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1234 Main St.
Johnson City, Tennessee 37604
10/13/2019 9:00AM

Sample agent
agent

Agent Name

Agency Name
56
Maintenance items
40
Recommended repairs
18
Major / safety issues

Inspector's Comments...

We appreciate you using Home Check Inspection Service, LLC. to inspect your new home.  It is important for you to understand that a Home Inspection is a detailed snap shot of the condition of a home at a specific time.  It is not an exhaustive or all inclusive assessment of a property, nor is it a code inspection.  Simply put, it is a form of protection; an inexpensive way of discovering the condition of a home, making sure the house is not hiding anything before you sign on the doted line.  

A home inspection identifies any visually discoverable problems.  Home inspectors do not remove walls or take things apart.  The inspection findings are not a guarantee or a warranty.  Just because an item is inspected and working today, does not mean it cannot fail tomorrow.  Predictions about how long something will last are not part of an inspection.   

Included in this report is a copy of the State of Tennessee's Home Inspection Standards of Practice.  It details the areas, systems, and components of a home that an inspector is required to report on as long as they are accessible and under safe conditions.  We do inspect major components of a home such as electrical, plumbing, heating/air, roof and basement/crawlspace, structure, etc.   If unable to inspect all these items or areas within the home the reason why will be noted.  There are also areas that an inspector is not required to observe, inspect, report on or describe.  So it is important to align your expectations with the State's Standards of Practices. 

The inspection outcome is a written report of findings, that are based upon the inspector's professional opinion, training and experience. As stated in the report not all inspection findings are reported. If no comment is made about a specific item, component, system, etc. it should be assumed that it was found to be operational, working, or in sound condition at the time of the inspection. The inspection findings may include simply Information that will be useful to you, such as the location of an item.  Second, there may be Limitations pertaining to the inspection process, such an inaccessible area not inspected.   Lastly and unfortunately there may be some Deficiencies identified.  These deficiencies are categorized by the inspector at the time of the inspection based upon the following:

Major / Safety Issues...current or future safety issues, significant issues, costly, possible damage causing defects, professional repairs needed, contractor should be consulted.

Repair Recommendations...if not dealt with further damage is possible, may not be routine repairs, non functioning,  professional contractor may be needed for further evaluation, or 

Maintenance Items...minor repairs or general maintenance, non-functioning component, correction by professional or homeowner.

Please review all deficiencies regardless of how they are categorized.  What the inspector perceives as a maintenance or repair item you may see as a more serious issue that may or may not impact your decision to purchase the home.  Although not required, the inspector may give an opinion about the cause of an issue or identified damage.  It is always recommended that a licensed professional, in the area of concern, be consulted and their opinions and recommendations be primary when deciding upon a course of action.


The Home Check Inspection Philosophy is pretty straight forward.  we strive to...

...conduct the inspection, at a minimum, in accordance with the State of Tennessee's Standards of Practices.

...not to be rushed, taking whatever time is necessary to do the best job possible, for you.

...inform you of all issues while putting these issues into perspective.

...be fair, honest, impartial, and always act in your interest, unless of course it violates the law.  And to...

...address all your questions and concerns. Either by you attending all or part of the inspection or meeting you at a later time to discuss the inspection findings.


What more can you do...

Be sure to use all the information at your disposal when making such a big purchase decision. The inspection findings are just one tool that you have at your disposal when making a property purchase decision.  Others include the seller's disclosure statement, possibly a discussion with the current owner of the property, pest inspection reports or inspection reports from other professionals. i.e. electrical, roofing, HVAC, radon, energy audits, etc.
You may want to look into purchasing a Home Warranty to cover future major repairs. There are a few different companies that sell these warranties, each with varying levels of coverage.  So don't automatically assume everything is covered, ask.   Of course, prices and deductibles may vary.  Many times these warranties are purchased by the seller and transferred to the buyer.


Thank You, 

Michael D. Ray-Inspector

Home Check Inspection Services, LLC.


 


1 - General

Standards: Inspection Parameters

Home Check Inspection Services conducts Home Inspections in accordance with the State of Tennessee's Home Inspection Standards of Practices. Any items, areas, or components, etc. inspected or comments made by the inspector that go beyond these Standards of Practices are done as a courtesy to you and may or may not be all inclusive.   Any item of interest or condition that would be considered a defect or deficiency will be so noted in the "Deficiency" category as either a "Maintenance Item", "Repair Recommendation" or "Major / Safety Issue".  If no comment is made about a specific item, component, system, etc. it should be assumed that it was found to be operational, working, or in sound condition at the time of the inspection.  If unable to fully inspect an area it will be noted in the "Limitations" section of the report.  

The home inspection does not address environmental hazards, including: lead-based paint; radon (unless requested); asbestos; cockroaches; rodents; pesticides; treated lumber; fungus; mercury; carbon monoxide; or other similar environmental hazards.  Additionally, the inspection does not address subterranean systems or system components (operational or nonoperational), including: sewage disposal; water supply; or fuel storage or delivery.


Standards: Visual Limitations

When a home is furnished there will be visual inspection limitations.  Without moving furniture, stored items, etc., the inspector will do their best to inspect these areas. 

Inspection Conditions: Start / Finish Times
Start 8:30 am, Finish 12 noon, Inspector, with OK from client, started the inspection on July 30 when radon box was installed and completed same on August 1 as originally scheduled
Inspection Conditions: Year Built

Per the MLS listing or Zillow the home was constructed in 1980.

Inspection Conditions: Building Type
Single Family
Inspection Conditions: Utilities
Electric On, Gas On, Water On
Inspection Conditions: Occupancy
Furnished
Inspection Conditions: Weather Conditions
Clear, Recent Rain

Temperature.....70's degrees F.

Inspection Conditions: In Attendance
Home Inspectors
Exterior Pictures: Exterior Views Of Home

All references to the location of an exterior item or system or component are based on the cover photo of this report being the front of the home.

Per the State of Tennessee's Home Inspector Standards Of Practices...
The home inspection report shall include the following:
  a report on any system or component inspected that, in the opinion of the home inspector, is significantly deficient; a list of any systems or components that were designated for inspection but that were not inspected; the reason a system or component was not inspected; a statement that the report does not address environmental hazards, including: lead-based paint; radon; asbestos; cockroaches; rodents; pesticides; treated lumber; fungus; mercury; carbon monoxide; or other similar environmental hazards.

The home inspection report shall include the following: statement that the report does not address subterranean systems or system components (operational or nonoperational), including: sewage disposal; water supply; or fuel storage or delivery.

The home inspection report is not required to report on: life expectancy of any component or system; the cause(s) of the need for a repair; the methods, materials, and costs of corrections; the suitability of the property for any specialized use; compliance or non-compliance with adopted codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; the market value of the property or its marketability; the advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; any component or system that was not inspected; the presence or absence of pests such as wood damaging organisms, rodents, or insects; or cosmetic damage, underground items, or items not permanently installed.

The home inspectors are not required to: offer warranties or guarantees of any kind; calculate the strength, adequacy, or efficiency of any system or component; enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely affect the health or safety of the home inspector or other persons; operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility; determine the effectiveness of any system installed to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; predict future condition, including but not limited to failure of components; project operating costs of components; evaluate acoustical characteristics of any system or component; or inspect special equipment or accessories that are not listed as components to be inspected in this rule.

The home inspectors shall not:  offer or perform any act or service contrary to law; offer or perform engineering, architectural, plumbing, electrical or any other job function requiring a license in this state for the same client unless the client is advised thereof and consents thereto.

2 - Exterior Of Home

Cladding, Flashing & Trim: Exterior Cladding Inspection

The inspector will report any identifiable damage or cracking of the home's exterior walls or cladding.  The inspector's interpretations or opinions as to the condition, severity, or causes, are based upon education and experience and are the inspector's opinion.  A more exact interpretation of the cause and / or severity of issues of this nature can be made only by a structural engineer.

Cladding, Flashing & Trim: Home's Exterior Covering
Brick, Wood
Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Fascia And Soffit Information

The fascia and soffit are inspected for visible issues such as water damage, installation defects, loose or missing components, etc.  

Eaves, Soffits & Fascia: Overhangs / Soffit / Fasia
Present, Wood Fascia, Metal Vent Screens
Downspouts Off Gutters: Downspout Information

This component of a roofs drainage system is inspected for proper attachment, damage, and to verify that they are routing water away from the homes foundation. Testing for blocked  gutters is beyond the scope of this inspection.  

Decks / Deck Stairs: Deck Type
Sunroom, Deck with Different Levels, No stairs between decks - stairs are from Hillside to Lower Deck
Decks / Deck Stairs: Material
Wood
Decks / Deck Stairs: Deck Pictures
Exterior Electrical Receptacles: GFCI receptacle information

There is no GFCI protection on the exterior electrical receptacles. A GFCI receptacle constantly monitors an electrical circuit.  If it detects even a slight flow of electricity to a grounded item, it immediately shuts off the flow of electricity.  This protects people from electrocution.  It is particularly important to protect people where they could come in contact with exposed grounded items such as plumbing fixtures.  The 1973 NEC (National Electric Code) required Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) for outdoor receptacles. The NEC does not require homes be ungraded according to code each time new NEC standards are released, every 3 years, unless the electrical system has been modified. Protection can be provide at the specific outlet or upstream of the outlet using a receptacle or dead front GFCI device or at the GFCI branch or feeder breaker. 

When a home inspector suggests upgrading certain receptacles to GFCK receptacles, it is done so with your safety in mind. 

Water Sigots: Spigot(s) Information

The water spigots are tested for normal operation, for secure attachment, possible leakage, and anti- siphon. The operation of the faucet is also weather dependent. If covered or wrapped for winter conditioning a faucet will not be inspected.

Water Sigots: Water Pressure Determination

The home's water pressure, normally tested / checked at the home's threaded exterior spigots, can not be checked if the outlets are wrapped to help prevent freezing. Weatherproofing is not removed.

Windows: Window Type
Casement, Drop-down, Single Pane, Some with removeable exterior pane
Windows: Window Casing Material
Wood
Windows: Picture(s)
Exterior Doors: Pictures

Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Exterior Components...

Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Wall cladding, flashings, and trim; entryway doors and a representative number of windows; garage door operators; decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches and applicable railings; eaves, soffits, and fascias. Vegetation, grading, drainage, driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls with respect to their effect on the condition of the building.

The Home Inspector Shall:  Describe wall cladding materials; operate all entryway doors and a representative number of windows; operate garage doors manually or by using permanently installed controls for any garage door operator; report whether or not any garage door operator will automatically reverse or stop when meeting reasonable resistance during closing; probe exterior wood components where deterioration is suspected. 


Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Exterior Components...

Home Inspector is Not Required to Inspect:  Storm windows, storm doors, screening, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories; fences; for the presence of safety glazing in doors and windows; garage door operator remote control transmitters; geological conditions; soil conditions; recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); detached buildings or structures; for the presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks.

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Comment
2.1.1 - Cladding, Flashing & Trim

No Weep Holes

FYI  --- There are no visible weep holes in the exterior brick cladding.  Weep holes appear as void mortar joints along the base of the brick, 2-3 feet apart.  They allow for air movement between the brick and exterior sheathing moisture barrier.  They also allow for the escape of moisture that may accumulate between the brick and the exterior block or sheathing.  Weep holes or mortar voids, when present, should not be filled.  Fiberglass screens can be placed in the weep holes to prevent insect entry.  Weep holes should be installed but often it is done at the discretion of the mason. 



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2.1.2 - Cladding, Flashing & Trim

Cracking Brick Mortar

There is some cracking of the brick mortar between the homes exterior brick cladding and the exterior chimney on the left side of the home.

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Comment
2.3.1 - Downspouts Off Gutters

Downspouts Water Exit Point Not Identified

There are some visible water drainage exit points around the home but it is unknown if all downspout exit points are visible and release water at grade level.

All downspout underground drainage line end points should be visible and release water at grade level.  This will prevent water from backing up and releasing water along the home's foundation.  Overtime soil, grass clippings, debris, etc. can clog these drain exit points.  Recommend the end points be identified and cleared if necessary.

Wrenches Handyman
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Comment
2.4.1 - Decks / Deck Stairs

Chipped / Peeling Paint

There are normal worn areas with chipped and peeling paint on the decking boards.

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2.4.2 - Decks / Deck Stairs

Soil contact

There is a joist support girder just in soil contact under the lower deck in the left front corner.  Wood rot is always a concern when wood and soil are in contact.

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2.4.3 - Decks / Deck Stairs

Deck Girder Not Resting On Support

There are concrete supports under the lower deck girders that are supporting the lower deck joists.  A few of the concrete supports have dropped slightly leaving a gap between the girder and support.  The girders are still in place (have not dropped).  May consider a shim between the concrete support and the girders to full support same.    

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2.4.4 - Decks / Deck Stairs

Unsafe Guard Rail Spacing

The spacing between the upper deck railing balusters ranges from 4 to 6 1/2 inches, this is considered unsafe, not meeting the standard building safety requirements.   

The spacing between balusters or deck railing fillers should not exceed 4". An opening greater than 4" is a serious safety hazard especially for children as their head or other body part can become trapped. This is considered a safety issue and correction is recommended.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
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2.4.5 - Decks / Deck Stairs

Guard Rail Missing

Railings have not been installed around the lower deck. Railings, for safety reasons, are required where the height of the deck exceeds 30 inches above the soil or hardscape within 36 inches of the deck.  This is a falling safety concern and the installation of a proper guardrail is highly recommended.  Railings should be 34 to 38 inches high with vertical balusters spaced no greater than 4 inches apart.

House front 1 Deck Contractor
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2.6.1 - Exterior Electrical Receptacles

Incorrect / Lack of Covers

Exterior receptacles should be protected from rain / moisture by having a cover that still protects the receptacle when in use.   Recommend installing.

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2.7.1 - Water Sigots

Not Freeze Type Spigots

The exterior spigots are not freeze-less anti-siphon (newer spigots) protected. These newer faucets drain water from the spigot when closed, therefore they will not freeze.  They will also prevent the backflow of contaminated water from entering the home's drinking water.   Recommend upgrading at some time.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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2.8.1 - Windows

Chipped / Peeling Paint

There are some areas with the chipped and peeling paint on the window sashes.

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2.9.1 - Exterior Doors

Exterior Door Condition

1.  There is some visible wood rot at the base of the main level front deck slider as well as chipped and peeling paint.

2.  Back door knob is loose.

3.  The cylinder slide lock on the kitchen storm door does not hold the door open. 

4.  The door bell at the kitchen door is not operational.

3 - Grounds

Driveway: Driveway Material
Asphalt, With Parking Area
Driveway: Asphalt Driveway Condition Information

Surface damage:  Suggest sealing the asphalt and periodically checking these areas. Sealing of concrete is recommended every 2-3 years.

Low Spots:  Low areas where water pools wear more quickly than normal. Areas like these should be monitored for deterioration and repairs made as needed.

Edge Cracking:  If edge cracking is allowed to continue then overtime pieces of the driveway edge may become displaced / dislodged.  Recommend sealing these cracks to help prevent water entry and thus further damage from soil erosion or heaving from water freezing.

Minor cosmetic cracks:  Cracks (less than 1/4 of an inch) may be due to age, typical movement or soil settlement.  Recommend sealing these cracks to prevent soil erosion under the cracks and possible further damage from winter water freezing. Also, a periodic self inspection by the homeowner is recommended and if further cracking takes place take the same recommended actions.

Major Cracking / Displacement:  These are cracks greater than 1/4" where the asphalt is broken into pieces with some pieces dislodged or raised or pieces missing.  Damage of this nature could be caused by tree roots, while sinking areas may be the result of uneven settlement.  Continued exposure to rain water, with water entering cracks or void areas, may result in further damage.  Recommend the driveway be evaluated by an appropriate contractor for repair or replacement. 

Driveway Sloped Toward House or Garage:  A negative slope toward the home or garage may allow water entry into the structure and / or into the space between the driveway and the home.  Overtime water entry at this location may cause soil erosion and thus further deterioration or freezing of water and lifting of the driveway surface.  Driveways should be sloped to move water away a 1/4 inch per foot (2% grade) to facilitate rainwater runoff. Re-sloping may be impractical so at a minimum sealing the space at the end of the driveway asphalt is recommended, as is monitoring this area during heavy rains.

 


Walkway / Patio / Back Entry Porch: Material
Brick
Walkway / Patio / Back Entry Porch: General Information

The back sidewalk and back porch / patio area are adjoined, between the detached carport and driveway.  The are numerous raised areas in the brick and mortar, cracked and loose mortar / brick, and an area where the brick surface is sloped toward the home, thus allowing water to drain toward the home.

Grading and Drainage: Grading Overview

It is important that the grading around a home be positively sloped so water flows away from not toward the home.  This comes from having a soil drop, from the foundation outward, with at least a 6 inch drop over a 10 foot run, (a 5% grade).  Flat areas around the home will allow water to pool and saturate the soil.  Overtime this may have an adverse impact on both the home's foundation and the exterior cladding. 

If soil is added to achieve the proper grade then care should be taken to leave at least 8 inches of space between the soil and home's exterior cladding.  If a positive grade cannot be achieved a drainage system or swale should be used to divert rain water run off away from the home.   

Since soil conditions can deteriorate quickly from heavy rain it is suggested that the homeowner periodically walk the exterior looking for deteriorated grading and make timely corrections as needed. 

Gas Meter: Gas Meter
Retaining Wall(s): When Inspected

Normally and per the State of Tennessee's Standards of Practices only retaining walls that are close enough to a home that their failure would negatively impact the home or garage are inspected.  If other retaining walls are inspected it is done as a courtesy and the findings may not be all inclusive. 

Retaining Wall(s): Wall Material(s)
Railroad Ties, Brick, Block / mortar, Cap Block

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States that for the Exterior Components of a Home...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Vegetation, grading, drainage, driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls with respect to their effect on the condition of the building.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for the Exterior Components of a Home....

The Home Inspector is Not Required To Inspect:  Seasonal accessories; fences; geological conditions; soil conditions; recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); detached buildings or structures; for the presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks.

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3.1.1 - Driveway

Areas Of Prior Repair

There are areas where the driveway asphalt has been repaired / replaced (asphalt over asphalt), primarily on the driveway just off the street. 

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3.1.2 - Driveway

Low Spots

There are low areas in the driveway where it appears that water has been pooling. In one low spot the asphalt at the base of the low area / hole is cracked / open thus possibly allowing water to drain under the asphalt.

Overtime, due to water pooling, low areas may deteriorate quicker than other areas. Recommend repairing the open hole and monitoring the others and repair as necessary.

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3.1.3 - Driveway

Cracking / Displacement

There are cracks in the driveway asphalt that range from minor cosmetic cracks (less than 1/4 inch) to major cracks (greater than 1/4 inch possibly with displacement).

Further damage from water entry may result from water entry from either soil erosion beneath the rock bed or from expansion due to water freezing . Recommend repair. See Driveway condition information provided in the "information section".

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3.1.4 - Driveway

Slopes Towards Home

The driveway appears to slope toward the brick patio / porch to the left of the driveway.  Water should be monitored to determine impact on drainage in this direction.  All cracks / mortar voids between the brick patio surface should be sealed to help prevent water entry.

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3.1.5 - Driveway

Raised Areas

There are raised / cracked areas in the asphalt driveway surface.  This is normally an indication of tree roots pushing up through the asphalt / soil below. 

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3.2.1 - Walkway / Patio / Back Entry Porch

Cracking Raised / Dropped Areas

Brick and mortar cracking with raised areas were observed in the combined walkway / patio / back porch.  This condition may be due to age or indicate movement or shifting of the soil. Recommend patching / sealing and monitoring the cracks to help avoid water entry and / or further cracking.

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3.2.2 - Walkway / Patio / Back Entry Porch

Joint At Home Not Sealed

There are signs around the patio / walkway / back porch where there has been some patching with concrete or mortar.  There is an open area, in the brick / mortar where it meets the home to the right of the back entry.  This area of the patio / walkway slopes toward the home so sealing this area is key to prevent water entry. 

Recommend this crack / joint / opening be sealed and periodically checked with corrective action taken as needed.

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3.2.3 - Walkway / Patio / Back Entry Porch

Patio / Walkway / Porch Brick Mortar Cracking

There is cracking / separation of the patio / porch / walkway brick and brick mortar.   This may allow water entry and thus damage due to erosion of the soil beneath the surface and water freezing and heaving of the soil. Recommend re-pointing of the aged mortar.  

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3.2.4 - Walkway / Patio / Back Entry Porch

Negative Water Flow

The patio or walkway area between the carport and the home has a slight peak down the center line and then is negatively sloped toward the home, thus directing water toward the home.  For this reason one needs to maintain a tight seal between the brick / mortar patio and the home.

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3.2.5 - Walkway / Patio / Back Entry Porch

Step Risers Height

1.  The step down off the sidewalk to the landing before the basement steps is greater than the standard seven three-quarter inch riser height.  It is 9 3/4 inches.

2.  The top step for the basement exterior stairs is raised about 1/1/2 inches above the landing.  This is a tripping / safety concern, especially with no stair railing to catch oneself if falling.   

3. The steps from the sidewalk to the landing in front of the kitchen door have dropped significantly.  The riser height varies more than the standard allowed max variance between steps of 3/8 inches.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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3.3.1 - Grading and Drainage

Flat / Negative Grading

There are areas around the home where the soil grade is flat or negatively sloped toward the home or there are holes in the soil at the base of the home's exterior.  

Water is one of the leading causes of damage to a home.  Water infiltration of a foundation wall or structural issues due to hydrostatic pressure or soil heaving or freezing is always possible. 

To help remove water from the base of the home's foundation the soil around the home should be positively sloped away from the home.  Recommend this be done.

See Grading Overview Information. 

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3.3.2 - Grading and Drainage

Bed Between Walkway & House

There is a rock flower bed between the back patio / walkway and the house. During heavy rains these beds can become drenched in water thus trapping water along the home's foundation.  Recommend monitoring and taking corrective action as necessary.

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3.3.3 - Grading and Drainage

Open Area Around AC Units

The back side Air Conditioning Units are not at ground / patio level.  They are below the patio and the base for the units and the water tightness of the base is unknown.  As designed this area may trap water from rainfall and runoff from the patio around the home's foundation.  Suggest this area be cleaned out and inspected to ensure the area is sealed with sound drainage. 

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3.6.1 - Retaining Wall(s)

Minor Deterioration / Cracking

The retaining on the right front of the home has visible signs of vertical and stair step cracking.

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3.6.2 - Retaining Wall(s)

Major Deterioration / Cracking

The retaining wall at back side of the property / to the right of the driveway shows signs of water intrusion and deterioration of the block and mortar.  

Contractor Qualified Professional
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3.6.3 - Retaining Wall(s)

Major Deterioration / Cracking

The retaining wall at the lower street has numerous visible signs of major deterioration - Wood Rot / cracking / shifting of the railroad ties.  Recommend evaluation and repair. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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3.6.4 - Retaining Wall(s)

No Visible Drain System

There is no visible drainage system for the back and right front corner and rear carport retaining walls.  The soil on the back side of both walls is sloped so water will flow down the back side of the walls toward the end of the walls.    However, water is still draining down between the wall and the soil because the soil is not graded to move water away from the wall.  Excessive water pressure (hydrostatic Pressure) will push water through the wall.

A drainage system should be installed to drain water or release water pressure from behind the retaining wall.  Normally, it exits at the front or sides of the retaining wall.  In the case of wood retaining walls they may be designed to allow water drainage through the wall itself.   Recommend the wall be evaluated thoroughly for a drainage system.  Overtime soil or vegetation my cover drainage ports.  If no drainage system is identified recommend installation of same.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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3.9.1 - Front Stairs To Hillside

Wood Rot

The wood framing around the front steps, from Hillside to the front of the home, has signs of wood rot on the tread framing and on the railing support posts.  

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3.9.2 - Front Stairs To Hillside

Chipped Peeling Paint / Damage

There is some chipped and peeling paint and some damage (wood rot) on the front step railings.

4 - Roof

Roofing - Asphalt: Roof Inspection - Limited Visual Inspection

The inspection of the roof covering material is limited to the condition of the roof on the day of the inspection. The roof is inspected by visually observing the roof covering itself, the visible portions of the roof structure from within the attic (if accessible), and the home's interior ceilings looking for indications of active or passive leaks. Future conditions and inclement weather may produce / reveal leaks that were not visibly present at the time of the inspection.

An inspector is not required to walk a roof.  Even if one elects to walk a roof as part of an inspection there are factors that would limit doing so: wetness; snow; ice; moss; type of roofing material; steepness of the roof; etc.

There are certain aspects of a roof that are not visible or not fully visible to an inspector so their condition / installation cannot be inspected or confirmed. These areas include but are not limited to fasteners, flashing, underlayment, etc.  Therefore, the inspection is a limited visual inspection only.

Roofing - Asphalt: Roof Slope or Pitch (estimate)
Standard Slope (4:12 and above)

Asphalt shingles should not be installed on flat roofs (a slope less than 2:12). Low slope roofs (2:12 or less) require solid membrane roofs or fully bonded roof coverings.  Double underlayment should be installed under asphalt roofs with a slope between 2:12 and 4:12.    Shingles are to be installed only on solid sheathed roofs.  

Roofing - Asphalt: Roof Style
Gable (two slopes meet to form a ridge)
Roofing - Asphalt: Inspection Method
Walked Entire Roof
Roofing - Asphalt: Material Type / Normal Lifespan
Asphalt Three Tab (13 - 15 yrs.), Asphalt Architect (25 - 30 yrs.)
Roofing - Asphalt: Estimated Roofing Material Condition
Three Tab (1st Stage - 1-5 yrs of age), Three Tab (2nd Stage - 6-10 yrs of age), Architectural (1st Stage - 1-10 yrs of age), Architectural (3rd Stage - 21-30 yrs of age), In Need Of Replacement, Nearing The End Of Life Expectancy

A shingle's life expectancy can be affected by multiple variables so the inspector does not specifically estimate the remaining life of roof coverings. This complies with the Tennessee's Standards and Practices.  

The life span of roof material can be impacted by: the material quality; the installation practices; the roof's pitch; climate; the layers of shingles on the roof; the direction the roof faces; how well ventilated the attic is; and vegetation on or over the roof.

The current condition of the home's roof covering is a best "guesstimate" based upon its appearance / condition at the time of the inspection. 




Roofing - Asphalt: Drip Edge Present

There is a drip edge present in the areas of the roof line inspected.

A metal drip edge should be installed along the roof edges, at both the fascia's and the rakes. The roofing felt (under the shingles) should be installed over the drip edge at the eaves (fascia) and under the drip edge at the rake boards. Without correct installation the edges of the roof sheathing may be exposed to water and eventually rot.  Drip edge flashing should extend at least 1/4 of an inch below the roof sheathing and extend at least 2 inches onto the roof deck. Drip edge pieces should overlap at least 2 inches. 




Roofing - Asphalt: Roof Condition Information

The roof's asphalt shingles appear to be of different ages and in different stages of deterioration.

1.  The shingles over the front main level sunroom are asphalt architect shingles, with a 25 - 30 year life expectancy, estimated to be in the first third of their life expectancy.

2.  The shingles over the carport are three tab asphalt shingles, estimated to be in the mid stage of life expectancy.

3.  The shingles over the main portion of the home, with the exception of the front sunroom (#1), are three tab asphalt shingles with significant signs of wear, estimated to be at or near the end of their life expectancy.


Guttering: Gutter Information

This component of a roofs drainage system are inspected for proper attachment, damage, standing water, debris, installation of screens, etc.  Leaking gutters cannot always be diagnosed if it was not raining at the time of the inspection, therefore leaks may be noticed after one takes ownership of the home.  Sealing of damaged areas and endcaps or gutter replacement is possible.   

Periodically cleaning debris from gutters to prevent downspouts from clogging is recommended.  If water backs up in or fills the gutters damage can occur to roof sheathing and fascia boards.  Additionally, over flowing gutters can saturate the soil around the foundation.  


Guttering: Gutter Material
Aluminum
Chimney: Viewed From
The Roof
Chimney: Chimney Information

The chimney is inspected for possible structural issues, flashing installation / condition, the existence / condition of a flue liner, the existence / condition of the cap and spark screen.  Unfortunately not all aspects of a chimney are visible for inspect so only those that are visible are reported on.

Chimney: Exterior Material
Brick
Chimney: Flue Material
Clay
Chimney: Picture(s)
Skylights: Pictures
Valleys: Valley Flashing Not Visible

There is no visible flashing in the roof valleys.  For asphalt shingled roofs there are generally two types of valleys.  There is the closed cut valley where shingles are cut in a straight line 2 inches from the valley centerline on the side with the least amount of rain water.  The second option is the woven valley. Where, just Iike it sounds, the shinges on either side are woven together in the valley.


Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Roofing Components...

Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  roof coverings; roof drainage systems; flashings; skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and signs of leaks or abnormal condensation on building components.

The Home Inspector Shall: describe the type of roof covering materials; and report the methods used to inspect the roofing.


Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Roofing Components...

The Home Inspector is Not Required To:  walk on the roofing; or inspect attached accessories including solar systems, antennae, and lightning arrestors.


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4.1.1 - Roofing - Asphalt

Underlayment Improperly Installed

There is improperly installed underlayment visible at the eaves of the roof line. It has been installed under the roof drip edge thus allowing any water draining down the underlayment to go under, rather than over, the drip edge. Thus exposing the edge of the roof decking to water.

Underlayment should be installed so it rests over the top of the drip edge at the eaves (so water will wash over the drip edge into the gutter) and under the drip edge at the rake boards.  Improperly installed under the drip edge may allow water to come in contact with the roof sheathing, thus overtime causing wood rot to the OSB or plywood roof decking.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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4.1.2 - Roofing - Asphalt

Exposed / Raised / Popped Nails

There are some exposed, under driven or raised nails that could, over time, become possible leak points.  Recommend securing and caulking.

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4.1.3 - Roofing - Asphalt

Missing Shingle Granules

There are numerous areas where the asphalt shingles are worn and shedding shingle granules or gravel.  This is a good indication that the shingle are worn / wearing and nearing the end of their life.

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4.1.4 - Roofing - Asphalt

Raised / Torn Tab(s)

There is a torn shingle tab on the back right side roof near the right side ridge line.   As shingles wear they rise up / cup, harden / stiffen and become brittle.  

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4.1.5 - Roofing - Asphalt

Area Patching

There is some patching of the roof shingles with tar.  Sometimes tar is used to patch singles; tar is not a permanent patching material it is for temporary repairs only.

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4.1.6 - Roofing - Asphalt

Raised Decking

There are three areas on the roof where the roof decking, beneath the shingles, is raised / buckling causing the shingles to raise as well.  This could cause leaking. Important to repair these areas before leaking results, especially with a vaulted interior ceiling.  

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4.2.1 - Guttering

Debris in Gutters

Leaf / tree debris has accumulated in the gutters.  Recommend periodically scheduled cleaning to facilitate water flow and / or the installation of gutter guards to prevent the build up of debris.  There are areas around the home where the soil is worn / eroded from water flowing over the gutters.  A good indication that the gutter downspouts may be clogged.


Wrenches Handyman
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4.2.2 - Guttering

No Gutter Screens / Guards

There are no gutter screens or guards over the home's roof line gutters.  This is the case for all gutters on both the home and the garage.

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4.3.1 - Chimney

Chimney Crown And Cap Cracked / Damaged

The chimney crown sealer has deteriorated and does not fully cover / protect the top of the chimney.  A properly established crown will move water off the crown while a poorly installed one may allow water to infiltrate the chimney walls, damaging the masonry work. 

The chimney cap, that covers the flues, is cracked / damaged.

 Repairs are recommended.

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4.3.2 - Chimney

Chimney Flashing

The step flashing around the base of the chimney has pulled away from the chimney in places.  Some of these areas have been caulked to prevent leakage.  Some of the areas have reopened or the caulking has split which may allow water entry.

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4.4.1 - Skylights

Tar Over Flashing Around Skylight

The flashing around the main roof skylight has been coated with tar, which is cracking and bubbling in areas.  Tar is not normally installed as part of a skylight installation.  It used as temporary fix to leakage, it is not intended to be a long term fix.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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4.4.2 - Skylights

Skylight Cracked

Both main roof skylights have numerous hair line cracks in the plastic bubble cover.  

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4.4.3 - Skylights

Skylight Water Penetration

There are signs of possible water penetration on the ceiling beam under the skylight and on the side walls of the skylight ceiling opening.  If not properly installed / or over time skylights are prone to leaking. Monitor the condition and if there is sign of leak then have the skylight repaired or replaced.

Proper flashing around the skylight is critical.

5 - Carport

Exterior: Pictures
Floor: Carport Floor Material
Concrete
Floor: Pictures
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5.4.1 - Floor

Cracking

Typical / common concrete cracking visible in the garage floor.  

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5.4.2 - Floor

Staining

Garage floor shows visible staining from oil / grease / paint. 


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5.6.1 - Walls

Water Intrusion

There are signs of water intrusion on the hill side wall and the base of the back wall of the carport.

6 - Main Electrical System

NEC Expectations

The NEC (National Electric Code) does not require electrical systems in older homes be updated with every new version of the code.  However, the inspector may find where an addition or upgrade to the current standard may / will provide greater personal protection and will therefore recommend doing so.

Utility Service Drop: Drop Clearances

The Utility Drop should have the following minimum clearances:

  • 22.5 feet above pools and 10 feet to the side.
  • 18 feet above roadways.
  • 12 feet above driveways.
  • 10 feet from the bottom of the drip loop to soil grade and above pedestrian walkways.
  • 10 feet above decks and balconies and pedestrian walkways.
  • 3 feet from sides of decks and balconies.
  • 3 feet from sides and bottom of openable windows.
  • At least 3 feet above any roof ridge with 4:12 or more slope.
  • At least 8 feet above any roof ridge with a slope of less than 4:12.
  • 18 inches is required from the weather head to the roof. 
  • 12 inches between communications and power lines.
  • If Mast Head is through the roof the bracket must be at least 18 inches from the roof surface.
Utility Service Drop: Utility Drop Type
Overhead (areal), Underground (lateral), To pole along side driveway

The Utility Drop or Service Drop is the name given to the power line(s) from the Utility Company Power source or pole to the house.  This line can be either areal (overhead) or lateral (buried).

Utility Service Drop: Underground (lateral) Utility Drop

An underground (lateral) Service Drop cannot be visually inspected.  The only place where it is visible is where it leaves the ground and is then connected to the meter base.

Meter Base: Meter Base Types

CL320 meter and 400 amp (dual 200 feeds).   


Main Service Panel : Location
Utility Pole
Main Service Panel : Panel Capacity
200 AMP

The minimum residential amperage for homes' today is 100 amps. The size of the service panel main disconnect alone does not determine the panels amperage.  Amperage is determined by the smallest of these three:  the main disconnect or the panel service rating or the size of the incoming service conductors.

Main Service Panel : Panel Pictures
Main Service Panel : Over Current Devices Not Tested

Over current devices, main disconnects, breakers and fuses are not turned off or tested.   

GFCI & AFCI: GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interruptor) Information

A GFCI receptacle constantly monitors an electrical circuit.  If it detects even a slight flow of electricity to a grounded item, it immediately shuts off the flow of electricity.  This protects people from electrocution.  It is particularly important to protect people where they could come in contact with exposed grounded items such as plumbing fixtures.  

The 1973 NEC (National Electric Code) required Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) for outdoor receptacles. The NEC does not require homes be ungraded according to code each time new NEC standards are released, every 3 years, unless the electrical system has been modified. Protection can be provide at the specific outlet or upstream of the outlet using a receptacle or dead front GFCI device or at the GFCI branch or feeder breaker. 

When a home inspector suggests upgrading certain receptacles to GFCI receptacles, it is done so with your safety in mind. 

Grounding: Panel Grounding
Water Pipe

Grounding means connecting the electrical system to the earth.  It is required as a means of disposing of unwanted electricity and energy from lightening strikes.   The electrical system is grounded by a means of a grounding electrode conductor or wire that runs from the neutral bus bar to the grounding electrode.  The grounding electrode may be a ground rod, metal plumbing lines, a well casing, or an UFER.

Grounding: Pictures

Both electrical panels are grounded to the water copper supply line under the utility room sink, where they enter the home.

Bonding: Bonding Information

Bonding means electrically connecting conductive items together.  With bonding you're bringing the potential to ground equal across all items that could become energized so that you don't become the path of least resistance and get electrocuted. 

The NEC requires that metallic water and gas supply piping to be bonded to the neutral bus bar at the main panel.  

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Electrical Components...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Service entrance conductors; service equipment, grounding equipment, main overcurrent device, and main and distribution panels; amperage and voltage ratings of the service; branch circuit conductors, their overcurrent devices, and the compatibility of their ampacities and voltages; the operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling's exterior walls; the polarity and grounding of all receptacles within six feet of interior plumbing fixtures, and all receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected structures; the operation of ground fault circuit interrupters; and smoke detectors.

The Home Inspector Shall Describe: Service amperage and voltage; service entry conductor materials; the service type as being overhead or underground; and the location of main and distribution panels.

The Home Inspector Shall Report: The presence of any readily accessible single strand aluminum branch circuit wiring; the presence or absence of smoke detectors. If a stand alone detector it is to be tested; if incorporated into an alarm system the entity that monitors the system should test the system.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Electrical Components...

The Home Inspector Is Not Required To:  Insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panel; test or operate any overcurrent device except ground fault circuit interrupters; dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels.

The Home Inspector is Not Required to Inspect:  Low voltage systems; security system devices; heat detectors; carbon monoxide detectors; telephones; security systems; cable TV; intercoms; wiring that is not a part of the primary electrical distribution system; built-in vacuum equipment; photovoltaic systems; back up generators.

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6.4.1 - Main Service Panel

Electrician Evaluation and Correction

Due to the findings identified with the main service panel it is highly recommended that a licensed electrician evaluate and correct any deficiencies.  Once an issue requiring evaluation and / or correction is identified the panel inspection may be discontinued.  Therefore the electrician may find other areas in need of correction.  

1.  The meter base in the yard is greater than five feet from the interior panels.  With this being the case a shut off is required at the meter base and this shut off would be considered the main service panel.  The two service panels in the home would be considered sub or distribution panels.

2.  If a shut off is added at the meter base a fourth wire will need to be run from the meter to the panels.  Main service panel require three wires while sub panel require four. 

3.  If a shut off is added at the meter base the two panels in the basement utility room will need to have changes made since they will then be classified as sub-panels.  i.e. neutrals and grounds separated.

Any deficiencies in the two panels (as service panels) are noted in the deficiency section of this report.


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6.4.2 - Main Service Panel

Location From Meter

The location of the Service is questionable.  The Service Panel is normally located inside the building from the meter socket (normally within 5 feet) or below in the basement or on the other side of the wall in the interior.  If not located in one of these areas there must be a separate disconnected at the meter, outside.  If this is the case the interior panels are referred to as Distribution or Sub Panels not as Service Panels and must be wired accordingly.   Recommend review and evaluation by a licensed electrical contractor. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
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6.4.3 - Main Service Panel

Incomplete or Missing Directory

The right side service panel directory is incomplete. 

All service panels should have a complete Breaker / Fuse Directory.  A directory will allow a specific circuit to be disconnected without shutting off the homes main disconnect. The inspector has no way of confirming the accuracy of the directory, only whether it is missing or appears incomplete.  For personal safety a complete circuit directory is required. 



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6.4.4 - Main Service Panel

Bus Bar Bonding Screw

There is no visible grounding screw (green) to verify the grounding of the neutral / ground bus bars to both Service Panels. Recommend a licensed electrician be consulted and their recommendation for correction be followed.


Electric Electrical Contractor
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6.4.5 - Main Service Panel

Breaker / Fuse Wiring Compatiblity

In the left side service panel there is a 100 amp / 240 breaker where one side of the breaker is supplying power to the gas furnace, this is considered a fire / safety hazard.   The 12 gauge wire from the breaker to the appliance, if there is a problem, may burn without tripping the breaker.   Recommend that a licensed electrician evaluate and repair.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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6.4.6 - Main Service Panel

Multiple Neutral Wires Together

In the right side Service Panel multiple neutral (white) conductors are under the same screw on the neutral ground bus bar.  This is not allowed.  Recommend a licensed electrician be consulted and their recommendation for correction be followed.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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6.4.7 - Main Service Panel

Neutrals And Grounds Together

In a left side Service Panel neutral (white) wires and ground (bare) wires are together under the same screw on the neutral / ground bus bar.  This needs to be corrected by a licensed electrician.

Electric Electrical Contractor
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6.4.8 - Main Service Panel

Abandoned Wiring

Any abandoned wires in the panel should be appropriately terminated or removed so there is no chance of them touching a live component.  There are abandoned taped wires in the left side panel.

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6.5.1 - GFCI & AFCI

No GFCI Protection Installed

GFCI protection is not present at the currently recommended locations. If an ungrounded receptacle is located where a GFCI is currently required it must be upgraded to a GFCI receptacle when it is replaced.  Recommend licensed electrician upgrade by installing ground fault receptacles in required all locations; kitchens (within 6 feet of sink), bathrooms, garages / carports, exterior, etc.

 

7 - Unfinished Basement, Foundation, & Structure

General: Pictures

There is an unfinished / unconditioned area in the basement accessibly through a living space door.  There are some storage closets in this area.  

Foundation: Material
Masonry Block
Dryer Venting: Dryer Vent Safety

Clothes dryers evaporate the water from wet clothing by blowing hot air past them while they tumble inside a spinning drum.  Heat is provided by an electrical heating element or gas burner.  Some heavy garment loads can contain more than a gallon of water which, during the drying process, will become airborne water vapor and leave the dryer and home through an exhaust duct or vent.  

Any restrictions in the ducting is a potential fire hazard.  Simply because along with water vapor evaporated out of wet clothes, the exhaust stream also carries lint which are highly flammable particles of clothing made of cotton and polyester. Lint can accumulated in an exhaust duct, reducing the dryer's ability to expel heated water vapor, which then accumulates as heat energy with the dryer.  

Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for a Home's Structural Components and Foundation...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Foundation; floors; walls; columns or piers; ceilings; and roofs.

The Home Inspector Shall Describe:  Foundation; floor structure; wall structure; columns or piers; ceiling structure; and roof structure.

The Home Inspector Shall:  Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected; enter underfloor crawl spaces, basements, and attic spaces except when access is obstructed, when entry could damage the property, or when dangerous or adverse situations are suspected; report the methods used to inspect underfloor crawl spaces and attics; and report signs of water penetration into the building or signs of condensation on building components.

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7.4.1 - Insulation

Air Gap Between Insulation and Subfloor

The unfinished area ceiling insulation is resting on the bottom of the floor trusses.  This leaves a gap between the sub floor and the insulation thus allowing the flow of unconditioned air between the two.  This pretty much eliminates the effectiveness of the insulation.  Insulation should be installed with the vapor barrier side toward the conditioned space and pressed firmly against the sub floor without compressing the insulation. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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7.4.2 - Insulation

Insulation Backward

When insulation with a vapor barrier (kraft paper) on one side is installed the paper side of the insulation needs to be installed with the paper facing toward the conditioned part of the home (the living space).  When installed backwards (paper toward the unconditioned space) it may trap water / moisture between the wall and the insulation. Recommend reversing the insulation.















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7.6.1 - Foundation

Evidence of Water Intrusion

1.  Water intrusion stains are visible on the foundation wall in the back corner (to the right) of the unconditioned area in the basement.  A moisture meter was used on the stained area and a high level of moisture was present.

2.  There is a high level of moisture present at the base of the wall above the block at the carport side of the house.

3.  There is a high level of moisture present at the base of the painted masonry wall in the unfinished area, just as you walk in the door.

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7.9.1 - Dryer Venting

Dryer Vent Material

Recommend using a smooth rigid metal duct to vent a dryer.  Metal can withstand the heat generated by the dryer and it will not accumulate dust and lint like plastic pipe.  Flexible, ribbed vents used in the past should no longer be used. They are potential fire hazards. 

Also, plastic flex dryer lines are not designed to pass through wall structures.  There should be a metal adaptor in the wall to which the flex lines are attached.  

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7.11.1 - Access Door

Unfinished Area Door

This door separates conditioned from unconditioned space.  This door is an uninsulated hollow interior door.  It has no weather stripping and no threshold.  There will be air movement around this door and thermal  bridging of hot and cold air through the door itself


8 - Attic, Insulation & Ventilation

Access: Access Type
Removable panel, In main floor bath off hallway
Insulation: Insulation Type
Fiberglass Batt / Blanket (R-value 3 - 3.5 per inch), Cellulose Loose Fill (R-value 3.7 per inch)

General Insulation Information:

1.  Insulation R-Values  (R-value equals amount of heat resistance for inch of thickness).

General Insulation Types:

1.  Fiberglass batt and blanket.  Ten inches is roughly  R-32.  If faced insulation the facing should be installed down toward the heated / conditioned part of the house.  If adding insulation to existing faced fiberglass if should be loosed fill.  Placing faced insulation over existing insulation will trap moisture between the two layers.  

2.  Fiberglass Loose fill insulation.  Fifteen inches is roughly R- 38.

3.  Rock mineral wool batt and blanket.  Typically dark gray in color. 10 1/2 inches for R-38.

4.  Rock wool loose fill.  R value is 2.9 per inch requiring 13 inches for R 38.

5.  Cellulose loose fill.  Shredded newspaper or wood fibers.  It is dusty, gray and feels like lint.  10 inches for R 38.  Doesn't  pack down as much as fiberglass.

6.  Vermiculite loose fill.  A silicate mineral, heated and expanded.  Looks like kitty liter.  Rectangular shaped particles.  Fireproof, rot and mildew resistant. May have asbestos in it.  

7.  Perlite.  A Loose fill volcanic rock. 

8.  Polystyrene and urethane..  Plastic rigid boards.  Interior / exterior, under slabs, under siding, on roofs.  If used in an interior living area it must not be exposed, if burns easily. 

9.  Spray in foam.  Spray under side of unvented attic.

Insulation: Attic Pictures
Exhaust Systems: Exhaust Fans
Fan Only



The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Insulation and Ventilation...

Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces; ventilation of attics and foundation areas; kitchen, bathroom, and laundry venting systems; and the operation of any readily accessible attic ventilation fan, and, when temperature permits, the operation of any readily accessible thermostatic control.

The Home Inspector Shall DescribeInsulation in unfinished spaces; and the absence of insulation in unfinished space at conditioned surfaces.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Homes Insulation and Ventilation...

Home Inspector Is No Required To Report On:  concealed insulation and vapor retarders; or venting equipment that is integral with household appliances.

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8.1.1 - Access

Panel Weather Stripping

There is no weather stripping around the access panel.  Weather stripping will help to reduce heat / moisture flow between the house and the attic.


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8.1.2 - Access

Panel Insulation

The attic side of the access panel is not insulated but should be.  Rigid insulation on top of the panel will work best and is recommended.


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8.4.1 - Area Around The Access

Access Obstructions / Wiring

The electrical wiring in the attic around the attic access is not protected. All electrical wiring within a 6 foot area around an attic access, panel should be protected, on both the floor and the rafters above. Protection should be in the form of wood strips on either side of the cabling or through the use of conduit. Normally an attic is not entered that often, however, protecting this wiring from damage is recommended.

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8.5.1 - Insulation

Insufficient Insulation

Where fiberglass batt insulation is used; it has an insulation value of R-19.  The minimal insulation R-Value for attics in our region is R-30, while the DOE recommends R-49.  


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8.5.2 - Insulation

Insulation Gaps / Voids

The attic insulation has been installed unevenly with gaps / voids or areas missing insulation.  For insulation to provide a proper barrier it must be installed evenly and completely at the desired R-Value depth.

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8.5.3 - Insulation

Vaulted Ceiling Spacing

As visible in the attic there is limited space between the roof decking and the insulation between the decking and the vaulted ceiling.  To vent a vaulted ceiling normally vents are installed between the rafters and extend from the soffits all the way to the roof ridge.  With the use of one rafter vent per rafter cavity.  Once the rafter vents are in place insulation is installed.  There is no visible sign, in the exposed area of the attic, where there is rafter venting.

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8.12.1 - Exhaust Systems

Bathroom Vents Into Attic

The main level hall bathroom ceiling fan vents to the attic and is clogged with insulation.  Since there is no tub / shower in this 1/2 bath a moisture fan is not really required.  It may have been installed to extract smells but it is not doing so with the vent clogged.

9 - Heating & Cooling

General Information: Type Of Heating & Cooling
Gas Furnace, Air Conditioner
General Information: Number Of HVAC Systems
Two A/C Units, Two Furnaces
General Information: General Heat / Air Information

There are two interior air handlers in the basement utility room.  One is a gas furnace with an exterior air conditioner.  And the second is an electric furnace with an exterior air conditioning unit

Gas Furnace- One: Furnace / Air Handler Brand
American Standard
Gas Furnace- One: Energy Source/Type
Natural Gas
Gas Furnace- One: High Efficiency Unit

This home has a high-efficiency gas heating system, or called a 90+ furnace which has an efficiency range of 90% to 98%.  This efficiency rating is achieved by removing so much heat from the water vapor in the exhaust gases that they are reduced to condensation.  These systems have more than one heat exchanger. Condensation is drained through tubing and the cooled gases are exhausted to the outside through piping to the roof or through a wall, no chimney is required.  They use outside air for combustion, have induced draft fans and sealed combustion chambers, and use electronic ignition rather than a pilot.

Gas Furnace- One: Furnace Data Plate Information

Brand....American Standard

Model Number....TXC042C4HB1

Serial Number....M02756796

Date of Manufacture...1/1997

Age....22 years of age

Unit Service Size...3.5 Tons...Normally 1 Ton will Service 500 - 600 square feet.

Generally, the average life-span of a heat pump is 15 to 20 years. However, an individual unit's life-span may vary depending on use and maintenance.  Newer units will last longer.

Gas Furnace- One: Thermostat Location
Living Room
Furnace - Two: Furnace / Air Handler Brand
Trane
Furnace - Two: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Furnace - Two: Furnace Data Plate Information

Brand....Trane

Model....TWE024C140B0

Serial Number....5143M052

Manufacture Date....4/2005

Age.....14 years

Size....2 Tons.

Furnace - Two: Thermostat Location
Downstairs
Furnace - Two: Heat differential

Cool Air Differential was normal.  20 degrees.

Air Conditioner - One: Unit Brand
Allegance
Air Conditioner - One: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Air Conditioner - One: Air Conditioner Data Plate

Brand....Allegance

Model....7A0042A100AO

Serial Number....L352G5JCF

Date of Manufacture....6/1996

Age...23 years


Air Conditioner - Two: Unit Brand
Trane
Air Conditioner - Two: Energy Source/Type
Electric
Air Conditioner - Two: AC Data Plate Information

Brand....Trane

Model....2TWR1024A1000AB

Size...Appliance is a 2 ton unit.  One ton will service approximately 500 - 600 square feet.

Serial 40742F04F

Manufactures date...2/2004

Age...15 years



Gas Furnace- One: Aging Unit

Though fully functional at the time of the inspection the unit is aging.  The average life expectancy of furnaces in homes today is between 16 and 20 years.   This gas appliance is 22 years of age.

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Heating Components...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Permanently installed heating systems including: heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible. Solid fuel heating devices. Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors.  For the presence of an installed heat source in each room.

The Home Inspector Shall Describe:  The energy source for the system and the heating equipment and distribution type.

A Home Inspector Shall Operate:  The systems using normal operating controls.

A Home Inspector Shall Open:  Readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Cooling Systems...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Central air conditioning and through-the-wall installed cooling systems including:  cooling and air handling equipment and normal operating controls.  Distribution systems including:  fans, pumps, ducts, piping, dampers, insulation, air filters, registers, fan-coil units and for the presence of an installed cooling source in each room. 

The Home Inspector Shall Describe:   The energy source for the system and the cooling system type. 

The Home Inspector Shall Operate:  The systems using normal operating controls.

The Home Inspector Shall Open:  Readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Homes Heating Components...

The Home Inspector Is Not Required to:  Operate heating systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; operate automatic safety controls; ignite or extinguish solid fuel fire.

The Home Inspector Is Not Required To Inspect:  The interior of flues; fireplace insert flue connections; humidifiers; electronic air filters; the uniformity or adequacy of heat supply to the various rooms.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Homes Cooling Components...

The Home Inspector Is Not Required To:  Operate cooling systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; inspect window air conditioners; inspect the uniformity or adequacy of cool-air supply to the various rooms.



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9.4.1 - Air Conditioner - One

Aging Unit

Per the units data plate the unit was built in 1996.  Making this unit 23 years old.  Generally, the average life-span of a unit built in the 1970s and 1980s is about 15 years, but individual units life-span may vary depending on use and maintenance.  Newer units will last longer.  Although fully functional at the time of the inspection the unit is aging.  Recommend qualified HVAC tech fully test system, monitor for proper function and replace as needed.

Fire HVAC Professional
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9.4.2 - Air Conditioner - One

Trees Overhanging

In order to help keep debris from falling onto the grilled top trees should not overhang the unit for at least 5 feet.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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9.4.3 - Air Conditioner - One

Distance Above Soil

The outside condensing unit should be raised at least 6 inches off the ground in moderate snowfall areas.  Recommend evaluation.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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9.5.1 - Air Conditioner - Two

Trees Overhanging

In order to help keep debris from falling onto the grilled top trees should not overhang the unit for at least 5 feet.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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9.5.2 - Air Conditioner - Two

Distance Above Soil

The outside condensing unit should be raised at least 6 inches off the ground in moderate snowfall areas.  This bas of this unit is covered in leaf debris.   Recommend evaluation.

Contractor Qualified Professional

10 - Plumbing

Water Supply Material To House
Copper

Polybutylene (PB) is gray or blue.  It uses crimped fittings. It has a history of failure from a chemical reaction with chlorine in water.  There are old class action suites pertaining to PB piping.

Copper has been the most common supply line material since about 1950.  There are three different thicknesses of copper piping.  Type L (blue) is a medium thickness preferred for water distribution.  Copper is too thin to thread so it is soldered.  Lead solder was prohibited in 1988.  Silver solder is used today.

The greenish stain around fittings is usually from excess soldering flux although leaks can also cause corrosion of copper pipes due to acidic water.  

Galvanized steel was common in the 70s.  The zinc coating on the pipes interior is lost over time due to galvanic corrosion, then the rust begins.  Lead pipes rust from the inside out and over time will close off the pipes water flow.  Galvanized piping live span is usually 40 - 60 years.  

Plastic pipe is has been a common supply line material since the 50s. PVC cannot be used for distribution piping within the home, CPVC can.  PVC is approved for service piping into the building from the public or private water supply.  

The use of Lead water supply piping has been prohibited since 1989.   

Water Source
Public
Utility Water Meter: Utility Meter Base Location

The Utility Water Meter Base is located in the front yard to the right of the stairs.  

Main Water Shut-Off: Location
Basement, Utility Closet
Main Water Shut-Off: Main Line Material
copper
Main Water Shut-Off: Picture(s)

Behind the utility sink.

Pressure Reducer Valve: Location

The homes water pressure reducer valve is located behind the sink in the basement utility closet.  The pressure reducer valve is designed to reduce the pressure of the water provided by the city to a workable 40 - 80 psi.  Pressure greater than 80 psi can be harmful to water distribution piping.  The pressure reducer valve can be adjusted to reach the desired water pressure in the home.

Water Pressure: Pressure

Water Pressure was 80 psi.  It was checked at the XXX exterior faucet. Normal pressure is between 40 and 80 psi.  Any pressure greater than 80 psi can insert unnecessary pressure on supply line joints.  f greater than 80 psi it  should be adjusted downward through the use of the pressure reducer valve.

Hot Water Systems: Manufacturer
Whirlpool

I recommend flushing & servicing your water heater tank annually for optimal performance. Water temperature should be set to at least 120 degrees F to kill microbes and no higher than 130 degrees F to prevent scalding. 

Here is a nice maintenance guide from Lowe's to help. 

Hot Water Systems: Capacity
50 gallons
Hot Water Systems: Location
Basement, Utility Room
Hot Water Systems: Power Source/Type
Electric
Hot Water Systems: Data Plate Information

Brand... Whirlpool

Model Number.... E50R6-45-110

Serial Number.... 1646103961267

Age.  2016 - 3 years.  Average life expectancy of a water heater is 8 -10 years.

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Plumbing Components...

The Home Inspector Shall Inspect:  Interior water supply and distribution system, including: piping materials, supports, and insulation; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections. Interior drain, waste, and vent system, including: traps; drain, waste, and vent piping; piping supports and pipe insulation; leaks; and functional drainage. Hot water systems including: water heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; and chimneys, flues, and vents.  Sump pumps.

The Home Inspector Shall Describe:  Water supply and distribution piping.


The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Plumbing Components...

The Home Inspector Is Not Required To:  State the effectiveness of anti-siphon devices; determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; operate automatic safety controls; operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets.

The Home Inspector is Not Required to Inspect:  Water conditioning systems; fire and lawn sprinkler systems; on-site water supply quantity and quality; on-site waste disposal systems; foundation irrigation systems; bathroom spas, except as to functional flow and functional drainage; swimming pools; solar water heating equipment; and the plumbing system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.

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10.1.1 - Utility Water Meter

Meter Dial Spinning

The main water meter was spinning at the time of the inspection.  This is usually an indication that water is either on in the home or there may be a leak in the water supply lines.  The home was walked and no faucets or appliances that use water were running.  This was checked at three different times during the inspection, making sure there was no water on in the home. Recommend further evaluation and repair if necessary.

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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10.7.1 - Hot Water Systems

No Drip Pan

No drip pan was present. If a water heater is located inside a living area on a floor that may be damaged by water a pan under a tank is recommended.  The catch pan should be plumbed to a safe location to avoid damaging floors.  If a drain line is not possible a float sensor with an alarm is recommended in the catch pan.  There is a floor drain in the utility room so if the water heater does leak it should flow toward that drain. 

Pipes Plumbing Contractor
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10.7.2 - Hot Water Systems

No TPR Pipe

There is no TPR pipe off the Water Heater TPR valve.  This pipe should be 3/4 inches in diameter, not PVC, and should drain to within 6 inches of the drip pan.  This is considered a safety issue.

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10.8.1 - Water Heater Strapping

No Strapping

Tennessee is in seismic area.  For this reason it is suggested that a water heater be strapped to a wall.  Two straps are suggested, one each in the top and bottom one third of the tank.

Contractor Qualified Professional

11 - Common Living Areas - General Information

General: Habitable Space

For a space to be defined as habitable the specific room must have an area of at least 70 square feet and be at least 84 inches (7 feet) high. This includes basements containing habitable rooms or hallways.  Any ceiling obstructions must be at least 76 inches (6 ft. 4 inches) above the finished floor.  

General: Carbon Monoxide Alarms

It is recommended that a carbon monoxide detector be installed within 10 feet of each room used for sleeping when the home has a fossil fuel burning heater or fireplace, and / or an attached garage or any other feature, fixture or element that emits carbon monoxide as a by product of combustion. 

General: Smoke Detectors

Smoke alarms should be installed in every bedroom; outside all bedroom areas in hallways (usually within 10 feet of the bedroom door); in each room with a fireplace; in garages; and on every level of the home, including the basement.

Suggest checking with the seller about the type of detectors installed in the house.  Whether they are battery operated or hardwired, individual or linked, or monitored by a security firm.

If battery operated, the batteries should be changed annually.  I makes it easier to remember if they are changed out at the New Year. 

General: Inspection Limitations

When homes are furnished some of a home's walls, floors and / or even ceiling surfaces can be obscured by furniture and / or stored items. Since the inspector is not required to move furniture these areas may not be thoroughly evaluated.  This may include electrical outlets and switches located in these non-visible areas.

General: Vaulted Ceilings

Vaulted Ceilings tend to have insulation completely filling the space between the interior ceiling and the roof deck above, which prevents proper venting.  Therefore, vaulted ceilings are more susceptible to problems from condensation.  Why?  Moisture laden air from the home's interior will find its way into an attic and without proper ventilation water vapor will accumulate there.  By providing adequate "intake" and "exhaust" ventilation, like in an attic, this moisture is sufficiently removed.   So if insulation completely fills the space between the ceiling and roof, ventilation will be minimal and problems from condensation may occur.  Some signs to look for that indicate a condensation problem are water stains around can lights or discoloration at the ceilings peak.  

General: Floor Coverings
Carpet, Engineered / Hardwood / Laminate
General: Wall / Ceiling Material
Drywall, Paneling, Wallpaper

These materials are represented throughout the entire home.  Condition or deficiencies will be noted in the report in the specific living area.

General: Window Type(s)
Casement, Thermal, Fixed

These materials are represented throughout the entire home.  Condition or deficiencies will be noted in the report in the specific living area.

12 - Common Living Areas

Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles: Switch Operated Outlet

The XXXXXX wall receptacle in this room is operated off a wall switch.  This will allow one to turn on a light or an appliance when they enter a room with the wall switch rather than at the light or appliance.

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12.1.1 - Interior Door

Door Operation

Interior doors should have a clearance of 1/8 of an inch on the top and sides and 3/4 of an inch at the bottom of the door.  If they rub, stick, don't close, hang out of square or are not level something is out of adjustment.

 The pocket door between the foyer and the kitchen does not open.

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12.1.2 - Interior Door

Door Doesn't Latch

The basement utility closet door is swollen at the base from moisture and does not fit or close in the jamb.

Wrenches Handyman
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12.2.1 - Smoke Detectors

No Smoke Detector

Current smoke detector safety installation standards require a smoke detector in each bedroom and in hallways outside of each bedroom (within 10 feet). They should always be installed per the manufacture's instructions.  

Generally, smoke detectors should be installed no closer than 4 inches from a wall / ceiling intersection and if installed on the wall, not more than 12 inches down the wall from the ceiling.


There are no functional smoke detectors in the house.  No smoke detectors in bedrooms.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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12.4.1 - Ceilings / Walls

Minor Cracks

There are minor cracks in this rooms walls /ceiling.  Cracks at the corners of doors and windows are not uncommon. They may be due to long-term settlement or from the shifting / shrinking of a door or window header.  Joint cracks can be the result of expansion and contraction of framing or structural stress.

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12.4.2 - Ceilings / Walls

Moisture Stains / Damage

There is a residue on the walls of the main level living room and dining room at approximately 6 to 7 feet up the wall. It is visible with a different sheen and appears to have an oily texture. Possibly from some type of bug bomb that was set off. Suggest cleaning before painting.


There is a mold-like substance on the closet door extending down the wall paneling of the basement living room.


There are signs of water penetration at the back corner of the basement unfinished closet area and a strong odor of mildew.

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12.7.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Exposed Wiring Not Encased

Electrical conductors (wires) must be encased where they run on the outer surface of walls or ceilings if less than 8 feet high.  Wires should be installed so they cannot be mechanically damaged. Recommend proper protection.

Contractor Qualified Professional

13 - Fireplace

General: Fireplace Operation

Per the State of Tennessee a home inspector is not required to ignite a fire to visually inspect operation nor is the inspector required to extinguish a fire in order to conduct an inspection.

General: Type(s) of Fireplaces
Wood Burning, Metal Insert

The State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices States for a Home's Fireplace...

The Inspector Shall Inspect:  Readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys; lintels above the fireplace openings; damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and cleanout doors and frames.

The Inspector Shall Describe:  The type of fireplace.

The Inspector Shall Report As In Need Of Correction:  Evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers; manually operated dampers that did not open and close; the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace; the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.

The Inspector Is Not Required To Inspect The:  Flue or vent system, interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.  Determine the need for a chimney sweep.  Operate gas fireplace inserts, light pilot flames.  Determine the appropriateness of any installation.  Inspect automatic fuel-fed devices.  Inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices.  Inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted.  Ignite or extinguish fires.  Determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics.  Move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents.  Perform a smoke test.  Dismantle or remove any component.  Perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection.  Perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.

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13.5.1 - Damper Doors

Inoperable / Damaged

The fireplace damper for the downstairs metal insert wood burning fireplace will not fully close or stay in the partially closed position. 

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13.10.1 - Gas

Valve In The Firebox

The gas supply shut off valve for the main level gas fireplace is located in the firebox. This is common placement for this valve but is not considered safe. Burns may result from one needing to quickly turn off this fuel supply line while the fireplace is in operation.  Recommend considering correction / relocation.

Contractor Qualified Professional

14 - Kitchen

Dishwasher: Dishwasher Information

A dishwasher's operation is inspected by running a short wash cycle while looking for leaks, etc. The dishwasher's washing capability is not tested for.  

Dishwasher: Brand
Kenmore
Cabinets / Drawers: Cabinets/Countertop Information

The countertops and cabinets are inspected for significant damage.  A representative number of door and drawers are operated / evaluated.

Sinks: Kitchen Sink Information

As part of the kitchen inspection faucets and valves are operated while checking for leaks or signs of significant deficiences.  The spray wand is operated, checking for flow and leakage.  In the cabinet under the sink supply and drain pipes are inspected for leaks, proper installation, etc.  The disposal unit is inspected to ensure proper function, rust, leaks, proper power cord protection, etc.  Unless noted in this report no reportable defects were identified. 

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Drywall, Wallpaper
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Oven Information

The oven is tested in bake mode only to ensure that the heating elements work. The temperature calibrations are not tested nor is the broiler or the clean mode. 

Range/Oven/Cooktop: Range/Oven Brand
GE
Range/Oven/Cooktop: Oven / Range Energy Source
Electric
Exhaust Fan / Range Hood: Hood Type
Mounted microwave with recirculating fan
Microwave - Built-In: Microwave Information

Only permanently installed microwaves are tested.  Any deficiences identified will be noted in the report.

Flooring: Flooring type
Natural Stone
Refrigerator: Brand
Kenmore
Counter Tops: Countertop Material
Laminate

Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for Built-in Kitchen Appliances...

Home Inspector Shall Inspect and Operate The Basic Functions Of:  Permanently installed; dishwasher(s) through a normal cycle; range(s), cook top(s), and permanently installed oven(s); trash compactor(s); garbage disposal(s); ventilation equipment or range hood(s); and permanently installed microwave oven(s).


Per the State of Tennessee Home Inspection Standards of Practices for Built-in Kitchen Appliances...

The Home Inspector is Not Required To Inspect:  Clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven functions, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation; non built-in appliances; refrigerationunits.

 The Home Inspector is Not Required to Operate:  Appliances in use; or any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.

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14.2.1 - Cabinets / Drawers

Loose / Damaged Cabinets

There are three sets of upper cabinet doors that do not latch fully and/or do not sit flush due to loose hinges: to the right and left of the stove and far right upper cabinet closest to the dining room pocket door.

There is also heat damage to the upper cabinets on both sides of the stove.

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14.3.1 - Sinks

Absence Of Drain Line High Loop Or Air Gap

The dishwasher drain line should either connect to an air system (air Admittance Valve) at the top of the sink or be installed so it has a loop in the line that touches the under side of the counter top.  This air gap system or high loop will help prevent drain water from the sink draining into the dishwasher.  Recommend correcting the line positioning to create this high loop.

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14.5.1 - Ceilings / Walls

Minor Cracks

There are minor cracks in the walls /ceiling.  Cracks at the corners of doors and windows are not uncommon.  They may be due to long-term settlement or from the shifting / shrinking of a door or window header. Joint cracks can be the result of expansion and contraction of framing or structural stress.

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14.5.2 - Ceilings / Walls

Moisture Stains

There are stains on the walls / ceiling that appear to be the result of moisture.  The source of moisture may / may not have been corrected.  There was no sign of moisture at the time of the inspection, as tested for with a moisture meter.  Recommend monitoring this area in order to detect further damage.  

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14.5.3 - Ceilings / Walls

Damaged Areas

There is some type of wall covering that has been painted and is now lifting away from the wall where it meets the countertop behind the cooktop.

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14.7.1 - Exhaust Fan / Range Hood

Range Hood / Microwave Circulates Air

The range hood / microwave vent is not an exhaust fan it simply re-circulates air back into the room.  

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14.15.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

No GFCI Protection

There is no GFCI protection on the kitchen countertop receptacles.  As of 1971 GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) protection is required on all bathroom outlets, kitchen outlets within 6 feet of counter tops, exterior receptacles, crawlspace and garages.  Although the NEC doesn't require updates each time a new code is established GFCI protection can save lives.  Recommend GFCIs be installed where currently required.  

Contractor Qualified Professional

15 - Bedrooms

No Emergeny Egress: Emergency Egress Requirements

Bedrooms must have a means of egress other than the room's interior entry door so that occupants can exit and rescue specialists can enter. This egress could be an exterior door, a sliding glass door or a window.  If a window, the base of the window should not be more than 44" above the finished floor.  The window must easily open and the open area must be at least 24 inches high by 20 inches wide.  Additionally, the minimum opening area of the egress window should be 5.0 sq. feet for window at grade level and 5.7 square feet for any bedroom window for a second floor or higher bedroom.  This also applies to basement and attic bedrooms.  These regulations are relatively new so if you have an older house make sure you keep it up to code for your own safety.

Smoke Detectors: Smoke Alarm Locations

Smoke alarms should be installed in every bedroom; outside all bedroom areas or hallways (usually within 10 feet of the bedroom door); in each room with a fireplace; in garages; and on every level of the home, including the basement.

Smoke Detectors: Smoke Detector Type

Suggest checking with seller about the type of detectors installed in the house:  battery or hardwired, individual or linked or monitored.

Ceilings / Walls: Ceiling / Wall Material
Drywall, Paneling, Tile
Windows: Window Type
Casement, Screened, Thermal
Ceilings / Walls: Visible Limitations

Not all surfaces of a home's wall or ceilings are visible when a home is furnished. 

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15.6.1 - Ceilings / Walls

Moisture Stains

Their are stains on the walls that appear to be the result of moisture intrusion.  There was a sign of moisture at the time of the inspection, as tested for with a moisture meter.  Recommend identifying sources and correcting.  damage.  

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15.7.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Receptacles Over Baseboard Heat

Electrical receptacles are not to be located over wall mounted baseboard electrical heating units.  This is considered a safety / fire issue for wiring or window coverings.   Recommend removing or covering these receptacles with a solid cover plate. 

Electric Electrical Contractor
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15.7.2 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

Exposed Wiring Not Encased

Electrical conductors (wires) must be encased where they run on the outer surface of walls or ceilings.  Wires should be installed so they cannot be mechanically damaged. Recommend proper protection.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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15.8.1 - Windows

General Damage

One or more windows appears to have general damage, but are operational. 


Screen frame is bent in the basement back 

Hammer Carpentry Contractor

16 - Bathrooms

Walk-in Shower : Shower Information

Showers are inspected by operating faucets to ensure adequate flow and proper drainage and to check for leaks.  Walls are inspected for damage (tile cracks, loose tile, missing grout, etc.) and areas that would allow water entry. 

Walk-in Shower : Shower Pan Leakage Inspections

Shower pans are not specifically tested for leaks by stopping up the shower drain and filling the shower.  However, water is run through the drain for an extended period of time, then the areas under the drains, if accessible, were inspected for indications of leaks.  The inspector cannot replicate the effects of the added weight / strain to the shower from a person taking a shower.  This additional weight can put strain or joints, gaskets, drain pipes, etc. that may result in leaking.

Sink(s): Sink Inspection Information

Sinks are inspected by running faucets, checking drains stoppers, checking for leaks, water flow and proper drainage.  The under-sink plumbing is inspected by running the water and looking for leaks from supply and drain lines.  

Sink(s): Sink Over Flow Information

Sink over flows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that over flow leakage will occur due to the age and possible dry rot of gaskets.

Mirrors: Mirror Information

Bathroom mirror are inspected for the type of wall attachments and damage to the mirror surface or backing. Any noted defects are noted in the report.  

Windows: Window Type
Casement, Thermal
Moisture Exhaust Fan: Ventilation Information

Bathrooms with a tub or shower require ventilation; either a window or a ventilation fan. Fans are tested for operation and must be vented to the homes exterior.  If a window is to substitute for a fan it must be openable.  Ideally, a fan is preferred since windows may not be used during colder months of the year.  Any deficiences are noted in the report.    

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub / Shower Inspection

Shower / tub drains are not specifically tested for leaks by stopping up the tub drain and filling the tub with water.  However, water was run through the drain for an extended period of time, then the areas under the drains, if accessible, were inspected for indications of leaks.   The inspector cannot replicate the effects of added weight / strain to the tub / shower from a person taking a shower.  This additional weight can put strain or joints, gaskets, drain pipes, etc. that may result in leakage.

Tub or Tub / Shower Combined: Tub Over Flow Limitations

Tub overflows are not tested due to the likelihood of leaky gaskets.  When filling a sink care should be taken to not allow water into the overflow.  One should assume that overflow leakage will occur.

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16.1.1 - Entry Door

Door Doesn't Latch

The 1st floor master bathroom door doesn't latch properly. Recommend repair / adjustment of the latch and / or strike plate.


The basement bathroom door is swollen and damaged from moisture and does not close in the jamb.

Wrenches Handyman
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16.1.2 - Entry Door

Loose mirror

The mirror on the closet doors is loose and could fall off during operation.

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16.3.1 - Ceilings / Walls

Stains / Damage - Moisture Present

Their are stains on the walls / ceiling that appear to be the result of moisture.  Recommend repair and monitoring this area in order to detect further damage.  

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16.3.2 - Ceilings / Walls

Ceiling stain/ damage

There is an area on the master bathroom ceiling that shows staining from a 2x4 in the attic and some peeling ceiling texture.

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16.4.1 - Floors

Cracked / Missing Tiles

There are four cracked floor tile in the master bathroom.

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16.5.1 - Walk-in Shower

Damaged / Loose / Cracked Tile

The wall tile is buckled out over the shower insert behind the shower head.  This could allow water entry and allow water to further damage the walls.

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16.5.2 - Walk-in Shower

Caulking / Grout Needed

There are areas on the tiled shower wall were the grout between the tiles is loose / missing where the wall tile meets the shower insert.  This could allow water entry and thus damage the walls.

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16.5.3 - Walk-in Shower

No Shower Access Panel

There is no panel to access the shower plumbing fixtures for repair or replacement.

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16.6.1 - Sink(s)

Stopper Not Operating Correctly

The sink stopper is not properly sealing to stop the flow of water down the drain.  Repairs are recommended for proper operation.

Basement bathroom stopper is disconnected.

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16.6.2 - Sink(s)

Slow Drainage

The sink is slow to drain.  

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16.6.3 - Sink(s)

Rust / Corrosion On Plumbing Pipes

Rust and / or corrosion is present on under sink plumbing pipes / traps.  Once this becomes obvious it indicates an end to a pipes life expectancy since they normally corrode from the inside out.  Repairs / replacements are recommended.  

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16.7.1 - Mirrors

Brackets Not Present

There are no visible brackets securing the mirror to the wall. Since one cannot see behind the mirror the condition of the adhesive is unknown.  For safety reason, in case of adhesive failure, visible brackets securing the mirror are recommended.

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16.7.2 - Mirrors

Backing Material Deteriorated

There are areas around the mirror where it appears that the backing on the mirror has deteriorated / come loose.

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16.8.1 - Tub or Tub / Shower Combined

Missing / Cracked Caulking

The caulking is cracked and missing in areas around the perimeter of the tub where it meets the wall tile as well as in areas where it meets the floor tile.

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16.10.1 - Toilet

Not Fully Secure To The Floor

The toilet is not fully secured to the floor.  If loose on the floor and continually moved the toilet seal cold be compressed and begin to leak.    Recommend securing.  When doing so you may want to replace the seal and while the toilet is off inspect the subflooring around the toilet for possible water damage.

Contractor Qualified Professional
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16.10.2 - Toilet

Signs of Water Damage

There are signs of water damage on the floor around the toilet.  Recommend this be evaluated for possible repair. 

Contractor Qualified Professional
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16.11.1 - Lighting Fixtures, Switches & Receptacles

No GFCI Protection

As of 1971 GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) protection is required on all bathroom outlets, kitchen outlets within 6 feet of counter tops, exterior receptacles, crawlspace and garages.  Although the NEC doesn't require updates each time a new code is established GFCI protection can save lives.  Recommend GFCIs be installed where currently required.  

None of the bathroom receptacles in the home are GFCI protected.

Contractor Qualified Professional

17 - Interior Stairs

18 - Laundry Room

Dryer Venting: Dryer Vent Safety

Clothes dryers evaporate the water from wet clothing by blowing hot air past them while they tumble inside a spinning drum.  Heat is provided by an electrical heating element or gas burner.  Some heavy garment loads can contain more than a gallon of water which, during the drying process, will become airborne water vapor and leave the dryer and home through an exhaust duct or vent.  

Any restrictions in the ducting is a potential fire hazard.  Simply because along with water vapor evaporated out of wet clothes, the exhaust stream also carries lint which are highly flammable particles of clothing made of cotton and polyester. Lint can accumulated in an exhaust duct, reducing the dryer's ability to expel heated water vapor, which then accumulates as heat energy with the dryer.  

Ceilings / Walls: Visible Limitations

Not all surfaces of a laundry room walls / ceilings / or floors are visible when a washer / dryer and other furnishings are installed.  

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18.5.1 - Dryer Venting

Dryer Vent Material

The dryer vent line is ribbed flex line.  It is recommended that a smooth rigid metal duct be used to vent a dryer.  Metal can withstand the heat generated by the dryer and it will not accumulate dust and lint like plastic pipe.  The flexible, ribbed vents used in the past should no longer be used and replaced.  They are potential fire hazards.   

19 - Locking Up

Oven Off
Yes
Cooktop / Burners Off
Yes
Thermostat To Initial Temp
Yes
Lights Off
Yes
Exterior Doors Secured
Yes
Key Returned To Lock Box
Yes