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1234 Main St.
Johnson City, Tennessee 37604
07/17/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
290
Items Inspected
45
Maintenance items
74
Recommended repairs
12
Major / safety issues

Inspector's Comments...

We appreciate you using Home Check Inspection Service, LLC. to inspect your new home.  It is important for you to understand that a Home Inspection is a detailed snap shot of the condition of a home at a specific time.  It is not an exhaustive or all inclusive assessment of a property, nor is it a code inspection.  Simply put, it is a form of protection; an inexpensive way of discovering the condition of a home, making sure the house is not hiding anything before you sign on the doted line.  

A home inspection identifies any visually discoverable problems.  Home inspectors do not remove walls or take things apart.  The inspection findings are not a guarantee or a warranty.  Just because an item is inspected and working today, does not mean it cannot fail tomorrow.  Predictions about how long something will last are not part of an inspection.   

Included in this report is a copy of the State of Tennessee's Home Inspection Standards of Practice.  It details the areas, systems, and components of a home that an inspector is required to report on as long as they are accessible and under safe conditions.  We do inspect major components of a home such as electrical, plumbing, heating/air, roof and basement/crawlspace, structure, etc.   If unable to inspect all these items or areas within the home the reason why will be noted.  There are also areas that an inspector is not required to observe, inspect, report on or describe.  So it is important to align your expectations with the State's Standards of Practices. 

The inspection outcome is a written report of findings, that are based upon the inspector's professional opinion, training and experience. As stated in the report not all inspection findings are reported. If no comment is made about a specific item, component, system, etc. it should be assumed that it was found to be operational, working, or in sound condition at the time of the inspection. The inspection findings may include simply Information that will be useful to you, such as the location of an item.  Second, there may be Limitations pertaining to the inspection process, such an inaccessible area not inspected.   Lastly and unfortunately there may be some Deficiencies identified.  These deficiencies are categorized by the inspector at the time of the inspection based upon the following:

Major / Safety Issues...current or future safety issues, significant issues, costly, possible damage causing defects, professional repairs needed, contractor should be consulted.

Repair Recommendations...if not dealt with further damage is possible, may not be routine repairs, non functioning,  professional contractor may be needed for further evaluation, or 

Maintenance Items...minor repairs or general maintenance, non-functioning component, correction by professional or homeowner.

Please review all deficiencies regardless of how they are categorized.  What the inspector perceives as a maintenance or repair item you may see as a more serious issue that may or may not impact your decision to purchase the home.  Although not required, the inspector may give an opinion about the cause of an issue or identified damage.  It is always recommended that a licensed professional, in the area of concern, be consulted and their opinions and recommendations be primary when deciding upon a course of action.


The Home Check Inspection Philosophy is pretty straight forward.  we strive to...

...conduct the inspection, at a minimum, in accordance with the State of Tennessee's Standards of Practices.

...not to be rushed, taking whatever time is necessary to do the best job possible, for you.

...inform you of all issues while putting these issues into perspective.

...be fair, honest, impartial, and always act in your interest, unless of course it violates the law.  And to...

...address all your questions and concerns. Either by you attending all or part of the inspection or meeting you at a later time to discuss the inspection findings.


What more can you do...

Be sure to use all the information at your disposal when making such a big purchase decision. The inspection findings are just one tool that you have at your disposal when making a property purchase decision.  Others include the seller's disclosure statement, possibly a discussion with the current owner of the property, pest inspection reports or inspection reports from other professionals. i.e. electrical, roofing, HVAC, radon, energy audits, etc.
You may want to look into purchasing a Home Warranty to cover future major repairs. There are a few different companies that sell these warranties, each with varying levels of coverage.  So don't automatically assume everything is covered, ask.   Of course, prices and deductibles may vary.  Many times these warranties are purchased by the seller and transferred to the buyer.


Thank You, 

Michael D. Ray-Inspector

Home Check Inspection Services, LLC.


 


1 - Inspection Conditions

Information: Inspection Parameters

All items are inspected in accordance with the State of Tennessee's Home Inspection Standards of Practices. Any comments by the inspector that go beyond these Standards of Practices are done as a courtesy to you and may or may not be all inclusive.   Any item of interest or condition that would be considered a defect or deficiency will be so noted in the "Deficiency" category as either a "Maintenance Item", "Repair Recommendation" or "Major / Safety Issue".  If no comment is made about a specific item, component, system, etc. it should be assumed that it was found to be operational, working, or in sound condition at the time of the inspection.  If unable to fully inspect an area it will be noted in the "Limitations" section of the report.  

The home inspection does not address environmental hazards, including: lead-based paint; radon (unless requested); asbestos; cockroaches; rodents; pesticides; treated lumber; fungus; mercury; carbon monoxide; or other similar environmental hazards.  Additionally, the inspection does not address subterranean systems or system components (operational or nonoperational), including: sewage disposal; water supply; or fuel storage or delivery.


Start / Finish Times
Start 8:30 am, Finish 1:30 pm
In Attendance
Home Inspectors
Weather Conditions
Cloudy, Light Rain, Chilly

Temperature.... 55-58  degrees F.

Year Built

Per the MLS listing the home was constructed in 1973

Building Type
Single Family, Detached
Occupancy
Furnished, Occupied, Utilities On
Orientation: House Front

All references to the location of an exterior item or component are described based upon the front of the home.

Non-Habitable Space: What Determines Habitable Space?

Just because a room is heated does not mean it is "habitable space".  For a space to be defined as "habitable" the specific space or room must have an area of at least 70 sq. feet and have a ceiling height at least 84 inches (7 feet) high.  This includes basements containing habitable rooms or hallways.  Any ceiling obstructions must be at least 76 inches (6 ft. 4 inches) above the finished floor. 

At least 80 inches finished ceilings height is required in bathrooms and laundry rooms, however, ceiling heights above sinks and toilets may be less than 80 inches, but high enough to safely use the fixture.  

For rooms with sloped ceilings, normally attic space, the ceiling height should be at least 84 inches down to a ceiling height of at least 5 ft. (knee walls).  The area with the ceiling height of 84 inch must be 50% of the rooms finished area, while still meeting the minimum 70 square foot minimum. 





Furniture Limitations

As is the case with furnished homes some walls, floors and / or even ceiling surfaces can be obscured by furniture and / or stored items. Since the inspector is not required to move furniture these areas may not be thoroughly evaluated. 

Per the State of Tennessee's Home Inspector Standards Of Practices...
The home inspection report shall include the following:
  a report on any system or component inspected that, in the opinion of the home inspector, is significantly deficient; a list of any systems or components that were designated for inspection but that were not inspected; the reason a system or component was not inspected; a statement that the report does not address environmental hazards, including: lead-based paint; radon; asbestos; cockroaches; rodents; pesticides; treated lumber; fungus; mercury; carbon monoxide; or other similar environmental hazards.

The home inspection report shall include the following: statement that the report does not address subterranean systems or system components (operational or nonoperational), including: sewage disposal; water supply; or fuel storage or delivery.

The home inspection report is not required to report on: life expectancy of any component or system; the cause(s) of the need for a repair; the methods, materials, and costs of corrections; the suitability of the property for any specialized use; compliance or non-compliance with adopted codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; the market value of the property or its marketability; the advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; any component or system that was not inspected; the presence or absence of pests such as wood damaging organisms, rodents, or insects; or cosmetic damage, underground items, or items not permanently installed.

The home inspectors are not required to: offer warranties or guarantees of any kind; calculate the strength, adequacy, or efficiency of any system or component; enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely affect the health or safety of the home inspector or other persons; operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility; determine the effectiveness of any system installed to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; predict future condition, including but not limited to failure of components; project operating costs of components; evaluate acoustical characteristics of any system or component; or inspect special equipment or accessories that are not listed as components to be inspected in this rule.

The home inspectors shall not:  offer or perform any act or service contrary to law; offer or perform engineering, architectural, plumbing, electrical or any other job function requiring a license in this state for the same client unless the client is advised thereof and consents thereto.

2 - Grounds

Driveway: Material
Asphalt
Fencing: Not Normally inspected

Fences and gates if present, per The State of Tennessee Standards of Practices, are excluded from an inspection.  However, if obvious issues are identified during the exterior inspection the inspector may take liberties to note them.  This is not required, it is simply a courtesy, and deficiencies noted may not be all inclusive.

Grading and Drainage: Information Overview

It is important that the grading around a home be positively sloped so water flows away from not toward the home.  This comes from having a soil drop, from the foundation outward, of at least 6 inches over 10 feet (a 5% grade). Flat areas around the home are not enough, they will allow water to pool and saturate the soil.  Overtime this may have an adverse impact on both the homes foundation and the exterior cladding. 

If soil is added to achieve the proper grade then care should be taken to leave at least 8 inches of space between the soil and homes exterior cladding.  If a positive grade cannot be achieved a drainage systems or swale should be used to divert rain water run off away from the home.   

Since soil conditions can deteriorate quickly from heavy rain it is suggested that the homeowner periodically walk the exterior looking for deteriorated grading and make timely corrections as needed. 

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States that for the Exterior Components of a Home...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Vegetation, grading, drainage, driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls with respect to their effect on the condition of the building.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for the Exterior Components of a Home....

The Home Inspector is Not Required To Inspect:  Seasonal accessories; fences; geological conditions; soil conditions; recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); detached buildings or structures; for the presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks.

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2.1.1 - Driveway

Surface Damage / Pitting

There is some cracking / damage to the concrete garage floor apron where it abuts the exterior asphalt driveway. 

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2.6.1 - Grading and Drainage

Flat / Negative Grading

There are areas around the home where the soil grade is flat or negatively sloped toward the home or there are holes in the soil at the base of the home's exterior. Water is not forgiving, some say it is the leading cause of damage to a home. Water infiltration of a foundation wall or structural issues due to hydrostatic pressure or soil heaving or freezing is always possible. To help remove water from the base of the home's foundation the soil around the home should be positively sloped away from the home.  

See Grading Overview Information. 

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2.7.1 - Vegetation

Trees Close To Foundation

There is a tree at the left front of the home in close proximity to the home.  Overtime tree root systems can cause structural damage.  The root systems for trees differ, with some roots extending out 2 to 3 times the drip line or about 1.5 times the height of the tree. Recommend consulting a Tree Service for their recommendation.

3 - Exterior Of Home

Cladding, Flashing & Trim: Home's Exterior Covering
Stucco
Cladding, Flashing & Trim: Stucco Cladding Information

Stucco is a porous and will always crack.  This is true even when installed perfectly. It is brittle, and cracking is in it nature.  However, while these shortfalls will lead to water getting through the surface, the water can be managed.  The key is to create a good drainage plane behind the stucco that drains to a weep system, allowing the water to flow out and away from the building. The drainage assembly normally or is recommended to consistsof the following:

1. Self- adhesive flashing to protect the plywood, OSB, and / or wood framing. This flashing protects the wood from water draining through the perforated screed.

2. A weep screed.  The bottom edge of the screed extends onto the foundation and provides the base of the stucco. 

3. A two-layer weather resistive barrier (WRB).  The first layer goes against the sheathing serves as a drainage plane that protects the wood sheathing from water. The second layer attaches to the stucco and water absorbed by the stucco will wick through this layer and drain down the wall between the two-layers of WRB.

4. Wire lath for attaching the stucco.  Paper-backed lath over a single layer of house wrap or building paper will work as well as two layers of WRB.

Cladding, Flashing & Trim: Flashing Information

Metal flashing on buildings serves a number of similar yet different functions.

1. to direct water that has penetrated the exterior cladding back to the exterior, or

2. to protect an interface between to different enclosure elements: such as roof to wall step flashing, or  

3. to shed water over protruding building elements: such as windows, doors, trim, etc.

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Fascia And Soffit Information

The fascia and soffit are inspected for visible issues such as water damage, installation defects, loose or missing components, etc.  

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Overhangs / Soffit / Fasia
Metal Soffit, Wood Fascia
Exterior Doors: Exterior Emergency Egrees

An egress door is an exit door that is accessible from all areas of the home and allows people to go directly outside without going through the garage.  It must provide a clear opening that is at least 32 wide and 78 inches (66) high.  It must provide a landing on both the interior and exterior sides of the door, at least as wide as the door. Landings should not be more than 1 1/2 inches below the top of the door threshold.  If the exterior door does not swing out over the landing it can be 7 3/4 inches below the threshold.  Storm or screen doors can swing out over the landing.  Double cylinder keyed deadbolt locks should not be installed on egress doors. In other words the interior side lock should be a dead bolt, not a keyed lock. 

Exterior Doors: Lock / Handleset Information

Door lock sets are not inspected for their functionality with keys.  Deadbolts and handles are inspected per alignment / misalignment only.  The interior side of an exterior door lock should not be operated by a key. This is a fire safety issue. 

Windows: Window Type
Casement, Double-hung, Sliders
Windows: Window Material
Wood, Vinyl
Cladding, Flashing & Trim: Exterior Siding / Cladding Information

The inspector will report any identified damage or cracking of the home's exterior walls or cladding.  The inspector's interpretations or opinions as to the condition, severity, or causes, are based upon education and experience and are the inspector's opinion.  A more exact interpretation of the cause and / or severity of issues of this nature can be made only by a structural engineer. 

Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Exterior Components...

Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Wall cladding, flashings, and trim; entryway doors and a representative number of windows; garage door operators; decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches and applicable railings; eaves, soffits, and fascias. Vegetation, grading, drainage, driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls with respect to their effect on the condition of the building.

The Home Inspector Shall:  Describe wall cladding materials; operate all entryway doors and a representative number of windows; operate garage doors manually or by using permanently installed controls for any garage door operator; report whether or not any garage door operator will automatically reverse or stop when meeting reasonable resistance during closing; probe exterior wood components where deterioration is suspected. 


Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Exterior Components...

Home Inspector is Not Required to Inspect:  Storm windows, storm doors, screening, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories; fences; for the presence of safety glazing in doors and windows; garage door operator remote control transmitters; geological conditions; soil conditions; recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); detached buildings or structures; for the presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks.

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3.1.1 - Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Cracking - Minor

The home's exterior cladding has minor cracking in places.  Some have been painted over and some that were painted have since cracked.  There were a few areas were there was some lateral displacement around the cracking.   To prevent water entry into the stucco recommend sealing the cracks and periodically monitoring

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3.1.2 - Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Cracking - Moderate

Moderate cracking was observed at one or more points on the exterior: to the right of the front walkway and under the left side front living area window.  These cracks show lateral movement and have been painted over.  There is no visible cracking since either of these areas were painted. 

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3.1.3 - Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Ground Clearance

There is inadequate clearance between the home's exterior cladding and the soil grade.  The recommended minimum ground clearance between exterior cladding and the soil is 6-8 inches, with 2 inches minimum required between cladding and hardscape.  With the soil against the stucco there is always the chance of water wicking up from the soil into the stucco itself.  With the soil in the flower beds flat to negatively sloped, at this time, additional soil may be needed or removed to correct the negative grade.



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3.1.4 - Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Rot / Decay

There areas around the home where there is visible wood rot / damage.

1.  Exterior window casings and sills.

2.  Lower back window trim.

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3.1.5 - Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Missing Sweep Creed

There is no visible weep screed at the base of the exterior stucco cladding.  A weep screed is a type of building material used along the base of an exterior stucco wall. The screed serves as a vent so that the moisture can escape the stucco wall finish just above the foundation.  It additionally acts as a barrier for moisture wicking up the foundation toward the stucco. 

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3.1.6 - Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Damaged Areas That May Allow Water Entry

There a few damaged areas or areas where screws or bolts have been removed that will allow water entry into the stucco.  Recommend patching, sealing and painting all chipped areas or holes to prevent water entry.

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3.2.1 - Eaves, Soffits & Fascia

Wasps Nest

Wasp nests were visible under the soffits. Recommend removal.

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3.5.1 - Electrical Receptacles

No GFCI Protection

All exterior outlets should be Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs).  GFCI protection was required in 1971 by the NEC but it is unknown when the city adopted the code.  Although homeowners are not required to upgrade their home's each time new codes are approved (every three years).  There are certain codes that are for personally safety and these changes will be recommended when needed.  Recommend installing GFCIs on exterior outlets. 

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3.7.1 - Porches

Lighting

At the time of the inspection the exterior light for the main level back patio door (mid house door) did not come one through the normal use of the light switch just inside the door.

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3.7.2 - Porches

Door Bell

At the time of the inspection the front door bell is loose on the wall, but operational.

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3.7.3 - Porches

Railings Required - Porch and Stairs

The front porch / extend back patio (main level) and the upper second story balcony railings do not meet standards.  Any structure higher than 30 inches above soil grade requires a railing for safety reasons.  The porch railing should be 34 - 38 high  (these are 29 inches high) with railing balusters spaced no more than 4 inches apart (these are 5" apart. Additionally for child safety the railing balusters should not be horizontal installed because a child could climb them.  Both porch and stair railing baluster spacing is a child safety requirement.  Recommend a carpenter be consulted.

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3.7.4 - Porches

Water Damage Area

There are a number of areas around the front porch and back patio soffits where there is water damage / wood rot.  Most of these areas have been painted over but were probed to be sure.

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3.7.5 - Porches

Paint Chipping

There is some paint chipping of the stucco on the exterior wall to the right of the front door as well as on the second level balcony.

4 - Roof

Inspection Method
Binoculars, Ground, Ladder
Roof Slope or Pitch (estimate)
Standard Slope (4:12 and above)

Asphalt shingles should not be installed on flat roofs (a slope less than 2:12).  Low slope roofs (2:12 or less) require solid membrane roofs or fully bonded roof coverings.  Double underlayment  should be installed under asphalt roofs with a slope between 2:12 and 4:12.    Shingles are to be installed only on solid sheathed roofs.  

Roof Style
Gable (two slopes meet to form a ridge)
Roofing Material: Roofing Type
Metal (15 - 40 yrs.)
Drip Edge : What Is A Drip Edge?

A metal drip edge should be installed along the roof edges, at both the eaves and the rakes.  The roofing felt (under the shingles) should be installed over the drip edge at the eaves and under the drip edge at the rake boards.  Without correct installation the edges of the roof sheathing may be exposed to water and eventually rot. It should extend at least 1/4 of an inch below the roof sheathing and extends at least 2 inches over the roof deck. Over lap drip edge pieces at least 2 inches. 

Chimney: Viewed From
Ground
Chimney: Exterior Material
Stucco / Metal
Chimney: Flue Material
Clay, Metal
Drainage Systems: Gutter Information

This component of a roofs drainage system are inspected for proper attachment, damage, standing water, debris, installation of screens, etc.  Leaking gutters cannot always be diagnosed if it was not raining at the time of the inspection, therefore leaks may be noticed after one takes ownership of the home.  Sealing of damaged areas and endcaps or gutter replacement is possible.   

Periodically cleaning debris from gutters to prevent downspouts from clogging is recommended.  If water backs up in or fills the gutters damage can occur to roof sheathing and fascia boards.  Additionally, over flowing gutters can saturate the soil around the foundation.  


Drainage Systems: Gutter Material
Aluminum
Roof Not Walked

An inspector is not required to walk a roof.  Even if they elected to walk roofs as part of an inspection there are factors that would limit doing so: wetness; snow; ice; moss; type of roofing material; steepness of the roof; etc.

Areas Not Visible

There are certain aspects of a roof that are not visible or not fully visible to an inspector so there condition / installation cannot be inspected or confirmed.  These areas include but are not limited to fasteners, flashing, underlayment, etc. Therefore, the inspection is a limited visual inspection only.

Roofing Material: Roof Limitations

The inspection of the roof covering material is limited to the condition of the roof on the day of the inspection.  The roof is inspected by visually observing the roof covering itself, the visible portions of the roof structure from within the attic (if accessible), and the homes interior ceilings looking for indications of active or passive leaks.  Future conditions and inclement weather may produce / reveal leaks that were not visibly present at the time of the inspection.

Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Roofing Components...

Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  roof coverings; roof drainage systems; flashings; skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and signs of leaks or abnormal condensation on building components.

The Home Inspector Shall: describe the type of roof covering materials; and report the methods used to inspect the roofing.


Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Roofing Components...

The Home Inspector is Not Required To:  walk on the roofing; or inspect attached accessories including solar systems, antennae, and lightning arrestors.


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4.1.1 - Roofing Material

Drip Edge Installation

Metal Drip edging is missing or has not been properly installed. There is a flashing like material that has been installed under the metal roofing but it is not the standard drip edge.  It is bent over into the gutters and in some areas this metal restricts the guttering space.  In some cases the edge of the roof sheathing is void of flashing / drip edge altogether. 

 A metal drip edge should be installed along the roof edges, at both the eaves and the rakes.  The roofing felt should be installed over the drip edge at the eaves and under the drip edge at the rake boards.  Without correct installation the edges of the roof sheathing may be exposed to water and eventually rot.  Drip edge flashing should extend at least 1/4 of an inch below the roof sheathing and extend at least 2 inches onto the roof deck.  Drip edge pieces should overlap at least 2 inches. 

Recommend evaluation by a Roofing Professional and their recommendation for correction followed. 



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4.3.1 - Vegetation

Tree Limbs In Close Proximity To Roof

There are tree limbs in close proximity to the roof.  It is recommend that limbs be cut back 8-10 feet from the roof and the chimney.

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4.4.1 - Chimney

Chimney Spark Screen Arrestor Missing

No chimney spark screens appear present on the chimney flues as viewed from the ground.  Also a good indicator that the flues do not have a spark screens is fact that leaves and debris fell into the fireplaces when the fireplace dampers where inspected.  With out a spark screen or cap debris, leaves, and water can / may enter the chimney.

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4.5.1 - Drainage Systems

Debris in Gutters

Debris has accumulated in the gutters.  Recommend periodically scheduled cleaning to facilitate water flow and / or the installation of gutter guards to prevent the build up of debris.


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4.5.2 - Drainage Systems

No Gutter Screens / Guards

There are no screens of the gutters.

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4.5.3 - Drainage Systems

No Gutter Kickout Flashing

"Kickout" flashing is not present where the gutters meet the house. There is some wall flashing in these areas, but not specifically "kickout" flashing.  There is some patching of the stucco and the space between the gutters and the stucco where there has been leaking, possibly due to the lack of this flashing. Specifically above the upper balcony door off the master bedroom.  

"Kickout" flashing is an important detail in preventing water damage to a building.   It is simply a little piece of metal that directs water out and away from a building where a roof surface ends at a wall.  Recommend evaluation and correction by a licensed contractor.  

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4.5.4 - Drainage Systems

Downspouts Releasing Water Over Roof Surface

There are downspouts that are releasing water directly onto the upper metal roofing with water then draining down the roof to the lower gutter.  This is not recommended simply because of the impact of a concentrated flow of water on the roof.  It may also cause water to splash onto the stucco chimney cladding or the flashing at the base of the chimney.

5 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

Access: Access Type
Removable panel
Insulation: Insulation Type
Fiberglass Batt / Blanket (R-value 3 - 3.5 per inch)

Insulation R-Values  (R-value equals amount of heat resistance for inch of thickness)

Fiberglass batt and blanket.  Paper facing should be toward heated area.  Ten inches roughly  R-32.

Ventilation: Ventilation Type
Ridge Vents, Soffit Vents
Access: Entire Attic Not Accessible

Upon entering the attic area one can move from side to side in this area.  There is an attic area over the left side of the house but the design of the trusses makes movement through this area difficult.  This side are was not entered or inspected.



The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Insulation and Ventilation...

Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces; ventilation of attics and foundation areas; kitchen, bathroom, and laundry venting systems; and the operation of any readily accessible attic ventilation fan, and, when temperature permits, the operation of any readily accessible thermostatic control.

The Home Inspector Shall DescribeInsulation in unfinished spaces; and the absence of insulation in unfinished space at conditioned surfaces.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Homes Insulation and Ventilation...

Home Inspector Is No Required To Report On:  concealed insulation and vapor retarders; or venting equipment that is integral with household appliances.

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5.1.1 - Access

Access Size

The attic access ceiling panel is smaller than the standard panel size of 22.5 x 30. It is located in the upper floor back right bedroom closet.  

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5.1.2 - Access

Panel Weather Stripping

There is no weather stripping around the access panel.  Weather stripping will help to reduce heat / moisture flow between the house and the attic.


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5.1.3 - Access

Panel Insulation

The attic side of the access panel is not insulated but should be.  Rigid insulation on top of the panel will work best and is recommended.


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5.2.1 - Area Around The Access

Access Obstructions / Wiring

The electrical wiring around the attic access is not protected.  Electrical wiring should be protected within a 6 foot area around the attic access, on both the floor and the rafters above. Protection should be in the form of wood strips on either side of the cabling.  Protecting this wiring from damage is recommended.

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5.3.1 - Chases

Open Chases

There is an  open space or chase in the attic that is considered a fire chase.  This area needs to be properly covered and sealed to help prevent the rapid spreading of a fire.  These open vertical spaces can act like a chimney providing any fire an easy and rapid pass between floors.  This area is at the back right side of the attic area.  Recommend the areas noted be properly covered (drywall or OSB) and caulked and then the surface area be insulated in accordance with attic insulation requirements.  Or in this case the front wall of the chase can be covered.


Also there was water staining on the interior walls of the chase but no sign of moisture.  Also in the upper right side of the chase was a nest of insects.  The type of insect is unknown.  The inspector is not a professional bug guy.  

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5.5.1 - Insulation

Insufficient Insulation

Insulation depth is less than the recommended standard.  The insulation appears to be R-19.  The minimal insulation R-Value for attics in our region is R-30, while the DOE recommends R-49. Recommend a additional insulation be added.  If rolled fiberglass insulation is installed over the current it needs to be unfaced. 

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Comment
5.5.2 - Insulation

Ceiling Trusses Exposed

The ceiling trusses in the attic are visible above the insulation.  It is recommend that these trusses be covered with insulation to help reduce thermal bridging, which is heat transfer through uninsulated wood members. Recommend a qualified attic insulation contractor install additional insulation.

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5.5.3 - Insulation

No Baffles Installed

Currently there are no baffles installed between the trusses for soffit venting.  When insulation is added it is recommended that baffles be added between the trusses to allow for air flow.  When insulation is added at the attic roof edges if it is compressed against the roof sheathing if will stop needed air flow through the attic.

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5.5.4 - Insulation

Ridge Venting Area

The attic has ridge venting through the metal cap on the ridge of the roof line.  The roof sheathing is normally cut back about 2 inches to allow air flow from the soffits / eaves up through the roof venting.  The visible sheathing at the ridge is cut back less than this 2 inches.

6 - Heating & Cooling

General: Type Of Heating & Cooling
Gas Furnace, Air Conditioner
General: Number Of HVAC Systems
One A/C Unit, One Furnace
Air Conditioner : Unit Brand
Lennox
Air Conditioner : Energy Source/Type
Electric
Air Conditioner : Thermostat Location

The Thermostat is located in the central living area.  They should be located on an interior wall where exterior factors wont affect the thermostat.  If should be secure to the wall and level.  Should not be located in a draft plane or near an exterior door.

Gas Furnace: Furnace / Air Handler Brand
Heil
Gas Furnace: Energy Source/Type
Natural Gas
Heat Pump - Split System: Cool Mode Not Tested - Low Temperature

In order to keep from damaging a heat pump the following temperature restrictions are followed. If the outside temperature is less than 60 degrees F. or the outside temperature drops below 50 degrees the night before the inspection the heat pump is not operated in the cooling mode.

Heat Pump - Split System: Heat Mode Not Tested - Outside Temperature

In order to keep from damaging a heat pump it is not tested / operated in the heat mode if the outside temperature is over 70 degrees F.

Air Conditioner : Cool Mode Not Tested - Low Temperature

In order to keep from damaging an air conditioner the following temperature restrictions are followed. If the outside temperature is less than 60 degrees F. or the outside temperature drops below 50 degrees the night before the inspection the heat pump is not operated in the cooling mode. At the time of the inspection the temperature was around 58 degrees.

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Heating Components...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Permanently installed heating systems including: heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible. Solid fuel heating devices. Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors.  For the presence of an installed heat source in each room.

The Home Inspector Shall Describe:  The energy source for the system and the heating equipment and distribution type.

A Home Inspector Shall Operate:  The systems using normal operating controls.

A Home Inspector Shall Open:  Readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Cooling Systems...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Central air conditioning and through-the-wall installed cooling systems including:  cooling and air handling equipment and normal operating controls.  Distribution systems including:  fans, pumps, ducts, piping, dampers, insulation, air filters, registers, fan-coil units and for the presence of an installed cooling source in each room. 

The Home Inspector Shall Describe:   The energy source for the system and the cooling system type. 

The Home Inspector Shall Operate:  The systems using normal operating controls.

The Home Inspector Shall Open:  Readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Homes Heating Components...

The Home Inspector Is Not Required to:  Operate heating systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; operate automatic safety controls; ignite or extinguish solid fuel fire.

The Home Inspector Is Not Required To Inspect:  The interior of flues; fireplace insert flue connections; humidifiers; electronic air filters; the uniformity or adequacy of heat supply to the various rooms.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Homes Cooling Components...

The Home Inspector Is Not Required To:  Operate cooling systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; inspect window air conditioners; inspect the uniformity or adequacy of cool-air supply to the various rooms.



Credit
Comment
6.4.1 - Air Conditioner

Aging Unit

Per the Lennox air conditioner data plate the unit was built in 2002 making this appliance approximately 17 years of age.  The data plate for the HEIL gas furnace indicates it was built in 2001 making this appliance roughly 18 years of age.   The gas furnace is working normally with a heat differential of approximately 45 degrees but both units are aging with the normal life expectancy of these appliances between 16 and 20 years.  Recommend qualified HVAC tech fully test system, monitor for proper function and replace as needed.

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Comment
6.4.2 - Air Conditioner

Distance Above Soil

The outside condensing unit should be raised at least 6 inches off the ground in moderate snowfall areas.  Recommend evaluation.

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Comment
6.5.1 - Gas Furnace

No Dirt Leg

There is no dirt leg on the gas line to the appliance.  Recommend installation.

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Comment
6.5.2 - Gas Furnace

Gas Exhaust Piping Leaking

The exhaust line off the crawlspace located gas furnace is rusted, the line is differing sizes (instead of one sized piping), the seams are taped and the end point of the exhaust line is not connected and appears to be exhausting carbon monoxide into the home (crawlspace).  This needs to be corrected immediately. 

7 - Plumbing

Water Supply Material To House
Copper

Polybutylene (PB) is a gray or blue.  It uses crimped fittings. It has a history of failure from chemical reaction with chlorine in water.  There are old class action suites pertaining to PB piping.

Copper has been the most common supply line material since about 1950.  There are three different thicknesses of copper piping.  Type L (blue) is a medium thickness preferred for water distribution.  Copper is too thin to thread so it is soldered.  Lead solder was prohibited in 1988.  Silver solder is used today.

The greenish stain around fittings is usually from excess soldering flux although leaks can also cause corrosion of copper pipes due to acidic water.  


Galvanized steel was common in the 70s.  The zinc coating on the pipes interior is lost over time due to galvanic corrosion, then the rust begins.  Lead pipes rust from the inside out and over time will close off the pipes water flow.  There live span is usually 40 - 60 years.  


Plastic pipe is has been a common supply line material since the 50s. PVC cannot be used for distribution piping within the home, CPVC can.  PVC is approved for service piping into the building from the public or private water supply.  


The use of Lead water supply piping has been prohibited since 1989.   

Water Source
Public
Water Pressure: Water Pressure

The water pressure as tested at an exterior outlet was 75 psi.  The norm is 40 - 80 psi.

Pressure Reducer Valve: Location

The homes water pressure reducer valve is located at the back left corner of the crawlspace..  The pressure reducer valve is designed to reduce the pressure of the water provided by the city to a workable 40 - 80 psi.  Pressure greater than 80 psi can be harmful to water distribution piping.  The pressure reducer valve can be adjusted to reach the desired water pressure in the home.

Main Water Shut-Off: Material
Crawlspace
Main Water Shut-Off: Main Line Material
copper
Hot Water Systems: Manufacturer
Envi-ro-temp

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding. 

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help. 

Hot Water Systems: Capacity
80 gallons
Hot Water Systems: Location
Utility Room, Washer/Dryer Area, Back of Garage
Hot Water Systems: Power Source/Type
Electric
Utility Water Meter: Not Located

The water meter for the home was not located.

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Plumbing Components...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Interior water supply and distribution system, including: piping materials, supports, and insulation; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections. Interior drain, waste, and vent system, including: traps; drain, waste, and vent piping; piping supports and pipe insulation; leaks; and functional drainage. Hot water systems including: water heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; and chimneys, flues, and vents.  Sump pumps.

The Home Inspector Shall Describe:  Water supply and distribution piping.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Plumbing Components...

The Home Inspector Is Not Required To:  State the effectiveness of anti-siphon devices; determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; operate automatic safety controls; operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets.

The Home Inspector is Not Required to Inspect:  Water conditioning systems; fire and lawn sprinkler systems; on-site water supply quantity and quality; on-site waste disposal systems; foundation irrigation systems; bathroom spas, except as to functional flow and functional drainage; swimming pools; solar water heating equipment; and the plumbing system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.

Credit
Comment
7.7.1 - Hot Water Systems

Electric Wiring Not Protected

The electrical wiring to the water heater is not protected and needs to be in protective conduit.

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Comment
7.7.2 - Hot Water Systems

Near End of Life

Water heater, per the data plate, was manufactured in the year 2000.  The normal life expectancy of a water heater is roughly 8-12 yrs.  So replacement at some point in time should not be a surprise.

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Comment
7.7.3 - Hot Water Systems

No Drip Pan Drain Line

 If a water heater is located inside a living area on a floor that may be damaged by water a pan under a tank is recommended.  The catch pan should be plumbed to a safe location to avoid damaging floors.  If a drain line is not possible a float sensor with an alarm is recommended in the catch pan.  Suggest evaluation and installation. 

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Comment
7.7.4 - Hot Water Systems

No Expansion Tank

No expansion tank was present. Expansion tanks allow for the thermal expansion of water in the tank without putting pressure on water distribution lines.  They are installed on the cold water lines.  These are required in certain areas for new installs. Recommend installation when replaced.

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Comment
7.7.5 - Hot Water Systems

No TPR Pipe

The TPR pipe off the TPR valve is:

 1.  Not fully secured, easily becomes disconnected and 

2.  The TPR pipe is PVC.  

Recommend replacing with non PVC piping and securing / attaching to TPR valve.

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Comment
7.7.6 - Hot Water Systems

No Electric Disconnect

There is no water heater electrical disconnect located at the water heater.  One is required for the protection of a service person when repairing or replacing the unit. However, since the water heater is in the same room as the electric panel the shut in the panel will suffice.

8 - Main Electrical System

NEC Expectations

The NEC (National Electric Code) does not require electrical systems in older homes be updated with every new version of the code.  However, the inspector may find where an addition or upgrade to the current standard may / will provide greater personal protection and will therefore recommend doing so.

Utility Service Drop: Utility Drop Type
Underground (lateral)

The Utility Drop or Service Drop is the name given to the power line(s) from the Utility Company Power source to the house.  This line can be either areal (overhead) or lateral (buried).

Meter Base: Meter Base Types

You can't specifically tell the size of the meter by the base.  However, over the last 20 years or so a rectangular-based meter base (200 amps) has been used.  In prior years, 40 years ago, a square base (100-150 amps) was in use. Prior to that round meter base (60 amps) was in use. 

If there is a CL200 on the meter is it rated for 200 amps.  A CL10 indicates two separate main service panels, primarily for larger homes.

The meter base for this home is 200 amp service.

Service Entrance Conductors: Electrical Service Conductors
Below Ground, 240 Volts
Main Service Panel : Location
Garage
Main Service Panel : Manufacturer
Square D
Main Service Panel : Panel Type
Circuit Breaker
Main Service Panel : Capacity
200 AMP

The minimum residential amperage for homes' today is 100 amps. The size of the service panel main disconnect alone does not determine the panels amperage.  Amperage is determined by the smallest of these three:  the main disconnect or the panel service rating or the size of the incoming service conductors.

Main Service Panel : Wiring Method
Romex
Main Service Panel : Branch Wire 15 and 20 AMP
Copper
GFCI & AFCI: GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters) Information

A GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) is a protective device specifically designed to break the circuit every time there is an imbalance between incoming and outgoing current.  A GFCI protected outlet protects electrical wiring and receptacles from overheating and possible fires.

As of 1971 GFCI are required in garages, kitchens, bathrooms, exteriors and unfinished basements.  During an inspection all GFCIs located are tripped / tested to make sure they are operational.

If a ungrounded receptacle is located where a GFCI is currently required it must be upgraded to a GFCI receptacle when it is replaced.

GFCI receptacles protect all downstream receptacles on the same circuit.

When a GFCI is used on an ungrounded circuit receptacle (no ground wire) that receptacle and all linked receptacles on the same circuit should be labeled as having no equipment ground.

GFCIs don't do well on circuits for older motor driven appliances because they can accidentally trip due to motor surges.

Computers, security systems, and other large appliances should not be plugged into GFCI protected circuits.  Appliances that could be damaged or cause unreasonable inconvience if power is lost should not be plugged into GFCI receptacles.

Bonding: Bonding Information

Bonding means electrically connecting conductive items together.  With bonding you're bringing the potential to ground equal across all items that could become energized so that you don't become the path of least resistance and get electrocuted. 

The NEC requires that metallic water and gas supply piping to be bonded to the neutral bus bar at the main panel.  

Main Service Panel : Over Current Devices Not Tested

Over current devices, main disconnects, breakers and fuses are not turned off or tested.   

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Electrical Components...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Service entrance conductors; service equipment, grounding equipment, main overcurrent device, and main and distribution panels; amperage and voltage ratings of the service; branch circuit conductors, their overcurrent devices, and the compatibility of their ampacities and voltages; the operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling's exterior walls; the polarity and grounding of all receptacles within six feet of interior plumbing fixtures, and all receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected structures; the operation of ground fault circuit interrupters; and smoke detectors.

The Home Inspector Shall Describe: Service amperage and voltage; service entry conductor materials; the service type as being overhead or underground; and the location of main and distribution panels.

The Home Inspector Shall Report: The presence of any readily accessible single strand aluminum branch circuit wiring; the presence or absence of smoke detectors. If a stand alone detector it is to be tested; if incorporated into an alarm system the entity that monitors the system should test the system.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Electrical Components...

The Home Inspector Is Not Required To:  Insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panel; test or operate any overcurrent device except ground fault circuit interrupters; dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels.

The Home Inspector is Not Required to Inspect:  Low voltage systems; security system devices; heat detectors; carbon monoxide detectors; telephones; security systems; cable TV; intercoms; wiring that is not a part of the primary electrical distribution system; built-in vacuum equipment; photovoltaic systems; back up generators.

Credit
Comment
8.4.1 - Main Service Panel

Working Spacing

The Main Service Panel is not in unobstructed clear space.  The panel should be in clear space (30 inches x 36 inches) that is at least 30 inches wide with 36 inches in front of the panel.  The panel does not need to be centered in the 30 inches but the door needs to open a full 90 degrees.  Not complying with this is considered a safety issue.  I recommend this be corrected.   A licensed electrician should address this issue. 

 

There is no lighting for the Main Service Panel. Should be lighting for each panel.The Main Service Panel The Main Service Panel requires unobstructed space around the panel. 



Panel should not be located in closets bathrooms and cabinets or near flammable liquids. If the only way to reach the panel requires leaning on grounded appliances such as washers, dryers, freezers, do not inspect the panel.

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Comment
8.4.2 - Main Service Panel

Incomplete or Missing Directory

The service panel directory is missing or incomplete. All service panels should have a complete Breaker / Fuse Directory.  A directory will allow a specific circuit to be disconnected without shutting off the homes main disconnect. The inspector has no way of confirming the accuracy of the directory, only whether it is missing or appears incomplete.  For personal safety a complete circuit directory is required.  A licensed electrician should be contacted about developing a panel directory.



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Comment
8.4.3 - Main Service Panel

Bus Bar Bonding Screw

There is no visible grounding screw (green) to verify the grounding of the neutral / ground bus bars to the panel.   I recommend a licensed electrician be consulted and their recommendation for correction be followed.


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Comment
8.4.4 - Main Service Panel

Panel Wire Bushings

There are conductors entering the service panel that are not protected from the edges of the panel openings with bushings.    I recommend a licensed electrician be consulted and their recommendation for correction be followed.

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Comment
8.4.5 - Main Service Panel

Multiple Neutrals Under Same Screw

Neutral (white) wires are not to be doubled up where they are secured to the neutral / ground bus bar.  One neutral wire only under a screw on the bus bar.  This is not the case in this panel.  Recommend evaluation and correction by a licensed electricain.

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Comment
8.4.6 - Main Service Panel

Neutrals And Grounds Together

In a service panel neutral (white) wires and ground (bare) wires are to be separated where secured to the neutral / ground bus bar.  In this panel there are neutral and ground wires together, under the same screw, on the bus bar.  This needs to be corrected by a licensed electricain.

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Comment
8.4.7 - Main Service Panel

Wires Spliced Without Caps

There a two grounded conductor (white wire) spices in the panel.  The splices are taped but because of their size do not appear to be capped before tapping.

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Comment
8.4.8 - Main Service Panel

Strand Wire Not Fully Under Screw

There is a stranded ground wire where not all of the wire strands are under the ground screw.  Recommend correction.

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Comment
8.6.1 - GFCI & AFCI

No GFCI Protection Installed


There is no GFCI Protection in the

1.  Garage

2.  Main level / bathroom no outlet, therefore no GFCI protection

3.  No upstairs  bathrooms (4) have GFCI protection

4.  All exterior outlets

Recommended in all of these areas.




Credit
Comment
8.7.1 - Grounding

Grounding Electrode Not Identified

The grounding electrode (GEC) from the Service Panel could not be identified and a ground was not located to an exterior rod or the water distribution lines.  Recommend evaluation by a licensed electrician. 

Grounding means connecting the electrical system to the earth.   It is required as a means of disposing of unwanted electricity and energy from lightning strikes.  Grounding is a safe alternate electrical path out of the main panel.  Before 1960 only the service panel required grounding. Since then all branch circuits, lights and electrical receptacles require grounding.


9 - Crawlspace

Inspection Method
Crawlspace Crawled - Full Access
Access: Location
Door Lower Level Living Area
Credit
Comment
9.1.1 - Access

Door Not Weather Stripped

The crawlspace door does not latch properly. It additionally has no weather stripping, threshold, etc. Since this door separates conditioned from unconditioned space sealing this door properly is recommended.

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Comment
9.3.1 - Dryer Venting

Not Vented To Exterior

The dryer vent is not properly exhausted to the home's exterior.  The vent line that goes through the floor from the dryer is damaged and currently the hot moist air and lint is being discharged into the crawlspace.  This needs to be corrected. 

Also the dryer vent is flexible plastic.  This type of line tends to trap lint in the line. A solid smooth lined vent pipe is recommended.


 

Credit
Comment
9.5.1 - Insulation

Missing Insulation

There is no insulation installed between the floor joists in the home's crawlspace.  Installation of insulation with a value of at least R-19 is recommended.  If insulation with kraft paper (a vapor barrier) is used, it should be installed so the vapor barrier is up tightly against the subfloor so there is no air space between the insulation and the subfloor.  Additionally, the insulation should not be compressed, this will significantly reduce its effectiveness.

Additionally, the underside of the steps from the main to lower level, in the crawlspace, are not insulated.  Recommend this be done as well.





Credit
Comment
9.7.1 - Electrical

Missing Junction Boxes

There are unprotected wiring ends in the crawlspace area. The wiring noted is just above and to the right of the furnace.  All splices and wire ends should be placed in a properly secured and covered junction boxes.  Recommend all wire splices be properly protected.

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Comment
9.9.1 - “Mildew Like” Substance

On the Crawlspace Floor

There are signs of a mildew like substance on the crawlspace soil.  This is normally the result of moisture escaping from the soil.  The proper installation of vapor retarder over the soil is recommended.  In addition to having the mildew like substance treated or removed.

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Comment
9.10.1 - Moisture / Water Present

Efflorescence Present

There is efflorescence present on the foundation block in the crawlspace.  This is a sign of water penetration of the block presumably from the flat to negatively sloped grading at the exterior of the home. The soil at the base of the block in these areas is wet / muddy indicating current / recent water entry.  

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Comment
9.11.1 - Structural Issues

Subfloor Damage

The metal subfloor under the front porch area is heavily rusted and a support beam one a block has been added.  The integrity of the support beam and block is in question.

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Comment
9.13.1 - Vapor Retarder

Improper Installation / Incomplete

Vapor barrier is improperly installed. This can result in unwanted moisture. Typically a vapor barrier or retarder should be at least 6 mil plastic that completely covers the soil; free of holes and tears; and all seams overlapped at least 6 inches and taped / sealed.  The vapor retarder should be cleanly cut around foundation walls and columns or be extended up and be secured / sealed to the walls and columns.  Recommend repair.

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Comment
9.14.1 - Ventilation

Ventilation Amount

The home's crawlspace lacks the standard recommended amount of venting. At this time there is one crawlspace vent on the back side of the house.   If the crawlspace has a full / complete / correctly installed vapor barrier / retarder one square foot of venting is required per 1500 sq. ft. of crawlspace.  If the crawlspace does not have a full / complete / correctly installed vapor retarder, as is the case here, then one square foot of ventilation is required per 150 sq.ft.  Recommend this be corrected by adding mechanical venting and adding / correcting the vapor retarder.


10 - Attached Garage

Door To Living Space: Separation Requirements

The door separating the garage and home has specific safety requirements. This firewall door must be at least 1 3/8-inch thick, metal / steel, or a 20-minute fire-rated solid wood door. Self closing hinges or self closing mechanism is required.  Weather stripping is required around the door, as is a sound threshold and a door sweep. Pet Doors and windows are not allowed.

Vehicle Door: Material
Metal, Aluminum
Vehicle Door: Type
Up-and-Over
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Comment
10.1.1 - Door To Living Space

Not Fire Rated

The door separating the garage and home is not a fire rated door.  This firewall door must be at least 1 3/8-inch thick, metal / steel, or a 20-minute fire-rated solid wood door.  Since this door has decorative panels it does not meet the 1 3/8 inch parameter.

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Comment
10.1.2 - Door To Living Space

Not Self-closing

The door between an attached garage and the home should have self-closing hinges or a self closing device to help prevent spread of a fire to living space. This door must close and latch on its own.  Recommend installation. 

.

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Comment
10.1.3 - Door To Living Space

Weather Stripping

To help prevent air movement between the home and the garage the garage living space door should have sound weather stripping, a sound threshold and a door base sweep. 

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10.1.4 - Door To Living Space

Pet Door

Pet doors in the door between the garage and the living space are not permitted.  Having one eliminates the required fire safety standard.

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Comment
10.1.5 - Door To Living Space

No Door Sweep

There is no door sweep or threshold at the base of the door to help eliminate the movement of air / fumes. 

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Comment
10.1.6 - Door To Living Space

Door To Laundry Room

The door at the back of the laundry room, through the garage, is a solid wood door but needs to be treated as a  firewall or fire rated door.  Self closing, fire rated, weather stripping, sweep,  etc.  As is it is now it is allowing air from the garage into the home (fumes) and is significantly negatively impacting the home's energy efficiency. 

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Comment
10.1.7 - Door To Living Space

General Damage

The garage walls are paneling with some loose seams.  The floor is painted with common chipped paint.  There is hole in the wall to the right of the laundry access (from the garage) around some plumbing lines.  

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Comment
10.2.1 - Vehicle Door

Auto Reverse Sensor Greater then 6 inches from floor

The electronic eye auto reverse on either side of the right side garage door (from the outside) needs to be no greater than 6 inches above the floor.  Recommend correcting.

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Comment
10.2.2 - Vehicle Door

Pressure Auto Reverse

The auto pressure reverse did not operate for the right side garage door (from the outside) while it did for the other door.  Recommend correction.

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Comment
10.3.1 - Electrical

Receptacle Location(s)

The single electrical outlet in garage (that was visible) should be at least three feet above the floor because a spark from this outlet the can be a source of ignition for gas fumes.  

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Comment
10.3.2 - Electrical

GFCI Protection

There is no GFCI protection on the single outlet visible in the garage, by the living space door.  Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) protection is required on all 120 volt receptacles in garages and grade level areas of unfinished accessory buildings as of 1971. GFCI protection is not required for receptacles in the garage ceiling nor for dedicated receptacles that serve an appliance that is not easily moved.  

11 - Unfinished Basement, Foundation, & Structure

Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Structural Components and Foundation...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Foundation; floors; walls; columns or piers; ceilings; and roofs.

The Home Inspector Shall Describe:  Foundation; floor structure; wall structure; columns or piers; ceiling structure; and roof structure.

The Home Inspector Shall:  Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected; enter underfloor crawl spaces, basements, and attic spaces except when access is obstructed, when entry could damage the property, or when dangerous or adverse situations are suspected; report the methods used to inspect underfloor crawl spaces and attics; and report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of condensation on building components.

12 - Common Living Areas - General Information

Habitable Space

For a space to be defined as habitable the specific room must have an area of at least 70 square feet and be at least 84 inches (7 feet) high. This includes basements containing habitable rooms or hallways.  Any ceiling obstructions must be at least 76 inches (6 ft. 4 inches) above the finished floor.  

Floor Coverings
Carpet, Tile, Engineered / Hardwood / Laminate
Wall / Ceiling Material
Drywall, Textured

These materials are represented throughout the entire home.  Condition or deficiencies will be noted in the report in the specific living area.

Window Type
Casement, Sliders, Fixed, Bay (3 window sets)

These materials are represented throughout the entire home.  Condition or deficiencies will be noted in the report in the specific living area.

Smoke Detectors
Hallway outside of Bedrooms, Main level Foyer

Smoke alarms should be installed in every bedroom; outside all bedroom areas or hallways (usually within 10 feet of the bedroom door); in each room with a fireplace; in garages; and on every level of the home, including the basement.

Suggest checking with the seller about the type of detectors installed in the house: battery or hardwired, individual or linked, or monitored by a security firm.

Vaulted Ceilings

Vaulted Ceilings tend to have insulation completely filling the space between the interior ceiling and the roof deck above, which prevents ventilation.  Therefore, vaulted ceilings are more susceptible to problems from condensation.  Why?  Moisture laden air from the home's interior will find its way into an attic and without proper ventilation water vapor will accumulate there.  By providing adequate "intake" and "exhaust" ventilation, like in an attic, this moisture is sufficiently removed.   So if insulation completely fills the space between the ceiling and roof, ventilation will be minimal and problems from condensation may occur.  Some signs to look for that indicate a condensation problem are water stains around can lights or discoloration at the ceilings peak.  

Receptacles Not Checked

Due to furniture / personal belongings in the home not all electrical receptacles could be checked.  The State of Tennessee requires checking a representative number or electrical receptacles.

Visible Limitations

Not all surfaces of a home's walls, ceilings or floors are visible when a home is furnished. Therefore, if furnished, some wall, ceiling, or floor areas may have not been visually inspected.

13 - Common Living Area- Lower Level

Windows: Lower level windows
Back of house

All windows on the lower level are sliding windows double pane with no screens or storm windows.

 It is noted at the time of inspection that the windowsill casings have not been finished.

Floors: Floor type

Floors are engineered hardwood

Heat Source: Wall unit
Lower level

Gas wall heat in addition to HVAD registers.  

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Comment
13.2.1 - Smoke Detectors

No Smoke Detector
Lower level living areas

Current smoke detector safety installation standards require a smoke detector in each bedroom and in hallways outside of each bedroom (within 10 feet). They should always be installed per the manufacture's instructions.  

Generally, smoke detectors should be installed no closer than 4 inches from a wall / ceiling intersection and if installed on the wall, not more than 12 inches down the wall from the ceiling.

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Comment
13.9.1 - Back Closet

Back Walls Not Insulated

In the back closet of the lower living area the following is noted.

1.  This is unconditioned space and the back of the walls between the living area and the closet are not insulated.

2.  The ceiling is insulated but the insulation is upside down (paper goes up toward living area) and the insulation is not pressed up against the ceiling.  This leaves a gap between the insulation and the flooring that allows air flow thus makes the insulation useless.

3.  The door is not weather stripped, has no threshold or sweep to help prevent the movement of air between the two spaces.

14 - Common Living Areas

Windows: Main level windows

The windows on the main level of the house or a combination of casement windows are single pane insulated windows and fixed side light windows around the front door.  The sidelight windows and casement windows appear original to the home while the single pane insulated windows at the back of the house are replacement windows .

Ceilings / Walls: Main level living area

 All living areas on the main level ceiling and walls are covered with a thick layer of textured mud.

Windows: Window Accessibility

Due to furniture placement, some windows were able to be opened at time of inspection.

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: No ceiling light fixture

There are no ceiling light fixtures in either of the living areas on the main level.

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14.1.1 - Interior Door

Door Doesn't Latch
Coat closet in foyer

This door doesn't latch. Recommend repair or readjusting the latch and / or strike plate.

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14.3.1 - Windows

General Damage
Main level casement Windows

One or more windows appears to have general damage, but are operational. 

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14.3.2 - Windows

Broken / Cracked Window Glazing (Glass)
Main level front LR

There are windows with cracked or broken window glazing.  Recommend repair / replacement of the glazing (glass).

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Comment
14.3.3 - Windows

Do Not Easily Open

Some windows are difficult to open.  Windows should be secure in the casings but easy to open.

 The right side window in the dining room does not close fully with the crank and the hinges are not operating correctly.

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Comment
14.4.1 - Ceilings / Walls

Major Cracks
Front LR

There is major cracking visible in this rooms walls / ceiling.  They may indicate soil movement or insufficient wall support resulting in wall sagging.  Cracks of around a 1/4 of an inch with visible displacement (up or down / in or out) around the cracks are considered to be of structural concern and should be evaluated. 

Located at base of railing where wood trim plate meets the wall at the step down from the foyer into front living room.


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14.4.2 - Ceilings / Walls

Moisture Stains / Damage

Their are stains on the walls/ceilings that appear to be the result of moisture.  The source of moisture may / may not have been corrected.  There was / was not a sign of moisture in this area, at the time of the inspection, as tested for with a thermal imaging camera.  If there was no corresponding moisture intrusion point identified then it is recommended that this area be monitored in order to detect continued or further damage.  This area is below the upper level bathroom.

This is located where the back main level living room meets the kitchen (close to the stove).

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Comment
14.7.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Closet Light Fixture Clearance(s)
Main level coat closet

The closet lighting does not meet today's safety clearance standards.  Although not an issue when the home was constructed, the lack of standard clearances is considered a safety issue.  Recommend adherence to today's standards.

Surface incandescent lighting fixtures in closets should not be within 12 inches of a closets defined storage area. Storage area height is roughly defined as the highest of 6 feet from the floor, the height of clothes hanging rod or the height of a shelf above the clothes hanging rod.  

Recessed (totally enclosed) incandescent, fluorescents or LED  lighting fixtures in closets shall be no closer than 6 inches from a closets defined storage area. Storage area height is roughly defined as the highest of 6 feet from the floor, the height of clothes hanging rod or the height of a shelf above the clothes hanging rod.

Surface mounted lights shall be at least 6 inches from a closets defined storage area.  Storage area height is roughly defined as the highest of 6 feet from the floor, the height of clothes hanging rod or the height of a shelf above the clothes hanging rod.


15 - Fireplace One - Main Level Living Area

General: Fireplace Operation

Per the State of Tennessee a home inspector is not required to ignite a fire to visually inspect operation nor is the inspector required to extinguish a fire in order to conduct an inspection.

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Fireplace...

The Inspector Shall Inspect:  Readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys; lintels above the fireplace openings; damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and cleanout doors and frames.

The Inspector Shall Describe:  The type of fireplace.

The Inspector Shall Report As In Need Of Correction:  Evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers; manually operated dampers that did not open and close; the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace; the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

The Inspector Is Not Required To Inspect The:  Flue or vent system, interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.  Determine the need for a chimney sweep.  Operate gas fireplace inserts, light pilot flames.  Determine the appropriateness of any installation.  Inspect automatic fuel-fed devices.  Inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices.  Inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted.  Ignite or extinguish fires.  Determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics.  Move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents.  Perform a smoke test.  Dismantle or remove any component.  Perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection.  Perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

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Comment
15.3.1 - Damper Doors

Inoperable / Damaged

The main level fireplace damper did not operate normally.  This means opening / closing properly, staying in place (either open or closed)  and when closed provides a seal between the firebox and the flue.   This damper would not stay closed. Recommend evaluation and repair.

 

16 - Fireplace Two

General: Fireplace Operation
Back living room

Per the State of Tennessee a home inspector is not required to ignite a fire to visually inspect operation nor is the inspector required to extinguish a fire in order to conduct an inspection.

Leaves fell into the firebox when the damper was tested may suggest no screen on the top of the chimney I can get on the road. Leaves fell into the firebox when the damper was tested may suggest no screen on the top of the chimney I can get on the road 

General: Type Or Types of Fireplaces
Gas Burning

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Fireplace...

The Inspector Shall Inspect:  Readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys; lintels above the fireplace openings; damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and cleanout doors and frames.

The Inspector Shall Describe:  The type of fireplace.

The Inspector Shall Report As In Need Of Correction:  Evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers; manually operated dampers that did not open and close; the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace; the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

The Inspector Is Not Required To Inspect The:  Flue or vent system, interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.  Determine the need for a chimney sweep.  Operate gas fireplace inserts, light pilot flames.  Determine the appropriateness of any installation.  Inspect automatic fuel-fed devices.  Inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices.  Inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted.  Ignite or extinguish fires.  Determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics.  Move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents.  Perform a smoke test.  Dismantle or remove any component.  Perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection.  Perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

17 - Fireplace Three

Fireplace Operation
Master bedroom

Per the State of Tennessee a home inspector is not required to ignite a fire to visually inspect operation nor is the inspector required to extinguish a fire in order to conduct an inspection.

Type Or Types of Fireplaces
Wood Burning, Metal Insert
Fireplace
Master bedroom

 Master bedroom fireplace does not appear to be in use at the time of inspection. Recommend inspection by a licensed professional before use .

Vents, Flues & Chimneys: Flues / Chimneys Not Fully Visible

The designs of fireplaces / metal inserts / dampers all can limit the visibility of the fireplace chimney / flue.

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Fireplace...

The Inspector Shall Inspect:  Readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys; lintels above the fireplace openings; damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and cleanout doors and frames.

The Inspector Shall Describe:  The type of fireplace.

The Inspector Shall Report As In Need Of Correction:  Evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers; manually operated dampers that did not open and close; the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace; the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

The Inspector Is Not Required To Inspect The:  Flue or vent system, interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.  Determine the need for a chimney sweep.  Operate gas fireplace inserts, light pilot flames.  Determine the appropriateness of any installation.  Inspect automatic fuel-fed devices.  Inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices.  Inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted.  Ignite or extinguish fires.  Determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics.  Move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents.  Perform a smoke test.  Dismantle or remove any component.  Perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection.  Perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

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Comment
17.6.1 - Firebox

No Fireplace Screen

Fireplace screen was missing in front of fireplace, this is recommended as a safety precaution.

18 - Interior Stairs

Winders: Winders

Winders are angled or winding or turned stairs.   They are no longer considered as safe as straight  stairs.

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Comment
18.1.1 - First Floor To Second Floor

Railings Height

The stair railings are 32 inches high.  They do not meet the recommended building standard railing height of 34 to 38 inches.  This is considered a safety issue, recommend addressing.

 




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18.1.2 - First Floor To Second Floor

Baluster Spacing
Main to upper level stairs

The spacing between the stair railing balusters or fillers is 5.5 inches.  There should be no more than 4 3/8 inches of space between stair railing balusters to prevent children heads or other body parts from getting trapped.  For safety reasons it is recommended that these steps be brought up to baluster recommended standards.

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18.3.1 - Finished Basement Stairs

Railings Height

The stair railings are 31.5/25 inches high.  They do not meet the recommended building standard railing height of 34 to 38 inches.  This is considered a safety issue, recommend addressing.

 




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18.3.2 - Finished Basement Stairs

Baluster Spacing

The spacing between the stair railing balusters or fillers is 5.25 nches.  There should be no more than 4  3/8 inches of space between stair railing balusters to prevent children heads or other body parts from getting trapped.  For safety reasons it is recommended that these steps be brought up to baluster recommended standards.

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18.3.3 - Finished Basement Stairs

Stairway Head Room

The headroom above these steps is less than the minimum standard of 6 feet 8 inches.  Care should be taken so a taller person doesnt smack their head.

19 - Kitchen

Counter Tops: Countertop Material
Stone
Dishwasher: Brand
Samsung
Dishwasher: Dishwasher Information

A dishwasher's operation is inspected by running a short wash cycle while looking for leaks, etc. The dishwasher's washing capability is not tested for.  

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Textured
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Oven Information

To oven is tested in bake mode only to ensure that the heating elements work. The temperature calibrations are not tested nor is the broiler or the clean mode. 

Oven is operational. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
Samsung
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Oven / Range Energy Source
Electric
Exhaust Fan / Range Hood: Exhaust Hood Type
None
Microwave - Built-In: Microwave Information
Above stove

Only permanently installed microwaves are tested.  Any deficiences identified will be noted in the report.

 Michael microwave unit has a recirculating fan. 

Flooring: Flooring type
Ceramic Tile
Windows: Window Type
Casement
Refrigerator: Brand
Samsung
Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Gypsum Board
Sinks: Kitchen Sink Information

As part of the kitchen inspection faucets and valves are operated while checking for leaks or signs of significant deficiences.  The spray wand is operated, checking for flow and leakage.  In the cabinet under the sink supply and drain pipes are inspected for leaks, proper installation, etc.  The disposal unit is inspected to ensure proper function, rust, leaks, proper power cord protection, etc.  Unless noted in this report no reportable defects were identified. 

Ceilings / Walls: Visible Limitations

Not all surfaces of a home's wall or ceilings are visible when a home is furnished. 

Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for Built-in Kitchen Appliances...

Home Inspector Shall Inspect and Operate The Basic Functions Of:  Permanently installed; dishwasher(s) through a normal cycle; range(s), cook top(s), and permanently installed oven(s); trash compactor(s); garbage disposal(s); ventilation equipment or range hood(s); and permanently installed microwave oven(s).


Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for Built-in Kitchen Appliances...

The Home Inspector is Not Required To Inspect:  Clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven functions, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation; non built-in appliances; refrigerationunits.

 The Home Inspector is Not Required to Operate:  Appliances in use; or any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.

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Comment
19.3.1 - Dishwasher

Absence Of Drain Line High Loop Or Air Gap

The dishwasher drain line should either connect to an air system at the top of the sink or be installed so it has a loop in the line that touches the under side of the counter top.  This air gap system or high loop will help prevent drain water from the sink draining into the dishwasher.  Recommend correcting the line positioning to create this high loop.

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Comment
19.3.2 - Dishwasher

Unprotected wiring

 The Romax wiring to the dishwasher and the wiring to the disposal are both  unprotected under the sink and both need to be in protective conduit

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Comment
19.8.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Number Of Island Outets
Kitchen

At least one receptacle outlet must be installed at each island countertop space with a long dimension of 2 feet or greater.  When breaks occur in countertop spaces for appliances, sinks, etc., and the width of the counterspace behind the appliance or sink is less than 1 foot, each countertop space is considered as a separate island for determining receptacle placement. 

This receptacle strip is  within 3 feet of the sink on the island and should be GFCI protected .


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19.11.1 - Windows

General Damage

One or more windows appears to have general damage, but are operational. 

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Comment
19.13.1 - Garbage Disposal

Unprotected Wiring

Romex wiring that is connected to the garbage disposal directly should be protected by being placed in conduit.  Recommend this be done.

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Comment
19.16.1 - Sinks

Large cut-out around pipes

The area under the sink where the drain line exits the cabinet is large and open.n

20 - Laundry Room

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling Material
Gypsum Board
Ceilings / Walls: Visible Limitations

Not all surfaces of a laundry room walls / ceilings / or floors are visible when a washer / dryer and other furnishings are installed.  

21 - Master Bedroom

No Emergeny Egress: Emergency Egress Requirements

Bedrooms must have a means of egress other than the room's interior entry door so that occupants can exit and rescue specialists can enter. This egress could be an exterior door, a sliding glass door or a window.  If a window, the base of the window should not be more than 44" above the finished floor.  The window must easily open and the open area must be at least 24 inches high by 20 inches wide.  Additionally, the minimum opening area of the egress window should be 5.0 sq. feet for window at grade level and 5.7 square feet for any bedroom window for a second floor or higher bedroom.  This also applies to basement and attic bedrooms.  These regulations are relatively new so if you have an older house make sure you keep it up to code for your own safety.

Smoke Detectors: Smoke Alarm Locations

Smoke alarms should be installed in every bedroom; outside all bedroom areas or hallways (usually within 10 feet of the bedroom door); in each room with a fireplace; in garages; and on every level of the home, including the basement.

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Textured
Windows: Window Type
Casement, Thermal, Fixed
Floors: Floor Coverings
Engineered Wood
Ceilings / Walls: Visible Limitations

Not all surfaces of a home's wall or ceilings are visible when a home is furnished. 

Floors: Visible Limitations

Not all areas of the floor is visible when furniture and/or area rugs are present.

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Comment
21.5.1 - Smoke Detectors

No Smoke Detector

There is no smoke detector installed in this bedroom.  This is considered a safety issue for the home's occupants and it is strongly suggested, for personal safety, that one be installed.  

Current smoke detector safety installation standards require a smoke detector in each bedroom and in hallways outside of each bedroom (within 10 feet). They should always be installed per the manufacture's instructions.  

Generally, smoke detectors should be installed no closer than 4 inches from a wall / ceiling intersection and if installed on the wall, not more than 12 inches down the wall from the ceiling.

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Comment
21.6.1 - Ceilings / Walls

Minor Cracks
Lower left corner of cathedral window

There are minor cracks in the walls /ceiling.  Cracks at the corners of doors and windows are not uncommon.  They may be due to long-term settlement or from the shifting / shrinking of a door or window header. Joint cracks can be the result of expansion and contraction of framing or structural stress.

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21.6.2 - Ceilings / Walls

Major Cracks
Bottom right of cathedral window

There is major cracking visible in the bedrooms walls.  They may indicate soil movement or insufficient wall support resulting in wall sagging.  Cracks of this size with visible displacement around the cracks are considered to be of structural concern and should be evaluated by a structural engineer.


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Comment
21.8.1 - Windows

Do Not Easily Open

The bottom casement window under the cathedral window in the seating is difficult to open.   This is not an egress concern as there is an operable exterior door in the master bedroom .

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Comment
21.8.2 - Windows

Failed Seal(s)
Cathedral window

Observed condensation / condensation stains between some window panes, which normally indicates a failed seal.  This does not normally reduce the window's efficiency but may negatively impact the windows appearance and the visibility through the glazing.  

22 - Master Bathroom ONE

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Drywall
Sink(s): Sink Inspection Information

Sinks are inspected by running faucets, checking drains stoppers, checking for leaks, water flow and proper drainage.  The under-sink plumbing is inspected by running the water and looking for leaks from supply and drain lines.  

Walk-in Shower : Shower Information

Showers are inspected by operating faucets to ensure adequate flow and proper drainage and to check for leaks.  Walls are inspected for damage (tile cracks, loose tile, missing grout, etc.) and areas that would allow water entry. 

Windows: Window Type
Casement
Sink(s): Sink Over Flow Limitations

Sink over flows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that over flow leakage will occur. 

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub / Shower Inspection

Shower / tub drains are not specifically tested for leaks by stopping up the tub drain and filling the tub with water.  However, water was run through the drain for an extended period of time, then the areas under the drains, if accessible, were inspected for indications of leaks.   The inspector cannot replicate the effects of added weight / strain to the tub / shower from a person taking a shower.  This additional weight can put strain or joints, gaskets, drain pipes, etc. that may result in leakage.

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub Over Flow Limitations

Tub overflows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that overflow leakage will occur.

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Comment
22.4.1 - Sink(s)

No Overflow Holes

Just a heads up that the sink does not have a water overflow hole.  So caution should be taken when filling the sink with the stopper closed.  

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Comment
22.7.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

No GFCI Protection

As of 1971 GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) protection is required on all bathroom outlets, kitchen outlets within 6 feet of counter tops, exterior receptacles, crawlspace and garages.  Although the NEC doesn't require updates each time a new code is established GFCI protection can save lives.  Recommend GFCIs be installed where currently required.  

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Comment
22.11.1 - Windows

Missing Screen(s) / Storm Windows

There are window screens or storm windows missing.  They may be in storage. Recommend addressing with the homes current owner to see if the are locateable.

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Comment
22.12.1 - Moisture Exhaust Fan

No Visible Venting

There is no bathroom moisture exhaust venting.  Bathroom venting is installed to remove moisture from the bathroom not to keep the air fresh.  Even with a window in the bathroom exhaust venting is recommended simply because opening a window in freezing weather is usually not done.   Many times we don't always remember to open the window before showering.  If installed an exhaust fan should vent to the homes exterior not to the attic.

23 - Master Bathroom TWO

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Drywall
Sink(s): Sink Inspection Information

Sinks are inspected by running faucets, checking drains stoppers, checking for leaks, water flow and proper drainage.  The under-sink plumbing is inspected by running the water and looking for leaks from supply and drain lines.  

Windows: Window Type
Casement
Sink(s): Sink Over Flow Limitations

Sink over flows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that over flow leakage will occur. 

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub / Shower Inspection
Tub only

Shower / tub drains are not specifically tested for leaks by stopping up the tub drain and filling the tub with water.  However, water was run through the drain for an extended period of time, then the areas under the drains, if accessible, were inspected for indications of leaks.   The inspector cannot replicate the effects of added weight / strain to the tub / shower from a person taking a shower.  This additional weight can put strain or joints, gaskets, drain pipes, etc. that may result in leakage.

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub Over Flow Limitations

Tub overflows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that overflow leakage will occur.

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Comment
23.4.1 - Sink(s)

No Overflow Holes
Master bath-two

Just a heads up that the sink does not have a water overflow hole.  So caution should be taken when filling the sink with the stopper closed.  

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Comment
23.7.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

No GFCI Protection

As of 1971 GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) protection is required on all bathroom outlets, kitchen outlets within 6 feet of counter tops, exterior receptacles, crawlspace and garages.  Although the NEC doesn't require updates each time a new code is established GFCI protection can save lives.  Recommend GFCIs be installed where currently required.  

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23.8.1 - Tub or Tub / Shower Combined

Fixture Water Leakage
Hot & cold water knob

There is water leaking from both the hot and cold faucets.  Replacement or repairs are recommended.

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Comment
23.8.2 - Tub or Tub / Shower Combined

No Shower Access Panel

Common building standards are to install a wall panel in the wall behind the shower faucet to allow access for faucet repair or replacement.  One has been installed in this case.  

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Comment
23.11.1 - Windows

Missing Screen(s) / Storm Windows

There are window screens or storm windows missing.  They may be in storage. Recommend addressing with the homes current owner to see if the are locateable.

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Comment
23.12.1 - Moisture Exhaust Fan

No Visible Venting

There is no bathroom moisture exhaust venting.  Bathroom venting is installed to remove moisture from the bathroom not to keep the air fresh.  Even with a window in the bathroom exhaust venting is recommended simply because opening a window in freezing weather is usually not done.   Many times we don't always remember to open the window before showering.  If installed an exhaust fan should vent to the homes exterior not to the attic.

24 - Bedroom 2-Back left

No Emergeny Egress: Emergency Egress Requirements

Bedrooms must have a means of egress other than the room's interior entry door so that occupants can exit and rescue specialists can enter. This egress could be an exterior door, a sliding glass door or a window.  If a window, the base of the window should not be more than 44" above the finished floor.  The window must easily open and the open area must be at least 24 inches high by 20 inches wide.  Additionally, the minimum opening area of the egress window should be 5.0 sq. feet for window at grade level and 5.7 square feet for any bedroom window for a second floor or higher bedroom.  This also applies to basement and attic bedrooms.  These regulations are relatively new so if you have an older house make sure you keep it up to code for your own safety.

Smoke Detectors: Smoke Alarm Locations

Smoke alarms should be installed in every bedroom; outside all bedroom areas or hallways (usually within 10 feet of the bedroom door); in each room with a fireplace; in garages; and on every level of the home, including the basement.

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Textured
Windows: Window Type
Casement
Floors: Floor Coverings
Engineered Wood
Floors: Visible Limitations

Not all areas of the floor is visible when furniture and/or area rugs are present.

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Comment
24.5.1 - Smoke Detectors

No Smoke Detector
Back left bedroom

There is no smoke detector installed in this bedroom.  This is considered a safety issue for the home's occupants and it is strongly suggested, for personal safety, that one be installed.  

Current smoke detector safety installation standards require a smoke detector in each bedroom and in hallways outside of each bedroom (within 10 feet). They should always be installed per the manufacture's instructions.  

Generally, smoke detectors should be installed no closer than 4 inches from a wall / ceiling intersection and if installed on the wall, not more than 12 inches down the wall from the ceiling.

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24.7.1 - Windows

Missing Screen(s) / Storm Windows
Left casement closest to closet

There are window screens or storm windows missing.  They may be in storage. Recommend addressing with the homes current owner to see if the are locateable.

25 - Bathroom 2- Back left

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Drywall
Sink(s): Sink Inspection Information

Sinks are inspected by running faucets, checking drains stoppers, checking for leaks, water flow and proper drainage.  The under-sink plumbing is inspected by running the water and looking for leaks from supply and drain lines.  

Windows: Window Type
Casement
Sink(s): Sink Over Flow Limitations

Sink over flows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that over flow leakage will occur. 

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub / Shower Inspection

Shower / tub drains are not specifically tested for leaks by stopping up the tub drain and filling the tub with water.  However, water was run through the drain for an extended period of time, then the areas under the drains, if accessible, were inspected for indications of leaks.   The inspector cannot replicate the effects of added weight / strain to the tub / shower from a person taking a shower.  This additional weight can put strain or joints, gaskets, drain pipes, etc. that may result in leakage.

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub Over Flow Limitations

Tub overflows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that overflow leakage will occur.

 This bathroom is en suite to the back left bedroom.

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Comment
25.4.1 - Sink(s)

No Overflow Holes

Just a heads up that the sink does not have a water overflow hole.  So caution should be taken when filling the sink with the stopper closed.  

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Comment
25.5.1 - Toilet

Not Fully Secure To The Floor

The toilet is not fully secured to the floor.  If loose on the floor and continually moved the toilet seal cold be compressed and begin to leak.    Recommend securing.  When doing so you may want to replace the seal and while the toilet is off inspect the subflooring around the toilet for possible water damage.

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25.7.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

No GFCI Protection

As of 1971 GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) protection is required on all bathroom outlets, kitchen outlets within 6 feet of counter tops, exterior receptacles, crawlspace and garages.  Although the NEC doesn't require updates each time a new code is established GFCI protection can save lives.  Recommend GFCIs be installed where currently required.  

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25.8.1 - Tub or Tub / Shower Combined

Fixture Water Leakage

There is water leaking from the shower head assembly / the water faucets.  Replacement or repairs are recommended.

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25.8.2 - Tub or Tub / Shower Combined

No Shower Access Panel

Common building standards are to install a wall panel in the wall behind the shower faucet to allow access for faucet repair or replacement.  One has been installed in this case.  

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25.8.3 - Tub or Tub / Shower Combined

Loose shower head

Shower Head is  not secure in the wall. 

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25.11.1 - Windows

Missing Screen(s) / Storm Windows

There are window screens or storm windows missing.  They may be in storage. Recommend addressing with the homes current owner to see if the are locateable.

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25.12.1 - Moisture Exhaust Fan

No Visible Venting

There is no bathroom moisture exhaust venting.  Bathroom venting is installed to remove moisture from the bathroom not to keep the air fresh.  Even with a window in the bathroom exhaust venting is recommended simply because opening a window in freezing weather is usually not done.   Many times we don't always remember to open the window before showering.  If installed an exhaust fan should vent to the homes exterior not to the attic.

26 - Bedroom 3-Front right

No Emergeny Egress: Emergency Egress Requirements

Bedrooms must have a means of egress other than the room's interior entry door so that occupants can exit and rescue specialists can enter. This egress could be an exterior door, a sliding glass door or a window.  If a window, the base of the window should not be more than 44" above the finished floor.  The window must easily open and the open area must be at least 24 inches high by 20 inches wide.  Additionally, the minimum opening area of the egress window should be 5.0 sq. feet for window at grade level and 5.7 square feet for any bedroom window for a second floor or higher bedroom.  This also applies to basement and attic bedrooms.  These regulations are relatively new so if you have an older house make sure you keep it up to code for your own safety.

Smoke Detectors: Smoke Alarm Locations

Smoke alarms should be installed in every bedroom; outside all bedroom areas or hallways (usually within 10 feet of the bedroom door); in each room with a fireplace; in garages; and on every level of the home, including the basement.

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Textured
Windows: Window Type
Casement
Floors: Floor Coverings
Engineered Wood
Ceilings / Walls: Visible Limitations

Not all surfaces of a home's wall or ceilings are visible when a home is furnished. 

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26.4.1 - Smoke Detectors

No Smoke Detector

There is no smoke detector installed in this bedroom.  This is considered a safety issue for the home's occupants and it is strongly suggested, for personal safety, that one be installed.  

Current smoke detector safety installation standards require a smoke detector in each bedroom and in hallways outside of each bedroom (within 10 feet). They should always be installed per the manufacture's instructions.  

Generally, smoke detectors should be installed no closer than 4 inches from a wall / ceiling intersection and if installed on the wall, not more than 12 inches down the wall from the ceiling.

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26.5.1 - Ceilings / Walls

Minor Cracks

There are minor cracks in the walls /ceiling.  Cracks at the corners of doors and windows are not uncommon.  They may be due to long-term settlement or from the shifting / shrinking of a door or window header. Joint cracks can be the result of expansion and contraction of framing or structural stress.

 Located on the right side above the closet door.

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26.8.1 - Windows

Missing Screen(s) / Storm Windows

There are window screens or storm windows missing.  They may be in storage. Recommend addressing with the homes current owner to see if the are locateable.

27 - Bathroom 3

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Drywall
Sink(s): Sink Inspection Information

Sinks are inspected by running faucets, checking drains stoppers, checking for leaks, water flow and proper drainage.  The under-sink plumbing is inspected by running the water and looking for leaks from supply and drain lines.  

Walk-in Shower : Shower Information

Showers are inspected by operating faucets to ensure adequate flow and proper drainage and to check for leaks.  Walls are inspected for damage (tile cracks, loose tile, missing grout, etc.) and areas that would allow water entry. 

Windows: Window Type
Casement
Sink(s): Sink Over Flow Limitations

Sink over flows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that over flow leakage will occur. 

Walk-in Shower : Shower Pan Leakage Inspections

Shower pans are not specifically tested for leaks by stopping up the shower drain and filling the shower.  However, water was run through the drain for an extended period of time, then the areas under the drains, if accessible, were inspected for indications of leaks.  The inspector cannot replicate the effects of the added weight / strain to the shower from a person taking a shower.  This additional weight can put strain or joints, caskets, drain pipes, etc. that may result in leaking.

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub / Shower Inspection

Shower / tub drains are not specifically tested for leaks by stopping up the tub drain and filling the tub with water.  However, water was run through the drain for an extended period of time, then the areas under the drains, if accessible, were inspected for indications of leaks.   The inspector cannot replicate the effects of added weight / strain to the tub / shower from a person taking a shower.  This additional weight can put strain or joints, gaskets, drain pipes, etc. that may result in leakage.

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub Over Flow Limitations

Tub overflows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that overflow leakage will occur.

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27.1.1 - Entry Door

Door Doesn't Latch

The bathroom door doesn't latch properly. Recommend repair of the latch and / or strike plate.

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27.4.1 - Sink(s)

No Overflow Holes

Just a heads up that the sink does not have a water overflow hole.  So caution should be taken when filling the sink with the stopper closed.  

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27.7.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

No GFCI Protection

As of 1971 GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) protection is required on all bathroom outlets, kitchen outlets within 6 feet of counter tops, exterior receptacles, crawlspace and garages.  Although the NEC doesn't require updates each time a new code is established GFCI protection can save lives.  Recommend GFCIs be installed where currently required.  

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27.11.1 - Windows

Missing Screen(s) / Storm Windows

There are window screens or storm windows missing.  They may be in storage. Recommend addressing with the homes current owner to see if the are locateable.

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27.12.1 - Moisture Exhaust Fan

No Visible Venting

There is no bathroom moisture exhaust venting.  Bathroom venting is installed to remove moisture from the bathroom not to keep the air fresh.  Even with a window in the bathroom exhaust venting is recommended simply because opening a window in freezing weather is usually not done.   Many times we don't always remember to open the window before showering.  If installed an exhaust fan should vent to the homes exterior not to the attic.

28 - Bathroom 5 - lower level

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Drywall
Sink(s): Sink Inspection Information

Sinks are inspected by running faucets, checking drains stoppers, checking for leaks, water flow and proper drainage.  The under-sink plumbing is inspected by running the water and looking for leaks from supply and drain lines.  

Walk-in Shower : Shower Information

Showers are inspected by operating faucets to ensure adequate flow and proper drainage and to check for leaks.  Walls are inspected for damage (tile cracks, loose tile, missing grout, etc.) and areas that would allow water entry. 

Mirrors: Mirror Information

Bathroom mirror are inspected for the type of wall attachments and damage to the mirror surface or backing. Any noted defects are noted in the report.  

Windows: Window Type
NONE
Moisture Exhaust Fan: Ventilation Information

Bathrooms with a tub or shower require ventilation; either a window or a ventilation fan. Fans are tested for operation and must be vented to the homes exterior.  If a window is to substitute for a fan it must be openable.  Ideally, a fan is preferred since windows may not be used during colder months of the year.  Any deficiences are noted in the report.    

Sink(s): Sink Over Flow Limitations

Sink over flows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that over flow leakage will occur. 

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub / Shower Inspection

Shower / tub drains are not specifically tested for leaks by stopping up the tub drain and filling the tub with water.  However, water was run through the drain for an extended period of time, then the areas under the drains, if accessible, were inspected for indications of leaks.   The inspector cannot replicate the effects of added weight / strain to the tub / shower from a person taking a shower.  This additional weight can put strain or joints, gaskets, drain pipes, etc. that may result in leakage.

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub Over Flow Limitations

Tub overflows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that overflow leakage will occur.

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28.1.1 - Entry Door

Door Base Not Trimmed For Return Air

Since there is no HVAC return air vent in the bathroom the clearance at the base of the doors should be at least 3/4 of an inch to allow for airflow back to the HVAC return vent.  If door is closed a great deal of the time it is recommended the door base be trimmed to allow for adequate air return.

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28.4.1 - Sink(s)

No Overflow Holes

Just a heads up that the sink does not have a water overflow hole.  So caution should be taken when filling the sink with the stopper closed.  

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28.4.2 - Sink(s)

Shut off valves

 There are no shut off valve to the supply lines .

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28.6.1 - Walk-in Shower

No Shower Access Panel

There is no panel to access the shower plumbing fixtures for repair or replacement.

29 - Locking Up

Oven Off
Yes
Cooktop / Burners Off
Yes
Thermostat To Initial Temp
Yes
Lights Off
Yes
Exterior Doors Secured
Yes