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1234 Main St.
Bettendorf, IA 52722
11/16/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name

SCOPE OF THE INSPECTION:

                Thank you for choosing Vital Property Inspections LLC to inspect your new home! Please read the entire inspection report carefully. If you have any questions throughout the inspection process don't hesitate to ask. This report is based on an inspection of the visible portion of the structure at the time of the inspection with a focus on safety and function, not on current building or municipality codes.

            Home Inspectors are generalists who report on readily visible concerns with the home.  It is our duty to recommend evaluation or repair by specific trades and not by specific person.  It is our recommendation to contact your Real Estate Professional or the Contractor of your choice for further advise on any repairs you feel are needed in the home.

            The furnishings, personal items, and/or systems of the home are not dismantled or moved. A 2 - 4 hour inspection is not equal to "live-in exposure" and may not discover all concerns with the home. Unless stated in writing, we will only inspect/comment on the following systems: Electrical, Heating/cooling, Appliances, Plumbing, Roof and Attic, Exterior, Grounds, and the Foundation. NOTE: This inspection is not a warranty or insurance policy. The limit of liability of Vital Property Inspections and its employees does not extend beyond the day the inspection was performed.

            This inspection report and all information contained within is the sole property of the client/s named in this report and is not to be shared/passed on without the owners consent. Doing so may result in legal action.

 

INSPECTION CATEGORIES

This report contains three different categories of concern noted during the inspection. 

Minor Defects and Maintenance Items: These items are generally small DIY repairs or maintenance recommendations.

Marginal Defects and Recommendations:  These items are defects that should be repaired sooner than later.  Marginal defects left unrepaired usually progress into the next category of major defects.

Major Defects and Safety Concerns: These items are cause for immediate concern.  Major defects could play a role on structural integrity and your safety in the home. 

                This home inspection was performed in accordance with the Standard of Practice and Code of Ethics of the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI).  These standards are included in the report under each section summary. An honest effort was made on your behalf to discover all visible defects, however, in the event of an oversight, maximum liability must be limited to three times the price of the home inspection. This inspection is an evaluation of the condition of the home, in my professional opinion, on the day of the inspection. Any areas that are not safe, readily accessible and/or visible to the inspector will not be included in the home inspection report. The home inspection is not intended as a substitute for a Seller’s Disclosure. This home inspection is not a compliance inspection or certification of any kind. It simply is my professional opinion of the condition of the home at the time of the inspection. This inspection does not cover items or conditions that may be only discovered by invasive methods. No removal of materials or dismantling of systems shall be performed under this inspection. This is not a technically exhaustive inspection. The inspection report lists the systems and components inspected by Vital Property Inspections LLC. Items not found in this report are considered beyond the scope of the inspection and should not be considered inspected at this time. This report contains technical information that may not be readily understandable to the lay person. Therefore, a verbal consultation with the inspector is recommended after the inspection. If you choose not to consult with the inspector, Vital Property Inspections LLC cannot be held liable for your understanding or misunderstanding of this report’s contents. If you were not present during this inspection, please call the inspector at (563-271-4100) to arrange for your verbal consultation.

1 - Inspection Details

In Attendance
Client, Client's Agent
Temperature (approximate)
76 Fahrenheit (F)
Style
Ranch
Occupancy
Utilities Off, Vacant
Type of Building
Single Family
Weather Conditions
Clear

2 - Utility Locations and Shut Offs

General: Gas Meter and Shut Off

This is the location of your shut off.  This if for your information. 

General: Electrical Disconnect

This is the location of you electrical disconnect.  This is for your information

General: Water Shut Off

This is the location of your main water shut off.  By closing this, it will shut the water to the residence off.  This is for your information.

3 - Roof

Inspection Method
Roof
Roof Type/Style
Gable
Roof Coverings: Material
Asphalt
Gutters and Downspouts : Gutter Material
Seamless Aluminum
Flashings: Material
Aluminum
Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job as the homeowner is to monitor the roof covering because any roof can leak. To monitor a roof that is inaccessible or that cannot be walked on safely, use binoculars. Look for deteriorating or loosening of flashing, signs of damage to the roof covering and debris that can clog valleys and gutters.

Roofs are designed to be water-resistant. Roofs are not designed to be waterproof. Eventually, the roof system will leak. No one can predict when, where or how a roof will leak. 

Every roof should be inspected every year as part of a homeowner's routine home maintenance plan. Catch problems before they become major defects.


Roof Views
Roof Coverings: Inspected
DEFECTS NOTED, MAINLY OK

The shingles were inspected at visible portions for excessive granule loss, signs of curling or delamination, loss of adhesion between the shingles, and any other signs of damage or excessive age. The shingles appeared to be in satisfactory condition, allowing for normal wear and tear, at the time of inspection. Some deficiencies were observed and noted in this report.

Roof Protrusions and Vent Pipes: Homeowner's Responsibility

Your job is to monitor the flashing around the plumbing vent pipes that pass through the roof surface.  Sometimes they deteriorate and cause a roof leak.  

Be sure that the plumbing vent pipes do not get covered, either by debris, a toy, or snow.

Roof Protrusions and Vent Pipes: Inspected
MOSTLY OK

I looked at DWV (drain, waste and vent) pipes that pass through the roof covering.  There should be watertight flashing (often black rubber material) installed around the vent pipes.  These plumbing vent pipes should extend far enough above the roof surface.    No defects were found with the gaskets. I recommend sealing the nail heads with a roofing sealant. 

Gutters and Downspouts : Inspected
MAINLY OK

The gutters were inspected looking for proper securement, debris in the channel, standing water, damage, etc. Leaking gutters can not be diagnosed if an active rain was not occurring at the time of inspection, and if leaks are noticed after taking ownership of the home, sealing may be needed at seams or endcaps. No deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

The downspouts were inspected to ensure they were diverting rainwater away from the foundation walls. Testing for blockages in downspouts or drainpipes is beyond the scope of a home inspection, as is locating their termination point. No deficiencies were present at visible portions at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report. Recommendations noted in report.

Flashings: Inspected
OK

Visible portions of the flashings were inspected looking for installation related deficiencies or damage (drip edge, sidewall, headwall, counter, etc - if applicable). Typically most areas of flashings are not visible as they are covered by the roof covering material, and therefore functionality has to be determined by looking for moisture intrusion on the sheathing in the attic, or ceilings where the flashing was presumed to be in place. No deficiencies were observed at visible portions, at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Roof Limitations

The inspection of the roof and its covering material is limited to the conditions on the day of the inspection only. The roof covering material, visible portions of the roof structure from within the attic (if applicable), and interior ceilings, were inspected looking for indications of current or past leaks. Future conditions and inclement weather may reveal leaks that were not present at the time of inspection. Any deficiencies noted in this report with the roof covering or indications of past or present leaks should be evaluated and repaired as needed by a licensed roofing contractor.


Roof Coverings: Unable to See Everything

This is a visual-only inspection of the roof-covering materials. It does not include an inspection of the entire system. There are components of the roof that are not visible or accessible at all, including the underlayment, decking, fastening, flashing, age, shingle quality, manufacturer installation recommendations, etc. 

Flashings: Difficult to See Every Flashing

I attempted to inspect the flashing related to the vent pipes, wall intersections, eaves and gables, and the roof-covering materials.  In general, there should be flashing installed in certain areas where the roof covering meets something else, like a vent pipe or siding.  Most flashing is not observable, because the flashing material itself is covered and hidden by the roof covering or other materials.  So, it's impossible to see everything.  A home inspection is a limited visual-only inspection.  

I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves: A. the roof-covering materials; B. the gutters; C. the downspouts; D. the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and E. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of roof-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of active roof leaks. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. walk on any roof surface. B. predict the service life expectancy. C. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes. D. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces. E. move insulation. F. inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments. G. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspectors opinion, to be unsafe. H. walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage. I. perform a water test. J. warrant or certify the roof. K. confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.

Credit
Comment
3.1.1 - Roof Coverings

Exposed Fasteners

I observed indications of exposed fasteners at the roof-covering materials. Fasteners should not be exposed. Potential water entry points. Roof could leak. I recommend sealing the nail heads with a roofing sealant. 

Roof Roofing Professional
Credit
Comment
3.3.1 - Gutters and Downspouts

Missing downspout extension

A downspout extension was missing in front of the garages. Recommend an extension to help prevent water from flowing next to the home and under the driveway 

Contractor Qualified Professional

4 - Exterior

General: Inspection Method
Visual
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Siding Material
Vinyl
Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway Material
Concrete
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Appurtenance
Deck, Patio
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Material
Concrete, Wood
Exterior Doors and Windows: Exterior Entry Door
Wood
General: Homeowner's Responsibility

The exterior of your home is slowly deteriorating and aging. The sun, wind, rain and temperatures are constantly affecting it. Your job is to monitor the buildings exterior for its condition and weathertightness. 

Check the condition of all exterior materials and look for developing patterns of damage or deterioration. 

During a heavy rainstorm (without lightning), grab an umbrella and go outside. Walk around your house and look around at the roof and property. A rainstorm is the perfect time to see how the roof, downspouts and grading are performing. Observe the drainage patterns of your entire property, as well as the property of your neighbor. The ground around your house should slope away from all sides. Downspouts, surface gutters and drains should be directing water away from the foundation. 

General: Exterior Views
Siding, Flashing & Trim: Inspected
MAINLY OK, DEFECTS NOTED

The walls and wall cladding (siding) were inspected looking for significant damage, presence of proper flashings, and potential water entry points, etc. No reportable deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. Recommendations noted in the report.

Exterior Doors and Windows: Inspected
OK

The exterior components of the windows and doors (trim, flashing, etc.) were inspected looking for damage, lack of proper flashing, clearance from grade, etc. No reportable deficiencies were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Inspected
OK

The driveways and walkways (if applicable) were inspected to determine their affect on the structure of the home only. I will also report on any visible deficiencies that may be present such as; cracking, displacement, or other damage. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Walkways, Patios & Driveways: Driveway Views
Decks, Balconies, Porches & Steps: Inspected
OK

The deck and or porches were inspected looking for water related damage, drainage issues, structural and safety issues and overall construction quality.  No defects were found unless otherwise noted in this report.

GFCIs & Electrical: Inspected
OK

I inspected the exterior receptacles checking for GFCI protection.  No defects were found on the day of the inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Inspected
OK

The soffit and fascia was inspected at visible portions looking for any water damage or other significant defects. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Vegetation, Grading, Drainage & Retaining Walls: Inspected
OK

The grading around the home was inspected to determine that it was designed to allow rainwater to adequately drain away from the structure. The soil is recommended to slope away from the home, with a 6 inch drop in elevation, in the first 10 feet away from the structure (5% grade). When the 5% grade can not be achieved, swales or drains should be used as needed to properly divert rainwater runoff. Any flat or low areas around the home should be backfilled and sloped away from the foundation, to prevent potential moisture infiltration into areas below grade. No reportable deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Siding, Flashing & Trim: Inspection Was Restricted

I did not inspect all of the exterior wall-covering material.  A home inspection is not an exhaustive evaluation.  My inspection of the exterior was limited.  I did not reach and access closely every part of the exterior wall-covering. 

GFCIs & Electrical: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the GFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim; B. all exterior doors; C. adjacent walkways and driveways; D. stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps; E. porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports; F. railings, guards and handrails; G. the eaves, soffits and fascia; H. a representative number of windows; and I. vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of exterior wall-covering materials. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting. B. inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing. C. inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions. D. inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment. E. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks. F. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures. G. inspect for safety-type glass. H. inspect underground utilities. I. inspect underground items. J. inspect wells or springs. K. inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems. L. inspect swimming pools or spas. M. inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools. N. inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems. O. inspect drainfields or dry wells. P. determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.

Credit
Comment
4.2.1 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Missing Siding
Front corner between garage and front door

Areas of siding were missing. Recommend replacing these areas with the correct siding.

Siding Siding Contractor
Credit
Comment
4.2.2 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Caulking missing

Proper sealant was missing around the sump pump drainage pipe. Recommend sealing with an exterior rated caulking. 

Tools Handyman/DIY
Credit
Comment
4.2.3 - Siding, Flashing & Trim

Inadequately secured started strip
South west corner next to patio

The starter strip holding the first row of siding is inadequately secured and easily moved. Recommend securing starter strip with appropriate amount of nails.

Siding Siding Contractor

5 - Kitchen

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Energy Source
Gas
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Exhaust Hood Type
Re-circulate
Dishwasher: Inspected
DEFECTS NOTED

The dishwasher was not operated due to the door not closing correctly. 

Countertops & Cabinets: Countertop Material
Granite
Countertops & Cabinets: Cabinetry
Wood
General: Kitchen Views:
Refrigerator: Brand
GE
Refrigerator: Inspected
OK

The refrigerator was running an cool during the time of the inspection.  No further testing was performed and no visible defects were noted at the time of the inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
GE
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Heating Elements Inspected
Not inspected

The heating elements were not checked due to the gas being turned off to the residence. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Oven Inspected
Not inspected

The oven was not operated due to the gas being turned off to the residence. 

Dishwasher: Brand
GE

Dishwasher was not operated. The door would not close. Defects noted on this report

Built-in Microwave: Brand
GE
Built-in Microwave: Inspected
OK

The microwave was tested by running on "Cook" mode for 30 seconds, and was functional at the time of inspection. The efficiency of the unit or other functions are not tested for. No reportable conditions were present unless otherwise noted in this report.

Countertops & Cabinets: Inspected
OK

The cabinets and countertops were inspected looking for significant damage and by testing a representative number of doors and drawers evaluating their operation. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Kitchen Sink: Inspected
OK

The kitchen sink was inspected by operating the faucet valves and faucet looking for any leaks or signs of significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Garbage Disposal: Inspected
OK

The garbage disposal was operated at the time of the inspection.  No deficiencies were found at the time of the inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Visible Plumbing: Inspected
OK

The supply and drain pipes were inspected looking for leaks, improper installation, and other deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

GFCI Protection: Inspected
OK

GFCI Protection: GFCI Information

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) is a protection feature that allows a circuit or receptacle to "trip" or "shut off" if as little as a 5 milliamp differential is detected between the "hot" and "neutral" conductors. This protection is required at locations near a water source or where something plugged into the receptacle could come into contact with water, including: bathrooms, kitchens, on the exterior, in garages, and basements. Although GFCI protection may not have been required in some or all of these areas when the home was built, their installation is highly recommended and is typically inexpensive. This protection, if present, was tested and was in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Unable to inspect burners

Unable to inspect burner performance due to gas being turned off at the home

10.1 The inspector shall inspect: F. installed ovens, ranges, surface cooking appliances, microwave ovens, dishwashing machines, and food waste grinders by using normal operating controls to activate the primary function. 10.2 The inspector is NOT required to inspect: G. installed and free-standing kitchen and laundry appliances not listed in Section 10.1.F. H. appliance thermostats including their calibration, adequacy of heating elements, self cleaning oven cycles, indicator lights, door seals, timers, clocks, timed features, and other specialized features of the appliance. I. operate, or con rm the operation of every control and feature of an inspected appliance.

Credit
Comment
5.4.1 - Dishwasher

Improper Installation

Contractor Qualified Professional

6 - Bathrooms

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Hot water was not present at the time of the inspection

Hot water not present due to the gas being turned off

Bathroom Views
Bathroom Toilets: Inspected
OK

The toilets were inspected by flushing them to ensure they were flushing adequately and to determine no leaks were present at the water supply line or tank location. Toilets will also be checked for an adequate connection at the floor. No deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Sinks, Tubs & Showers: Inspected
OK

Water was ran through the drains of tubs and showers for an extended period of time, and the areas under these drains (if applicable) were then inspected looking for indications of leaks. No leaks were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

What I can't replicate is the affects of weight applied to these drains. When showering or bathing the forces from weight can put strain on gaskets or joints on the drain pipes that can possibly result in leaking, this can be even more likely if the home has been vacant for an extended period of time. 




Bathroom Exhaust Fan / Window: Inspected
OK

I inspected the exhaust fans of the bathroom(s). All mechanical exhaust fans should terminate outside. Confirming that the fan exhausts outside is beyond the scope of a home inspection.

GFCI & Electric in Bathroom: Inspected
OK

I inspected the GFCI-protection at the receptacle near the bathroom sink by pushing the test button at the GFCI device or using a GFCI testing instrument. 

All receptacles in the bathroom must be GFCI protected. 

Cabinetry, Ceiling, Walls & Floor: Inspected
OK

The cabinets and countertops were inspected looking for significant damage and by testing a representative number of doors and drawers evaluating their operation. No reportable conditions were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

The home inspector will inspect: 

  • interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  • all toilets for proper operation by flushing; and 
  • all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage.

7 - Doors, Windows & Interior

Smoke Alarms Present in All Recommended Areas
Yes
Carbon Monoxide Alarms Present In All Recommended Areas
Yes
Interior Views
Doors: Inspected
OK

I inspected a representative number of doors according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice by opening and closing them. I did not operate door locks and door stops, which is beyond the scope of a home inspection. 

Windows: Inspected
OK

The windows were inspected by operating a representative number (I will try and operate every window in the home, but personal belongings may block accessibility to some). Their operation was tested, along with looking for damage, broken glass, failed seals, etc. No reportable deficiencies were present unless otherwise noted in this report.

Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Inspected
OK

I inspected the readily visible surfaces of floors, walls and ceilings. I looked for cracks, holes and signs of settlement.  I looked for signs of water damage and leakage.  No deficiencies were found unless otherwise noted in this report.

Stairs, Steps, Stoops, Stairways & Ramps: Inspected
OK

I inspected the stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps that were within the scope of my home inspection. 

All treads should be level and secure. Riser heights and tread depths should be as uniform as possible. As a guide, stairs must have a maximum riser of 7-3/4 inches and a minimum tread of 10 inches.  No defects were found on the day of the inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Railings, Guards & Handrails: Inspected
OK

I inspected a representative number railings, guards and handrails that were within the scope of the home inspection. I looked for loose connections, checked baluster spacing and strength. No defects were found on the day of the inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Smoke and CO Detectors: Inspected
OK

I inspected for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors. 

The smoke alarm(s) that were present were tested by depressing the "test" button and an audible alarm sounded. Any exceptions will be listed below. A true test of the alarm(s) would require the use of a smoke can and is beyond the scope of a Home Inspection. It is recommended to test the alarms as soon as you move in, and monthly thereafter. Ensure to replace the batteries every six months, and replace the alarms themselves every five to ten years (manufacturer specific). If the home is older than 5 years old I recommend removing the smoke alarms to check the manufacturing date on the back. Dual sensor alarms incorporating both an ionization sensing chamber and photoelectric eyes are recommended.

Smoke and CO Detectors: Smoke Alarm Information

Smoke alarms are recommended for each sleeping room and (1) outside of each sleeping room(s), and one per level including habitable attics and basements. I recommend testing the smoke alarms before spending your first night in the home, and monthly thereafter. Several other recommendations relating to smoke alarms and fire safety are recommended by the NFPA, and can be found here:

Installing and Maintaining Smoke Alarms

Smoke and CO Detectors: Carbon Monoxide Alarm Information

Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors are recommended to be installed outside of each sleeping area, in the area(s) of any gas appliances, and any fireplace(s). CO alarms are recommended if any gas appliances are present in the home or if the home contains a garage. More information about CO detectors and there requirements can be found here:

Carbon Monoxide Information

Smoke and CO Detectors: Unable to Test Every Detector

I was unable to test every detector. We recommend testing all of the detectors.  Ask the seller about the performance of the detectors and of any issues regarding them.  We recommend replacing all of the detectors (smoke and carbon monoxide) with new ones just for peace of mind and for safety concerns.  

The inspector shall inspect: 

  • a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; 
  • floors, walls and ceilings; stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; 
  • railings, guards and handrails; and 
  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. 

The inspector shall describe: 

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. 

The inspector shall report as in need of correction: 

  • improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; 
  • photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and 
  • any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. 

8 - Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure

Foundation: Material
Concrete
Floor Structure: Material
Concrete
Floor Structure: Sub-floor
OSB
Sump Pump: Inspected
DEFECTS NOTED
Homeowner's Responsibility

One of the most common problems in a house is a wet basement or foundation. You should monitor the walls and floors for signs of water penetration, such as dampness, water stains, peeling paint, efflorescence, and rust on exposed metal parts. In a finished basement, look for rotted or warped wood paneling and doors, loose floor tiles, and mildew stains. It may come through the walls or cracks in the floor, or from backed-up floor drains, leaky plumbing lines, or a clogged air-conditioner condensate line. 

Inspection Method
Visual
Foundation: Inspected
OK

REVIEW LIMITATIONS TAB

I inspected visible portions of the foundation looking for cracking, signs of water penetration and obvious damage. No defects were found on the day of the inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Basements & Crawlspaces: Inspected
OK

The basement area was inspected looking for signs of past or present water intrusion by inspecting visible portions of the foundation walls and floors looking for moisture stains and/or other signs of prior water intrusion. No signs of water / moisture intrusion was present at visible portions at the time of inspection in the basement area unless otherwise noted in this report. I can only report on the conditions as they existed at the time of inspection, and can not guarantee that water will not infiltrate this area at a future time due to a heavy rain or changes in conditions. Recommend homeowner monitoring with heavy rainfall to ensure water intrusion is not present. 

Floor Structure: Basement/Crawlspace Floor
Concrete
Floor Structure: Inspected
OK

Visible portions of the framing and floor structure were inspected looking for damage or other significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were visibly present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Sump Pump: Sump Pump Installed

DEFECTS NOTED 

I observed a sump pump was installed in the house. 

Neglecting to test a sump pump routinely, especially if it is rarely used, can lead to severe water damage when a heavy storm, snow melt, or flooding sends water against the home. 

Overload of the sump pump due to poor drainage elsewhere on the property can lead to pump failure. Frequent sump operation can be a sign of excessive water buildup under the basement floor due to poorly sloped landscaping, poor rain runoff, gutter back-flows, and other problems. 

Lack of a back-up sump pump, which can be quickly installed in the event the first pump fails, can lead to serious water damage and property loss. This is especially important if the sump pump is relied upon to maintain a dry basement, or if the house is located in an area of seasonally high groundwater. Sump failure can cause extensive water damage and the loss of valuable personal belongings. 

Review deficiencies noted in report.

Wall Structure: Inspected
OK

REVIEW LIMITATIONS TAB

Visible portions of the foundation walls were inspected looking for significant cracking, moisture intrusion, or any other indications of damage or significant deficiencies. No reportable conditions were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

Foundation: Visual Limitations

The referenced visual obstructions listed above may block or hinder visual accessibility of the floor structure and other areas. The inspection of the foundation area and floor structure is limited to visual portions only. Any items or areas not visible are excluded from this inspection. Insulation or any other item is not moved or disturbed for visual accessibility.

Sump Pump: Sump Pump Lid is Sealed Shut

The sump pump lid was sealed shut.  This is an inspection restriction. 

Wall Structure: Unable to see foundation walls inside

I was unable to visualize the foundation walls inside due to the install vapor barrier. 

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the foundation; B. the basement; C. the crawlspace; and D. structural components. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of foundation; and B. the location of the access to the under-floor space. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil; B. observed indications of active water penetration; C. observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and D. any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself. B. move stored items or debris. C. operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats. D. identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems. E. provide any engineering or architectural service. F. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Sump Pump

Battery Back-Up for Sump Pump Recommended

I recommend a battery back-up system for the sump pump. 

Wrench DIY
Credit
Comment
8.4.2 - Sump Pump

Sump pump discharging next to the house

The sump pump discharge pipe terminates next to the home. Recommend discharging further from the foundation 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor

9 - Heating and Cooling

Cooling Equipment: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Cooling Equipment: Location
Exterior North West
Heating Equipment: Heat Type
Gas-Fired Heat
Heating Equipment: Energy Source
Gas
Cooling Equipment: Exterior Unit Manufacture Year:

05/2019

The typical life expectancy of an exterior unit is 12-15 years.

Homeowner's Responsibility

Most HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. They consist of four components: controls, fuel supply, heating or cooling unit, and distribution system. The adequacy of heating and cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

As the homeowner, make sure to get the HVAC system inspected and serviced every year. And make sure to change the air filter regularly. 

General HVAC testing information

The inspection of the HVAC system is limited to the response of the system at the thermostat in both heating and cooling modes; a visual observation of the exterior and interior equipment, and the removal of any access panels made for removal by a homeowner (not requiring ANY tools). If a more thorough inspection is desired, an HVAC contractor should be consulted.

Carbon Monoxide Alarms

Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors are recommended to be installed outside of each sleeping area, in the area(s) of any gas appliances, and any fireplace(s). CO alarms are recommended if any gas appliances are present in the home or if the home contains a garage. More information about CO detectors and there requirements can be found here:

Helpful information about Carbon Monoxide





Normal Operating Controls: Location of the thermostat
Normal Operating Controls: Inspected
OK

The thermostat was inspected looking for normal operating controls, functionality, and making sure it was properly secured to the wall.  No defects were found at the time of the inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Cooling Equipment: Homeowner's Responsibility

Most air-conditioning systems in houses are relatively simple in design and operation. The adequacy of the cooling is often quite subjective and depends upon occupant perceptions that are affected by the distribution of air, the location of return-air vents, air velocity, the sound of the system in operation, and similar characteristics. 

As the homeowner, make sure to get the air conditioning system inspected and serviced every year.  

Cooling Equipment: Brand
Amana
Cooling Equipment: Inspected
OK

The exterior unit(s) were inspected visually  No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Cooling Equipment: Service disconnect Inspected
OK

I observed a service disconnect within sight of the cooling system. No deficiencies were found unless otherwise noted in this report.

Heating Equipment: Brand
Amana, Amana
Heating Equipment: Interior Unit Manufactured Year

09/2018


The typical life expectancy of electric units is approximately 13-15 years, and 15-17 years for gas units. 






Heating Equipment: AFUE Rating
96.1

AFUE (Annual fuel utilization efficiency) is a metric used to measure furnace efficiency in converting fuel to energy. A higher AFUE rating means greater energy efficiency. 90% or higher meets the Department of Energy's Energy Star program standard.

Heating Equipment: Inspected
OK

The interior unit(s) were inspected visually.  The furnace was not operated due to the gas being shut off at the residence. 

Filter size and Location

This is the HVAC filter size and location.  I recommend monitoring this and changing it every 3 months or sooner if needed.

Heating Equipment: Unable to operate furnace

I was unable to operate the furnace due to the gas being turned off

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. the heating system, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the location of the thermostat for the heating system; B. the energy source; and C. the heating method. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. any heating system that did not operate; and B. if the heating system was deemed inaccessible. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems. B. inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems. C. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system. D. light or ignite pilot flames. E. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment. F. override electronic thermostats. G. evaluate fuel quality. H. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.

Credit
Comment
9.3.1 - Heating Equipment

Filter Dirty

The furnace filter is dirty and needs to be replaced every 3 months or as needed

10 - Plumbing

Hot Water Source: Water Heater Capacity
50 Gallons
Hot Water Source: Type of Hot Water Source
Gas-Fired Hot Water Tank

 

Hot Water Source: Brand
AO Smith
Hot Water Source: Water Heater Manufacture Year:

03-2019

The typical life expectancy of a water heater is 10-12 years

Main Water Shut-Off Valve: Inspected
OK

I inspected the main shut off valve looking for active or signs of past water leaks. The valve was not operated due to the risk of leakage after operation.  

Water Supply : Water Supply Is Public

The water supply to the house appeared to be from the public water supply source based upon the observed indications at the time of the inspection.  To confirm and be certain, I recommend asking the homeowner for details. 

Hot Water Source: Inspected
OK

SEE LIMITATIONS TAB


The water heater was inspected looking for proper installation, signs of leakage and corrosion.  Venting was checked for proper slope and signs of leakage. 

Hot Water Source: TPR Valve:

 A TPR valve was in place, and appeared functional. These are not tested due to the fact that once they are tested, they tend to form a drip leak. These valves allow the water heater to expel water and pressure if the tank reaches a pressure over 150psi, or the water temperature exceeds 210 degrees. No deficiencies were observed with the valve unless otherwise noted in this report. 

Hot Water Source: Maintenance Recommendations:

WATER HEATER: We recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding.

Here's a helpful article from Lowes on maintaining you water heater.


Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Inspected
OK

I attempted to inspect the drain, waste, and vent pipes.  Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed.  Inspection restriction.  Ask the homeowner about water and sewer leaks or blockages in the past.  

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Inspected
OK

I attempted to inspect the water supply and distribution pipes (plumbing pipes). Not all of the pipes and components were accessible and observed. Inspection restriction. Ask the homeowner about water supply, problems with water supply, and water leaks in the past.  No defects were seen unless otherwise noted in this report.

Hot Water Source: Inspection Restriction

The inspection of the system was restricted.  I was unable to completely inspect the system due to the gas being turned off

Drain, Waste, & Vent Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the drainage pipes were hidden within the walls.  

Water Supply & Distribution Systems: Not All Pipes Were Inspected

The inspection was restricted because not all of the water supply pipes were exposed, readily accessible, and observed.  For example, most of the water distribution pipes, valves and connections were hidden within the walls.  

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the main water supply shut-off valve;
  2. the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  3. the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
  4. interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
  5. all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
  6. all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  7. the drain, waste and vent system; and
  8. drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
  2. the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
  3. the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
  4. the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
  5. the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
  2. deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
  3. active plumbing water leaks that were observed during the inspection; and  
  4. toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate.


11 - Electrical

Service Entrance Type
Underground
Service Amperage
200
Electrical Wiring: Type of Wiring, If Visible
NM-B (Romex)
Panelboards & Breakers: Sub Panel Not Present
Not present
Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Inspected
OK
Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Ceiling Fans
Breakers in off position
2

I observed breakers in the off position.  These were not turned on to test their functionality.  I recommend talking with the home owner about why these breakers were turned off.

Overhead Service Conductors & Attachment Point: Inspected
Not present

I inspected the readily visible areas of the overhead electrical service conductors and attachment point.

Panelboards & Breakers: Inspected
OK

The breakers were inspected looking for any visible signs of damage due to arcing, heat, etc. Corresponding conductors were inspected looking for multiple lugging, sizing, damage, etc. No deficiencies were present at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report. 




Service Grounding & Bonding: Inspected
OK

I inspected the electrical service grounding and bonding.  No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Electric Meter & Base: Inspected
OK

I inspected the electrical electric meter and base. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Receptacles

A representative number of receptacles were tested with a polarity tester to confirm proper wiring. No wiring deficiencies were reported by the tester unless otherwise noted in this report.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Switches

A representative number of switches and lights were tested throughout the home and were found to be in good working order. No deficiencies were observed unless otherwise noted in this report.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Fixtures

I inspected a representative number of fixtures checking for functionality.  No deficiencies were found unless otherwise noted in this report.

AFCIs: Inspected
OK

The AFCI (Arc fault circuit interrupter) breakers in the panel tripped when the test button was depressed. No indications of deficiencies were observed at the time of inspection unless otherwise noted in this report.

GFCIs: Inspected
OK

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) is a protection feature that allows a circuit or receptacle to "trip" or "shut off" if as little as a 5 milliamp differential is detected between the "hot" and "neutral" conductors. This protection is required at locations near a water source or where something plugged into the receptacle could come into contact with water, including: bathrooms, kitchens, on the exterior, in garages, and basements. Although GFCI protection may not have been required in some or all of these areas when the home was built, their installation is highly recommended and is typically inexpensive. This protection, if present, was tested and was in satisfactory condition at the time of inspection, unless otherwise noted in this report.

Electrical Wiring: Unable to Inspect All of the Wiring

I was unable to inspect all of the electrical wiring. Obviously, most of the wiring is hidden from view within walls. Beyond the scope of a visual home inspection. 

Service Grounding & Bonding: Unable to Confirm Proper Grounding and Bonding

I was unable to confirm proper installation of the system grounding and bonding according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the grounding and bonding as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice. 

AFCIs: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the AFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

GFCIs: Unable to Inspect Everything

I was unable to inspect every electrical component or proper installation of the GFCI system according to modern code. A licensed electrician or township building code inspector could perform that type of test, which is beyond the scope of my visual-only home inspection. I inspected the electrical system as much as I could according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

I. The inspector shall inspect:

  1. the service drop;
  2. the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
  3. the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
  4. the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
  5. the electric meter and base;
  6. service-entrance conductors;
  7. the main service disconnect;
  8. panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
  9. service grounding and bonding;
  10. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
  11. all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
  12. for the presence of smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.


II. The inspector shall describe:

  1. the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and 
  2. the type of wiring observed.


III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

  1. deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
  2. any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
  3. the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  4. any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and
  5. the absence of smoke and/or carbon monoxide detectors. 


Credit
Comment
11.2.1 - Electrical Wiring

Wire in contact with ductwork
West wall at base of the stairs

There is a wire in direct contact with thin foil type ductwork. I would recommend moving the wire to ensure no direct contact is made between ductwork and wire.

Hardhat General Contractor

12 - Laundry

Clothes Washer: NOT PRESENT
NOT PRESENT
Clothes Dryer: NOT PRESENT
NOT PRESENT
Laundry Room Views
Clothes Dryer: Did Not Inspect

I did not inspect the clothes washer and dryer fully. These appliances are beyond the scope of a home inspection. I did not operate the appliances. The clothes dryer exhaust pipe must be inspected and cleaned every year to help prevent house fires. 

The inspector shall inspect:

  • mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.


13 - Attached Garage

Garage Vehicle Door: Type of Door Operation
Opener
Garage Vehicle Door Opener: General Warning Label Was Inspected

I observed a general warning label attached to the back of the door panel. 

Electric in Garage: GFCI in the Garage
OK

I inspected for GFCI protection in the garage.  

Garage Floor: Garage Floor Inspected

OK

I inspected the floor of the attached garage. 

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Manual Release

OK


I checked for a manual release handle--a means of manually detaching the door from the door opener. 

The handle should be colored red so that it can be seen easily. The handle should be easily accessible and no more than 6 feet above the garage floor. The handle should not be in contact with the top of a vehicles.

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Spring Warning Label Was Inspected

I observed a spring warning label attached to the spring assembly or the back of the door panel. 

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Springs, Bracket & Hardware Were Inspected

OK


I closed the door and checked the springs for damage. If a spring was broken, operating the door can cause serious injury or death. I would not operate the door if there was damage. 

I visually checked the doors hinges, brackets and fasteners. If the door had an opener, the door must have an opener-reinforcement bracket that is securely attached to the doors top section. The header bracket of the opener rail must be securely attached to the wall or header using lag bolts or concrete anchors. 

Doors opened with no issues.

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Doors Were Manually Opened and Closed

I closed the door.  I pulled the manual release to disconnect the door from the opener. I lifted and operated the door. 

I raised the door to the fully-open position, then closed the door. The door should move freely, and it should open and close without difficulty. As the door operates, I make sure that the rollers stay in the track. The door should stay in the fully open position. The door should also stay in a partially opened position about three to four above the garage floor level. 

I reconnected the door to the opener. 

Doors opened manually with no issues.

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Wall Push Button Was Inspected

OK


I inspected the wall button. The wall button should be at least 5 feet above the standing surface, and high enough to be out of reach of small children. I pressed the push button to see if it successfully operated the door. Door successfully opened.

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Non-Contact Reversal Was Inspected

OK


I observed the auto-reverse feature during a non-contact test. 

Standing inside the garage but safely away from the path of the door, I used the remote control or wall button to close the door. As the door was closing, I waved an object in the path of the photoelectric eye beam. The door automatically reversed as required. 

Garage Vehicle Door Opener: Photo-Electric Eyes Were Inspected

MARGINAL


I inspected the photo-electric eyes. 

Federal law states that residential garage door openers manufactured after 1992 must be equipped with photo-electric eyes or some other safety-reverse feature that meets UL 325 standards.

I checked to see if photo-electric eyes are installed. The vertical distance between the photo-eye beam and the floor should be no more than 6 inches. See recommendations noted in the report.

Ceiling, Walls & Firewalls in Garage: Garage Ceiling & Walls Were Inspected

OK

I inspected the ceiling and walls of the garage according to the Home Inspection Standards of Practice.

The inspector shall inspect:

  • garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls.


The inspector shall describe:

  • a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener.


Credit
Comment
13.3.1 - Garage Vehicle Door Opener

Photo-Electric Eyes Were Too High

I observed that the photo-electric eyes are installed too high from the garage floor surface. 

The vertical distance between the photo-eye beam and the floor should be no more than 6 inches.

Garage Garage Door Contractor

14 - Attic

Attic Insulation: Insulation Type
Blown, Cellulose
Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Ridge Vents
Attic Views
Attic Insulation: Inspected
OK

The insulation was inspected visually to determine approximate depth and R value.  Care was taken to not disturb the insulation by walking on or through it. Disturbing the insulation will decrease it R value and effectiveness.  

Attic Insulation: Insulation Estimated R Value
38

Insulation Recommendations:

Attic | R38 - R60

Cathedral Ceiling | R30 - R38

Wall Cavity Insulation | R13 - R15

Wall Sheathing | R2.5 - R6

Floor | R25 - R30

-Information from energy.gov

Blown cellulose is R-3.2 to 3.8 per inch - Blown fiberglass is R-2.2 to 2.7 per inch


I. The inspector shall inspect: A. insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; B. ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and C. mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area. II. The inspector shall describe: A. the type of insulation observed; and B. the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard. B. move, touch or disturb insulation. C. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders. D. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers. E. identify the composition or R-value of insulation material. F. activate thermostatically operated fans. G. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring. H. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

15 - Misc. Interior

I. The inspector shall inspect: A. a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them; B. floors, walls and ceilings; C. stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps; D. railings, guards and handrails; and E. garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls. II. The inspector shall describe: A. a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener. III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction: A. improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings; B. photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and C. any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals. IV. The inspector is not required to: A. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments. B. inspect floor coverings or carpeting. C. inspect central vacuum systems. D. inspect for safety glazing. E. inspect security systems or components. F. evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures. G. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure. H. move suspended-ceiling tiles. I. inspect or move any household appliances. J. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted. K. verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door. L. operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards. M. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices. N. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights. O. inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens. P. operate or examine any sauna, steamgenerating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices. Q. inspect elevators. R. inspect remote controls. S. inspect appliances. T. inspect items not permanently installed. U. discover firewall compromises. V. inspect pools, spas or fountains. W. determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects. X. determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.

16 - General Notes and Recommendations.

17 - Final Checklist

Oven turned off:
Yes
GFCI receptacles reset
Yes
Thermostat Initial setting
Off
Thermostat Setting When Leaving
Off
Lights turned off
Yes
Doors Locked
Yes
Photo of Oven in Off position

Information showing the home was left how we found it