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1234 Main St.
Maple Valley WA 98038
12/16/2018 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
21
Maintenance item
91
Recommendations
3
Safety hazard

1 - Inspection Details

Type of home
Rambler with a basement
Temperature (approximate)
60 Fahrenheit (F)
In Attendance/Access
Client

It is always recommended that you and your agent be there for the inspection to answer any pressing questions and to get the most out of the inspection. 

Occupancy
Furnished

Often times when we are inspecting an occupied home where there may be furniture or the home owners belongings impeding our ability to fully inspect an/all items. We make a due diligence effort to inspect key areas, but at times this may be beyond our reasonable reach to fully inspect something. If ever there is an issue that you would feel better if we were to come back and inspect after the furniture and belongings are removed from the house, feel free to give us a call. (additional charges may apply)

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1.1.1 - Weather

Overcast-occasional light rain

During the inspection the weather was overcast with periods of light rain.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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1.2.1 - Environment

Some trees around the property

Some trees are located around the property. There is a possibility that tree debris will fall on the roof and clog the gutters. Recommend keeping an eye on the roof and gutters.

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1.3.1 - Utilities

Meter Info

Here is your utility meter info:

Mag glass Monitor
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1.3.2 - Utilities

All utilities on

All utilities were on at the time of the inspection.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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1.4.1 - Natural Hazards

No significant hazards to note

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1.4.2 - Natural Hazards

There is some run off water that comes of the roadway in front.

I would keep an eye on this to see if it needs A catch basin and drain it into the downspout drain. 

2 - Exterior

IN NI NP O
2.1 Walkways, Patios & Driveways X
2.2 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls X
2.3 Tree and Bush concerns X
2.4 Windows X
2.5 Siding, Flashing & Trim X
2.6 Exterior Doors X
2.7 Exterior Electrical Wiring X
2.8 Exterior Plumbing X
2.9 Exterior Lighting X
2.10 Eaves, Soffits & Fascia X
2.11 Fence X
2.12 Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps X
2.13 AC/Heat Pump X
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Wood
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Style
Batten, Lap
Exterior Doors: Exterior Entry Door
Steel, Wood
Exterior Doors: Garage Door
Steel
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Front Porch, Patio
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Concrete, Wood
General Information

Pavement and Hard Surfaces:

All walks, driveways or any paved surface should slope away from any building for proper drainage. Slabs that are improperly pitched may be repaired by mud jacking or replaced. Asphalt will deteriorate faster if regular maintenance is neglected. We recommend filing any large cracks and sealing the surface at least ever 5 years. This will minimize water and freeze damage and provide for the maximum lifespan.


Drainage:

Proper drainage is critical to the structural integrity of any building structure. Water can undermine footings, leak into crawl spaces or basements and create conducive conditions for wood destroying organisms. Maintaining proper slope, grading and landscaping can all help keep water away from a building. Additional backfill and/or digging out soil is recommended where there is a negative grade. A minimum slope of 1" per foot for 4' will help, and more is better. Always remember to keep soil 6" from wood contact and out of the foundation vents.


Landscaping Surfaces:

All landscaping surfaces accept water at different rates. On occasion a particular planting bed or mulching material can trap water next to a structure. With the proper grade, grass is usually a good ground cover near homes. Be careful with other landscaping items like plastic edging, wood, railroad ties, and alike to make sure border items don't dam up water next to the house. It is wise to walk around your home during a hard rain to see how your homes systems deal with excess water.


Gutters and Downspouts:

All gutters, downspouts and/or splash blocks must be cleaned and functional to keep roof runoff from damaging the home. Poorly maintained gutter/drainage systems are the most common source for wet basements, crawl spaces, and other water damage. Window wells are rarely a problem with rain water, but can collect runoff from improper grading. There are covers available to help keep out leaves, debris and even deflect water if needed. 


Retaining walls:

Some retaining walls can be damaged by water accumulation behind the wall exerting pressure. This condition can be improved by removing the backfill and replacing it with course gravel and perforated drain pipe. The system is completed by adding drainage holes to keep water from accumulating.


Railings:

All raised walking surfaces, decks or porches that are more than 18" off the ground should have a railing. All stairs with more than 3 steps need to have a handrail. Openings for all railings must be small enough to prevent children from getting through.


Exterior Wood Surfaces:

All exterior wood surfaces should be treated regularly with paint or preservatives. Some wood such as redwood and cedar are naturally resistant to decay and are not always painted or stained. All other wood surfaces with the exception of pressure treated lumber should be maintained regularly.


Fasteners for all decks and patios:

All metal fasteners should be galvanized or aluminum to resist rust, especially near salt water. Post and beam joists should always have positive connections. There are 2 types of metal hardware connectors that are used and at times you may see 2x4's being used as well. When properly installed, these connectors significantly strengthen the structure. Also, long lag bolts and joist hangers with proper TICO nails should be installed to hold the structure up against the home. When not properly applied, the deck or patio can detach from the home.

Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway
Asphalt, Concrete

Driveways can perform a lot of functions. Driving cars and trucks over them, washing vehicles on them, kids play area etc. There are a few key factors tat go into a good functioning driveway. They all need to have proper slope for water run-off (away from the house preferable). When its concrete, expansion joints are important for controlled cracking, otherwise they just crack wherever it can. Controlling the water that is directed on them and drained off of them is important as well. Proper care and upkeep can preserve the life of a driveway for many years.

Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Walkways
Concrete

Walkways are generally a hard surface put in place for people to walk on. Depending on the substrate that they were set on and the materials used determines the lifespan and durability over the years. Roots, unmitigated water flow and improper substrate can all contribute to settling, cracks and deterioration. Yearly maintenance and care is important in order to extend its overall lifespan. 

Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Patio
Concrete, Wood

Patios can be made out of all types of materials like: concrete, concrete pavers, bricks, treated lumber, etc. They all are subject to settling, cracking, and deterioration over time. Maintenance on patios is generally a yearly task and in order to preserve the life of them. It is very important to stay on top of the maintenance and care of them. Maintenance can consist of blowing them off, pressure washing, sealing, and possibly treating them. It is also important to re-direct any downspout drainage or standing water away from them.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
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2.1.1 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Driveway and Walks Cracking - Minor

Minor cosmetic cracks observed, which may indicate movement in the soil.  I recommend keeping an eye on it to watch for further settlement. The key is to not have any areas of standing water or extreme run off towards the house of foundation. 

Gardening shovel tool shape Concrete Contractor
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2.1.2 - Walkways, Patios & Driveways

Concrete is level or sloping towards the house

Any surface water from the concrete should be sloped away from the house. It is not uncommon for older homes to have concrete that may slope towards the house. I would keep an eye on this to make sure it is not settling more or affecting the foundation in a negative way. If it does, I would recommend repairing or replacing the concrete to mitigate this water issue. 

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2.2.1 - Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls

Vegitation - Ok

Just small vegetation and everything is ok at this time. I recommend keeping all vegetation trimmed down and away from the house structure at least 12 to allow the siding to dry out after a rain.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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2.3.1 - Tree and Bush concerns

No problems

There were no visible tree or bush problems.

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2.4.1 - Windows

Windows function

The windows were functional at this time. 

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2.4.2 - Windows

Windows - need tempered glass on some of them

There are some windows that are in need of tempered glass due to them being: within 18 of the floor or ground, in a bathroom or they are within the swing of a door. 

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2.4.3 - Windows

Egress window is not to code

The egress window is not to code and could be a problem for someone trying to get out of the house in the event of a fire. Recommend installing the proper window and exit. 

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2.5.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding - Ok

The siding is in good condition at this time. 

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2.5.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding - Lacks maintenance and deteriorated

The siding overall needs caulking, repairs and paint to hold up over time. This is not uncommon on houses that are this age. I recommend repairs, caulking and repainting to preserve the life of the siding.

I recommend properly prepping, using good QUAD caulk and a good grade of paint product to preserve the life of the paint job and the siding. 

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2.5.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Siding - Splitting

Siding shingles was splitting in one or more areas, which can lead to moisture intrusion and/or mold. Recommend caulking and painting these areas. 

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2.5.4 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Bees nest

Ther was evidence of some small bees nests on the soffits. They do not appear to be active at this time. Just need to monitor.

On the shed soffit. 

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2.5.5 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Facia is showing signs of deterioration due to moisture.

Recommend fixing the gutters properly and prepping and painting the facia when done to extend the life of the facia. 

If you feel that the extent of the water damage is beyond that, you can replace the facia and properly paint it. 

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2.6.1 - Exterior Doors

Garage door is working at this time.

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2.6.2 - Exterior Doors

Ok

The doors were in good operating condition at the time of inspection.

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2.6.3 - Exterior Doors

Wood door on shed is showing signs of extreme exposure to the elements.

Recommend painting as needed. 

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2.7.1 - Exterior Electrical Wiring

Ok

The exterior wiring is in good condition at this time. No real issues to note. 

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2.7.2 - Exterior Electrical Wiring

GFCI - The exterior plugs are not GFCI protected

The exterior plugs are supposed to be GFCI protected for safety. I recommend that you install a GFCI plug and properly protect it from the weather.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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2.8.1 - Exterior Plumbing

OK

At the time of the inspection, I observed no deficiencies in the condition of exterior water faucets.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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2.9.1 - Exterior Lighting

Exterior light inoperable

A light fixture was inoperable at the time of the inspection. This condition can be caused by a burned out bulb, or a problem may exist with the light fixture, wiring or the switch. This light fixture should be re-tested after the bulb is replaced. If after bulb replacement the light still fails to respond to the switch, this condition may be a potential fire hazard, and an inspection and any necessary work should be performed by a qualified electrical contractor.

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2.10.1 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Eaves - Water Stains or Surface Discoloration

Water stains or surface discoloration was observed under the roof eaves. This may indicate an active leak or improper ventilation at the attic vents. I would recommend cleaning the surface with a pressure washer, prep and paint accordingly and if there is an active leak or blocked vent, I would clear the insulation away from the vent for the attic and the soffit wood to breathe properly. 

Roof Roofing Professional
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2.11.1 - Fence

Gates - Ok

The gates operate and function ok at this time.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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2.11.2 - Fence

Fence posts are rotting and some of the fence is due for replacement

You can just replace the damaged posts vs replacing all of the fence at this time. 

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2.11.3 - Fence

The fence is leaning in some spots.

there are some spots where the fence is leaning. This is common with fences that have posts that are not set in concrete, and the boards do not have gaps large enough to let the wind through during a wind storm. 

Eventually it would be a good idea to remove and replace the posts as needed and to set them with concrete. 

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2.12.1 - Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps

Patio - Ok

Patio is in good shape at this time. One of the posts is showing a large crack, but is functioning fine at this time.

The porch was not built per code and it appears that the roof over the back door is a steel garage door. The hardware used and the way it was all built is functional, but not secured properly at the joists , posts or at the house. Also the screws used vs Tico nails is not the proper application. The screws used will eventually rust out. 

3 - Roof

IN NI NP O
3.1 Roof Accessibility X
3.2 Coverings/Facia/Sheeting X
3.3 Underlayment material X
3.4 Gutters and Downspouts X
3.5 Flashings X
3.6 Plumbing and Combustion Vents X
3.7 Roof supports X
3.8 Chimneys X
3.9 Porch roof attachment to header X
3.10 Skylights X
3.11 Cricket X
Roof Type/Style
Hip
Coverings/Facia/Sheeting: Material
Asphalt
Coverings/Facia/Sheeting: Remaining lifespan
15 years +
Gutters and Downspouts: Gutter Material
Aluminum
Inspection Method
Roof


     The roof inspection in general will not be as comprehensive as an inspection performed by a qualified roofing contractor. This is mainly due to the myriad of variations in installation requirements from the manufacturers for the huge number of different roof-covering materials they provide. The Home Inspection that we provide does not include confirmation of proper installation per the manufacturer. We as Home Inspectors are trained to identify common deficiencies and to recognize conditions that require evaluation by a specialist. 

     The inspection of the roof typically includes a visual evaluation of the roof structure, roof-covering materials, flashing, and roof penetrations like chimneys, mounting hardware for roof-mounted equipment, attic ventilation devices, and combustion and plumbing vents. The roof inspection does not include leak-testing and will not certify or warranty the roof against current or future leakage. We will do our best to assess the current condition of the roofing, how it was cared for and the estimated functional life left in it. We will also look for leaks, potential leaks and any potential issues that you should know about.

     The key to a good roof is a good installation, quality materials, regular care and maintenance of the roof and an ongoing annual assessment of its condition. We all have seen a roof that has not been taken care of and a roof that looks new and is well cared for. We as Inspectors are tasked with assessing these factors in order to give you our best opinion as to the life expectancy and current function of the roof. But remember, that this is subjective and should not be considered as a guarantee of its lifespan. If for any reason you want a further evaluation of your roof, you can bring in a qualified roofing contractor to assess your roof and give you further insight as to the condition of your roof. Just be aware that contractors make money repairing and replacing roofs and not assessing their condition. So you may get a proposal that requires an objective look at all the factors before you make a decision on your roof.

Flashings: Material and Description
Aluminum

Flashing is a general term used to describe sheet metal fabricated into shapes and used to protect areas of the roof from moisture intrusion. Inspection typically includes inspection for condition and proper installation of flashing in the following locations: - roof penetrations such as vents, electrical masts, chimneys, mechanical equipment, patio cover attachment points, and around skylights; - junctions at which roofs meet walls; - roof edges; - areas at which roofs change slope; - areas at which roof-covering materials change; and - areas at which different roof planes meet (such as valleys).

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
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3.1.1 - Roof Accessibility

Walked the roof

I accessed the roof via a ladder. I was able to walk the entire roof.

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3.2.1 - Coverings/Facia/Sheeting

The roof on the house is in good condition at this time

I observed no notable deficiencies in the condition of the exterior roof structure at this time. The roof on the house is 5-10 years old and has aged consistent with its lifespan. I recommend regular care of the roof and I believe you can extend the life of the roof. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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3.2.2 - Coverings/Facia/Sheeting

Roof corners are not properly draining into the gutters.

Will need to clean, prep and properly repair as needed. 

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3.2.3 - Coverings/Facia/Sheeting

Zinc strips are installed on the roof to inhibit moss growth.

This is normal. I still recommend getting up on the roof and cleaning as needed. 

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3.3.1 - Underlayment material

#15 Felt paper

The roof had #15 felt paper installed as water-resistant underlayment beneath roof-covering materials. The underlayment was inspected in representative areas only. Most of this membrane was hidden beneath roof-covering materials and was not inspected.

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3.4.1 - Gutters and Downspouts

Ok

Gutters are in good shape at this time.

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3.4.2 - Gutters and Downspouts

Gutters have long runs due to the roof design. This can create low spots that water can collect.

Keep an eye on the water flow and adjust the fall of the gutters if needed to preserve the life and function of the gutters. 

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3.5.1 - Flashings

No visual flashing deficiencies

I observed no real deficiencies with the roof flashing at this time.

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3.6.1 - Plumbing and Combustion Vents

Ok

Plumbing and ventilation boots are in good shape at this time. 

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3.7.1 - Roof supports

I do not see any roof support issues at this time.

Here are a couple things to note in regards to roof supports:

You should never cut and engineered truss in the attic or over a PorTech. They are designed for specific loads and should not be cut. If for any reason you have to cut a truss, you should contact an engineer and get them re-engineered.

If you cut a roof collar tie or a pony wall in the attic, you should take measures to properly support befor cutting and properly support after any cuts have been made. 

You can also install additional supports for rafters as needed. More support never hurts. 

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3.8.1 - Chimneys

Chimney flue disclaimer

Accurate inspection of the chimney flue lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection. Although the Inspector may make comments on the condition of the portion of the flue readily visible from the roof, a full, accurate evaluation of the flue condition would require the services of a specialist. Because the accumulation of flammable materials in the flue as a natural result of the wood-burning process is a potential fire hazard, I recommend that before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline that you have the flue inspected by a specialist.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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3.8.2 - Chimneys

Chimney - Ok

The chimney appears to be ok at this time. Recommend regular inspection and maintenance to keep it in good shape.

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3.8.3 - Chimneys

Minor deterioration and sprawling on the chimney

I recommend keeping an eye on this and maintain as needed. This is normal for houses of this age. 

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3.9.1 - Porch roof attachment to header

The porch roof is not properly attached to the header.

I recommend using a hurricane clip and Tico nail to attach the rafters to the beam and attaching it to the house properly. 

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3.10.1 - Skylights

Ok

The skylights appear to be in good shape at this time. I recommend going up and taking a look annually when you clean the gutters to make sure everything is holding up well.

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3.10.2 - Skylights

The rubber flashing will eventually dry out and crack .

I would keep an eye on this and repair or replace as needed. 

4 - Interior - Doors, Windows & Interior

IN NI NP O
4.1 Doors X
4.2 Slider doors X
4.3 Windows X
4.4 Floors X
4.5 Walls / Ceilings X
4.6 Steps, Stairways & Railings X
4.7 Countertops & Cabinets X
Floors: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Hardwood, Laminate
Walls / Ceilings: Wall Material
Drywall
Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Granite, Formica
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
Windows: Window Type
Double Pane Windows

     There are many types of windows in the homes in our area. Everything from aluminum to wood clad to vinyl to single pane glazed windows. All of them perform differently and wear differently. They all require regular care and proper operation. If not take care of, they will wear out prematurely or require more expensive repairs. 

     The key elements to look for in windows is that they open correctly, the screens are in place, the weep holes and tracks remain clean and that they are cleaned regularly. In addition, wood clad windows will need to be treated regularly. It is also a good idea to check the caulking regularly and make sure the exterior trim paint is maintained.

Steps, Stairways & Railings: Staircase Requirements

The requirements for staircases, including (but not limited to) dimensions for handrail height, size, allowable projection, and component spacing, and maximum and minimum tread and riser dimensions, will vary according to the standards adopted by the jurisdiction in which a home is located. Here are some basic parameters for stairs and railings:

4" spacing between balusters or spindles.

Stairs should be at 7 3/4" maximum height

The treads should be 10" long at least

No more than a 3/8" variance in the heights of steps

Handrails must be 34-38" tall and should extend to the end of the stairs

Handrails should have a grab rail on one side to hold onto and it should return to the wall at the ends


Now due to the era of the home or the people that have interacted with them over time, you may not see these standards met. The best thing to do is look at all of your stair systems realistically. Do they work? Are they in need of repair or adjustment? Do they need to be upgraded? Were they put in to serve a function, but safety was not considered at the time? If ever you are planning to do a remodel and remove any set of stairs, at that point you will be required to build the new set to the new building standards.Ultimately, its your decision whether you feel something is ok or if it needs to change. When making any decisions, it is always a good idea to consult a qualified contractor to help you make your decision.


I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
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4.1.1 - Doors

Doors - Ok

Found no major issues with doors at this time. 

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4.1.2 - Doors

Inoperable door hardware

The door hardware was inoperable at the time of the inspection. I recommend repair, adjustment or replacement as necessary.

The front door. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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4.3.1 - Windows

No egress window for bedroom area

It is a good idea to have an accessible egress window in every functional bedroom. This is a fire safety issue for people to be able to get out in the event of a fire. I recommend that you consult a qualified contractor to discuss your options for this.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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4.3.2 - Windows

Window sill - evidence of water/condensation

I found evidence of water condensation on the window sills. This issue is often from the windows sweating and producing condensation or possibly a leaking seal or damaged caulking. It does not appear to be sweating since the windows have been upgraded. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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4.4.1 - Floors

Flooring - General Wear and Tear

The home had general wear and tear for the floors at the time of the inspection. Regular maintenance and cleaning are what I recommend. 

Mop Cleaning Service
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4.5.1 - Walls / Ceilings

Ceilings - Ok

At the time of the inspection, I observed no deficiencies in the condition of ceilings in the home worth noting in the areas inspected. 


Contractor Qualified Professional
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4.5.2 - Walls / Ceilings

Some past water damage was noticed.

It does not look like a current problem. I would repair as needed and keep an eye on it for further deterioration. In one of the upper bedrooms.

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4.5.3 - Walls / Ceilings

Walls - Ok

The walls are in pretty good shape at this time. No major concerns to note.

The texture is pretty cool, yet hard to match. Be careful with the walls. 

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4.6.1 - Steps, Stairways & Railings

Stair System - Ok

Stairs were in good shape at this time.

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4.7.1 - Countertops & Cabinets

Cabinets are old and are built in. I recommend adjusting and repairing as needed.

This type of cabinet is hard to come by these days. If they are in good shape, they are worth keeping. 

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4.7.2 - Countertops & Cabinets

Condition

Cabinets appear to be in good working condition relative to the age and care of them. Recommend  regular maintenance and care. 

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Comment
4.7.3 - Countertops & Cabinets

The countertops are in good shape at this time.

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Comment
4.7.4 - Countertops & Cabinets

I recommend sealing the quartz or granite

I recommend sealing because there is no easy way to tell if the current owner did seal them and this will protect them from any future accidents. 

5 - Appliances

IN NI NP O
5.1 Garbage Disposal X
5.2 Dishwasher X
5.3 Range/Oven/Cooktop X
5.4 Built-in Microwave X
5.5 Range Hood X
5.6 Refrigerator X
5.7 Washer/Dryer X
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Gas
General Information

The appliances like everything in a home have an average lifespan. This lifespan often times can be shortened or prolonged depending on the care and maintenance of these appliances. It is also important to use these appliances for what they intended for. And lastly, the brand and quality of the appliance plays a large factor in their function as well. I recommend talking to the owners as to the function of the appliances and any issues that they may be aware of in regards to their function.

Built-in Microwave: Function

The Microwave was tested to see if it comes on, and not whether it properly heats anything inside or how quickly it heats things up. It is not uncommon for a microwave to take longer to heat items the older it gets in its life. If you have a question with this, I recommend contacting a qualified appliance repair person to give you further insight into the operation of your microwave.

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Temperature

The range was tested for function and not calibration. Ranges at times can vary in the temperature output vs what the knob or display says. This does not mean the range does not function, just that it may function at a different temperature than what is noted.

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
Credit
Comment
5.1.1 - Garbage Disposal

No Disposal

The kitchen had no garbage disposal installed.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
5.1.2 - Garbage Disposal

There is a unique drainage motor with a switch in the basement kitchen.

This sink was not installed per code. There is a switch on the cabinet that controls the pumping of the water in the sink because it does not drain on its own to the sewer line or even a grinder pump in the basement and then to the sewer. 

The system is functioning, but is not to code. In order to make this all up to code, I recommend contacting a licensed plumber. This could cost up to $5000 or more to properly rectify this issue if you want it up to code. 

Credit
Comment
5.2.1 - Dishwasher

Dishwasher OK

At the time of the inspection, I observed no deficiencies in the condition and operation of the dishwasher. It was operated through a rinse cycle.


Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.3.1 - Range/Oven/Cooktop

Range - Ok

The range appears to be in good working condition at this time. The burners and oven elements turned on. 

Credit
Comment
5.3.2 - Range/Oven/Cooktop

Range - No anti-tipping device

Range was not fastened to the floor. This poses a safety hazard to children. Recommend a qualified contractor secure range so it can't tip. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
5.5.1 - Range Hood

Draft hood - Ok

The draft hood is working at this time.

Credit
Comment
5.6.1 - Refrigerator

Operable

The refrigerator appears to be operable at the time of inspection. 


Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
5.7.1 - Washer/Dryer

W/D - Ok

The washer and dryer appear to be in good working condition at this time. They were not actually turned on, but they show no signs of inoperability.

Credit
Comment
5.7.2 - Washer/Dryer

Needs steel braided hoses

I recommend installing steel braided hoses to the washer.

6 - Plumbing

IN NI NP O
6.1 Water Pressure X
6.2 Main Water Shut-off Device X
6.3 Kitchen faucet X
6.4 Hammer Valves X
6.5 Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems X
6.6 Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures X
6.7 Toilets X
6.8 Tubs
6.9 Water Heating System X
6.10 Sump Pump X
Water Source
Public water
Main Water Shut-off Device: Location
Basement
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Drain Size
1 1/2", 1 1/4”
Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Material
ABS, Iron, PVC
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Piping Material
Copper
Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures: Water Supply Material
Copper, Pex
Water Heating System: Power Source/Type
Gas
Water Heating System: Capacity
50 gallons
Water Heating System: Location
Basement

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the main water supply shut-off valve; B. the main fuel supply shut-off valve; C. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing; D. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water; E. all toilets for proper operation by flushing; F. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage; G. the drain, waste and vent system; and H. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats. II. The inspector shall describe: A. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence; B. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve; C. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve; D. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and E. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously; B. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets; C. mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and D. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. light or ignite pilot flames. B. measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater. C. inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems. D. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply. E. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source. F. open sealed plumbing access panels. G. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections. H. operate any valve. I. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection. J. evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping. K. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, backflow prevention or drain-stop devices. L. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains. M. evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems. N. inspect wastewater treatment systems. O. inspect water treatment systems or water filters. P. inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks. Q. evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements. R. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air. S. test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves. T. examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation. U. determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing. V. inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
Credit
Comment
6.1.1 - Water Pressure

Water Pressure for the house

The recommended water pressure for a house is 60-80 PSI. If the pressure is above this, it can eventually have an effect on the water heaters pressure relief valve and make it possibly leak. If the pressure is below this, it can make for low water pressure for showers, etc. 

* If the pressure is too high, you can install a pressure reducing valve in the main water line to the house to reduce the overall water pressure to the house. 

* If the pressure is to low, it may be due to the galvanized plumbing pipes or it may benefit from a booster pump being installed. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
6.2.1 - Main Water Shut-off Device

Shut off location picture

In the ceiling downstairs behind a vent cover by the hall.

Credit
Comment
6.3.1 - Kitchen faucet

The kitchen faucet is working fine at this time.

Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - Hammer Valves

Hammer valves for dishwasher, washing machine and ice makers.

I recommend installing hammer valves for any mechanical item tied to the water supply lines. This will reduce the stress on the water lines over time with these items turning on and off all the time. It is not a requirement, but rather a good idea. 


https://www.homedepot.com/p/Mini-Rester-3-8-in-x-3-8-in-Copper-Compression-x-Compression-Water-Hammer-Arrester-HD660-GTR1/202273964

Credit
Comment
6.4.2 - Hammer Valves

Missing some hammer valves - I recommend installing them where needed

Credit
Comment
6.5.1 - Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems

Drains and Vents - Ok

The drains and vents appear to be properly installed under the sinks. I ran the hot and cold water and the stopper and everything appeared to run correctly at this time.

There are unconventional drains in the basement for all of the plumbing. None of this is up to code, but is currently working at this time. If you are concerned with its future use, I would contact a licensed plumber for repair or replacement options.  

Credit
Comment
6.6.1 - Water Supply, Distribution Systems & Fixtures

Water lines - Ok at this time

I did not see any visible leaks or major problems at this time. Keep an eye on the plumbing under the sinks periodically to make sure everything is ok.

Credit
Comment
6.7.1 - Toilets

Toilets - Ok

Toilets were working ok at time of inspection.


Credit
Comment
6.7.2 - Toilets

Toilet needs caulk around the base by the floor

Recommend caulking the toilet to the floor to properly seal it. Leave a 1 gap in the back for a leak if ever needed. 

Credit
Comment
6.9.1 - Water Heating System

Water Heater - Ok

The water heater appears to be working correctly at this time and is installed correctly.

Credit
Comment
6.9.2 - Water Heating System

Strap and stand - Ok

The water heater straps and stand if needed are ok.

7 - Heating/Fireplace

IN NI NP O
7.1 Heating units X
7.2 Thermostat X
7.3 Filters X
7.4 Ductwork/Radiators X
7.5 Vents and Flues X
7.6 Fireplace/Woodstove X
7.7 Gas logs X
Heating units: Energy Source
Gas
Heating units: Heat Type
Forced Air

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
Credit
Comment
7.1.1 - Heating units

Equipment - Appears to be ok at this time

The furnace or heating system appears to be in good working condition at this time. It is always a good idea to have a certified heating contractor or electrician take a look at the equipment periodically.

Credit
Comment
7.1.2 - Heating units

The whole house heating system is controlled from the basement thermostat.

This my pose a problem in the control of the upstairs temp in addition to the downstairs temp. I would test it out in the winter and adjust as needed or move the tstat upstairs. 

Credit
Comment
7.2.1 - Thermostat

Ok

The thermostat is working at this time.

Credit
Comment
7.3.1 - Filters

Filter - Ok

I found no problem with the filter at this time. I recommend checking it every 6 months and replace or clean as needed. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
7.4.1 - Ductwork/Radiators

The registers appear to be producing heat

The registers were showing heat at the time of inspection.

Credit
Comment
7.5.1 - Vents and Flues

Ok

Exhaust pipes appear to be installed correctly at this time. 

Credit
Comment
7.5.2 - Vents and Flues

Water Heater flue vents to chimney

Exhaust flue from water heater vents into chimney. This is common. Just and FYI.

Fire HVAC Professional
Credit
Comment
7.7.1 - Gas logs

Gas logs - Ok

Gas fireplace is working at time of inspection.


8 - Electrical

IN NI NP O
8.1 Service Entrance Conductors X
8.2 Panel / Sub-panels X
8.3 Circuits/Breakers/Fuses X
8.4 Lighting Fixtures/Switches/Receptacles X
8.5 GFCI & AFCI X
8.6 Smoke Detectors X
8.7 Carbon Monoxide Detectors X
Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Overhead
Service Entrance Conductors: Service Size
200 Amp
Panel / Sub-panels: Main Panel Location
Hallway
Panel / Sub-panels: Panel Capacity
200 AMP
Panel / Sub-panels: Panel Manufacturer
Square D
Panel / Sub-panels: Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Panel / Sub-panels: Sub Panel Location
NA
Circuits/Breakers/Fuses: Wiring Type
Romex

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the service drop; B. the overhead service conductors and attachment point; C. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops; D. the service mast, service conduit and raceway; E. the electric meter and base; F. service-entrance conductors; G. the main service disconnect; H. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses); I. service grounding and bonding; J. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible; K. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and L. smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and B. the type of wiring observed. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. deficiencies in the integrity of the serviceentrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs; B. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled; C. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible; D. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and E. the absence of smoke detectors. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures. B. operate electrical systems that are shut down. C. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts. D. operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices. E. operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms F. inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarms systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems. G. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled. H. inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices. I. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized. J. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any timecontrolled devices. K. verify the service ground. L. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility. M. inspect spark or lightning arrestors. N. inspect or test de-icing equipment. O. conduct voltage-drop calculations. P. determine the accuracy of labeling. Q. inspect exterior lighting.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
Credit
Comment
8.1.1 - Service Entrance Conductors

Electric service - Ok

I found no visual issues with the electrical service, weather head or service conductors at this time. 

Credit
Comment
8.2.1 - Panel / Sub-panels

Panel - Ok

The electric panel appears to be operational at this time. 

Credit
Comment
8.3.1 - Circuits/Breakers/Fuses

Branch circuit wiring - Ok

I found no issues with branch circuit wiring at the panel or throughout the home that I can see.  

Contractor Qualified Professional
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Comment
8.4.1 - Lighting Fixtures/Switches/Receptacles

Plugs / Switches - Ok

Overall, the plugs and switches that I was able to test were working fine. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.4.2 - Lighting Fixtures/Switches/Receptacles

Lighting - Ok

At the time of the inspection, I observed no deficiencies in the condition and operation of permanently-installed interior or exterior lighting worth noting beyond the normal accepted condition of the fixtures. There may be minor issues with a fixture that most often can be rectified by just replacing a fixture, bulb or switch over time. If anything beyond this scope is found, it is best to contact a Handyman or licensed electrician to check things out for you.


Contractor Qualified Professional
Credit
Comment
8.5.1 - GFCI & AFCI

GFCI's - Ok

All GFCI plugs that I was able to test are in good working order at this time. 

Credit
Comment
8.5.2 - GFCI & AFCI

There are some missing GFCI plugs

No GFCI protection present in all locations. Recommend licensed electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles in all locations.

Here is a link to read about how GFCI receptacles keep you safe. 


Should have a GFCI plug in each of these locations: Garage, Outside, Laundry room, Kitchen and Bathrooms.

Electric Electrical Contractor
Credit
Comment
8.6.1 - Smoke Detectors

Smoke Detectors - Ok

The smoke detectors  that are present are working at this time.

Credit
Comment
8.7.1 - Carbon Monoxide Detectors

CO Detectors - Ok

All CO detectors are working at this time.

Credit
Comment
8.7.2 - Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Missing CO Detector

It is recommended that there be 1 CO detector located in every bedroom and one on every level of the home. I recommend that you install CO detectors where needed. You can pick these up at any hardware store and install them yourself. 

 

Contractor Qualified Professional

9 - Garage

IN NI NP O
9.1 Floor X
9.2 Walls & Firewalls X
9.3 Garage Door X
9.4 Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home) X
9.5 Garage wiring X
9.6 Garage ventilation X
9.7 Roof framing X
Garage Door: Material
Steel
  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Floor

Concrete floor is in adequate shape

No signs of large cracks, settling or major stains on the concrete floor at this time.  

Credit
Comment
9.2.1 - Walls & Firewalls

Firewall - Ok

Garage firewall is in good shape at his time based on the age of the home.

Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Garage Door

Garage door - Ok

The garage door is working properly at this time.

Credit
Comment
9.4.1 - Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home)

Door - Ok at this time.

Found no major issues with the fire door to the garage at this time. 

Credit
Comment
9.4.2 - Occupant Door (From garage to inside of home)

Not Self-closing

Door from garage to home should have self-closing hinges to help prevent spread of a fire to living space. You can pickup self closing hinges at Home Depot and put these on yourself if you want to.  

DIY Resource Link.

Door Door Repair and Installation Contractor
Credit
Comment
9.5.1 - Garage wiring

No major issues to note for garage wiring.

The garage wiring appears to be in good order at this time. It is not recommended to add additional extension cords or exposed wires in the garage due to potential sparks and fuel vapors.

Credit
Comment
9.6.1 - Garage ventilation

There is a little screen on the left side of the house that has a little hole in it that I would plug up.

Its down by the ground. 

Credit
Comment
9.7.1 - Roof framing

Roof system - Ok

I do not see any visible issues with the roof system at this time. 

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

IN NI NP O
10.1 Attic Insulation X
10.2 Ventilation X
10.3 Exhaust Vent Systems X
10.4 Wiring in the attic X
Attic Insulation: R-value
30
Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Batt, Loose-fill
Ventilation: Ventilation Types
Soffit Vents, Roof vent
Exhaust Vent Systems: Exhaust Fan types
Fan Only, Range draft hood
Attic Ventilation - Standards

Ventilation methods and level of thermal insulation may affect the lifespan or performance of the roofing materials, home energy efficiency, or comfort levels. Often times it can be a simple as installing additional roof vents to cure a problem. But in some instances, the duration of improper ventilation may have had an impact on the overall condition and lifespan of the existing roofing and sheeting. (It is recommended that you have 1 vent for every 150 SF of attic space and that you have cross ventilation at the soffits or eaves.) 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
Credit
Comment
10.1.1 - Attic Insulation

Attic Insulation - Ok

The attic insulation appeared to be in good order at this time.


Credit
Comment
10.2.1 - Ventilation

Good cross ventilation at this time

Attic has good cross ventilation from the soffit vents and the roof vents from what I can tell at this time.  




Credit
Comment
10.2.2 - Ventilation

May want to install a wired attic ventilation fan to help remove the hot attic air.

Credit
Comment
10.3.1 - Exhaust Vent Systems

Bath fans are working at this time.

The bath fans appear to be operating at this time.

Credit
Comment
10.3.2 - Exhaust Vent Systems

Kitchen vent appears to be vented fine.

Credit
Comment
10.4.1 - Wiring in the attic

The wiring in the attic appears to be ok at this time from what I can see.

The wiring appears to be fine from what I can see. I would keep an eye on the attic periodically and make sure that there are not exposed wiring connections that are not secured inside of a jbox. 

11 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structural

IN NI NP O
11.1 Crawlspace Ventilation X
11.2 Foundation X
11.3 Crawlspace Condition X
11.4 Vapor barrier X
11.5 Floor Structure X
11.6 Insulation X
11.7 Basement X
Inspection Method
NA
Foundation: Foundation Type
Concrete
Floor Structure: Material
Concrete
Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Concrete
Vapor barrier: 6 mil vapor black vapor barrier

It is recommended that you place a 6 mil black vapor barrier over any exposed soils to reduce moisture levels in the crawlspace. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. (ie - standing water, feces, rodent activity, etc.) B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations
Credit
Comment
11.2.1 - Foundation

Foundation is in good condition

The foundation appears to be in good condition at this time. There are no sizeable cracks or settling to be noted from areas inspected.


Credit
Comment
11.5.1 - Floor Structure

Floor system - Ok

Floor system is in good shape at this time from what I can see.


Credit
Comment
11.6.1 - Insulation

Insulation overall is in tact at this time.

For the most part, the insulation is in tact at this time. 

Credit
Comment
11.7.1 - Basement

Concrete basement floor - Ok

The concrete floor appears to be in good shape at this time.



12 - Maintenance List/Schedule

IN NI NP O
12.1 Maintenance Schedule
Maintenance Schedule: Maintenance Item List

Here is a list of General Maintenance Items for the home. In order to maintain any home properly, it should become a common practice to perform certain maintenance functions periodically either by yourself or to call a specialized professional. Without proper maintenance, areas of the home can either break down, deteriorate or stop functioning prematurely. 


Interior:

Range hood clean filters - (Winter / Spring / Summer / Fall) 

Laundry -  check for leaking hoses, dryer vent problems, lint build up around dryer or exhaust (Spring / Fall) 

Crawlspace - check for unusual odors, standing water, insulation falling down, ductwork disconnected (Winter / Summer) 

Attic - use a bright light, look for stains, mold or mildew, look for daylight around penetrations, disconnected vents (Winter / Summer) 

Grout - check/maintain all grout, seal twice a year or as otherwise directed on grout sealant (Winter / Spring / Summer /Fall) 

Caulking - check/maintain around tubs, shower enclosures, backsplash to counter joints, sinks, etc. (Winter / Summer) 

Ceilings/Walls - look for nail pops, cracks, and stains. Address any water stains promptly, repair leaks. Note any significant changes that may indicate problems. Fill /repair/paint as needed. (Winter /Summer)

Window Sills/Trim - check and caulk/paint as necessary (Winter /Summer) 

Safety Equipment Checks - replace batteries and test all smoke & carbon monoxide detectors. Check fire extinguishers, test all GFCIs outlets/breakers and all AFCIs breakers in panel (if equipped) (Spring /Fall) 

Windows/Sliding Doors - clean tracks and lubricate mechanisms. Repair any locks or faulty counter balances. (Spring / Fall) 

Doors - check weather striping, caulk, door sweeps, stops, caulk and paint/stain (Spring / Fall)

Cabinets - check adjust tighten all doors, hardware, hinges, catches (Winter / Summer) 

Air filters - change/clean them during heating or cooling season, more frequently if you have pets or allergies. (every 60 days during heating/cooling seasons. Adjust to longer intervals if the filter appears too clean)

Fan forced electric wall heaters - vacuum and clean Heating systems (Fall)

Oil furnaces and all boilers systems - have professional check and repair annually (Fall) 

Gas forced air furnaces - have professional checks at 5 years, 10 years and then every year thereafter (** Make sure you have working carbon monoxide detectors annually **)

 


Exterior: 

Wash - vinyl siding, bricks, balconies (Spring) 

Siding - inspect, caulk, repair/paint/stain as required (Spring / Fall) 

Decks - stain/paint as required. Check posts, beams, railings, pickets, stairs and handrails regularly. If there is any significant movement, rot, loose railings, etc., repair or replace at once. (Winter / Spring / Summer / Fall) 

Balconies - if you have waterproof balconies, clean and inspect for any leaks, check drains (Winter / Summer) 

Gutters and Downspouts - clean, check mounts, drains, look for leaking end caps or joints repair as needed (Spring / Fall) 

Drains - check drains in driveways, stairwells and yards frequently during rainy periods (Winter / Spring / Fall) 

Sprinkler systems - assure they are not soaking the home or crawlspace vents, etc (Spring / Summer / Fall) 

Hose bibs - winterize non frost free spouts, disconnect all hoses (Winter) 

Landscaping - keep all plants trimmed away from the building, keep mulch from getting closer then 3 from siding (Spring / Summer) 

Other optional equipment If you have a septic, keep it pumped regularly. (Have it checked at 3-5 years depending on the size of your family and usage) 

Be sure to maintain wells, (periodic shocking and testing recommended.) 

If you have a sump pump, test it yearly. 

Be sure to walk around your home in the rain and see how the gutters, downspouts, splash-blocks & drains are working. Never allow water to puddle next to the home or to come in contact with the structure. 

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations

13 - WAC (Exclusions and limitations)

IN NI NP O
13.1 WAC Standards of Practice

WAC 308-408C-030

Exclusions and limitations.

Inspectors are not required to:

(1) Determine the condition of any system or component that is not readily accessible; the remaining service life of any system or component; the strength, adequacy, effectiveness or efficiency of any system or component; causes of any condition or deficiency; methods, materials, or cost of corrections; future conditions including, but not limited to, failure of systems and components.

(2) Comment on the suitability of the structure or property for any specialized use, compliance with codes, regulations, laws or ordinances.

(3) Report the presence of potentially hazardous plants or animals including, but not limited to, wood destroying insects or diseases harmful to humans; the presence of any environmental hazards including, but not limited to mold, toxins, carcinogens, noise, and contaminants in soil, water or air; the effectiveness of any system installed or methods utilized to control or remove suspected hazardous substances.

(4) Determine the operating costs of any systems or components.

(5) Determine the acoustical properties of any systems or components.

(6) Operate any system or component that is shut down, not connected or is otherwise inoperable.

(7) Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal user controls.

(8) Operate any circuit breakers, water, gas or oil shutoff valves.

(9) Offer or perform any act or service contrary to law.

(10) Offer or perform engineering services or work in any trade or professional service other than home inspection.

(11) Offer or provide warranties or guarantees of any kind unless clearly explained and agreed to by both parties in a preinspection agreement.

(12) Determine the existence of or inspect any underground items including, but not limited to, underground storage tanks or sprinkler systems.

(13) Inspect decorative items, or systems or components that are in areas not entered in accordance with the SOP.

(14) Inspect detached structures, common elements and areas of multiunit housing such as condominium properties or cooperative housing.

(15) Perform any procedure or operation that will, in the opinion of the inspector, likely be dangerous to the inspector or others or damage the property, its systems or components.

(16) Move suspended ceiling tiles, personal property, furniture, equipment, plants, soil, snow, ice or debris.

(17) Dismantle any system or component, except as explicitly required by the SOP.

(18) Enter flooded crawlspaces, attics that are not readily accessible, or any area that will, in the opinion of the inspector, likely be dangerous to the inspector or other persons or damage the property, its systems or components.

(19) Inspect or comment on the condition or serviceability of elevators or related equipment.

(20) Inspect or comment on the condition or serviceability of swimming pools, hot tubs, saunas, sports courts or other similar equipment or related equipment.

Inspectors are not limited from examining other systems and components or including other inspection services. Likewise, if the inspector is qualified and willing to do so, an inspector may specify the type of repairs to be made.

An inspector may exclude those systems or components that a client specifically requests not to be included in the scope of the inspection or those areas that, in the opinion of the inspector, are inaccessible due to obstructions or conditions dangerous to the inspector. When systems or components designated for inspection under this SOP are excluded, the reason the item was excluded will be reported.

  • IN = Inspected
  • NI = Not Inspected
  • NP = Not Present
  • O = Observations