade wall over time. Recommend correction by installing kick-out flashing at noted points.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Chimney & Flues

Metal chimney > 5' above roof, no bracing

The metal chimney servicing the fireplace extends higher than 5 feet above the roof surface, and has no bracing. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of the flue pipe moving and possibly being damaged or becoming loose. Surrounding flashing, roof sheathing and/or roof surface materials may also be over-stressed during chimney movement. Recommend that a qualified person install bracing per standard building practices.
Contractor Qualified Professional

6 - Attic & Roof Structure

Attic Access Location and Type of Access
Pull Down
Inspection Method
In Attic
Access: Method
Partially traversed
Roof Structure & Decking: Sheathing Type
Plywood
Insulation: Condition
Required repair or replacement
Insulation: Type
Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation: Vermiculite
None visible
Ventilation & Exhaust Ducts: Condition
Required repair or replacement
Roof Structure & Decking: Roof structure type
Trusses
Roof Structure & Decking: Structure Condition
Appeared Sound
Roof Structure & Decking: Sheathing Condition
Appears Sound
Ventilation & Exhaust Ducts: Types
Ridge vent(s), Enclosed soffit vents, Baffles
Limitation

The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.

The interior of the roof structure and components could not be fully evaluated as the areas of the home that have cathedral ceilings are not accessible and have been concealed by finish materials. Concealed damage may exist, which was not detected.


Section 197-5.15   Attics (a).      

Home inspectors shall observe and report on any safe and readily accessible attic space describing: 

  • 1.         The method of observation used; and 
  • 2.         Conditions observed. (b).      

Home inspectors are not required to enter any attic where no walkable floor is present or where entry would, in the opinion of the home inspector, be unsafe.

Section 197-5.13     

 Insulation and Ventilation (a).      Home inspectors shall: 

  • 1.         Observe, describe and report on insulation in accessible, visible unfinished spaces; 
  • 2.         Observe, describe and report on ventilation of accessible attics and foundation areas; 
  • 3.         Observe and report on mechanical ventilation systems in visible accessible areas. 

(b).      Home inspectors are not required to: 

  • 1.         Disturb insulation; 
  • 2.         Operate mechanical ventilation systems when weather or other conditions are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. 

Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Insulation

Can Lights - Lights w/ no visible rating

Recessed "can" lights were installed in the attic and were in contact with insulation. I was unable to find a label or markings that indicated that these lights are designed to be in contact with insulation. If lights are not "IC" rated then this is a fire hazard. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor to determine if these lights are rated for contact with insulation. If they aren't, or if their rating can't be determined, then recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary. For example, by installing shields around lights or moving insulation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
6.3.2 - Insulation

Compacted or Uneven

The ceiling insulation in one or more areas of the attic was compacted or uneven. Heating and cooling costs may be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices (typically R-38).

House construction Insulation Contractor
Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - Ventilation & Exhaust Ducts

Exhaust ducts - Not insulated

The exhaust duct for the first floor bathroom fan is not properly insulated. This can result in moisture forming inside the duct or "sweating" on the outside of the duct depending on the surrounding air temperature and the exhaust air temperature. There are water stains on the exhaust vent indicating there has been leakage in the past. Stains could be related to condensate fall-back and/or leakage at the roof outlet cap. This should be further investigated. Recommend that a qualified person install insulation per standard building practices (typically R-4 rating), or replace non-insulated ducts with insulated ducts. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

7 - Basement/Foundation

Foundation : Foundation material
Poured Concrete
Handrail: Handrail
Satisfactory, No Return
Lighting: Lighting
Satisfactory
Stairs: Condition
Satisfactory
General: Limitations
Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by under-floor insulation are also excluded from this inspection. Note that the inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. 

The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the basement in the future. Access to the basement during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of basement floor or stairwell drains, or determine if such drains are clear or clogged.

Note that all basement areas should be checked periodically for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity. 
General: No signs of water penetration

I found no observable evidence of on-going water penetration at time of the inspection, although as a visual inspection no guarantees are given regarding future basement leaks. 

Foundation : Condition
Satisfactory

The poured concrete foundation exhibits no major cracks or signs of movement as visible to observe. Visible evidence indicates sound and stable. 

Floor Substructure: Floor structure
Solid wood joists, Steel

2x10 floor joist and steel I beams used for the floor structure. Observable evidence indicates sound floor system. 

General: Finished Areas

Finish materials on walls and ceilings of the basement limited ability to determine condition of structural members and components. Inspection limited to structure-components that were readily visible to observe. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Floor Substructure

Missing post-beam ties

One or more support posts were not positively secured to the beam above. While this is common in older homes, current standards require positive connections between support posts and beams above. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing metal plates, plywood gussets or dimensional lumber connecting posts and beams.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Handrail

No returns

The handrail for the basement stairs has not return. It is now a requirement the handrails turn and connect to adjacent walls so objects or clothing will not catch on the open ends. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person install returns per standard building practices.

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.7.1 - Gaurdrail

Missing >30" high

The basement stairs requires a guard rail to prevent possible injury recommend qualified contractor to install per current safety standards.

Contractor Qualified Professional

8 - Electric

Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Below Ground
Panel: Brand
Square D, Eaton
Panel: Main service panel condition
Appeared serviceable
Panel: Location of main disconnect
Breaker at top of main service panel
Wiring: Condition
Serviceable
Wiring: Branch circuit wiring type
Non-metallic sheathed
AFCI: AFCI's
Not Present
Smoke and CO alarms: CO alarms installed
Yes but not tested
Smoke and CO alarms: Hard Wired and Interconnected
Not Determined
General: Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.

Service Entrance Conductors: Condition
Satisfactory

Underground lateral. Sections are buried and not visible. No observable concerns. 

Panel: Expansion
Space for Expansion

The main panel has no room for expansion. The sub-panel has a few spaces available.
            

Panel: 200 Amp Square D

The main electric panel is a 200 amp Square D breaker panel. The panel appears serviceable. No observable concerns. 

Panel: Sub-Panel

The sub panel is a 100 amp Eaton breaker panel. The panel appears serviceable. No observable concerns. 

Wiring: Modern Wiring

The branch circuit wiring is modern copper NM grounded type as visible. No observable concerns. Evidence suggest functioning as intended.  Note: Only visible portions of the branch circuit wiring were examined. 

Smoke and CO alarms: Smoke alarms installed
Yes but not tested

The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Smoke alarms should be installed in each bedroom, in hallways leading to bedrooms, on each level and in attached garages. They have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. For home buyers, batteries in smoke alarms should be changed when taking occupancy. Batteries should be replaced annually in the future. Carbon monoxide alarms should be installed in the vicinity of sleeping areas and on each level. For more information, visit:

SMKALRM

COALRM

Section 197-5.9        Electrical System
(a).      Home inspectors shall observe and report upon readily accessible and observable portions of:
1.         Service drop;
2.         Service entrance conductors, cables and raceways;
3.         The main and branch circuit conductors for property over current protection and condition by visual observation after removal of the readily accessible main and sub electric panel covers;
4.         Service grounding;
5.         Interior components of service panels and sub-panels;
6.         A representative number of installed lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles;
7.         A representative number of ground fault circuit interrupters.
(b).      Home inspections shall describe readily accessible and observable portions of:
1.         Amperage and voltage rating of the service;
2.         The location of main dis-connects and sub-panels;
3.         The presence of aluminum branch circuit wiring;
4.         The presence or absence of smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors;
5.         The general condition and type of visible branch circuit conductors that may constitute a hazard to the occupant or the residential building by reason of improper use or installation of electrical components.
(c).       Home inspectors are not required to:
1.         Observe and report on remote control devices;
2.         Observe and report on alarm systems and components;
3.         Observe and report on low voltage wiring systems and components such as doorbells and intercoms;
4.         Observe and report on ancillary wiring systems and components which are not a part of the primary electrical power distribution system;
5.         Insert any tool, probe or testing device into the main or sub-panels;
6.         Activate electrical systems or branch circuits which are not energized;
7.         Operate overload protection devices;
8.         Observe and report on low voltage relays, smoke and/or heat detectors, antennas, electrical de-icing tapes, lawn sprinkler wiring, swimming pool wiring or any system controlled by timers;
9.         Move any object, furniture or appliance to gain access to any electrical component;
10.       Test every switch, receptacle and fixture;
11.       Remove switch and outlet cover plates;
12.       Observe and report on electrical equipment not readily accessible;
13.       Dismantle any electrical device or control;
14.       Measure amperage, voltage or impedance;
15.       Observe and report on any solar powered electrical component or
any standby emergency generators or components.  

Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - AFCI

No AFCI's

There are no (AFCI) circuit breakers. AFCI breakers reduce the risk of fire by protecting against overheated or arcing receptacles or light fixtures. Recommend installation of AFCI breakers per current standards for increased safety.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.1 - Smoke and CO alarms

>10 years old

Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may have been installed more than 10 years ago. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit:

SMKALRMLS

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
8.6.2 - Smoke and CO alarms

Missing - CO

Carbon monoxide alarms were missing from one or more sleeping areas / on one or more levels. This is a potential safety hazard. Some states and/or municipalities require CO alarms to be installed in the vicinity of each sleeping area, on each level and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. Recommend installing additional carbon monoxide alarms per these standards. For more information, visit:
COALRM
Tools Handyman/DIY

9 - Heating and Cooling Systems

AFU Efficiency Rating
90+%
Heating Equipment: Energy Source
Propane
Heating Equipment: Heat Type
Forced Air
Heating Equipment: Condition
Appears Serviceable, Needs maintenance or repair
Operating and Safety Controls: Electrical Disconnect Present
Yes
Operating and Safety Controls: Fuel valve present
Yes
Operating and Safety Controls: ThermoStat Controls
Yes, Programmable
Distribution Systems: Forced Air Ductwork
Insulated
Burners : Condition
Appeared serviceable
Venting: Flue Type
High Efficiency PVC
Cooling Equipment: Approximate Age
5-10 yrs
Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Cooling Equipment: Condenser Unit Location
Exterior South
Filters: Condition
Required replacement
Heating Equipment: Brand
Bryant
Heating Equipment: Approximate Age
5-10 yrs
Cooling Equipment: Brand
Luxaire
Central Humidifier: Condition
Inoperative, Mineral Build-up
Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).

Burners : Properly Fired

The burners properly fired, had normal shape and color when system was tested. 

Venting: Periodic Inspections

The venting for the system appears to be in serviceable condition with no visual issues or concerns.  It is recommended that you have a professional complete a periodic inspection of all vent piping for signs of deterioration and/or loss of seal, which could allow noxious dangerous deadly gases to enter the home.

Cooling Equipment: Condition
Appear serviceable

The central air conditioning system operated as intended when tested. Supply air temperature measured at 55 degrees. 

Distribution Systems: Air Flow Distribution

Determining the air flow distribution to the house is beyond the scope of a home inspection.  HVAC contractor should be able to adjust the air flow by balancing the system, if needed.

Section 197-5.10      Heating System
(a).      Home inspectors shall:
1.         Describe the type of fuel, heating equipment and heating distribution system;
2.         Operate the systems using thermostats;
3.         Open readily accessible and operable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance;
4.         Observe and report on the condition of normally operated controls and components of the systems;
5.         Observe and report on visible flue pipes, dampers and related components for functional operation;
6.         Observe and report on the presence of and the condition of a representative number of heat sources in each habitable space of the residential building;
7.         Observe and report on the operation of fixed supplementary heat units;
8.         Observe and report on visible components of vent systems, flues and chimneys;
(b).      Home inspectors are not required to:
1.         Activate or operate the heating systems that do not respond to the thermostats or have been shut down;
2.         Observe, evaluate and report on heat exchangers;
3.         Observe and report on equipment or remove covers or panels that are not readily accessible;
4.         Dismantle any equipment, controls or gauges;
5.         Observe and report on the interior of chimney flues;
6.         Observe and report on heating system accessories, such as humidifiers, air purifiers, motorized dampers and heat reclaimers;
7.         Activate heating, heat pump systems or any other system when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment;
8.         Evaluate the type of material contained in insulation and/or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets and boilers;
9.         Evaluate the capacity, adequacy or efficiency of a heating or cooling system;
10.       Test or operate gas logs, built-in gas burning appliances, grills, stoves, space heaters or solar heating devices or systems;
11.       Determine clearance to combustibles or adequacy of combustion air;
12.       Test for gas leaks or carbon monoxide;
13.       Observe and report on in-floor and in-ceiling radiant heating systems.

Section 197-5.11      Air Conditioning Systems
(a).      Home inspectors shall:
1.         Observe, describe and report on the type of air conditioning equipment and air conditioning distribution system;
2.         Operate the system using the thermostat;
3.         Open a representative number of readily accessible and operable access panels provided by the manufacturer for routine homeowner maintenance;
4.         Observe and report on the condition of normally operated controls and components of the system.
(b).      Home inspectors are not required to:
1.         Activate or operate air conditioning systems that have been shut down;
2.         Observe and report on gas-fired refrigeration systems, evaporative coolers, or wall or window-mounted air conditioning units;
3.         Check the pressure of the system coolant or determine the presence of leakage;
4.         Evaluate the capacity, efficiency or adequacy of the system;
5.         Operate equipment or systems if exterior temperature is below 65 degrees Fahrenheit or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage equipment;
6.         Remove covers or panels that are not readily accessible or that are not part of routine homeowner maintenance;
7.         Dismantle any equipment, controls or gauges;
8.         Check the electrical current drawn by the unit;
9.         Observe and report on electronic air filters.

Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Heating Equipment

Recommend Service and Maintenance

The furnace operated as intended when tested, although there is rust inside the furnace beneath the condensate drain indication past leakage and the draft inducer motor had an abnormal whining noise upon start up. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean, service and certify furnace. The furnace should be serviced annually. 

Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - Cooling Equipment

Recommend annual service

I could not determine the last service date for the system. The system should be cleaned and serviced annually. Recommend a qualified HVAC contractor clean and service to promote system performance and longevity. 

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
9.7.1 - Filters

Disposable filter replacement

Air filters are dirty and need replacement. Recommend that home buyers replace the HVAC filters upon taking occupancy. Recommend checking filters monthly in the future and replacing as necessary. How frequently replacement will be necessary depends on the type and quality of the filter, how the system is configured (e.g. always on vs. "Auto"), and on environmental factors (e.g. pets, smoking, frequency of house cleaning, number of occupants, the season).

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
9.8.1 - Central Humidifier

Inoperative

Humidifier inoperative and water panel has mineral build up.  If intended for use repair and service needed.   Humidifiers are known to leak and cause damage to the furnace.  Routine service will be needed if used.

Fire HVAC Professional

10 - Plumbing

Service / Main Line: Condition
Appeared serviceable

The well stand pipe is metal and is located at the rear area of the yard. 

Service / Main Line: Type
Private well
Water Supply Lines: Distribution Material
Copper, Pex
Water Supply Lines: Distribution piping size
1/2", 3/4"
Drain and Waste Lines: Waste/Drain pipe condition
Appeared serviceable
Drain and Waste Lines: Waste/Drain pipe material
Plastic
Hot Water System: Power Source/Type
Propane
Hot Water System: Quantity of Water Heaters
One
Hot Water System: Capacity
40 Gallons
Hot Water System: Location
Basement
Hot Water System: Condition
Appears Serviceable
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Location of main fuel shut-off
At propane tank
Fuel Storage & Distribution Systems: Visible fuel storage systems
Above ground, propane tank
Hose Faucets: Condition
Serviceable
Hose Faucets: Hose Faucet location
Front, Rear
General: Limitations
The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment; private sewage disposal systems; hot tubs or spas; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; trap primers; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
Basement

The water supply line enters the building at the front North area of the basement. The main shut off valve is located where the line enters the building. 

Water Supply Lines: Water Supply Pipes Serviceable

The water supply pipes are a mixture or copper and PEX. The pipes are in serviceable condition with no visible leaks or problems detected at time of the inspection.

Drain and Waste Lines: PVC Serviceable

The waste lines are PVC as visible and appear to be in serviceable condition. I found no observable leaks or signs of blockages at time of the inspection. 

Hot Water System: Manufacturer
Bradford & White

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding. 

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help. 

Hot Water System: Approximate Age
10-15 Yrs

The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8-12 years. This water heater is near 12 years old and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future, or considering replacement now before any leaks occur. The client should be aware that significant flooding can occur if the water heater fails. If not replaced now, consider having a qualified person install a catch pan and drain or a water alarm to help prevent damage if water does leak.

Hose Faucets: Frost Free Type

Bibb at front of building is a frost-free type.  Under normal conditions the fixture self  drains to prevent potential freeze damage. Be sure to remove hoses prior to freezing conditions each year.

Hose Faucets: Not Frost Free Type

Hose faucet at rear of building doesnt appear to be frost free type. The bibb and pipe will need to be properly winterized prior to freeze conditions to prevent freeze damage. 

Pressure Tank: Appears older

The estimated useful life for most bladder pressure tanks is around 8-12 years. This tank appears to be well beyond that, possibly original to the building and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future, or considering replacement now before the tank fails. 

General: Private septic
Based on visible components or information provided to the inspector, this property appeared to have a private sewage disposal (septic) system. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Generally, septic tanks should be pumped and inspected every 3 years. Depending on the type of system and municipal regulations, inspection and maintenance may be required more frequently, often annually. Recommend the following:
  • Consult with the property owner about this system's maintenance and repair history
  • Review any documentation available for this system
  • Review inspection and maintenance requirements for this system
  • That a qualified specialist evaluate, perform maintenance and make repairs if necessary
For more information, visit:
SEPTIC
General: Private well
Based on visible equipment or information provided to the inspector, the water supply to this property appeared to be from a private well. Private well water supplies are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. The inspector does not test private well water for contamination or pollutants, determine if the supply and/or flow are adequate, or provide an estimate for remaining life of well pumps, pressure tanks or equipment. Only visible and accessible components are evaluated. Recommend the following:
  • That a qualified well contractor fully evaluate the well, including a pump/flow test
  • That the well water be tested per the client's concerns (coliforms, pH, contaminants, etc.)
  • Research the well's history (how/when constructed, how/when maintained or repaired, past performance, past health issues)
  • Document the current well capacity and water quality for future reference
For more information, visit:
WELL
General: Sewage ejector pump
A sewage ejector pump was installed on the premises. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. These systems are typically sealed and involve moving parts. They are subject to clogging and/or damage from disposal of items such as disposable diapers and sanitary napkins. Recommend that this pump and related equipment (piping, valves, etc.) be evaluated by a qualified plumber and repaired if necessary. This should be done per the manufacturer's recommendations in the future, or annually if unable to verify the manufacturer's recommendations. Typically, these pumps have a lifespan of 7-10 years. For more information, visit:
SEWEJPMP
Water Supply Lines: Limited Visual Inspection

The purpose of the inspection is to determine if the plumbing system is currently functional or not. A technical evaluation to determine the adequacy or ongoing usefulness of the plumbing pipes, fixtures, etc is not included. This service can be performed by a licensed plumber if desired. Also, drain lines from the house to the street or septic tank, particularly in older homes, may fail over time and require repair or replacement. Buried &/or concealed sewer drain lines are outside the scope of this inspection. Sewer lines can often be partially obstructed, cracked, crushed, disconnected or in some other way damaged in a way that would not be detected in this inspection. Repairs for this type of deficiency can be quite costly. Having such lines inspected / scoped by a qualified plumbing contractor may be prudent.

Section 197-5.8        

Plumbing System (a)       

Home inspectors shall observe and report on the following visibly and readily accessible components, systems and conditions: 

  • 1.         Interior water supply and distribution systems including fixtures and faucets; 
  • 2.         Drain, waste and vent systems; 
  • 3.         Water heating equipment and vents and pipes; 
  • 4.         Fuel storage and fuel distribution systems and components; 
  • 5.         Drainage sumps, sump pumps, ejector pumps and related piping; 
  • 6.         Active leaks. 

(b)       In inspecting plumbing systems and components, home inspectors shall operate all readily accessible: 

  • 1.         Fixtures and faucets; 
  • 2.         Domestic hot water systems; 
  • 3.         Drain pumps and waste ejectors pumps; 
  • 4.         The water supply at random locations for functional flow; 
  • 5.         Waste lines from random sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; 

(c)        Home inspectors are not required to: 

  • 1.         Operate any main, branch or fixture valve, except faucets, or to determine water  temperature; 
  • 2.         Observe and report on any system that is shut down or secured; 
  • 3.         Observe and report on any plumbing component that is not readily accessible; 
  • 4.         Observe and report on any exterior plumbing component or system or any underground drainage system; 
  • 5.         Observe and report on fire sprinkler systems; 
  • 6.         Evaluate the potability of any water supply; 
  • 7.         Observe and report on water conditioning equipment including softener and filter systems; 
  • 8.         Operate freestanding or built in appliances; 
  • 9.         Observe and report on private water supply systems; 
  • 10.       Test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage; 
  • 11.       Observe and report on gas supply system for materials, installation or leakage; 
  • 12.       Evaluate the condition and operation of water wells and related pressure tanks and pumps; the quality or quantity of water from on-site water supplies or the condition and operation of on-site sewage disposal systems such as cesspools, septic tanks, drain fields, related underground piping, conduit, cisterns and equipment; 
  • 13.       Observe, operate and report on fixtures and faucets if the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance; 
  • 14.       Record the location of any visible fuel tank on the inspected property that is not within or directly adjacent to the structure; 
  • 15.       Observe and report on any spas, saunas, hot-tubs or jetted tubs; 
  • 16.       Observe and report on any solar water heating systems. 

 (d).      Home inspections shall describe the water supply, drain, waste and vent piping materials; the water heating equipment including capacity, and the energy source and the location of the main water and main fuel shut-off valves.  In preparing a report, home inspectors shall state whether the water supply and waste disposal systems are a public, private or unknown.

Credit
Comment
10.5.1 - Drain and Waste Lines

Banded Couplings

Banded couplings have been used for one or more of the pipe connections. These are usually not allowed as they can work loose, or can degrade and leak.  You should have a qualified plumber correct the banded coupling connections.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.6.1 - Hot Water System

Life Expectancy

The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8-12 years. This water heater is near 12 years old and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future, or considering replacement now before any leaks occur. The client should be aware that significant flooding can occur if the water heater fails. If not replaced now, consider having a qualified person install a catch pan and drain or a water alarm to help prevent damage if water does leak.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.8.1 - Hose Faucets

Anti-Siphon device

Current hose faucet at rear of building does not have a anti-siphon device. Modern hose faucets have an anti-siphon device to prevent the cross connection of contaminated and potable water sources. Recommend a qualified plumber to upgrade to current standards.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
10.9.1 - Sewage Ejector Pump

Sewage Ejector Pump

The drain pump for the wet bar sink has a leak where the discharge pipe connects to the check valve.  A qualified plumber should be consulted for repair.

The sewage ejector pump for the basement bathroom appeared to be operating as intended. I cycled on 4 times and found no leaks or signs of seal failure. 

A sewage ejector pump was installed on the premises. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. These systems are typically sealed and involve moving parts. They are subject to clogging and/or damage from disposal of items such as disposable diapers and sanitary napkins. Recommend that this pump and related equipment (piping, valves, etc.) be evaluated by a qualified plumber and repaired if necessary. This should be done per the manufacturer's recommendations in the future, or annually if unable to verify the manufacturer's recommendations. Typically, these pumps have a lifespan of 7-10 years. For more information, visit:

SEWEJPMP

Contractor Qualified Professional

11 - Laundry

Laundry Location
Laundry Room
Floor: Floor Coverings
Tile
Walls and Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls and Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Window(s): Window Type
Casement, Thermal
Window(s): Window Material
Vinyl
Door(s): Door Type/Material
Solid core
Electrical Components: GFCI Protected Receptacles
Present
Washer/Dryer: Washing machine condition
Appears serviceable
Washer/Dryer: Dryer Condition
Appears serviceable
Washer/Dryer: Dryer Power Source
220 Electric

Gas and electric connections available. Currently gas dryer 

Washer/Dryer: Dryer Vent location
Wall
Washer/Dryer: Dryer Vent Material
Metal (Flex)
Laundry Sink: Laundry Sink
Yes, Functional Flow, Functional Drainage
Washer/Dryer: Washing Machine Brand
Maytag
Washer/Dryer: Dryer Brand
Maytag
Washer/Dryer: Dryer Maintenance and Safety Recommendations

*Have dryer and exhaust ducts inspected and cleaned annually.

*Always follow the dryer manufacturers recommendations.

*If the exhaust duct system is not up to current standard, have it replaced or corrected.

*It is good practice to always run the dryer long enough so that the last few minutes push only hot, dry air into the duct. This will help to clear out any remaining moisture.

*Install a fire extinguisher in laundry area, but not over the dryer.

*Install smoke alarm in laundry area.

*Install CO alarm in laundry area (Gas dryer only).

*Clean lint filter before every cycle.

Washer/Dryer: Washing Machine Hoses

You should replace the washing machine water supply hoses every  3-5 years and shut off when not in use to reduce the risk of leaks subsequent damage.

Washer/Dryer: Containment Pan

It is recommended to install a secondary containment pan beneath the washing machine to reduce risk of saying event of leakage. 

12 - Kitchen

Floor: Condition
Satisfactory
Floor: Floor Coverings
Tile
Walls and Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls and Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Window(s): Window Type
Casement, Thermal
Window(s): Window Material
Vinyl
Window(s): Missing insect screen

One missing screen noted. Check availability with owner. 

Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Granite
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinets Serviceable

Cabinets are in good and serviceable condition. 

Plumbing Components: Condition
Appears Serviceable
Electrical Components: GFCI Protected Receptacles
Not Present
Refrigerator: Operational
Yes
Range/Oven/Cooktop/Exhaust : Operational
Yes
Range/Oven/Cooktop/Exhaust : Range/Oven Energy Source
Electric
Range/Oven/Cooktop/Exhaust : Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Built-in Microwave: Operational
Yes
Heating Source: Heating Source
Present
Refrigerator: Brand
Whirlpool
Refrigerator: Age

Manufactured 08/15

Range/Oven/Cooktop/Exhaust : Range/Oven Brand
Whirlpool
Dishwasher: Brand
Bosch
Built-in Microwave: Age

Manufacturer date of 10/15

General: Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.

Range/Oven/Cooktop/Exhaust : Ductless Exhaust

The exhaust hood is a recirculating-ductless type, you should considering upgrading to an exhaust that discharges directly to the exterior to remove excess moisture, reduce potential damages and promote indoor air quality.

Range/Oven/Cooktop/Exhaust : Filter Cleaning

The filter will need to be periodically cleaned or replaced to prevent grease build-up and the potential for a fire.

Dishwasher: Operational
Yes

Dishwasher was operated in normal mode, run through a complete, normal cycle. Function and operation appear to be normal. Lower access panel not removed. At the time of the inspection the dishwasher did not leak. Care should be taken the first time the dishwasher is run after a period of inactivity because seals tend to dry out and can leak at first. If this happens dry the area inside the unit where the leak is occurring and then re-start the dishwasher. Also be sure to follow the manufactures recommendation for type of soap and amount as this can be the cause of leaking. If it continues to leak repair is required.

Credit
Comment
12.6.1 - Plumbing Components

S trap

Kitchen sink drain is plumbed using an S Trap, these are subject to trap seal failure. Recommend qualified plumber to replace with current standards.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.7.1 - Electrical Components

Kitchen electrical receptacles not to current standards

Some of the kitchen electrical receptacles do not meet current safety standards-lack GFCI protection. Recommend a qualified electrician to repair to current standards to prevent possible injury.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
12.7.2 - Electrical Components

Light inoperative

The light in front of the kitchen window  is inoperative. The bulb should be replaced prior to further investigation. Function should be verified prior to closing. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Wet Bar

Floor: Condition
Satisfactory
Floor: Floor Coverings
Laminate
Walls and Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls and Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Granite
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Plumbing Components: Condition
Appears Serviceable
Refrigerator: Operational
Yes
Heating Source: Heating Source
Present
Refrigerator: Brand
Haier
Credit
Comment
13.6.1 - Electrical Components

Receptacle not GFCI protected

Receptacle near Floor lacks GFCI protection. Recommend a qualified electrician to repair to current standards to prevent possible injury.

Electric Electrical Contractor

14 - Basement Bathroom

General: Bathroom Type
Full Bathroom
General: Bathroom location
Basement
Floor: Floor Coverings
Tile
Floor: Condition
Satisfactory
Counter: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Walls and Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls and Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Door(s): Door Type/Material
Hollow core
Vanity: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Sink(s): Condition
Appeared serviceable
Toilet: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Shower: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Electrical Components: GFCI Protected Receptacles
Present
Ventilation: Bathroom Ventilation
Ventilation fan, Operational
Heating Source: Heating Source
Present
General: LImitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.

Section 197-5.8        Plumbing System

(a)       Home inspectors shall observe and report on the following visibly and readily accessible components, systems and conditions:
1.         Interior water supply and distribution systems including fixtures and faucets;
2.         Drain, waste and vent systems;
3.         Water heating equipment and vents and pipes;
4.         Fuel storage and fuel distribution systems and components;
5.         Drainage sumps, sump pumps, ejector pumps and related piping;
6.         Active leaks.

(b)       In inspecting plumbing systems and components, home inspectors shall operate all readily accessible:
1.         Fixtures and faucets;
2.         Domestic hot water systems;
3.         Drain pumps and waste ejectors pumps;
4.         The water supply at random locations for functional flow;
5.         Waste lines from random sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;

(c)        Home inspectors are not required to:
1.         Operate any main, branch or fixture valve, except faucets, or to determine water  temperature;
2.         Observe and report on any system that is shut down or secured;
3.         Observe and report on any plumbing component that is not readily accessible;
4.         Observe and report on any exterior plumbing component or system or any underground drainage system;
5.         Observe and report on fire sprinkler systems;
6.         Evaluate the potability of any water supply;
7.         Observe and report on water conditioning equipment including softener and filter systems;
8.         Operate freestanding or built in appliances;
9.         Observe and report on private water supply systems;
10.       Test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage;
11.       Observe and report on gas supply system for materials, installation or leakage;
12.       Evaluate the condition and operation of water wells and related pressure tanks and pumps; the quality or quantity of water from on-site water supplies or the condition and operation of on-site sewage disposal systems such as cesspools, septic tanks, drain fields, related underground piping, conduit, cisterns and equipment;
13.       Observe, operate and report on fixtures and faucets if the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance;
14.       Record the location of any visible fuel tank on the inspected property that is not within or directly adjacent to the structure;
15.       Observe and report on any spas, saunas, hot-tubs or jetted tubs;
16.       Observe and report on any solar water heating systems. 

(d).      Home inspections shall describe the water supply, drain, waste and vent piping materials; the water heating equipment including capacity, and the energy source and the location of the main water and main fuel shut-off valves.  In preparing a report, home inspectors shall state whether the water supply and waste disposal systems are a public, private or unknown.

Credit
Comment
14.7.1 - Sink(s)

Corrugated drain pipe

A section of the sink drain is corrugated drain pipe. This types of drain pipes increase risk of blockage. Should consider having a qualified plumber replace with a non-corrugated pipe. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

15 - First Floor Bathroom

General: Bathroom Type
Full Bathroom
General: Bathroom location
1st Fl
Floor: Floor Coverings
Tile
Floor: Condition
Satisfactory
Counter: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Walls and Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls and Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Window(s): Window Type
Casement, Thermal
Window(s): Window Material
Vinyl
Door(s): Door Type/Material
Hollow core
Vanity: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Sink(s): Condition
Appeared serviceable
Toilet: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Shower: Condition
Appeared serviceable

Some cracked sealant at corner joints need resealing to prevent leakage 

Electrical Components: GFCI Protected Receptacles
Present
Ventilation: Bathroom Ventilation
Ventilation fan, Operational
Heating Source: Heating Source
Present
General: LImitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.

Section 197-5.8        Plumbing System

(a)       Home inspectors shall observe and report on the following visibly and readily accessible components, systems and conditions:
1.         Interior water supply and distribution systems including fixtures and faucets;
2.         Drain, waste and vent systems;
3.         Water heating equipment and vents and pipes;
4.         Fuel storage and fuel distribution systems and components;
5.         Drainage sumps, sump pumps, ejector pumps and related piping;
6.         Active leaks.

(b)       In inspecting plumbing systems and components, home inspectors shall operate all readily accessible:
1.         Fixtures and faucets;
2.         Domestic hot water systems;
3.         Drain pumps and waste ejectors pumps;
4.         The water supply at random locations for functional flow;
5.         Waste lines from random sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;

(c)        Home inspectors are not required to:
1.         Operate any main, branch or fixture valve, except faucets, or to determine water  temperature;
2.         Observe and report on any system that is shut down or secured;
3.         Observe and report on any plumbing component that is not readily accessible;
4.         Observe and report on any exterior plumbing component or system or any underground drainage system;
5.         Observe and report on fire sprinkler systems;
6.         Evaluate the potability of any water supply;
7.         Observe and report on water conditioning equipment including softener and filter systems;
8.         Operate freestanding or built in appliances;
9.         Observe and report on private water supply systems;
10.       Test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage;
11.       Observe and report on gas supply system for materials, installation or leakage;
12.       Evaluate the condition and operation of water wells and related pressure tanks and pumps; the quality or quantity of water from on-site water supplies or the condition and operation of on-site sewage disposal systems such as cesspools, septic tanks, drain fields, related underground piping, conduit, cisterns and equipment;
13.       Observe, operate and report on fixtures and faucets if the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance;
14.       Record the location of any visible fuel tank on the inspected property that is not within or directly adjacent to the structure;
15.       Observe and report on any spas, saunas, hot-tubs or jetted tubs;
16.       Observe and report on any solar water heating systems. 

(d).      Home inspections shall describe the water supply, drain, waste and vent piping materials; the water heating equipment including capacity, and the energy source and the location of the main water and main fuel shut-off valves.  In preparing a report, home inspectors shall state whether the water supply and waste disposal systems are a public, private or unknown.

Credit
Comment
15.10.1 - Shower

Door unit leaks

The shower door unit shows signs of leakage. Repair or replacement recommended to minimize risk of secondary water related damage. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

16 - Master Bathroom

General: Bathroom Type
Full Bathroom
General: Bathroom location
1st Fl
Floor: Floor Coverings
Tile
Floor: Condition
Satisfactory
Counter: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Walls and Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls and Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Window(s): Window Type
Casement, Thermal
Window(s): Window Material
Vinyl
Door(s): Door Type/Material
Hollow core
Vanity: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Sink(s): Condition
Appeared serviceable
Toilet: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Bathtub: Condition
Appeared serviceable
Electrical Components: GFCI Protected Receptacles
Present
Ventilation: Bathroom Ventilation
Ventilation fan, Operational
Heating Source: Heating Source
Present
General: LImitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.

Section 197-5.8        Plumbing System

(a)       Home inspectors shall observe and report on the following visibly and readily accessible components, systems and conditions:
1.         Interior water supply and distribution systems including fixtures and faucets;
2.         Drain, waste and vent systems;
3.         Water heating equipment and vents and pipes;
4.         Fuel storage and fuel distribution systems and components;
5.         Drainage sumps, sump pumps, ejector pumps and related piping;
6.         Active leaks.

(b)       In inspecting plumbing systems and components, home inspectors shall operate all readily accessible:
1.         Fixtures and faucets;
2.         Domestic hot water systems;
3.         Drain pumps and waste ejectors pumps;
4.         The water supply at random locations for functional flow;
5.         Waste lines from random sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;

(c)        Home inspectors are not required to:
1.         Operate any main, branch or fixture valve, except faucets, or to determine water  temperature;
2.         Observe and report on any system that is shut down or secured;
3.         Observe and report on any plumbing component that is not readily accessible;
4.         Observe and report on any exterior plumbing component or system or any underground drainage system;
5.         Observe and report on fire sprinkler systems;
6.         Evaluate the potability of any water supply;
7.         Observe and report on water conditioning equipment including softener and filter systems;
8.         Operate freestanding or built in appliances;
9.         Observe and report on private water supply systems;
10.       Test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage;
11.       Observe and report on gas supply system for materials, installation or leakage;
12.       Evaluate the condition and operation of water wells and related pressure tanks and pumps; the quality or quantity of water from on-site water supplies or the condition and operation of on-site sewage disposal systems such as cesspools, septic tanks, drain fields, related underground piping, conduit, cisterns and equipment;
13.       Observe, operate and report on fixtures and faucets if the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance;
14.       Record the location of any visible fuel tank on the inspected property that is not within or directly adjacent to the structure;
15.       Observe and report on any spas, saunas, hot-tubs or jetted tubs;
16.       Observe and report on any solar water heating systems. 

(d).      Home inspections shall describe the water supply, drain, waste and vent piping materials; the water heating equipment including capacity, and the energy source and the location of the main water and main fuel shut-off valves.  In preparing a report, home inspectors shall state whether the water supply and waste disposal systems are a public, private or unknown.

17 - Common Rooms

General: Common Room Types
Living Room, Dinning Room, Family Room
Floors: Floor Coverings
Laminate, Hardwood
Floors: Condition
Satisfactory
Walls and Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls and Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall, Wood
Windows: Window Type
Casement, Thermal, Double Pane
Windows: Window Material
Wood, Vinyl
Electrical components: Ceiling Fan
Operational
Electrical components: Receptacles
Yes
Electrical components: Switches
Yes
Heating Source: Heating Source
Present

Section 197-5.12      Interior
(a).      Home inspectors shall:
1.         Observe and report on the material and general condition of walls, ceilings and floors;
2.         Observe and report on steps, stairways and railings;
3.         Observe, operate and report on garage doors, garage door safety devices and garage door operators;
4.         Where visible and readily accessible, observe and report on the bath and/or kitchen vent fan ducting to determine if it exhausts to the exterior of the residential building;
5.         Observe, operate and report on a representative number of primary windows and interior doors;
6.         Observe and report on visible signs of water penetration.
(b).      Home inspectors are not required to:
1.         Ignite fires in a fireplace or stove to determine the adequacy of draft, perform a chimney smoke test or observe any solid fuel device in use;
2.         Evaluate the installation or adequacy of inserts, wood burning stoves or other modifications to a fireplace, stove or chimney;
3.         Determine clearance to combustibles in concealed areas;
4.         Observe and report on paint, wallpaper or other finish treatments;
5.         Observe and report on window treatments;
6.         Observe and report on central vacuum systems;
7.         Observe and report on household appliances;
8.         Observe and report on recreational facilities;
9.         Observe and report on lifts, elevators, dumbwaiters or similar devices.

18 - Bedrooms

General: Smoke Detector
Not Present
General: Closet
Present
Floors: Floor Coverings
Laminate, Carpet
Floors: Condition
Moderate Wear
Walls and Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Walls and Ceilings: Ceiling Material
Drywall
Windows: Window Type
Casement, Thermal
Windows: Window Material
Vinyl
Doors: Door Type/Material
Hollow core
Electrical components: Ceiling Fan
Operational, Not Present All Rooms
Electrical components: Receptacles
Yes
Electrical components: Switches
Yes
Heating Source: Heat Source
Present
General: Bedroom clarification

Several factors are used to determine if a room is a "Bedroom" the following are some examples per current building codes of features a "Bedroom" must have.

  • Heat source
  • Power source
  • A secondary means of egress to the exterior of the home.
  • Minimum Square footage
  • Minimum ceiling height.

It is not within the NY Standards of Practice for a home inspector to decide if a "room" is a bedroom. The room count is fed from Realestate data and is not defined by the inspector.

Electrical components: Restricted views

Due to stored household items/furniture some switches and receptacles may not have been visible/tested at time of inspection. 

19 - Fireplaces

Fireplace: Fireplace Location
Living room, Dining room
Fireplace: Hearth Extension Area
Proper
Fireplace: Damper
Operational
Fireplace: Fireplace Doors
Present, Functional
Fireplace: Type of Fireplace
Vented, Metal Wood Burning
Fireplace: Level II Chimney Inspection

NFPA 211 15.4.1 9(3) States the requirement for a level II chimney inspection shall be performed for sale or transfer of the property. A level II chimney inspection will incorporate the use of a video camera system to inspect the chimney components. Potential defects may be concealed without the use of a level II chimney inspection. It is our recommendation that any wood burning fireplace be inspected by a Licensed Level II chimney inspection contractor. Click link below for more information regarding this topic.

NFPA 211 codes and standards

Section 197-5.14      Fireplaces
(a).      Home inspectors shall:
1.         Observe and report on visible and accessible system components;
2.         Observe and report on visible and accessible chimneys and vents;
3.         Observe and report on chimney caps;
4.         Observe and report on fireplaces and solid fuel burning appliances;
5.         Observe and report on chimneys;
6.         Observe, operate and report on accessible fireplace dampers.
(b).      Home inspectors are not required to:
1.         Observe and report on the interiors of flues or chimneys;
2.         Observe and report on fire screens and doors;
3.         Observe and report on automatic fuel feed devices;
4.         Observe and report on mantles and fireplace surrounds;
5.         Observe and report on combustion make-up air devices;
6.         Observe and report on heat distribution assists;
7.         Ignite or extinguish fires;
8.         Determine draft characteristics;
9.         Move fireplace inserts and stoves or firebox contents.