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1234 Main St.
Santa Ana, CA 92701
04/19/2019 9:00AM

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agent

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Agency Name
37
Maintenance items
46
Recommendations
17
Safety hazards

This is a summary review of the inspectors' findings during this inspection. However, it does not contain every detailed observation. This is provided as an additional service to our client, and is presented in the form of a listing of the items which, in the opinion of your inspector, merit further attention, investigation, or improvement. Some of these conditions are of such a nature as to require repair or modification by a skilled craftsman, technician, or specialist. Others can be easily handled by a homeowner such as yourself.

Often, following the inspector's advice will result in improved performance and/or extended life of the component(s) in question. In listing these items, your inspector is not offering any opinion as to who, among the parties to this transaction, should take responsibility for addressing any of these concerns. As with most of the facets of your transaction, we recommend consultation with your Real Estate Professional for further advice with regards to the following items.

Signature Home Inspection has partnered with Residential Warranty Services to bring more value to our clients. Order your home warranty here for an additional 6 months of coverage for using Signature Home Inspection for your home inspection. That is 18 months of home warranty coverage for the price of 12 months. The Simple Warranty by Residential Warranty Services represents the broadest coverage available in the market today. All options are included, no known preexisting conditions and they offer a best coverage guarantee. In fact, if you are denied coverage for a claim that can be verified eligible by any other policy they will either cover it or give you 100% of your premium back. With Residential Warranty Services, you are simply covered.



1 - Scope and Limitations

YOUR REPORT

Thank you for choosing Signature Home Inspection (SHI) to inspect your new home! Please carefully read your entire Inspection Report. If you have any questions throughout the closing process don't hesitate to ask. This report is based on an inspection of the visible portion of the structure at the time of the inspection with a focus on safety and function, not on current building or municipality codes. Any and all evaluations or repairs made by SHI should be carried out prior to closing. We recommend that you and/or your representative carry out a final walk-through inspection immediately before closing to check the condition of the property.

A home inspection is limited in scope and lower in cost than many individual inspections. Client is hereby informed that exhaustive inspections are available from specialists in a multitude of disciplines such as roofing, plumbing, pools, heating and air conditioning, decking, electrical, fenestration (windows and doors) and environmental quality among others. Additional inspections by specialists in a particular field will be more exhaustive and thorough, and likewise cost significantly more than a home inspection. A home inspection is intended to identify evidence of problems which exist. Since home inspections are non-destructive, the home inspector can only report on the evidence that is observable at the time of the inspection. A home inspection is specifically not exhaustive in nature, and therefore cannot identify defects that may be discovered only through more rigorous testing than a home inspection allows. A generalist inspection is essentially visual and does not include the dismantling of any component, or the sampling of air and inert materials. Consequently, a generalist inspection and report will not be as comprehensive or technically exhaustive as that by a specialist, and it is not intended to be.

We do not review plans, permits, recall lists, and/or government or local municipality documents. Information regarding recalled appliances, fixtures and any other items in this property can be found on the Consumer Product Safety website. These items may be present but are not reviewed.

We are specifically prohibited by state law from commenting on damage caused by termites and other wood-destroying organisms, which is the responsibility of a state-licensed pest control expert and commonly mandated as a condition of sale and usually scheduled and paid for by the sellers. More importantly, a home inspection does not include mold, air, contaminate, radon, asbestos, lead, drug residue or other sampling unless otherwise agreed to. Mold testing services are available by this company and other companies for an additional fee.

Numerous digital photographs have been taken of the house to document the flaws noted or defects observed when possible. Sometimes it is not possible to take a photograph of a defect due to location, lighting, or other obstructions. Numerous pictures may be taken of a house but not all photographs will necessarily be included with the report.

If similar defects are found at several locations throughout the house, only a representative number of photos may be shown in the report. Repair should not be limited to only those areas, but at all instances of the defect (such as aged angle stop valves, failed GFCI, failed windows, worn rollers, etc.)

Due to personal items such as towels, clothing, personal items, hygiene and/or cleaning products, There is limited accessibility and visibility as a result. We may not be able to test or inspect each and every outlet, heating and air conditioning supply, window, wall surface or other inaccessible components. We therefore recommend a follow-up inspection to be performed prior to the close of title, perhaps at your pre-closing walk through when furnishings and stored items are removed and accessibility is better. We recommend you carefully inspect the cabinets and closets prior to close of escrow. The home inspector does not move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, or debris that obstructs access or visibility.

WHEN THINGS GO WRONG

There may come a time when you discover something wrong with the house you purchased, and you may be upset or disappointed with your home inspection.  There are some things wed like you to keep in mind.

Intermittent or Concealed Problems:

Some problems can only be discovered by living in a house.  They cannot be discovered during the few hours of a home inspection.  For example, some shower stalls leak when people are in the shower, but do not leak when you simply turn on the tap.  Some roofs and basements only leak when specific conditions exist.  Some problems will only be discovered when carpets are lifted, furniture is moved or finishes are removed.

No Clues:

These problems may have existed at the time of the inspection, but there were no clues as to their existence.  Our inspections are based on the past performance of the house. If there are no clues of a past problem, it is unfair to assume we should foresee a future problem.

We Always Miss Some Minor Things:

Some say we are inconsistent because our reports identify some minor problems, but not others.  The minor problems that are identified were discovered while looking for more significant problems.  We note them simply as a courtesy.  The intent of the inspection is not to find the $200 problems; it is to find the $2,000 problems.  These are the things that affect peoples decisions to purchase.

Contractors Advice:

A common source of dissatisfaction with home inspectors comes from comments made by contractors.  Contractors opinions often differ from ours. Don't be surprised when three roofers all say the roof needs replacement, when we said that the roof would last a few more years with some minor repairs.

Last Man in Theory:

While our advice represents the most prudent thing to do, many contractors are reluctant to undertake these repairs.  This is because of the last man in theory. The contractor fears that if he is the last person to work on the roof, he will get blamed if the roof leaks, regardless of whether or not the roof leak is his fault. Consequently, he wont want to do a minor repair with high liability, when he could re-roof the entire house for more money and reduce the likelihood of a callback.  This is understandable.

Most Recent Advice Is Best:

There is more to the last man in theory.  It suggests that it is human nature for homeowners to believe the last bit of expert advice they receive, even if it is contrary to previous advice. As home inspectors, we unfortunately find ourselves in the position of first man in and consequently it is our advice that is often disbelieved.

Why Didn't We See It?

Contractors often say, I cant believe you had this house inspected, and the inspector didn't find this problem.  There are several reasons for these apparent oversights:

  • Most Contractors Have No Clue Whats Inside or Outside The Scope Of A Standard Home Inspection:  All of our inspections are conducted in accordance with the NACHI Standards of Practice.  The Standards of Practice specifically state what's included and excluded from the standard home inspection. Most contractors have no clue this document exists and many of them have a tendency to blame the Home Inspector for any issue found, regardless of whether the issue is within the scope of the standard home inspection. 
  • Conditions During the Inspection: It is difficult for homeowners to remember the circumstances in the house at the time of the inspection.  Homeowners seldom remember that it was snowing, there was storage everywhere or that the furnace could not be turned on because the air conditioning was operating, etc.  It's impossible for contractors to know what the circumstances were when the inspection was performed.
  • The Wisdom of Hindsight: When the problem manifests itself, it is very easy to have 20/20 hindsight. Anybody can say that the basement is wet when there is 2 feet of water on the floor.  Predicting the problem is a different story.
  • A Long Look:  If we spent half an hour under the kitchen sink or 45 minutes disassembling the furnace, wed find more problems, too.  Unfortunately, the inspection would take several days and would cost considerably more.
  • Were Generalists:  We are generalists; we are not specialists.  The heating contractor may indeed have more heating expertise than we do.  This is because we are expected to have heating expertise and plumbing expertise, structural expertise, electrical expertise, etc.
  • An Invasive Look:  Problems often become apparent when carpets or plaster are removed, when fixtures or cabinets are pulled out, and so on.  A home inspection is a visual examination.  We don't perform invasive or destructive tests.
  • Not Insurance:  In conclusion, a home inspection is designed to better your odds of not purchasing a money pit.  It is not designed to eliminate all risk.  For that reason, a home inspection should not be considered an insurance policy.  The premium that an insurance company would have to charge for a policy with no deductible, no limit and an indefinite policy period would be considerably more than the fee we charge.  It would also not include the value added by the inspection.
THIS REPORT IS NOT A WARRANTY

Receipt of this report by any purchasers of this property other than the party(s) identified on the cover page of this report is not authorized by the inspector. The inspector strongly advises against any reliance on this report by such party(s). We recommend that you retain a qualified home inspector to provide you with your own inspection and report on this property. Liability under this report is limited to the party identified on the cover page of this report. The Home Inspection and the Inspection Report do not constitute and shall not be considered to be a warranty, either expressed or implied, concerning the present or future condition of the Property, the presence or absence of latent or hidden defects that are not reasonably ascertainable in a competently performed home inspection, or the remaining useful life of any system or component of the property. This report is not binding unless the pre-inspection agreement has been signed by the client and returned to Wind River Property LLC dba Signature Home Inspection along with payment of the inspection fee.

OUTSIDE THE SCOPE OF THE HOME INSPECTION

The following areas and descriptions are not included in the scope of this inspection:

  •    Structural integrity,
  •    Geological stability or ground condition of site,
  •    System design problems or functional adequacy, operational capacity, quality of suitability for particular use of items inspected,
  •    Fireplace and flue draft,
  •    Capacity for the garbage disposal to grind food or the dishwasher to clean properly,
  •    Cosmetic items including, but not limited to minor scratches, scrapes, dents, cracks, stains, soiled or faded surfaces, 
  •    Wells or well pumps,
  •    Septic systems,
  •    Cisterns
  •    Sewer lines beyond the foundation wall and not visible,
  •    Fountains,
  •    Electronic air cleaners or filters,
  •    Water quality or volume,
  •    Water conditioning systems,
  •    Environmental hazards,
  •    Active or passive solar systems,
  •    Security systems,
  •    Detached buildings or equipment unless specifically included and paid for in the agreement,
  •    Central vacuum systems,
  •    Wall or window mounted air conditioning systems,
  •    Home warranty and component warranties.
KEYS TO THE HOME INSPECTION

The home inspection was performed in accordance with the Standard of Practice and Code of Ethics of the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI). These standards are included in the report under each section summary. An earnest effort was made on your behalf to discover all visible defects, however, in the event of an oversight, maximum liability must be limited to the price of the home inspection. This inspection is an evaluation of the condition of the home. Any areas that are not safe, readily accessible and/or visible to the inspector will not be included in the home inspection report. The home inspection is not intended as a substitute for a Sellers Disclosure. This home inspection is not a compliance inspection or certification of any kind. It simply is an inspection of the condition of the home at the time of the inspection. This inspection does not cover items or conditions that may be only discovered by invasive methods. No removal of materials or dismantling of systems shall be performed under this inspection. This is not a technically exhaustive inspection. The inspection report lists the systems and components inspected Signature Home Inspection Items not found in this report are considered beyond the scope of the inspection and should not be considered inspected at this time. This report contains technical information that may not be readily understandable to the lay person. Therefore, a verbal consultation with the inspector is a mandatory part of this inspection. If you choose not to consult with the inspector, Signature Home Inspection cannot be held liable for your understanding or misunderstanding of this reports contents. If you were not present during this inspection, please call the office at (888-860-2688) to arrange for your verbal consultation.

MOLD

This home inspection is not an inspection for mold. Mold can be present in any home. Mold cannot grow unless there is excess moisture. The key to mold control is moisture control. While this inspection attempts to detect high moisture conditions that can lead to mold growth, be advised that mold can grow in hidden areas which are beyond the scope of this inspection. If mold is a concern to you, you should obtain a further evaluation by a mold specialist prior to the end of the inspection contingency.

DO NOT RELY ON THIS REPORT FOR IDENTIFICATION OF MOLD OR OTHER ALLERGENS UNLESS CLIENT AUTHORIZES THE COLLECTION AND TESTING OF AREAS OF CONCERN. THE REAL ESTATE INSPECTION COMPANY SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY MOLD RELATED ISSUES UNLESS SAMPLES AND TESTING ARE AUTHORIZED BY PAYMENT OF ADDITIONAL MOLD SAMPLING FEES.

Recommended reading -  A Brief Guide to Mold Moisture and Your Home 

NOTICE TO THIRD PARTIES OR OTHER PURCHASERS

Receipt of this report by any purchasers of this property other than the party(s) identified on the cover page of this report is not authorized by the inspector. The inspector strongly advises against any reliance on this report. We recommend that you retain a qualified home inspector to provide you with your own inspection and report on this property. Liability under this report is limited to the party identified on the cover page of this report.

NOTICE: CODES AND REGULATIONS

It is always wise to check with the Building and Codes Department of your local township or municipality for permit information and code requirements when there is a question regarding the construction or remodeling of a home.

IMPORTANT PEST NOTICE AND DISCLAIMER

California termites can attack a home at the fascia, eave, rafter tail, Attic and Crawlspace areas. Signature Home Inspection recommends that the Client obtain a pest inspection and report from a Qualified and Licensed Structural Pest Inspector before the end of the Inspection Period. California law allows only persons who possess a valid Structural Pest Control License, issued by the State of California Structural Pest Control Board, to inspect or make reports with respect to pest infestations including wood destroying insects, termites, and other organisms such as fungus (causing wood rot). This report is not a termite inspection and no responsibility is assumed for any infestation or damage caused by wood-destroying organisms. More information can be found here http://www.pestboard.ca.gov

HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO REPLACE?

This is a home inspection question that we often get asked. Here is a good reference source for estimating costs for home repairs and services. It will give you a price range. Let me know if you find this helpful in your Real Estate transactions. https://www.fixr.com/costguides.html

1. Definitions and Scope

1.1.  A general home inspection is a non-invasive, visual examination of the accessible areas of a residential property (as delineated below), performed for a fee, which is designed to identify defects within specific systems and components defined by these Standards that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector.  The scope of work may be modified by the Client and Inspector prior to the inspection process.

  1. The general home inspection is based on the observations made on the date of the inspection, and not a prediction of future conditions. 
     
  2. The general home inspection will not reveal every issue that exists or ever could exist, but only those material defects observed on the date of the inspection.

 1.2.  A material defect is a specific issue with a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk to people.  The fact that a system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal, useful life is not, in itself, a material defect.
1.3.  A general home inspection report shall identify, in written format, defects within specific systems and components defined by these Standards that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector.  Inspection reports may include additional comments and recommendations.
 2. Limitations, Exceptions & Exclusions

2.1. Limitations:

  1. An inspection is not technically exhaustive.
  2. An inspection will not identify concealed or latent defects. 
  3. An inspection will not deal with aesthetic concerns or what could be deemed matters of taste, cosmetic defects, etc. 
  4. An inspection will not determine the suitability of the property for any use. 
  5. An inspection does not determine the market value of the property or its marketability.
  6. An inspection does not determine the insurability of the property. 
  7. An inspection does not determine the advisability or inadvisability of the purchase of the inspected property. 
  8. An inspection does not determine the life expectancy of the property or any components or systems therein. 
  9. An inspection does not include items not permanently installed. 
  10. This Standards of Practice applies to properties with four or fewer residential units and their attached garages and carports.

 2.2. Exclusions:

 I. The inspector is not required to determine:

  1. property boundary lines or encroachments.
  2. the condition of any component or system that is not readily accessible. 
  3. the service life expectancy of any component or system. 
  4. the size, capacity, BTU, performance or efficiency of any component or system. 
  5. the cause or reason of any condition. 
  6. the cause for the need of correction, repair or replacement of any system or component. 
  7. future conditions. 
  8. compliance with codes or regulations. 
  9. the presence of evidence of rodents, birds, bats, animals, insects, or other pests. 
  10. the presence of mold, mildew or fungus.
  11. the presence of airborne hazards, including radon. 
  12. the air quality. 
  13. the existence of environmental hazards, including lead paint, asbestos or toxic drywall.
  14. the existence of electromagnetic fields. 
  15. any hazardous waste conditions. 
  16. any manufacturers' recalls or conformance with manufacturer installation, or any information included for consumer protection purposes.
  17. acoustical properties.
  18. correction, replacement or repair cost estimates. 
  19. estimates of the cost to operate any given system.

 II. The inspector is not required to operate:

  1. any system that is shut down.
  2. any system that does not function properly. 
  3. or evaluate low-voltage electrical systems, such as, but not limited to:

           1. phone lines;
           2. cable lines;
           3. satellite dishes;
           4. antennae;  
           5. lights; or
           6. remote controls. 

     
  4. any system that does not turn on with the use of normal operating controls. 
  5. any shut-off valves or manual stop valves. 
  6. any electrical disconnect or over-current protection devices. 
  7. any alarm systems. 
  8. moisture meters, gas detectors or similar equipment.

 III. The inspector is not required to:

  1. move any personal items or other obstructions, such as, but not limited to:  throw rugs, carpeting, wall coverings, furniture, ceiling tiles, window coverings, equipment, plants, ice, debris, snow, water, dirt, pets, or anything else that might restrict the visual inspection.
  2. dismantle, open or uncover any system or component.
  3. enter or access any area that may, in the inspector's opinion, be unsafe. 
  4. enter crawlspaces or other areas that may be unsafe or not readily accessible. 
  5. inspect underground items, such as, but not limited to: lawn-irrigation systems, or underground storage tanks (or indications of their presence), whether abandoned or actively used. 
  6. do anything that may, in the inspector's opinion, be unsafe or dangerous to him/herself or others, or damage property, such as, but not limited to:  walking on roof surfaces, climbing ladders, entering attic spaces, or negotiating with pets. 
  7. inspect decorative items. 
  8. inspect common elements or areas in multi-unit housing. 
  9. inspect intercoms, speaker systems or security systems.
  10. offer guarantees or warranties. 
  11. offer or perform any engineering services. 
  12. offer or perform any trade or professional service other than general home inspection. 
  13. research the history of the property, or report on its potential for alteration, modification, extendibility or suitability for a specific or proposed use for occupancy. 
  14. determine the age of construction or installation of any system, structure or component of a building, or differentiate between original construction and subsequent additions, improvements, renovations or replacements. 
  15. determine the insurability of a property.
  16. perform or offer Phase 1 or environmental audits.
  17. inspect any system or component that is not included in these Standards.

 3. Standards of Practice
 
3.1. Roof
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves:

  1. the roof-covering materials;
  2. the gutters;
  3. the downspouts;
  4. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and 
  5. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs.

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of roof-covering materials.

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

 

  1. observed indications of active roof leaks.

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. walk on any roof surface.
  2. predict the service life expectancy. 
  3. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. 
  4. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces.
  5. move insulation. 
  6. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments.
  7. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspector's opinion, to be unsafe.
  8. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. 
  9. perform a water test.
  10. warrant or certify the roof.
  11. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

 3.2. Exterior
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the exterior wall-covering materials; 
  2. the eaves, soffits and fascia;
  3. a representative number of windows;
  4. all exterior doors;
  5. flashing and trim;
  6. adjacent walkways and driveways;
  7. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
  8. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
  9. railings, guards and handrails; and 
  10. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. 

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of exterior wall-covering materials.

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails.

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting.
  2. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. 
  3. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. 
  4. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. 
  5. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. 
  6. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. 
  7. inspect for safety-type glass. 
  8. inspect underground utilities. 
  9. inspect underground items. 
  10. inspect wells or springs. 
  11. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. 
  12. inspect swimming pools or spas. 
  13. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. 
  14. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. 
  15. inspect drainfields or dry wells. 
  16. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

 3.3. Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the foundation;
  2. the basement;
  3. the crawlspace; and
  4. structural components.

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of foundation; and
  2. the location of the access to the under-floor space.

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil;
  2. observed indications of active water penetration; 
  3. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and
  4. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern.

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself.
  2. move stored items or debris. 
  3. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. 
  4. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. 
  5. provide any engineering or architectural service. 
  6. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

 3.4. Heating
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the heating system, using normal operating controls.

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the heating system;
  2. the energy source; and
  3. the heating method.

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any heating system that did not operate; and
  2. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible.

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect, measure, or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, makeup air, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems.
  2. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. 
  3. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. 
  4. light or ignite pilot flames. 
  5. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. 
  6. override electronic thermostats. 
  7. evaluate fuel quality.
  8. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.
  9. measure or calculate the air for combustion, ventilation, or dilution of flue gases for appliances. 

 3.5. Cooling
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the cooling system, using normal operating controls.

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and
  2. the cooling method.

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. any cooling system that did not operate; and
  2. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system.
  2. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. 
  3. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65 Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. 
  4. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. 
  5. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

 3.6. Plumbing
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the main water supply shut-off valve;
  2. the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  3. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  4. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  5. all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  6. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  7. the drain, waste and vent system; and
  8. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  2. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  3. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  4. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and 
  5. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. 

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  2. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  3. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and
  4. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate.

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. light or ignite pilot flames.
  2. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. 
  3. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. 
  4. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. 
  5. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. 
  6. open sealed plumbing access panels. 
  7. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. 
  8. operate any valve.
  9. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. 
  10. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. 
  11. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, back-flow prevention or drain-stop devices. 
  12. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. 
  13. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems.
  14. inspect wastewater treatment systems.
  15. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. 
  16. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. 
  17. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. 
  18. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. 
  19. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. 
  20. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation.
  21. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing.
  22. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

 3.7. Electrical
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the service drop;
  2. the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  3. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  4. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  5. the electric meter and base;
  6. service-entrance conductors;
  7. the main service disconnect;
  8. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  9. service grounding and bonding;
  10. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  11. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  12. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  2. the type of wiring observed.

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  2. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  3. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  4. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and
  5. the absence of smoke detectors. 

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures.
  2. operate electrical systems that are shut down. 
  3. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts.
  4. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. 
  5. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms. 
  6. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarm systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. 
  7. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled.
  8. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. 
  9. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. 
  10. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any time-controlled devices. 
  11. verify the service ground. 
  12. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. 
  13. inspect spark or lightning arrestors.
  14. inspect or test de-icing equipment. 
  15. conduct voltage-drop calculations. 
  16. determine the accuracy of labeling.
  17. inspect exterior lighting. 

 3.8. Fireplace  
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;
  2. lintels above the fireplace openings;
  3. damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and
  4. cleanout doors and frames.

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of fireplace.

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;
  2. manually operated dampers that did not open and close;
  3. the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;
  4. the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and
  5. cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect the flue or vent system.
  2. inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels. 
  3. determine the need for a chimney sweep. 
  4. operate gas fireplace inserts. 
  5. light pilot flames. 
  6. determine the appropriateness of any installation. 
  7. inspect automatic fuel-fed devices. 
  8. inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices. 
  9. inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted. 
  10. ignite or extinguish fires. 
  11. determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics. 
  12. move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents. 
  13. perform a smoke test.
  14. dismantle or remove any component.
  15. perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection.
  16. perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

 3.9. Attic, Insulation & Ventilation
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas;
  2. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and
  3. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the type of insulation observed; and
  2. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure.

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces.

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard.
  2. move, touch or disturb insulation. 
  3. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. 
  4. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. 
  5. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. 
  6. activate thermostatically operated fans. 
  7. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring.
  8. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

 3.10. Doors, Windows & Interior
 
 I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them;
  2. floors, walls and ceilings;
  3. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps;
  4. railings, guards and handrails; and
  5. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls.

 II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener.

 III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings;
  2. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and
  3. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals.

 IV. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments.
  2. inspect floor coverings or carpeting.
  3. inspect central vacuum systems. 
  4. inspect for safety glazing. 
  5. inspect security systems or components. 
  6. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. 
  7. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. 
  8. move suspended-ceiling tiles. 
  9. inspect or move any household appliances. 
  10. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. 
  11. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. 
  12. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. 
  13. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. 
  14. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. 
  15. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. 
  16. operate or examine any sauna, steam-generating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. 
  17. inspect elevators. 
  18. inspect remote controls. 
  19. inspect appliances. 
  20. inspect items not permanently installed.
  21. discover firewall compromises. 
  22. inspect pools, spas or fountains.
  23. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. 
  24. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

 4. Glossary of Terms

  • accessible:  In the opinion of the inspector, can be approached or entered safely, without difficulty, fear or danger.
  • activate:  To turn on, supply power, or enable systems, equipment or devices to become active by normal operating controls. Examples include turning on the gas or water supply valves to the fixtures and appliances, and activating electrical breakers or fuses.
  • adversely affect:  To constitute, or potentially constitute, a negative or destructive impact.
  • alarm system:  Warning devices, installed or freestanding, including, but not limited to: carbon-monoxide detectors, flue gas and other spillage detectors, security equipment, ejector pumps, and smoke alarms.
  • appliance:  A household device operated by the use of electricity or gas. Not included in this definition are components covered under central heating, central cooling or plumbing.
  • architectural service:  Any practice involving the art and science of building design for construction of any structure or grouping of structures, and the use of space within and surrounding the structures or the design, design development, preparation of construction contract documents, and administration of the construction contract.
  • component:  A permanently installed or attached fixture, element or part of a system.
  • condition:  The visible and conspicuous state of being of an object.
  • correction:  Something that is substituted or proposed for what is incorrect, deficient, unsafe, or a defect.
  • cosmetic defect:  An irregularity or imperfection in something, which could be corrected, but is not required.
  • crawlspace:  The area within the confines of the foundation and between the ground and the underside of the lowest floor's structural component.
  • decorative:  Ornamental; not required for the operation of essential systems or components of a home.
  • describe:  To report in writing a system or component by its type or other observed characteristics in order to distinguish it from other components used for the same purpose.
  • determine:  To arrive at an opinion or conclusion pursuant to examination.
  • dismantle:  To open, take apart or remove any component, device or piece that would not typically be opened, taken apart or removed by an ordinary occupant.
  • engineering service:  Any professional service or creative work requiring engineering education, training and experience, and the application of special knowledge of the mathematical, physical and engineering sciences to such professional service or creative work as consultation, investigation, evaluation, planning, design and supervision of construction for the purpose of assuring compliance with the specifications and design, in conjunction with structures, buildings, machines, equipment, works and/or processes.
  • enter:  To go into an area to observe visible components.
  • evaluate:  To assess the systems, structures and/or components of a property.
  • evidence:  That which tends to prove or disprove something; something that makes plain or clear; grounds for belief; proof.
  • examine:  To visually look (see inspect).
  • foundation:  The base upon which the structure or wall rests, usually masonry, concrete or stone, and generally partially underground.
  • function:  The action for which an item, component or system is specially fitted or used, or for which an item, component or system exists; to be in action or perform a task.
  • functional:  Performing, or able to perform, a function.
  • functional defect:  A lack of or an abnormality in something that is necessary for normal and proper functioning and operation, and, therefore, requires further evaluation and correction. 
  • general home inspection:  The process by which an inspector visually examines the readily accessible systems and components of a home and operates those systems and components utilizing this Standards of Practice as a guideline.
  • home inspection:  See general home inspection.
  • household appliances:  Kitchen and laundry appliances, room air conditioners, and similar appliances.
  • identify:  To notice and report.
  • indication:  That which serves to point out, show, or make known the present existence of something under certain conditions.
  • inspect:  To examine readily accessible systems and components safely, using normal operating controls, and accessing readily accessible areas, in accordance with this Standards of Practice.
  • inspected property:  The readily accessible areas of the buildings, site, items, components and systems included in the inspection.
  • inspection report:  A written communication (possibly including images) of any material defects observed during the inspection.
  • inspector:  One who performs a real estate inspection.
  • installed:  Attached or connected such that the installed item requires a tool for removal.
  • material defect:  A specific issue with a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk to people.  The fact that a system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal, useful life is not, in itself, a material defect.
  • normal operating controls:  Describes the method by which certain devices (such as thermostats) can be operated by ordinary occupants, as they require no specialized skill or knowledge.
  • observe:  To visually notice.
  • operate:  To cause systems to function or turn on with normal operating controls.
  • readily accessible:  A system or component that, in the judgment of the inspector, is capable of being safely observed without the removal of obstacles, detachment or disengagement of connecting or securing devices, or other unsafe or difficult procedures to gain access.
  • recreational facilities:  Spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment and athletic facilities.
  • report (verb form): To express, communicate or provide information in writing; give a written account of.  (See also inspection report.)
  • representative number:  A number sufficient to serve as a typical or characteristic example of the item(s) inspected.
  • residential property:  Four or fewer residential units.
  • residential unit:  A home; a single unit providing complete and independent living facilities for one or more persons, including permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking and sanitation.
  • safety glazing:  Tempered glass, laminated glass, or rigid plastic.
  • shut down:  Turned off, unplugged, inactive, not in service, not operational, etc.
  • structural component:  A component that supports non-variable forces or weights (dead loads) and variable forces or weights (live loads).
  • system:  An assembly of various components which function as a whole.
  • technically exhaustive:  A comprehensive and detailed examination beyond the scope of a real estate home inspection that would involve or include, but would not be limited to:  dismantling, specialized knowledge or training, special equipment, measurements, calculations, testing, research, analysis, or other means.
  • unsafe:  In the inspector's opinion, a condition of an area, system, component or procedure that is judged to be a significant risk of injury during normal, day-to-day use. The risk may be due to damage, deterioration, improper installation, or a change in accepted residential construction standards.
  • verify:  To confirm or substantiate.

2 - Inspection Details

Inspector
Scott Knudson
Type of Home
Single Family
Payment Method
Invoiced
In Attendance
Client, Realtor
Weather Conditions
Clear
Temp
Hot
Ground
Damp
Foundation
Slab
Excluded
Septic, Security, Irrigation, Pool, Hot tub, Well, Sheds, Playground, Sauna, Outdoor lighting, Central vacuums, Water filter, Water softener, Sound, Intercom, Generator, Sport court, Sea wall, Outbuildings, Operating skylights, Operating awnings, Exterior bbq grills, Fire pits, Micro Fridges, Plumbing Slab Leaks, Elevator, Wall/Window Mounted A/C, Electric Car Charger, Wine Cellar
Left Side Elevation Photo
Left Side
Right Side Elevation Photo
Right Side
Rear Elevation Photo
Rear
Occupancy
Furnished, Occupied

Definitions:

FURNISHED - Access to some items such as electrical outlets/receptacles, windows, wall/floor surfaces, and cabinet interiors may be restricted by furniture or personal belongings. Any such items are excluded from this inspection report. 

OCCUPIED - Similar to FURNISHED. Potentially more areas of restricted acces due to furniture and personal belongs. Areas that are restricted are excluded from this inspection report.

UNOCCUPIED - The home was not being lived in and was empty of furniture at the time of the inspection.

VACANT - Access to plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems may be limited due to those systems being turned off. Access to other parts of the home may be limited due to locked doors, barricades or usage conditions. Any items or areas that are not accessible for the above reasons will be excluded from this report.

STAGED - The home was unoccupied, but had been staged with furniture at the time of the inspection. Homes that are not used on a full-time basis may have problems, such as plumbing leakage, that will not be identified without regular use.

UTILITIES OFF - The utilities were shut off to the house at the time of the inspection. The plumbing, electrical and heating systems could not be fully evaluated and should be completely evaluated after the utilities are turned on and prior to settlement.

Backyard Elevation Photo
Outside Rear
CA Pool Safety Act Requirements
Less than Two Approved Safety Features

Safety features that comply with the new law, as outlined in Senate Bill 442:

  1. An enclosure that isolates the swimming pool or spa from the private single-family home.
  2. Removable mesh fencing that meets American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Specifications F2286 standards in conjunction with a gate that is self-closing and self-latching and can accommodate a key lockable device.
  3. An approved safety pool cover
  4. Exit alarms on the private single-family homes doors that provide direct access to the swimming pool or spa. The exit alarm may cause either an alarm noise or a verbal warning, such as a repeating notification that the door to the pool is open.
  5. A self-closing, self-latching device with a release mechanism placed no lower than 54 inches above the floor on the private single-family homes doors providing direct access to the swimming pool or spa.
  6. An alarm that, when placed in a swimming pool or spa, will sound upon detection of accidental or unauthorized entrance into the water. The alarm shall meet and be independently certified to the ASTM Standard F2208 Standard Safety Specification for Residential Pool Alarms, which includes surface motion, pressure, sonar, laser, and infrared type alarms. A swimming protection alarm feature designed for individual use, including an alarm attached to a child that sounds when the child exceeds a certain distance or becomes submerged in water, is not a qualifying drowning prevention safety feature.
  7. Other means of protection, if the degree of protection afforded is equal to or greater than that afforded by any of the features set forth above and has been independently verified by an approved testing laboratory as meeting standards for those features established by the ASTM or the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).
Excluded: Furniture, Stored Items - Many

Many wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by large amounts of furniture and/or stored items. Many areas couldn't be evaluated.

General Warnings: CO Alarms

This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and should have at least one carbon monoxide alarm for each floor. If missing recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. 

ORDER CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTORS HERE

General Warnings: Updated GFCI Comment

One or more electric receptacles (outlets) had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. 

General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:

Outdoors (since 1973)

Bathrooms (since 1975)

Garages (since 1978)

Kitchens (since 1987)

Crawl spaces and unfinished basements (since 1990)

Wet bar sinks (since 1993)

Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005)

ORDER GFCI'S OUTLETS HERE

3 - Exterior

Footing Material
Not Visible
Foundation Material
Concrete
Wall Structure
Wood Frame
Wall Cover
Stucco
Driveway
Concrete
Sidewalk
Concrete, Paving Stones, Brick
Exterior Door Material
Sliding Glass
Exterior Limitations

The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings, foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris, wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.

Siding: Exterior Recently Painted

The exterior of the property has been recently painted. New paint makes it difficult for the inspector to see any previous damage and or moisture stains.

Excluded : Foundation and/or Walls

One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.

Excluded : Steep Slope

Home inspectors are not soil engineers and generally advised against making comment and recommendations regarding slopes noted on property. If client is concerned about possible lot and or/soil movement it is recommended that the client contact and hire a licensed and reputable soil engineer for further evaluation.

Retaining Walls not present.

Stairs not present.

Handrails not present.

Propane Tank not present.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

Credit
Comment
3.2.1 - Siding

Stucco - Repair, Replace Stucco

Minor cracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the stucco siding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace stucco siding as necessary.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.2.2 - Siding

Composition Wood Fiber - Minor, Maintain

This property is clad with composition wood fiber siding. Many brands of this type of siding by different manufacturers are known to deteriorate and/or fail prematurely due to moisture penetration. Failure is typically visible in the form of swelling, cracking and delamination, especially at the bottom edges.  Class action lawsuits have been filed or are being filed against most manufacturers of this material. 

Some areas of siding on this structure show the symptoms described above, but it appears that the siding hasn't deteriorated to the point of needing replacement. Some manufacturers (Louisiana Pacific) recommend a repair process for this siding where affected areas are sealed with "Permanizer Plus", a flexible primer made by Pittsburgh Paint, followed by two coats of 100% acrylic latex paint. This sealant must be applied to the bottom edges using a brush. The face of the siding can be sprayed. The "Permanizer Plus" sealer isn't required for edges that aren't swollen, cracked or deteriorated, but the acrylic latex should still be brushed on these edges.

At a minimum, recommend having a qualified contractor seal and repaint as described above, or by other methods specified by the siding's manufacturer. The client(s) may wish to have a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if some or all of the siding should be replaced.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Electrical

Light Fixtures - No Caulk Around Back Plate

One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures have wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
3.3.2 - Electrical

Light Fixtures - Loose or Substandard

One or more light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.6.1 - Driveway

Minor Cracks

Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

House front Driveway Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.7.1 - Sidewalks and Patios

Minor Cracks

Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.9.1 - Soil Contact

Soil w/in 6" of Siding/Trim

Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.10.1 - Vegetation

<1' From Exterior

Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

Grass Lawncare Professional
Credit
Comment
3.11.1 - Drainage

Negative Perimeter Slope - Soil

The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.

Here is a helpful article discussing negative grading.

Triangle Grading Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.11.2 - Drainage

Drain Covers

One or more drain covers were missing/damaged. Covers should be replaced as necessary.

Yard scissors Landscaping Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.12.1 - Downspouts

Terminate Above Roof Surface

One or more downspouts terminate above roof surfaces rather than being routed to gutters below or to the ground level. This is very common, but it can reduce the life of roof surface materials below due to large amounts of water frequently flowing over the roof surface. Granules typically are washed off of composition shingles as a result, and leaks may occur. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install extensions as necessary so downspouts don't terminate above roof surfaces.

Gutter Gutter Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.12.2 - Downspouts

Dented, Crushed or Damaged

One or more downspouts are dented, damaged and/or crushed. This can restrict the water flow and result in clogging and overflowing gutters. Water may  accumulate around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Damaged downspouts should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

Gutter Gutter Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.16.1 - Fascia

Deteriorated

Fascia boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
3.21.1 - Paint & Caulk

Caulk Missing or Deteriorated

Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
3.25.1 - Outside Area

Lawn Sprinklers Hitting House

The lawn watering system needs to be adjusted so water does not hit the side of the home. Recommend repair or replacement.

Grass Lawncare Professional

4 - Roofing

Roof Inspection Method
From Eves, From Ground, From Windows
Estimated Age of Roof
25 to 30 Years
Roof Layers
One
Roof Type
Gable, Hipped
Roof Covering
Tile
Evidence of Past or Current Leaks
No
Roof Vents
Good
Ridge Caps
Good
Gutter & Downspout Material
Metal
Roof Ventilation
Unable to Determine
Roofing Limitations

The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access, solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions performed adequately or were leak-free.

Excluded: Roofing Special Notes Disclaimer

Although not required to, we generally attempt to evaluate various roof types by walking on their surfaces. If we are unable or unwilling to do this for safety reason or possible physical damage to the roofing system, we will indicate the method used to evaluate them. Every roof will wear differently relative to its age, number of layers, quality of material, method of application, exposure to weather conditions, and the regularity of its maintenance. We can only offer an opinion of the general quality and condition of the roofing material. The inspector cannot and does not offer an opinion or warranty as to whether the roof leaks or may be subject to future leakage. The waterproof membrane beneath roofing materials is generally concealed and cannot be examined without removing the roof material. Although roof condition can be evaluated, it is virtually impossible for anyone to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water tests, which are beyond the scope of our service. Even water stains on ceilings or on framing within attics will not necessarily confirm an active leak without some corroborative evidence, and such evidence can be deliberately concealed. We evaluate every roof conscientiously, and even attempt to approximate its age, but we will not predict its remaining life expectancy, or guarantee that it will not leak. Naturally, the sellers or the occupants of a residence will generally have the most intimate knowledge of the roof and of its history. Therefore, we recommend that you ask the sellers about it, and that you either include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy, or that you obtain a roof certification from an established local roofing company. We do not inspect attached accessories including by not limited to solar systems, antennae, and lightning arrestors

Roof Design: Slope - Wall

One or more roof surface sections slope down towards exterior walls. Debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate in this area than rest of the roof. Leaks may occur as a result. Recommend monitoring such areas for accumulated debris in the future and cleaning as necessary.

Excluded: Couldn't Traverse

Because of the Home Owners Association (HOA), roof covering type and/or the configuration of the roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.

Composition not present.

Flat Roof not present.

Metal not present.

Shakes not present.

Built-up Roofing not present.

EPDM Roofing not present.

Masonite Woodruf not present.

Skylight(s) not present.

New Composition Roof will Need not present.

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspector’s opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Concrete or Tile

Chipped or Cracked

One or more roofing tiles are chipped and/or cracked. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and replace tiles as necessary.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Concrete or Tile

Slipped

One or more roofing tiles have slipped, and are loose. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
4.7.1 - Vegetation and Maintenance

Moss

Moss is growing on the roof. As a result, shingles may lift or be damaged. Leaks may result and/or the roof surface may fail prematurely. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Efforts should be taken to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically zinc-based chemicals are used for this, and must be applied periodically.

Tools Handyman/DIY

5 - Electrical

Service Type
Underground
Protection
Breakers
Amperage
100
Voltage
120/240
Location of Sub-Panels
N/A
Service Entrance Conductor Material
Aluminium
System Ground
Aluminium
Main Disconnect Rating
100
Branch Circuit Wiring Type
Copper
Aluminum Wiring Present
Yes
Smoke Detectors
Yes
Electrical Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection- generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring, underground utilities and systems, low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings or stored items are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested, these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke detectors is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors should be verified and batteries should be changed. Smoke detectors have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.

Location of Main Service Switch
Outside
Excluded: Electrical Special Notes Disclaimer

While we are not licensed electricians and in accordance with the standards of practice we only test a representative number of switches and outlets and do not perform load-calculations to determine if the supply meets the demand. However, every electrical deficiency or recommended upgrade should be regarded as a latent hazard that should be serviced as soon as possible, along with evaluation and certification of the entire system as safe by a licensed contractor. Therefore, it is essential that any recommendations that we may make for service or upgrades should be completed before the close of escrow, because an electrician could reveal additional deficiencies or recommend additional upgrades for which we disclaim any responsibility. Any electrical repairs or upgrades should be made by a licensed electrician. Aluminum wiring requires periodic inspection and maintenance by a licensed electrician. Smoke Alarms should be installed within 15 feet of all bedroom doors, and tested regularly. Inoperative light fixtures often lack bulbs or have dead bulbs installed.

The inspector is not required to insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels, test or operate any over-current device except for ground fault interrupters, nor dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels. Any ancillary wiring or system that is not part of the primary electrical distribution system is not part of this inspection but may be mentioned for informational purposes only, including but not limited to low voltage systems, security system devices, heat detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, telephone, security, cable TV, intercoms, and built in vacuum equipment.

Excluded: Interior/Exterior Low Voltage Lighting

Low voltage exterior/interior lighting was found during the inspection. This is considered to be a specialty system. Only a cursory evaluation of this lighting was performed during the inspection. For a full evaluation, the client(s) should hire a qualified electrician.

Service Drop Wires not present.

Service Mast not present.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panel boards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the service entrance conductors’ insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panel board, sub-panels, distribution panel boards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panel board cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any time controlled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Service and/or Panel

Inadequate Working Space

Inadequate working space exists for the main service panel. Standard building practices require the following clearances:

  • An area 30 inches wide by 3 feet deep exists in front of the panel
  • The panel is at least 5 1/2 feet above the floor
  • There is at least 6 feet 6 inches of headroom in front of the panel
  • The wall below the panel is clear to the floor

A qualified contractor and/or electrician should evaluate and make modifications as necessary.

Electric Electrical Contractor

6 - Plumbing

Service Pipe
Copper
Supply Pipe
Copper
Vent Pipe
Plastic
Drain Pipe
Plastic, Not Visible
Waste Pipe
Plastic
Water Pressure
60 to 70 psi
Pressure Regulator
Yes
Location of Main Water Shut-Off
Outside
Location of Main Water Meter
Outside
Location of Main Fuel Shut-Off
Outside
Plumbing and Laundry Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment, private sewage disposal systems, hot tubs or spas, main, side and lateral sewer lines, gray water systems, pressure boosting systems, trap primers, incinerating or composting toilets, fire suppression systems, water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems, plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs, underground utilities and systems, overflow drains for tubs and sinks, backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determining the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.

Excluded: Plumbing Special Notes Disclaimer

The home inspector in no way can determine the condition plumbing pipes that are concealed in walls counties and below grade. The home inspector will do his best to describe what type systems are present in. The home inspector will not determine the percentage of copper versus galvanized in a home that has been re-piped. If the home inspector diagnose the system as no apparent leaks on the day of inspection. This does not mean that there is not leaks present. It only means that there were no leaks visibly apparent. Destructive evaluations the plumbing system is not allowed during a basic home inspection.

Modern plumbing system will utilize PEX tubing. This tubing functions under certain water pressure and temperatures that help to prevent leaks. It is important to maintain proper water pressure levels along with hot water heater temperatures. Client should seek the assistance of a licensed plumber if higher hot water temperature is desired in the home.

The plumbing inspection is not a guarantee or warranty against future leaks, clogs or predictions of the future performance of the plumbing systems. It is merely a snapshot of the functionality of the primary plumbing system on the day of inspection.

Water and Gas Piping: No Gas Meter Wrench

A meter wrench should be located in the vicinity of the gas meter as recommended in areas subject to seismic activity. A proper wrench should be chained to the meter to provide a convenient means for shutoff in an emergency. The valve can be turned 90 degrees in either direction to shut the gas supply off.

Order a Gas Meter Wrench Here

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

Credit
Comment
6.6.1 - Waste Clean Out

No Main Clean Out

The Inspector was unable to locate a clean out for the main sewer pipe. Generally-accepted modern standards mandate that a full-size clean out be located within 5 feet of the foundation in line with the building drain and sewer. The Inspector recommends repair by a qualified contractor.
Pipes Plumbing Contractor

7 - Laundry

Dryer Energy Supply
220 Volt, Gas
Laundry Special Notes Disclaimer

Laundry appliances are not tested or moved during the inspection and the condition of any walls or flooring hidden by them cannot be judged. Drain lines and water supply valves serving washing machines are not operated. Water supply valves may be subject to leaking if turned. 20 amp rated outlets are recommended for continuous use laundry equipment outlet(s).

Laundry Appliances

Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated if present. These units are not built in, are typically personal property and are excluded from this inspection.

Limited Access to Back of Washer, Dryer

No access or only limited access was available to the back of the clothes washer and dryer, and to utility hook-ups located behind the appliances when present. The inspector normally attempts to determine the presence of a gas vs. electric power supply, the configuration of the stand pipe, whether the dryer exhaust duct is serviceable, etc. Because of the lack of access, the inspector is sometimes unable to fully evaluate and/or describe the hook-ups and appliances.

Credit
Comment
7.2.1 - Dryer Venting

Dryer Duct - Plastic or Foil

The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct.

Buy a Rigid Aluminum Dryer Vent Duct Here

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
7.2.2 - Dryer Venting

Dryer Duct - Needs Cleaning

The clothes dryer exhaust duct appears to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build up was found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire from decreased air flow. This duct should be cleaned now and annually, or more often if necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service.

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Plumbing

Gas Line Cap Missing

One or more propane or natural gas supply terminations were unused (no appliance connected) and no cap was installed on the gas shut-off valve(s). Gas can flow directly out of the termination with the shut-off valve is opened. This is a potential fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified person install caps where missing per standard building practices.

Tools Handyman/DIY

8 - Heating and Cooling

Heating Estimated Age
10 to 15 years
Cooling Estimated Age
Unknown
Primary Heat Energy Source
Natural Gas
Primary Heat Type
Forced Air, Standard Efficiency
Primary A/C Energy Source
Electric
Primary A/C Type
Split System
Distribution
Flex
Manufacturer
Bryant, Carrier
Last Service Date
Unknown
Thermostat Location
Hallway
Filter Location
Base of Furnace
Heating Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, solar, coal or wood fired heat systems, thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions, heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas, underground utilities and systems, safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating system components, does not determine if heating systems are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks.

Cooling Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions, cooling components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas, underground utilities and systems, safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on cooling system components, does not determine if cooling systems are appropriately sized, and does not test coolant pressure. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future.

Excluded: HVAC Special Noted Disclaimer

The inspector can only readily open access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance, and will not operate components when weather conditions or other circumstances apply that may cause equipment damage. The inspector does not light pilot lights or ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires, nor are safety devices tested by the inspector. The inspector is not equipped to inspect furnace heat exchangers for evidence of cracks or holes, or inspect concealed portions of evaporator and condensing coils, heat exchanger or firebox, electronic air filters, humidifiers and de-humidifiers, ducts and in-line duct motors or dampers, as this can only be done by dismantling the unit or external components. This is beyond the scope of this inspection. Thermostats are not checked for calibration or timed functions. Adequacy, efficiency or the even distribution of air throughout the structure cannot be determined by a visual inspection. However these items can help with overall efficiency and should be evaluated by a qualified individual. The inspector does not perform pressure tests on coolant systems, therefore no representation is made regarding refrigerant charge or line integrity.

We perform a conscientious evaluation of the system, but we are not HVAC contractors. Please note that even modern heating systems can produce carbon monoxide, which in a poorly ventilated room can result in sickness and even death. Therefore, it is essential that any recommendations we make for service or further evaluation be scheduled before the close of escrow, because a specialist could reveal additional defects or recommend further upgrades that could affect your evaluation of the property, and our service does not include any form or warranty or guarantee. Normal service and maintenance is recommended on a yearly basis. Determining the presence of asbestos materials commonly used in heating systems can ONLY be preformed by laboratory testing and is beyond the scope of this inspection.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the cooling system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and B. the cooling method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any cooling system that did not operate; and B. if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system. B. inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters. C. operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65° Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. D. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks. E. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Outside Condensing Unit

Cooling Fins - Dirty

The cooling fins on the outdoor condensing unit's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.

How to Perform AC Condenser Maintenance

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
8.2.2 - Outside Condensing Unit

Inadequate Clearance - Structure

Permanent structures are too close to the outdoor condensing unit. Standard building practices require that there be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least four to six feet above. Inadequate clearances around the condensing unit can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Modifications should be made to structures around and/or above the condensing unit by a qualified contractor as necessary to maintain these clearances.

Here is a Video on How to Perform A/C Condenser Maintenance

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Gas Heat

No Drip Leg

No drip leg is installed on the furnace or boiler gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the furnace or boiler components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.

* Note that depending on the quality of the gas being delivered in some municipalities, the installation of a drip leg or dirt leg may not be required by local officials.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
8.3.2 - Gas Heat

Flex Connector - Through Cabinet

One or more flexible gas supply connectors are routed through a metal cabinet. Standard building practices require that solid iron pipe be used where gas supply lines are routed through holes in metal cabinets. Continued vibration from this equipment may cause the edge of the metal cabinet to wear through the flexible connector, resulting in gas leaks. This is a safety hazard. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or modifications as necessary.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - Age

A/C Condensing Unit - Unknown, May Be Old

The estimated useful life for most air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the air conditioning compressor. The clients should be aware that this air conditioning compressor may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the air conditioning compressor's age (ask property owner or service technician), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
8.6.1 - Service

Now & Every Few Years

The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.

Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.2 - Service

Perform Heat Exchanger CO Test

Because of the age and/or condition of this furnace, recommend that a qualified heating and cooling technician inspect the heat exchanger and perform a Carbon Monoxide test when it's serviced.

Here is a resource on the importance of furnace maintenance.

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.10.1 - Ducts

Duct Insulation - Deteriorated

Insulation on one or more heating/cooling ducts in unconditioned spaces is damaged, delaminating and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace insulation and/or ducts as necessary and as per standard building practices.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
8.12.1 - Air Handler

Cooling Fins - Dirty

The cooling fins on the unit's coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Th Heating and Cooling Contractor

9 - Garage

Vehicle Door: Vehicle Door(s) Last Service Date
Unknown
Garage Limitations

The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities. First and foremost garage door safety is the responsibility of the operator. The garage door should not be operated when children and pets are within close proximity to moving parts. Tilt up garage doors pose a additional safety hazards and should be considered for immediate upgrade. Determining the heat resistance rating of firewalls is beyond the scope of this inspection. Flammable liquids such as gasoline and kerosene should only be stored in appropriate containers. Garage door opening heights are not standard for all homes, so you may wish to measure the opening to ensure that there is sufficient clearance to accommodate your vehicles. It is not uncommon for moisture to penetrate garages, particularly with slabs on-grade construction, and this may be apparent in the form of efflorescence, calcium or salt crystal formations on the concrete. Post tension slabs should not be cut or cored as this will create a structural defect and may even cause personal injury or death. All cracks in the garage slab small or not should be monitored for growth and movement. Contact an engineer if changes appear. You may want to have any living space above the garage should there be any, evaluated further by a structural engineer, as it may be seismically vulnerable. A structural engineer may recommend additional bracing around the garage door opening to prevent failure during seismic activity. Only a licensed structural engineer can evaluate the home for structural integrity.

Excluded: Perimeter

The interior perimeter of the garage is excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.

Attic Access not present.

Stairs not present.

Handrails not present.

Guardrails not present.

Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Garage Deficiencies

Walls or Ceiling Not Fire-Rated

One or more wall and/or ceiling surfaces between the attached garage and interior living spaces have gaps, holes, or missing or inadequate surface materials. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the attached garage wall and ceiling surfaces that adjoin living spaces are tightly sealed and fire rated as per standard building practices. Typically these surfaces require a one-hour fire rating.

Link for more info.

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.2.2 - Garage Deficiencies

Garage Floor Cracks - Minor

Minor cracks were found in the garage floor. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

Here is a DIY video.

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.2.3 - Garage Deficiencies

Garage Moisture Stains

Stains or evidence or past stains were found in one or more areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Mag glass Monitor
Credit
Comment
9.2.4 - Garage Deficiencies

Garage Wall Damage

Minor damage were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a major concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Garage - House Door

Repair/Replace Auto-Close

The automatic door closing device (sprung hinges, etc.) on the garage-house door needs adjustment, repair or replacing. The door doesn't close and latch easily and/or completely via the force of the automatic closing device. This door is intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Do It Yourself Maintenance Video

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
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9.3.2 - Garage - House Door

Not Fire-Rated

The garage-house door poses a fire risk because it's not fire-rated (metal or solid-core construction or no rating tag visible). A qualified contractor should replace this door with a fire-rated door.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
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9.4.1 - Vehicle Door

Not Balanced

The vehicle door isn't balanced. The door won't stay in place when it's partially opened and falls to the ground instead. This is a safety hazard since the door may fall when open. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Garage Door Maintenance

Garage Garage Door Contractor
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Comment
9.4.2 - Vehicle Door

Repair/Replace

The garage vehicle door is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door as necessary.

Garage Door Maintenance

Garage Garage Door Contractor
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Comment
9.11.1 - Electrical

Wiring - Exposed

Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
9.11.2 - Electrical

Wiring - Extension Cord

Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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Comment
9.12.1 - Rodent Evidence

Minor Rodent Activity

Minor amounts of rodent feces was visible at various areas of the home. Traps should be set for mice and avenues of entry located and blocked.

Buy Recommended Rodent Traps Here

Pest control Pest Control Pro

10 - Water Heater

Manufacturer
Reliance
Energy Source
Natural Gas
Capacity
50
Estimated Age
Unknown
Water Temperature
< 120 Degrees F
Last Service Date
Unknown
Water Heater Limitations

Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: water recirculation pumps, solar water heating systems, Energy Smart or energy saver controls, catch pan drains. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.

How to Flush the Water Heater

When it comes to doing household chores, flushing your hot water heater is easy to overlook. But regularly flushing out your hot water heater is an important task. Getting rid of the gunk and mineral deposits that accumulate will help your hot water heater run more efficiently as well as prolong its life, saving you money in the long run. Depending on your model, aim to flush your hot water heater every one to three years. Really, the job is so easy, it wouldn't be a bother to do it at least once a year.

How to Flush Your Hot Water Heater

Obscured By: Permanent Enclosure

The water heater is located inside a permanently or semi-permanently installed enclosure which the inspector didn't open or remove. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.

Electric Water Heater not present.

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Comment
10.2.1 - Gas Water Heater

No Drip Leg

No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.

* Note that depending on the quality of the gas being delivered in some municipalities, the installation of a drip leg or dirt leg may not be required by local officials.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
10.2.2 - Gas Water Heater

Draft Hood Loose

The draft hood for the water heater flue was loose. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of exhaust gases entering living spaces. A qualified person should permanently secure the draft hood with appropriate fasteners per standard building practices.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
10.2.3 - Gas Water Heater

< 1 Inch

Combustible materials were found less than one inch from the B-vent flue pipe for the gas-fueled furnace or boiler. This is a fire hazard. Combustible materials should be moved, or repairs made by a qualified contractor, as necessary to maintain this clearance.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
10.4.1 - Age

8-12 Years or Older

The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Mag glass Monitor
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Comment
10.6.1 - Earthquake Straps

Substandard Bracing

The water heater's seismic straps or struts are substandard. For example, they may allow significant movement or use improper fasteners. This is a potential safety hazard since movement can cause leaks in the gas supply lines or damage wiring. Leaks may also occur in water supply pipes. A qualified contractor should evaluate and either repair existing straps or install new straps or struts as necessary and as per standard building practices.

ORDER WATER HEATER STRAPS HERE

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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10.9.1 - Drain Line

Drain Line Routed Up

The temperature-pressure relief valve drain line is routed upwards. This drain line should be routed either down or horizontally. This is a safety hazard as water may not be able to flow through the drain line adequately when the valve releases due to accumulated water. Also, accumulated water may corrode the valve and prevent it from working. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair so the drain line is routed down or horizontally, but not up.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
10.9.2 - Drain Line

Improper Material

The discharge pipe of the water heater temperature/pressure relief (TPR) valve was of an improper material. TPR discharge pipes should be galvanized steel, copper pope, or CPVC. The Inspector recommends correction by a qualified contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
10.10.1 - Expansion Tank

Missing Expansion Tank

One or more water heaters had no expansion tank(s) installed to allow for thermal expansion of water in the plumbing pipes. Expansion tanks are required for new installations in the jurisdiction in which this home was located. Consider consulting with a qualified plumbing contractor about the need for the installation of an expansion tank on this system.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

11 - Kitchen

General: Kitchen Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters, appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.

General: Appliances Older Than 10 or 15 years

One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

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Comment
11.2.1 - Dishwasher

No High Loop or Air Gap

The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop" or "air gap". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices.

Also, no "air gap" is installed. Air gaps are another device meant to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. These are required in some municipalities for new construction and when remodeling. The client(s) should consult with a qualified contractor to determine if an air gap should be installed.

How to Perform Dishwasher Maintenance
Wash Appliance Repair
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11.3.1 - Refrigerator

Ice Maker Turned Off

The refrigerator ice maker is in the "off" position. The inspector was unable to evaluate this component.

How to Clean Refrigerator Coils

Wash Appliance Repair
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Comment
11.3.2 - Refrigerator

Broken or Missing Shelving

Refrigerator shelving is broken and/or missing and should be replaced or repaired as necessary.

How to Clean Refrigerator Coils

Wash Appliance Repair
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Comment
11.4.1 - Range Hood

Vents Indoors

The range hood fan vents into the kitchen rather than outdoors. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary as per standard building practices so the range hood fan vents outdoors.
Wash Appliance Repair
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Comment
11.6.1 - Range/Oven/Stove top

No Anti-Tip Bracket

The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard.

Wash Appliance Repair
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Comment
11.13.1 - Faucets

Loose or Missing Handle

One or more faucet handles are loose or missing and should be repaired or replaced as necessary. All work should be performed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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Comment
11.17.1 - Countertops

Minor Deterioration

Minor damage and/or deterioration was found at countertops in one or more areas. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made, and/or countertops replaced where necessary.
House building Countertop Contractor
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Comment
11.23.1 - GFCI Receptacles

Non-GFCI Within 6' of Sink

One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

 

The Basics of GFCI Outlets

ORDER GFCI OUTLETS HERE

 

Electric Electrical Contractor

12 - Fireplace, Wood Stoves and Chimneys

Chimney Type
Metal
Fireplace Type
Metal Prefab
Wood Stove Type
N/A
Annually for All

All solid fuel burning appliances (wood stoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.

Fireplace, Wood Stove and Chimney Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.

Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.

Excluded: Fireplace Firebox Obscured by Ashes or Debris

Significant amounts of ashes, wood and/or debris are in the fireplace. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate it.

Excluded: No Gas

The gas supply for one or more gas fireplaces and/or stoves was turned off. As per the Standards of Practice for both the http://www.nachi.orgNational Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI)and thehttp://www.ashi.orgAmerican Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI)the inspector does not operate gas shut off valves or light pilot lights during inspections. These appliances were not fully evaluated.

Pre-Cast Concrete Fireplace not present.

Wood Stove not present.

Credit
Comment
12.4.1 - Fireplace

Gaps in Firebox and Face

One or more gaps exist in the fireplace and or the fire box. This is a fire hazard since heat from fires may reach wood wall cavities surrounding the fireplace. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Fire Fireplace Contractor
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Comment
12.5.1 - Gas

Damper Can Close

One or more fireplaces equipped with a gas burner has a damper that can be closed. This is a safety hazard due to the possibility of burner or pilot light exhaust gases entering living spaces. A qualified chimney service contractor should make repairs as necessary so the damper is made permanently open. Typically a bracket or bolt is installed for this purpose.

Order Damper Clamp Online Here

Wrenches Handyman
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Comment
12.5.2 - Gas

Doors Difficult to Operate

The doors/screens of the fireplace were difficult to operate. A qualified fireplace contractor should make repairs accordingly.

Fire Fireplace Contractor

13 - Interior Rooms

Interior Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems, communications wiring, central vacuum systems, elevators and stair lifts, cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment, deficiencies relating to interior decorating, low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.

Interior Recently Painted

The interior of the property has been recently painted. New paint makes it difficult for the inspector to see any prior potential damaged/moistures stains.

Interior Special Notes Disclaimer

Our inspection of living space includes the visually accessible areas of walls, floors, cabinets and closets, and the testing of a representative number of windows and doors, switches and outlets. We do not evaluate window treatments, move furnishings or possessions, lift carpets or rugs, empty closets or cabinets, nor comment on cosmetic deficiencies. We may not comment on cracks that appear around windows and doors, along lines of framing members or along seams of drywall and plasterboard. These are typically caused by minor movement, such as wood shrinkage, common settling, and seismic activity, and will often reappear if they are not correctly repaired. Such cracks can become the subject of disputes, and are therefore best evaluated by a specialist. Floor covering damage or stains may be hidden by furniture, and the condition of floors underlying floor coverings is not inspected. Determining the condition of insulated glass windows is not always possible due to temperature, weather and lighting conditions. Check with owners for further information and disclosures. All fireplaces should be cleaned and inspected on a regular basis to make sure that no cracks have developed. Large fires in the firebox can overheat the firebox and flue liners, sometimes resulting in internal damage.

Testing, identifying, or identifying the source of environmental pollutants or odors (including but not limited to lead, mold, allergens, odors from household pets and cigarette smoke) is beyond the scope of our service, but can become equally contentious or difficult to eradicate. We recommend you carefully determine and schedule whatever remedial services may be deemed advisable or necessary before the close of escrow.

Minor Wear and Deterioration

The home interior showed minor general wear and deterioration commensurate with its age.

Receptacles (Representative Number): Receptacles - Childproof Caps

Numerous electric receptacles were not evaluated because childproof covers were installed at the time of the inspection.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steam generating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

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Comment
13.2.1 - Windows (Representative Number)

Older Windows

Windows in the home were generally old. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Window Window Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
13.3.1 - Doors (Representative Number)

Binds in Jam

One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.

Here is a helpful DIY article on how to fix a sticking door.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
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13.3.2 - Doors (Representative Number)

Won't Latch

One or more doors will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing lock sets.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
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Comment
13.3.3 - Doors (Representative Number)

Deteriorated/Damaged

One or more interior doors are deteriorated and or damaged and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
13.4.1 - Door Bell

Button Loose or Damaged

The doorbell button is loose or damaged. It should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

Order a Ring Video Doorbell Here for Additional Security

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
13.10.1 - Smoke Detectors

Smoke Alarms - > 10 Years Old

Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA.

Buy Smoke Alarms Here 

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
13.10.2 - Smoke Detectors

Smoke Alarms - Replace Batteries

Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing.

Buy Smoke Detector Batteries Here

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
13.10.3 - Smoke Detectors

Smoke Alarms - Too Few

An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom.

Buy Smoke Alarms Here

Tools Handyman/DIY
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Comment
13.12.1 - Ceiling

Cracks/Damage

Cracks and or damage were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a major structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons or have them further evaluated if client has additional concerns.

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
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Comment
13.13.1 - Walls

Minor Cracks/Damage

Minor cracks/damage was found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

Putty knife Drywall Contractor
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Comment
13.17.1 - Floors

Carpet - Deteriorated

Carpeting in one or more rooms is damaged and/or significantly deteriorated. Recommend replacing carpeting where necessary.

Video on How to Remove Carpet

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
13.17.2 - Floors

Squeaky
2nd Floor

Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor.

Order Squeeek No More Here


 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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13.19.1 - Environmental

MicroBio Growth

Microbial growths were found at one or more locations. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to identify what substance or organism this staining is. However such staining is normally caused by excessively moist conditions, which in turn can be caused by plumbing or building envelope leaks and/or substandard ventilation. These conducive conditions should be corrected before making any attempts to remove or correct the staining. Normally affected materials such as drywall are removed, enclosed affected spaces are allowed to dry thoroughly, a mildewcide may be applied, and only then is drywall reinstalled. For evaluation and possible mitigation, consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or mold/moisture mitigation specialist.

Hardhat Mold Inspector

14 - Bathrooms

Bathroom Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks, heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.

Credit
Comment
14.2.1 - Exhaust Fans

None with Shower

One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.

ORDER EXHAUST FANS HERE

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
14.5.1 - Sinks

Sink Drain - Leak

One or more sink drains have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.7.1 - Bathtubs

Caulk Missing or Deteriorated - At Surround

Caulk is missing or deteriorated above one or more bathtubs, where the tub surround meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.

Wrenches Handyman
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Comment
14.8.1 - Showers

Diverter Valve Defective
2nd Floor Hallway Bathroom

The shower diverter valve for one or more bathtub faucets is defective. A significant amount of water comes out of the bathtub spout when the shower is turned on. Water will be wasted as a result. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace components or make repairs as necessary.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
Credit
Comment
14.10.1 - Countertops

Needs Caulk at Backsplash

Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.

Here is a helpful DIY video on caulking gaps.

Wrenches Handyman
Credit
Comment
14.11.1 - Environmental

MicroBio Growth

Microbial growths were found at one or more locations. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to identify what substance or organism this staining is. However such staining is normally caused by excessively moist conditions, which in turn can be caused by plumbing or building envelope leaks and/or substandard ventilation. These conducive conditions should be corrected before making any attempts to remove or correct the staining. Normally affected materials such as drywall are removed, enclosed affected spaces are allowed to dry thoroughly, a mildewcide may be applied, and only then is drywall reinstalled. For evaluation and possible mitigation, consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or mold/moisture mitigation specialist.

For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?MOLDCDC
http://www.reporthost.com/?MOLDEPA

Hardhat Mold Inspector
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Comment
14.12.1 - Floors

Carpeted Bathroom

The carpet was permanently attached to the floor, rather than being installed loosely over another flooring type, more appropriate to use in a wet area. This installation is conducive to moisture retention in the carpeting. It is recommended that the carpets be removed and a more appropriate material be installed.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
14.12.2 - Floors

Tile, Stone and Grout - Deteriorated

Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.

Contractor Qualified Professional

15 - Attic

Ceiling Structure
Trusses
Inspection Method
Partially traversed
Insulation Material
Fiberglass Roll/Batt
Roof Structure
Trusses
Attic Limitations

The following items or areas are not included in this inspection-areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access, areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.

Excluded: No Light/Walkway - Equip. Installed

Although home mechanical system (HVAC or water heater) equipment was installed in the attic, no lights or walkway were installed to provide service access to this equipment. This condition is potentially hazardous to those who must service this equipment. The inspector recommends that lights and a walkway that comply with current safety standards be installed by a qualified contractor.

Excluded: Some Areas Inaccessible

Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

Excluded: Vaulted Ceilings

Vaulted ceilings in the home had no attic space and no access hatch was provided for inspection of roof framing.  The roof framing was not inspected and the Inspector disclaims any responsibility for confirming its condition.

Attic Fan not present.

Exhaust Fans not present.

Water Pipe Insulation not present.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

Credit
Comment
15.2.1 - Access Hatch

No Insulation Over

No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.

Wrenches Handyman

16 - Pool and Spa

General: Excluded
Diving Board, Slide
General: Water Refill Through
Not Determined
General: Pool/Spa Material
Plaster-Gunite
General: Coping Material
Tile
General: Deck Material
Concrete, Brick, Paving Stones
General: Fence and Gate Material
Wrought Iron, Masonry
General: Heater Energy Source
Natural Gas
General: Line Material
PVC
General: Water Level
Full
General: Electrical Disconnect Location
Sub-Panel at Equipment
General: Filter Type
Diatomaceous Earth
General: Pool/Spa Type
Below Ground
General: Electrical Wiring
Liquid Tite Flex
General: Filter Air Relief Valve Installed
Yes
General: Pump Types
Circulation
General: Filter Pressure Gauge Installed
Yes
General: Pool and Spa Limitations

The following items are not included in this inspection: swimming pool bodies; equipment on timers, remote controls or sensors; underground or concealed piping; motorized covers; waterfalls and related equipment; Ozone generators; ultra violate light systems; filter back flushing mechanisms. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not disassemble filters, remove pool covers, nor determine if swimming pool bodies, filters or skimmers leak, nor determine if swimming pool bodies are level.

Credit
Comment
16.2.1 - Fences and Gates

Self Closing Device

Self-closing devices on one or more gates used with pool or spa fencing are missing or did not function as intended. This is a safety hazard because these devices are intended to control access to the pool or spa, especially for children. A qualified person should repair, replace or install as necessary.

Fence Fence Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.3.1 - Body

Missing Safety Float Line

No safety float line was installed where the bottom slope begins to deepen. This is a safety hazard. Standards require that one be installed one to two feet on the shallow side of this transition when the transition is located in water deeper than four and a half feet deep. Recommend installing a safety float line.
Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.3.2 - Body

No Cover

No removable cover was installed for the pool and or spa. Recommend that one be installed to maintain water quality and for safety purposes.

Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.5.1 - Coping

Stained

The tile, brick, grout and or caulk in various sections of the coping was significantly stained.

Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.6.1 - Pumps, Motors, Lines and Valves

Pump - Air Bubbles

Air bubbles were present when the pump was operating. Typically this indicates a leak on the suction side of the pump. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.6.2 - Pumps, Motors, Lines and Valves

Motor - Service Life (8 Years)

The motor for the pump appeared to be near, at or beyond its service life. Typically this is eight years but may be longer. The motor may need rebuilding or replacement in the near future.

Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.7.1 - Heater

Gas Piping - No Drip Leg

No drip leg was installed in the heater's gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to prevent damage to gas-fired appliances by trapping oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.

Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.7.2 - Heater

Service Gas Heater Now and Annually

The last service date of this system appeared to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by natural gas or propane, this servicing should be performed annually in the future.

Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.8.1 - Filter

High Pressure - DE > 7-10 psi Clean

The reading at the Diatomaceous earth filter's pressure gauge was relatively high. Diatomaceous earth filters should be backwashed and have the medium replaced when the pressure gauge reads 7-10 lbs above the clean, starting pressure (after backwashing and replacing medium). If backwashing is ineffective then the septa may need replacing, or other repairs may be needed. A qualified person should evaluate and maintain or repair as necessary.

Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.8.2 - Filter

Pressure Gauge Issues

The filter pressure gauge was inoperable, damaged, deteriorated and or corroded. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Pool Swimming Pool / Spa Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.10.1 - Electrical

Timer Not Weatherproof

The timer mechanism's housing was not weather proof and/or the timer was not in a weather proofed location. This is a hazard for shock. A qualified person should evaluate and make repairs or modifications as necessary.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
16.10.2 - Electrical

Underwater Lights - Inoperable

One or more underwater lights were inoperable. Bulb(s) may be burned out or repairs may be needed. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Electric Electrical Contractor

17 - Landscape Irrigation

Landscape and Irrigation Introduction

How much water does it take to grow an attractive and healthy landscape? There really is no “right” answer to this question, it all depends factors such as local climate, type of plants, soil conditions, shading, maintenance practices, and so on.  Some healthy landscapes require no supplemental irrigation beyond what falls from the sky, others rely on substantial amounts of water.  In a perfect world, everyone would put exactly the right amount of water on their landscape to keep it healthy and attractive without any excess runoff or water waste.  We are a long way from a perfect world.

Research has shown that on average about half of the water used in a single-family American home during the course of a year will be put onto the landscape. In a wet climate such as the Pacific Northwest less water is required for irrigating a turf landscape compared with a hot dry climate like Arizona. But even in a wet climate, the landscape area is often the single highest user of water.

Credit
Comment
17.3.1 - Control Panel Location

Box Loose/Damaged

The landscape irrigation timer box is lose and or damaged. Recommend repair and or replacement by a qualified and reputable professional.

Grass Lawncare Professional
Credit
Comment
17.5.1 - Sprinkler Heads

Not Working Correctly

Some sprinkler heads were not working as designed and the system should be serviced by a qualified contractor.

Grass Lawncare Professional
Credit
Comment
17.5.2 - Sprinkler Heads

Heads Need Adjustment

Several sprinkler heads appeared to need adjustment at the time of the inspection.

Grass Lawncare Professional

18 - Sewer Camera Scope

Scope of Work

This confidential report is furnished for the use of the client only. It is not intended to be relied upon for any purpose by any other party not named on the report and Inspection Agreement.

This inspection was performed in accordance with and under the terms of the Sewer Scope Inspection Agreement. The agreement was signed and agreed upon before the preparation of this report and a signed copy of the agreement is available upon request.

Signature Home Inspection conducts all inspections according to the recommended procedures outlined by the camera equipment manufacturer, and follows the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) Code of Ethics for every sewer scope inspection performed.

A sewer scope inspection is a video camera inspection to inspect the main sewer line from the house to the street or sewer service point to the property. The line is accessed through a clean out or access point in the home, which could include a an exterior, basement or crawl space clean out, a toilet drain line, or a roof vent. The inspector will determine the best access point, and the report will outline where the line was entered.

The camera inspection does not scope every drain line in the home or all the drain lines running underneath the basement slab, for example. The intent is to inspect the line that runs from the house to the final service point, and to inspect this buried line for defects. The results of the inspection are outlined below.

Video Observations: Video Observations

The drain line leading away from the property was remotely inspected via a sewer camera via the clean out. Recommend client follow up with a plumbing contractor for regular sewer line cleaning to remove any build up that commonly happens over time.


CLICK HERE FOR LINK TO VIDEO OF SEWER SCOPE


Credit
Comment
18.1.1 - Sewer Line

Misaligned or Offset Pipes

Offset pipes joints were visible during the sewer camera inspection. It is not necessary to be repaired at this time but possibly in the future when it gets worse where debris could get blocked and clog the pipe.

Mag glass Monitor

19 - NACHI Home Energy Report™

NACHI Home Energy Report

It takes a lot of energy to heat, cool and operate a home. Most homebuyers have no idea how much it will cost them to operate their home once they move in. Homeowners do not fully understand how much energy and, therefore, money is being wasted by their home. And if they did understand, they wouldn't know what to do about it. The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are embarking upon an effort to develop a national program to assess the energy performance of every home in America and lead homeowners toward investing in home energy improvements. InterNACHI's Home Energy Inspection Program includes: empowering 15,000 Home Energy Inspectors with the Home Energy Report; inspecting every home in America by 2030; and educating current and prospective homeowners about saving energy, increasing comfort and protecting the environment. As the worlds largest organization of residential and commercial property inspectors who perform more than 10,000 property inspections nationwide every day, InterNACHI will help American homeowners maintain safe, healthy and energy-efficient home.

CLICK HERE TO GET YOUR HOME ENERGY REPORT

20 - Get a 18 Month Home Warranty for Price of 12 Months

6 Months Free Home Warranty Offer

SIMPLE WARRANTY VIDEO

Order your warranty here and get 18 months of coverage for the price of 12 months just for using Signature Home Inspection.

www.signaturehomewarranty.com

The Simple Warranty by Residential Warranty Services represents the broadest coverage available in the market today. All options are included, no known preexisting conditions and we offer a best coverage guarantee. In fact, if you are ever denied coverage for a claim that can be verified eligible by any other policy we will either cover it or give you 100% of your premiums back. Pricing is based on a simple square footage system, and youll never experience any up charges. To see details of this policy, please download the brochure here.

Click Here for Brochure

21 - Platinum Roof Protection Plan

5 Year Roof Leak Protection Plan

This service contract is for the repair of leaks to your home's (Detached Homes Only) roof for a period of 5 years following the date of inspection. This service contract covers only those items specifically listed and excludes all others, subject to the terms and conditions herein.

This policy covers all residential roof types, including asphalt singles, slate roofs, metal roofs, tiles roofs, and non-commercial flat roof types. This policy applies only to the home itself, and specifically excludes other structures. 

For warranty claims or questions call 800-544-8156.

Click to see policy for complete terms and conditions

22 - 90 Day Warranty +

90 Day Limited Warranty Plus

Clients want more than just a home inspection, they need professionals they can depend on even after the job is done. Thats why we back all of our inspections with a 90-Day Structural and Mechanical Buyers Home Warranty.

The 90-Day Warranty comes with your home inspection. This warranty is valid 90 days from the date of inspection or 22 days after closing, whichever comes later. You will always have at least 22 days worth of coverage.

This warranty covers repairs to the items the home inspector found to be in good working condition at the time of inspection and are specifically listed within our warranty.

You will never have a deductible to pay, and claims will be handled within 72 hours of completion. And if you already have a warranty, no problem. Ours can work in conjunction with an existing warranty.

For warranty claims or questions call 800-544-8156.

Click to see policy for complete terms and conditions

23 - SewerGard Coverage

SewerGard Coverage

With every full home inspection (detached homes only), we have Sewer Line Protection from SewerGard - the world leader in underground repair coverage. Buy with confidence and worry less knowing that main water and sewer collapses and breaks are covered, up to $4000.

Click to see policy for complete terms and conditions

Click here to see the SewerGard 1 Minute Video

24 - MoldSafe Coverage

MoldSafe Coverage

You're covered! We offer way more than just an inspection! If mold is found in your home that was not present at the time of inspection, you are covered for remediation, up to $2000.

Click Here to see policy for complete terms and conditions

25 - Free Concierge Service

Free Concierge Service

Our partners work with over 150,000 Real Estate Professionals throughout the U.S. and Canada and deliver over 140,000 services for real estate transactions, new moves, and new service installs monthly giving us the Guaranteed Best pricing and service in the industry.

Signature Home Inspection / ISG Full Concierge is the only service of its kind with an in-house utility team, solar team, communications, satellite & cable team, and access to more services than any other Utility Connection Provider anywhere.  ISG and the ISG Full Concierge serve more than 1 in 5 home buyers throughout North America.

Click Here to Access this FREE Service

 

26 - Home Owners Resource

Home Owners Resource

Home Owners Resource is a membership based service that provides homeowners with easy access to the information they need to properly maintain and manage their property. Login to your account to get in touch with our team of experts who are here to help with any question you have about your home, from maintenance and repair questions to project advice, we are here to help. Home Owners Resource is offered exclusively by home inspectors approved by Home Owners Resource.

You may register for FREE HERE by providing your name and the zip code of the property you had inspected along with a user name and password that you will use to log into the site. As a member of the Home Owners Resource you will have access to our website where you can find answers to any home maintenance/repair question you may have.

 

27 - Review Us on Online

Review Us on Online

YOUR REVIEWS MATTER TO SIGNATURE HOME INSPECTION

Please Share Your Experience With Us and Help Our Small Business Grow! In order to improve the satisfaction of my customers, we are asking recent clients if they could take a few minutes to tell us how I did and leave our business a Yelp, Facebook and Google Review.

Thank you for taking the time to help improve our company! It helps me to improve on my service to future customers and I am grateful for your review. It would be greatly appreciated!

28 - Certified Master Inspector® Safe Home Book

Certified Master Inspector Safe Home Book

Signature Home Inspection is proud to include our 226 Page Safe Home Book as part of your home inspection report.  This publication is a compilation of well-researched articles especially for homeowners.  They include valuable information and tips for helping keep families safe and their homes in top condition.  Please enjoy it with our compliments. ©2013 International Association of Certified Home Inspectors & Master Inspector Certification Board.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW

29 - Additional Resources/Home Maintenance eBooks

Additional Resources

CA PUBLIC RESOURCES CODE

25401.7. At the time a single-family residential dwelling is sold, a buyer or seller may request a home inspection, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 7195 of the Business and Professions Code, and a home inspector, as defined in subdivision (d) of Section 7195 of the Business and Professions Code, shall provide, contact information for one or more of the following entities that provide home energy information: (a) A nonprofit organization. (b) A provider to the residential dwelling of electrical service, or gas service, or both. (c) A government agency, including, but not limited to, the commission.

UTILITY BILL, REBATES AND OTHER ASSISTANCE

Online Consumer and Business Conservation Rebate Database: www.consumerenergycenter.org
California Department of Consumer Affairs: www.dca.ca.gov/energy-challenge.htm
California Energy Commission, for information on utility bill assistance programs: 800-772-3300 or www.consumerenergycenter.org
California Public Utilities Commission Consumer Affairs Branch, for information on baseline and other optional rates and bill assistance programs: 800-649-7570 or www.cpuc.ca.gov
California Energy Alternative Rates (CARE): Call your local utility company for information and applications.

CONCLUSION

We are proud of our service and trust you will be happy with the quality of your report. We have made every effort to provide you with an accurate assessment of the condition of the property and its components and to alert you to any significant defects or adverse conditions. However, we may not have tested every outlet, opened every window and door or identified every problem. Also because our inspection is essentially visual, latent defects could exist. We cannot see behind walls. Therefore, you should not regard our inspection as a guarantee or warranty. It is simply a report on the general condition of a property at a given point in time. As a homeowner, you should expect problems to occur. Roofs will leak, basements may have water problems and systems may fail without warning. We cannot predict future events. For those reasons, you should keep a comprehensive insurance policy current.

This report was written exclusively for our Client. It is not transferable to other people. The report is only supplemental to a seller’s disclosure.

Thank you for taking the time to read this report and call us if you have any questions. We are always attempting to improve quality of our service and our report.

PRE-CLOSING WALK-THROUGH

The walk-through prior to closing is the time for Client to inspect the property. Conditions can change between the time of a home inspection and the time of closing. Restrictions that existed during the inspection may have been removed for the walk-through. Defects or problems that were not found during the home inspection may be discovered during the walk-through. Client should be thorough during the walk-through.

Any defect of problem discovered the walk-through should be negotiated with the owner/seller of the property prior to closing. Purchasing the property with a known defect or problem releases SIGNATURE HOME INSPECTION of all responsibility. Client assumes responsibility for all known defects after settlement.

The following are recommendations for the pre-closing walk-through your new house. Consider hiring a Certified Master Inspector to assist you.

1. Check the heating and cooling system. Turn the thermostat to heat mode and turn the temperature setting up. Confirm that the heating system is running and making heat. Turn the thermostat to off and wait 20 minutes. Turn the thermostat to cool mode and turn the temperature setting down. Confirm the condenser is spinning and the system is making cool air. The cooling system should not be checked if the temperature is below 60 degrees. You should not operate a heat pump in the heating mode when it is over 75 degrees outside.
2. Operate all appliances.
3. Run water at all fixtures and flush toilets.
4. Operate all exterior doors, windows and locks.
5. Test smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.
6. Ask for all remote controls to any garage door openers, fans, gas fireplaces, etc.
7. Inspect areas that may have been restricted at the time of the inspection.
8. Ask seller questions about anything that was not covered during the home inspection.
9. Ask seller about prior infestation treatment and warranties that may be transferable.
10. Read seller’s disclosure.

The links below connect you to a series of documents that will help you understand your home and how it works. These are in addition to links attached to specific items in the report.

Click on any link to read about that system.

ROOFING, FLASHINGS AND CHIMNEYS

EXTERIOR

STRUCTURE

ELECTRICAL

HEATING

COOLING/HEAT PUMPS

INSULATION

PLUMBING

INTERIOR

APPLIANCES

LIFE CYCLES and COSTS

ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS

HOME SET-UP AND MAINTENANCE

MORE ABOUT HOME INSPECTIONS

FOLLOW-UP INSPECTION POLICY
Generally we discourage follow-up inspections for this reason:

QUALITY OF REPAIRS:

If repairs are made to a property based on the results of an inspection, the work should be performed by qualified contractors, not the seller. By qualified, we mean licensed, bonded, state-certified where applicable and with a reasonable amount of experience. Contractors providing repairs should provide legible documentation in the form of work orders and/or receipts. If repairs are made in this way, then there's generally no need for a follow-up inspection. Additionally, it may be better to negotiate a lower price on your home and have repairs made by contractors you choose rather than the seller making repairs as cheaply as possible.

Our fees for follow-up inspections are as follows:

* Re-inspection fees are billed at $100 per hour, minimum of 2 hours. Travel time to and from property is billed at this rate.

ENERGY SAVING WEBSITES/TIPS:

Perhaps you never thought of your home as a likely place to save you a lot of money, but it is. Most homes are far from being energy-efficient. That means if you are using more energy than you have to, you are also paying higher monthly bills than necessary. By checking out the following energy saving web-sites, you will be able to gain some wise energy saving ideas that you will be able to put to use right away. You can do many of them yourself, others may require the services of a licensed contractor:

http://www.energystar.gov/
http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/building_america
http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide
http://www.efficientwindows.org